LUV My dogs: Yorkies

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Showing posts with label Yorkies. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Yorkies. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Everything about your Australian Terrier

Everything about your Australian Terrier
  The Australian Terrier was developed in Australia, as his name implies. Bred to hunt and exterminate rodents and snakes, Australian Terriers were also prized as watchdogs and companions. Today, the Australian Terrier dog breed maintains those same characteristics: he is a delightful companion, a fierce earthdog competitor, and a conformation and obedience showman.

Overview
  This little feller from the land Down Under is a happy dog that loves everyone. Fond of children, the elderly, and the handicapped, the Australian Terrier makes the ideal companion for a variety of households. From its origins as a vermin catcher, the Australian Terrier is the smallest of working terriers. But don’t let its size fool you – this breed is full of pep and energy. That means it needs a good amount of exercise every day, so long walks or an unleashed run in a safe area are essential.
  There is so much to love about the Australian Terrier. It fits in with families and likes being outdoors. Just a few of its endearing traits include that it is fairly quiet, fun, energetic, tough, eager to please, and adventurous. If you plan on leaving it in the backyard, be warned – the Australian Terrier likes to dig up a storm. 

Highlights
  • The Aussie is all terrier, and not everyone finds his favorite hobbies endearing: he loves to bark, dig, and chase.
  • Bossy is the Aussie's middle name. He wants to be the dominant dog in a multidog household (males can be cranky with other male dogs). In fact, he'll happily take over the role of pack leader among people, too — so be sure to establish yourself as the boss before he does.
  • Early training and socialization are musts to keep this dog happy and well liked by family and friends, both human and animal.
  • The Aussie's personality is active and lively. If you prefer a dog with a more subdued nature, look at other breeds first.
  • The Australian Terrier was the first breed developed in Australia to be shown and recognized by the kennel clubs of other countries.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terriers

UKC group: Terriers

Average lifespan: 12-14 years
Average size: 14 to 16 pounds
Coat appearance: medium length shaggy harsh double coat that is not normally trimmed
Coloration: blue and tan (tan body with a blue saddle), sandy, and red
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Apartments, families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Playful, clever, obedient, quiet
Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier

History
  The Australian Terrier is descended from the rough coated type terriers brought from Great Britain to Australia in the early 19th century. 
  The ancestral types of all of these breeds were kept to eradicate mice and rats. The Australian Terrier shares ancestors with the Cairn Terrier, Shorthaired Skye Terrier, and the Dandie Dinmont Terrier; Yorkshire Terriers and Irish Terriers were also crossed into the dog during the breed's development.
  Development of the breed began in Australia about 1820, and the dogs were at first called the Rough Coated Terrier. The breed was officially recognised in 1850, and later renamed as the Australian Terrier in 1892. The Australian Terrier was shown at a dog show for the first time in 1906 in Melbourne, and was also shown in Great Britain about the same time.   The Kennel Club (UK) recognised the breed in 1933. The American Kennel Club recognised the Australian Terrier in 1960, and the United Kennel Club (US) in 1970. It is now recognised by all of the kennel clubs in the English speaking world, and also is listed by various minor kennel clubs and other clubs and registries.

Personality
  The Aussie is a fun-loving, upbeat dog who makes a great companion for any individual or family who wants to share his energetic lifestyle. Devoted to his owners, he's happiest when he's part of daily family life. He likes to be in the house, playing with the kids, following you room to room, or shouldering his way to the front door when you greet a friend. He is clever and should be easy to train — as long as you keep him busy and never, ever bore him.

Health
  The average life span of the Australian Terrier is 12 to 15 years. Breed health concerns can include allergies, arthritis, cancer, cataracts, diabetes, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, patellar luxation and thyroid problems. Generally, Australian Terriers are hardy and healthy little dogs.



Care
  A well-behaved housedog, the Australian Terrier should be allowed to spend lots of time with its family. However, in order to prevent frustration, this adventurous and playful breed requires daily exercise in the form of a playful game, a moderate walk, or an off-leash run. The wire coat requires combing every week and stripping of dead hairs twice a year. For a neat look, the hair around the feet should be trimmed.
  This terrier was bred to tolerate harsh Australian weather conditions, thus it can stay outside in warm and temperate climates.

Living Conditions
  The Australian Terrier is good for apartment living. It is fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard provided it is taken for walks on a lead. They should not be allowed to roam free because they have a tendency to chase.

Trainability
  Once firm leadership is established, Australian Terriers can excel in training. Though small and generally possessing the desire to please, Australian Terriers are also independent and like to be the boss. Early training and a confident air can teach the Australian who is really in charge of the home. Positive reinforcement and rewards are the best method to train this breed.
  Like other breeds of terrier, Australians are quick to bark and quick to take a chase. Though they may listen to you one-on-one, if an Australian Terrier takes off after a small animal, he probably won't obey your commands to come home. For this reason they should be kept on a leash or in a fenced-in yard at all times.

Exercise Requirements
  For a small dog, the Australian Terriers sure has a large amount of energy. That’s why it needs lots of regular exercise. Because this breed likes to hunt and herd, it helps to have a yard where it can chase toys and birds. If you have an apartment, daily walks or trips to the park are a must.
  A dog for a range of lifestyles, the Aussie fits into any household. This breed loves children, so use them to exercise Australian Terrier. Games, jogging, hikes and other outdoor pastimes will keep the Australian Terrier amused. Also needed is mental stimulation – interactions with new people, animals and experiences are good for your Australian Terrier’s mental health.

Grooming
  There is nothing complicated about grooming an Australian Terrier. Brush his coat once a week with a soft slicker brush, trim his toenails once a month, and bathe him in mild shampoo as needed every three months or so. Check the ears once a week for dirt, redness, or a bad odor that can indicate an infection, then wipe out weekly using a cotton ball dampened with gentle ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian to prevent problems.
  Regular tooth brushing with a soft toothbrush and doggie toothpaste will help keep the Australian Terrier’s teeth and gums healthy and his breath fresh. Introduce him to grooming when he is young so he learns to accept the fuss and handling of grooming graciously.

Children And Other Pets
  The Aussie makes a wonderful family pet, well suited to families with kids. He loves to play but, like all dogs, should be properly socialized and supervised around very young children. He prefers to be with his people and can become destructive when left alone too long. He also has a penchant for chasing cats and small animals, so he isn't best suited to homes with rabbits, mice, or hamsters. However, with patient training, the Aussie can be taught to respect and leave alone the animals he lives with — but only those he lives with. He will eagerly chase the neighbor's cat or a squirrel at a park.

Is the Australian Terrier the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Australian Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
Australian Terriers first came to the United States in the late 1940s from Britain and Ireland. The Australian Terrier Club of America was formed in 1957.


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Friday, July 7, 2017

Everything about your Yorkipoo

Everything about your Yorkipoo
  A Yorkipoo is a mix of a Yorkshire Terrier and a Toy Poodle or Miniature Poodle, or more rarely the offspring of two Yorkie/Poodle mixes. At his best, the Yorkipoo is friendly, playful, smart, and cute as all get out. His small stature makes him best suited to a home with adults or older children.

Overview
  The Yorkipoo loves people and fun, not necessarily in that order. He will delight his family and is always willing to perform tricks or show off for any visitor. His confidence keeps him from being overly snappy or aggressive; he's happy in his own skin. The Yorkipoo can be an excellent companion to anyone looking for a small, confident dog with ample energy and even greater love.
  Like most of the Poodle hybrids, the Yorkipoo was originally designed to be a companion dog who could reside with allergy sufferers. 
  The Yorkipoo has low-dander, a low-shedding coat, and the small size of a toy breed. He's happy in many different types of homes and can make an excellent companion for the elderly. With his gentle and loving disposition, the Yorkipoo has proven that he can be a successful therapy dog.
  The Yorkipoo enjoys barking just a little too much  and generally makes an excellent watchdog. He'll alert bark when someone comes to the door or when he sees anything suspicious. Some Yorkipoos can be trained to only bark once or twice, but many cannot.

Highlights
  • The Yorkipoo is a designer dog and is the result of Yorkshire Terrier to Toy or Miniature Poodle breedings. There's been an increase in multigenerational breeding (Yorkipoo to Yorkipoo), and also in Yorkipoo to Poodle or Yorkipoo to Yorkshire Terrier breeding; but many litters are first generation, the result of breeding two purebred parents.
  • A Yorkipoo is active and energetic, as are both Poodles and Yorkies. He requires daily exercise and does well with a good walk or romp in the yard.
  • Barking is a favorite pastime. Occasionally a Yorkipoo can be trained to bark less, but expect to hear the noise whenever someone comes to the door. He has no clue that his bark doesn't terrify anyone.
  • He is a non- to low-shedder and can make an excellent companion for people with allergies.
  • Daily brushing is needed to keep his fine, silky coat free of tangles and mats.
  • Loving and gentle, the Yorkipoo can make an excellent companion to older, more considerate children. Like most toy breeds, he's not recommended for homes with very young children.
  • He's easy to train if you use positive reinforcement. He's got a stubborn streak, though, so expect some occasional resistance.
  • The Yorkipoo can live very happily in an apartment.
  • A companion dog, he may suffer from separation anxiety when left alone for long periods at a time.
Other Quick Facts

  • Yorkipoos can be many different colors and patterns, from the blue and gold of the Yorkie to the many solid colors of the Poodle to a color plus white, known as particolor.
Breed standards
AKC group, UKC group: Not Applicable,Not recognized as a standardized breed by any major kennel club.
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Weight: 8 to 15 pounds
Coat appearance: Medium, Silky, and Slightly Wavy
Coloration: Varies
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Energetic, lively, playful, good-natured
Comparable Breeds: Poodle, Yorkshire Terrier

History
  Like many designer breeds, the Yorkipoo is quite a young hybrid — he's been popular for about a decade. He was originally developed to create a toy-sized dog who had a hypoallergenic coat and was free of the genetic disorders that affected the parent breeds, the Yorkshire Terrier and the Toy or Miniature Poodle.
The success of crossing the Poodle with the Yorkshire Terrier has had mixed results, as with any hybrid; but the popularity of the Yorkipoo has grown. Today, most Yorkipoo litters are still the result of first-generation breeding, but some breeders have concentrated on multigenerational crosses in an effort to see the Yorkipoo produce offspring who confirm more consistently to the desired traits.
  There are no breed groups or registries for the Yorkipoo, but efforts have begun to create a direction for all Yorkipoo breeders.

Temperament
  If bred from parents of sound temperament and adequately socialized in puppyhood, the yorkipoo is likely to be a confident, loving, playful companion combining terrier boldness and poodle intelligence. Yorkipoos require mental stimulation and social interaction, and enjoy activities like dog agility and learning tricks.
  For their size, yorkipoos are rather energetic. However, their energy is easily expended within the confines of an apartment. Therefore, they do not require the sort of exercise regime that larger dogs need. Yorkipoos are very social dogs. Unlike yorkies and other purebred toys, however, they do not long for constant physical contact. Yorkipoos have no objections to cuddling up on a lap but are also content to simply be nearby. Yorkipoos are generally not aggressive and tend to "greet strangers as if they were long lost friends."
  Yorkipoos are smart enough to be trained and take marked pride in learning new commands. They respond best to positive reinforcement, as opposed to negative reinforcement or punishment. When faced with negative reinforcement or punishment, yorkipoos respond with stubbornness. The greatest hurdle to training a yorkipoo is barking.   Although they do not tend to sit and yip for no reason, they will almost unfailingly bark when someone knocks at the door. It is unknown if this is to warn that someone is approaching or out of sheer glee to encounter another person.

Heath 
  A newly developed crossbreed, the Yorkiepoo is predisposed to the health problems that effect both Yorkshire Terriers and Poodles. These can include cataracts, retinal detachment, dry eye, corneal dystrophy, keratitis, hypoglycemia, progressive retinal atrophy and endocardiosis.

Care
  The Yorkipoo is equally at home in a house or an apartment. He's far too small to live outside; he must live indoors for both his physical and emotional well-being. He requires daily exercise, since he has a surprising amount of energy . A daily walk or romp in the yard will provide enough exercise to keep him healthy and happy. The Yorkipoo can also burn off steam by playing a game of fetch down a hallway.
  Crate training benefits every dog and is a kind way to ensure that your Yorkipoo doesn't have accidents in the house or get into things he shouldn't. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your Yorkipoo accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized.
  Never stick your Yorkipoo in a crate all day long, however. It's not a jail, and he shouldn't spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he's sleeping at night. Yorkipoos are people dogs, and they aren't meant to spend their lives locked up in a crate or kennel.

Training
  An easily trainable dog, the Yorkiepoo is eager to please his owners. Positive training methods should always be used while working with this crossbreed. Excided praise and delectable tidbits will produce better results than harsh words or aggressive methods.   Yorkie-Poos can quickly learn basic commands but can also learn typical parlor tricks such as crawl, play dead and dance. His enthusiasm and desire to entertain will keep your family and friends entertained and laughing!
  This crossbreed has the potential to become great obedience prospects as well as agility and therapy dogs. There is no doubt that the Yorkie-Poo can be highly competitive in a variety of dog sports.

Exercise Requirements
  Yorkie-Poos do not require an excessive amount of exercise. They are lively and are happy to play but a brisk walk around the block is really all he needs to keep him fit, trim and healthy. A fenced yard is also great and the Yorkie-Poo will happily chase a ball or other toy and run like a little maniac! His minimal need for exercise makes this crossbreed an excellent pet for many living situations.

Grooming
  Yorkipoos usually have a slightly scruffy coat, although it can also, like the Poodle’s coat, be curly. A Yorkipoo’s grooming needs will vary depending on his coat, but all Yorkipoos need regular, even daily, brushing. Those with the curlier Poodle coat require grooming every four to six weeks. Some owners learn to use the clippers and do the job themselves, but most rely on professional groomers. Either way, it’s essential to take proper care of the coat, because without regular grooming it will quickly become a matted mess that can cause painful skin infections at the roots of the hair.
  Your Yorkipoo’s ears need to be kept clean and dry to help minimize wax, so clean them regularly with an ear cleaning solution recommended by your veterinarian. The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Yorkipoo is a gentle and loving dog who can do well with children. He's not recommended for homes with very young children, since he can be easily injured when improperly handled. A Yorkipoo can make an excellent companion for an older, more considerate child.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  In general, he does well with other dogs and pets. He may display prey drive due to his Yorkie parent, however. That may lead him to chase smaller pets and cats, but usually it's in good fun.

Is the Yorkiepoo the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Crossbred puppies like the Yorkipoo — even within the same litter — can look very different from each other and can look the same as or different from their parents. The Yorkipoo is usually extremely small, but his size, color, coat, temperament, activity level, and health risks can vary depending on the traits an individual puppy inherited from his parents.




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Thursday, August 4, 2016

Everything about your Yorkshire Terrier

Everything about your Yorkshire Terrier
  Yorkshire Terriers, affectionately known as "Yorkies," offer big personalities in a small package. Though members of the Toy Group, they are terriers by nature and are brave, determined, investigative and energetic. Named for the English county from which they originally hail, Yorkshire Terriers were used in the nineteenth century to catch rats in clothing mills. Surprisingly enough, in its beginnings, the Yorkie belonged to the working class, especially the weavers; in fact, facetious comments were often made about how the dogs' fine, silky coats were the ultimate product of the looms. Eventually, the breed left the workforce and became a companion animal to families of European high society.

Overview
  The Yorkie's terrier heritage can be seen in its sharp, intelligent expression, confident carriage, and compact body. It is a diminutive breed, however, now more noted for its long, silky hair, which should be fine, glossy, and perfectly straight. Color is a hallmark of this breed, with the blue a dark steel blue and the tan a clear tan. 
  The Yorkshire Terrier seems oblivious of its small size, ever eager for adventure and trouble. It is busy, inquisitive, bold, stubborn, and can be aggressive to strange dogs and small animals in other words, it is true to its terrier heritage. Although some tend to bark a lot, it can easily be taught not to do so.

Highlights
  • Yorkshire Terriers are known for being difficult to housetrain. Crate-training is recommended.
  • Yorkshire Terriers don't like the cold and are prone to chills, especially if they're damp or in damp areas.
  • Because of their small size, delicate structure, and terrier personality, Yorkshire Terrier generally aren't recommended for households with toddlers or small children.
  • Some Yorkshire Terriers can be "yappy," barking at every sound they hear. Early and consistent training can help. If you don't feel qualified to provide this training, consult a professional dog trainer.
  • Yorkshire Terriers can have delicate digestive systems and may be picky eaters. Eating problems can occur if your Yorkie has teeth or gum problems as well. If your Yorkie is showing discomfort when eating or after eating, take him to the vet for a checkup.
  • Yorkshire Terriers think they are big dogs and will try to pick a fight with a big dog if allowed. Be sure to keep your Yorkie under control. Even better, try to socialize your Yorkie at an early age by taking him to obedience classes.
  • Yorkies tend to retain their puppy teeth, especially the canines. When your puppy is around five months old, check his teeth often. If you notice that an adult tooth is trying to come in but the baby tooth is still there, take him to your vet. Retained baby teeth can cause the adult teeth to come in unevenly, which may contribute to tooth decay in later years.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Yorkshire Terrier has an inquisitive temperament — not to mention an impish sense of humor.
  • Yorkies have stunning blue-and-tan coats, but they’re not born that way. Puppies are black, and their coat color develops as they mature.
  • Despite their Toy status, these dogs love speed, action, and plenty of applause, so sports such as agility and rally are tailor-made for them.
  • Show dogs should weigh between four to seven pounds, but pet Yorkies can weigh as much as 12 to 15 pounds. A Yorkie who weighs less than four pounds is more prone to health problems, and more likely to suffer complications while under anesthesia.
  • Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Pomeranian

History
  The Yorkshire Terrier’s bold nature descends directly from his ancestors, which include the long-extinct Clydesdale Terrier and the Black-and-Tan Terrier. Scottish weavers who migrated south to England during tough economic times took their terriers with them to York, Manchester, and Leeds. The weavers ultimately crossbred their little terriers with local dogs, creating the small but feisty terrier known today for its shimmering cloak of blue and gold.
  Yorkies proved to be fine ratters in the English woolen mills, a skill they retain to this day. As they became more and more of a companion dog, breeders began to select for smaller size. The dog considered to be the foundation sire of the modern Yorkie, Huddersfield Ben, was born in 1865. At the time, the dogs were called Broken Haired Scotch Terriers or Toy Terriers, but by 1870, they were known as Yorkshire Terriers, after the region where they were first produced. It wasn’t long before these tough ratters morphed into domestic sidekicks for fashionable ladies, and began appearing at dog shows as “fancy terriers.”
  By 1872, Yorkshire Terriers had made their way to the U.S., where they quickly became upper-crust favorites and even political mascots. The Nixon family shared the White House with their beloved Yorkie, Pasha. The Yorkshire Terrier currently holds third place among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club.

Personality
  Smart and self-assured, the Yorkshire Terrier is a combination of endearingly small size and adventurous terrier spirit. The breed displays a range of personalities. Some are cuddly and perky, wanting nothing more than to follow in their people's footsteps throughout the day. Others are mischievous, outgoing, and into everything.
  Set limits, and your Yorkie will be a wonderful companion, but if you spoil him, watch out! Start training when they're puppies, and you'll have much better luck than if you let them have their way and then try to correct bad habits.
  Like all dogs, Yorkies needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Yorkie will be a friendly, well-rounded dog.

Health
  Some Yorkies are prone to slipped stifle, bronchitis, eye infections, early tooth decay, poor tolerance of anesthetic, and delicate digestion. Exotic treats should be avoided. They sometimes suffer paralysis in the hindquarters caused by herniated disks and other problems of the spine. Falls or knocks can cause fractures of fragile bones. Abnormal skull formations in Yorkies measuring less than 8 inches (20 cm). Dams often have trouble delivering puppies and sometimes need to have cesareans. Be sure to feed Yorkies some type of dry food or bone to chew on to help keep their teeth clean and strong. They should get their teeth cleaned at the vet to keep them from falling out and creating infection.

"Teacup Yorkies"
  "Teacup" Yorkshire terriers is a term used to describe very small Yorkshire terriers. The AKC and other Kennel clubs do not acknowledge the Teacup as a variation of the breed or recognize it as a separate variety.Usually a teacup is any dog weighing less than 4 lbs (1.8 kg) when fully grown, when the actual breed standard is given at 7 lbs maximum. Breeding for "Teacup" is a controversial practice that is not encouraged by responsible breeders.
  A fashion pressure, they are bred to appeal with their puppy-like features, rather than bred to expel health issues. There is great risk to a dam (mother) during pregnancy who is too small, most of these litters are a result of cesarean sections and have a high mortality rate.
  There are many health issues associated with teacup dogs, such as luxating patella, heart disease, hydrocephalus, hypoglycemia, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, open fontanels and seizures.

Exercise
  These are active little dogs that need a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, it will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. If your Yorkie zooms around the house like a speeding bullet, it is a sign that he needs to go on more/longer walks where he is made to heel beside or behind the human. Remember, in a dog’s mind, the leader leads the way. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.

Care
  Yorkshire Terriers enjoy taking a walk with you or playing outside, but since they're very active while indoors, it doesn't take a lot of effort to keep them well exercised.
  In general, Yorkies are receptive to training, especially if it brings them attention for performing cute tricks or performing in agility or obedience trials. They can be difficult to housetrain, however, because their "accidents" are so small and easy to clean up that people let it slide. That's a mistake. It's better to show them where to go from the beginning and reward them for doing their business in the right place. When you make the effort, you can end up with a very well trained Yorkie indeed.
  They definitely are housedogs and don't tolerate extreme heat or cold well. Many people paper train their Yorkshire Terriers so they don't have to take them outdoors when the weather is too hot or cold.

Living Conditions
  The Yorkie is a good dog for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. The Yorkie is sensitive to the cold and prefers warm climates.

Grooming
  Yorkies are definitely not low-maintenance pooches. If you keep their coats show-dog long, they need to be brushed daily, with their long topknot tied up and kept out of their eyes. Most pet-owners opt for a “puppy” clip, with the facial hair left a bit longer than the hair on the body. Regular trips to a professional groomer are a must, along with weekly baths.
   On the plus side, Yorkies don’t shed much, possibly making them less problematic for some people with allergies. However, this varies from dog to dog, so don’t believe anyone who tells you that Yorkies are “non-allergenic.”
  The rest is basic care: Trim his nails every week or two. And brush his teeth regularly with a pet toothpaste for overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Because of their small size, Yorkies aren't suited to families with young children. Most breeders won't sell puppies to people whose children are younger than 5 or 6 years old. It's just too easy for children to drop them, step on them, or hold them too tightly.
  Yorkies can get along well with other pets, including cats, if socialized to them at an early age. They're bold in going after strange dogs, however, even those that outweigh them by a factor of ten, and protecting them from themselves becomes second nature to people with Yorkies.

Is this breed right for you?
  Yorkies make excellent companions for pet owners looking for a shed-free and allergen-free addition to their family. A Yorkie's compact size makes it a perfect apartment dog as long as exercise is part of the daily routine. This breed is sensitive to extreme temperatures, and leaving them outside unattended can cause severe health issues. Due to their independent and stubborn nature, this toy breed may not do well with small children, as most Yorkies enjoy personalized attention. Don't be overwhelmed by the long locks of AKC-bred Yorkies — regardless of hair length, this breed simply needs a weekly brushing to keep up its looks.

Did You Know?
  The feisty Yorkie was once coveted in England for its excellent ratter abilities. In the U.S., the diminutive breed became a popular lap dog for society ladies — and even set paw in the White House. President Nixon had a Yorkie named Pasha.

Notability
  • Show dogs: In 1997, Champion Ozmilion Mystification became the first Yorkie to win Best in Show at Crufts, the world's largest annual dog show.
  • Small dogs: Sylvia, a matchbox-sized Yorkshire Terrier owned by Arthur Marples of Blackburn, England, was the smallest dog in recorded history. The dog died in 1945 when she was two years old, at which point she stood 2.5 inches tall at the shoulder, measured 3.5 inches from nose tip to tail, and weighed 4 ounces.
  • War dogs: Smoky, a war dog and hero of World War II, was owned by William Wynne of Cleveland, Ohio. Wynne adopted Smoky while he was serving with the 5th Air Force in the Pacific.
  • White House dogs: Pasha, Tricia Nixon Cox's pet Yorkie, lived in the White House during the Richard Nixon presidency.
A dream day in the life of a Yorkshire Terrier
  Because they were bred as working dogs, Yorkies love a challenge and mental stimulation. This intelligent breed can pick up training techniques faster than most pooches and enjoys the special attention and bonding time of training sessions. Weighing in at an average of 5 to 7 pounds, Yorkies make first-rate travel companions, as they can fit in most purses or carriers. This tiny breed is very attentive to their human counterparts, and constant companionship is a must.


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