LUV My dogs: World Wars

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Showing posts with label World Wars. Show all posts
Showing posts with label World Wars. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Everything about your Boxer

Everything about your Boxer
  Boxers are silly, sweet and mischievous. They clown around with family and friends, are patient and playful with children, but show a deliberate and wary face to strangers, responding with unmatched courage to anything that threatens their loved ones. Those characteristics are why people love them.

Overview
  The Boxer is a breed of stocky, medium-sized, short-haired dogs developed in Germany. Their coat is smooth and tight-fitting; colors are fawn or brindled, with or without white markings, which may cover the entire body, and white. Boxers are brachycephalic (they have broad, short skulls), have a square muzzle, mandibular prognathism (an underbite), very strong jaws, and a powerful bite ideal for hanging on to large prey. The Boxer was bred from the Old English Bulldog and the now extinct Bullenbeisser, and is part of the Molosser group. The Boxer is a member of the Working Group.
  Boxers were first exhibited in a dog show for St. Bernards in Munich in 1895, the first Boxer club being founded the next year. Based on 2013 American Kennel Club statistics, Boxers held steady as the seventh most popular breed of dog in the United States for the fourth consecutive year.

Highlights
  • Boxers are high-energy dogs and need a lot of exercise. Make sure you have the time, desire, and energy to give them the play and activity they need.
  • Boxers are exuberant and will greet you ecstatically.
  • Early, consistent training is critical — before your Boxer gets too big to handle!
  • Although they are large, Boxers are not "outdoor dogs." Their short noses and short hair make them uncomfortable in hot and cold weather, and they need to be kept as housedogs.
  • Boxers mature slowly and act like rambunctious puppies for several years.
  • Boxers don't just like to be around their family — they need to be around them! If left alone for too long or kept in the backyard away from people, they can become ill-tempered and destructive.
  • Boxers drool, a lot. Boxers also snore, loudly.
  • Although they have short hair, Boxers shed, especially in the spring.
  • Boxers are intelligent and respond well to firm but fun training. They also have an independent streak and don't like to be bossed around or treated harshly. You'll have the biggest success in training your Boxer if you can make it fun for him.
  • Some Boxers take their guarding duties a little too seriously, while others may not exhibit any guarding instincts at all.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Boxers are big dogs with a big streak of mischief in their makeup. You’ll need a sense of humor to live with one.
  • Boxers are great watchdogs but not aggressive toward people unless the situation calls for it.
  • Boxers are athletic and excel in many dog sports, including agility and herding.
  • Boxers are lovers, not fighters, but they won’t back away from a showdown if another dog starts something.
  • Comparable Breeds: Bull Terrier, Bulldog
History 
  The Boxer was developed as a working breed in Germany in the late nineteenth century. He belongs to the family of bull breeds, which include the Bulldog, Bull Terrier and Dogue de Bordeaux, to name just a few.
  In his modern incarnation, the Boxer has existed for only about a century, but you can see hints of him in the dogs portrayed on old tapestries from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Those big Mastiff-type dogs may have been ancestors of the Boxer. They were known as bullenbeissers, a German word meaning “bull biter.” Bullenbeissers were used on great estates to bring down large game, and later they were employed by butchers and cattle drovers to keep livestock in line.
  The modern Boxer was born in the 1880s, when a man named George Alt, who lived in Munich, imported a brindle bullenbeisser named Flora from France. Her offspring became the foundation of the Boxer breed. It’s unclear whether the breed name comes from a corruption of the word “beisser” or is a reference to the breed’s habit of using his front paws in a fight. Boxers were trained for police work, were some of the earliest guide dogs and served in the German military during World War I as messengers and scouts.
  The American Kennel Club first registered a Boxer in 1904. The breed didn’t catch on right away, and the dislike for German breeds that occurred during World War I didn’t help matters any. It wasn’t until the 1940s and 1950s that the Boxer became a popular breed. In 1951, a Boxer named Bang Away won Best in Show at Westminster, the third Boxer to do so, and for the time, he was a rock star. You could see Bang Away’s photo in Lifeand Esquire, and when he flew to dog shows, he rode in the cabin of the plane, never in cargo. Only one other Boxer has won Westminster since the days of Bang Away, Ch. Arriba’s Prima Donna, who won in 1971.
  Boxers today are more refined and elegant than their ancestors, but they are still strong, smart, and fearless. The breed ranks seventh among those registered by the AKC.

Personality
  Boxers may look like imposing figures from afar, but up close and personal they are playful and loving family companions. Often dubbed the Peter Pan of dogs, Boxers are highly energetic, and as they grow into adulthood, they never lose the desire to romp and play like a puppy. Perpetual cuddle bugs, Boxers will try to wriggle into even the smallest spaces possible to get close to the ones they love. They love to be the center of attention and make a sound unique to their breed that some owners call a “Woo Woo.” When they want something they will make this “woo woo” sound to attract an audience.
  Protective of their family, Boxers are alert and reliable watchdogs, sounding the alarm that strangers are approaching. Their menacing, muscular appearance will deter anyone whose intent is not above board. Boxers get along well with other pets, including cats and make a loving and loyal addition to any active family.

Health 
  Some major concerns are cardiomyopathy and other heart problems, sub-aortic stenosis and thyroid. Can be prone to skin and other allergies. Sometimes prone to epilepsy. From age eight on they are more likely to get tumors than other breeds. Prone to cancer. Boxers are highly prone to mast cell tumors. Prone to arthritis, hip dysplasia, back and knee issues. These dogs may drool and snore. May have excessive flatulence, especially when fed something other than their own dog food. Some white Boxers are prone to deafness.

Care
  The Boxer’s coat needs just occasional brushing to get rid of dead hair. Daily physical and mental exercise is essential for the dog, which also loves to run. A long walk on leash or a good jog is enough to meet the dog’s exercise needs. It is not suited to live outdoors nor does it like hot weather. The dog is at its best when given a chance to spend equal time in the yard and home. Some Boxers may snore.

Living Conditions
  Boxers will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are fairly active indoors and do best with at least an average-sized yard. Boxers are temperature sensitive, getting easily overheated and chilling very quickly.

Exercise
  An active, athletic breed, Boxers need daily work or exercise, as well as a long brisk, daily walk. They also enjoy fetching a ball or other sessions of play.

Grooming
  The Boxer is an easy-care dog. His short, smooth coat benefits from weekly brushing with a firm bristle brush or rubber curry brush to keep it shiny and healthy and to remove dead hairs that would otherwise find their way to your clothes and furniture.
  Frequent baths are not necessary unless he gets dirty, but with the gentle dog shampoos available now, you can bathe a Boxer weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  Clean the ears as needed with a solution recommended by your veterinarian. Don’t use cotton swabs inside the ear; they can push gunk further down into it. Wipe out the ear with a cotton ball, never going deeper than the first knuckle of your finger.
   Trim the nails every couple of weeks or as needed. Don’t let them get so long that you can hear them clicking on the floor.

Children and other pets
  Boxers love kids and are great playmates for active older children. They can be too rambunctious for toddlers, however, and can accidentally knock them down in play.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Boxers can get along well with other dogs and cats, especially if they're raised with them.

Did You Know?
  White Boxers are not albinos and their coloration is not the result of a genetic mutation. In Boxers, white is just a color. But white dogs tend to burn in the sun and may be at increased risk of skin cancer.

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Monday, September 8, 2014

Everything about your German Shepherd

Everything about your German Shepherd
  The German Shepherd Dog is a natural protector and so adaptable and intelligent that he has performed just about every job known to dog. If he had opposable thumbs, he would be unstoppable.
  The German Shepherd Dog is one of America's most popular dog breeds — for good reason. He's an intelligent and capable working dog. His devotion and courage are unmatched. And he's amazingly versatile, excelling at most anything he's trained to do: guide and assistance work for the handicapped, police and military service, herding, search and rescue, drug detection, competitive obedience and, last but not least, faithful companion.

Overview
  Rin Tin Tin, a pup found in a World War I battle zone, became the world’s first canine movie star, forever marking the German Shepherd Dog as one of the most easily recognized breeds. From his imposing size to his erect ears and dark, intelligent eyes, he has achieved legendary status as the ideal canine. A versatile, athletic and fearless working dog, the Shepherd has done just about every job a dog can do, from leading the blind and detecting illicit drugs to bringing down fleeing criminals and serving in the armed forces. An energetic, loyal and devoted companion, the German Shepherd isn’t a breed but a lifestyle.
  The abilities of this breed go far beyond its origin as a herding dog. The German Shepherd has made a name for himself as a police and military dog, guide and assistance dog, search and rescue dog, and detector dog. He has excelled in every canine sport, including agility, obedience, rally, tracking and, of course, herding. German Shepherds still work livestock on farms and ranches around the world, including the United States. If you have horses, they will trot alongside you while you ride and help you put the horses back in the barn when you’re done.
  It takes some dedication to live with a German Shepherd.  Be prepared to provide plenty of exercise and mental stimulation. A half-hour walk twice a day, plus a vigorous play or training session, is a good start.
  The protective but loving German Shepherd is a great choice for families with children, but singles and couples who love the outdoors also match up well with this breed. With sufficient exercise and opportunities to use their considerable athleticism and brains, these versatile companions can handle anything from a small city apartment to a vast ranch.   They're not suited for life in the backyard or a doghouse, but need to live indoors as a member of the family.

Highlights
  • German Shepherds isn't the breed for you if you're away from home frequently or for long periods of time. When left alone they can become anxious or bored, and are likely to express their worry in ways you don't like — barking, chewing, and digging.
  • The German Shepherd is an active and intelligent dog. He must be kept busy learning, playing, and working. Daily exercise, both physical and mental, is a must.
  • German Shepherds can be aloof and suspicious of strangers. To raise a social and well-behaved dog, expose your German Shepherd puppy to many experiences, places, and people. Obedience training, beginning with puppy classes, is important for getting him used to other people and dogs, as well as teaching him basic canine manners.
  • These dogs shed, shed, shed — in fact, their nickname is the "German shedder." Brush him several times a week and buy a good vacuum. You'll need it.
  • Crate training is not only a wonderful way to housetrain a puppy, it helps teach him to be calm and happy when separated from his owner. This is especially important for the German Shepherd, who sometimes suffers separation anxiety, or extreme anxiety when left alone.
  • He's got a reputation for being a great watchdog — and he is — but the German Shepherd should never be chained or tethered just to stand guard. No dog should; it leads to frustration and aggression. The German Shepherd is happiest living indoors with the family, but with access to a large, fenced yard, where he can burn off some of his natural energy.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The German Shepherd is highly intelligent and will not be content to live life as a couch potato. He’s a dog of action, and he needs to live with an active person who will give him a job worthy of his talents.
  • German Shepherds love children and make great family dogs when they are given early socialization and training.
  • Most of us think of the German Shepherd as a black and tan dog, but they can also be sable and solid black. Dogs with white, blue or liver-colored coats are frowned upon by breeders, so don’t fall for marketing claims that those colors are “rare” and command a higher price.
  • A German Shepherd should never be shy, nervous or aggressive.
  • Comparable Breeds: Doberman Pinscher, Rottweiler


History
   As his name suggests, the German Shepherd originated in Germany, where he was created in the nineteenth century primarily by Captain Max von Stephanitz, who wanted to develop a dog that could be used for military and police work. The result was a dog that encompassed striking good looks, intelligence and versatility.
  The adaptable and attractive dogs soon drew the attention of dog lovers in other countries. While Rin Tin Tin is the most famous of the early German Shepherds, he was not the first to come to the United States. One is known to have been brought to the U.S. in 1906, and the American Kennel Club registered a German Shepherd in 1912. The following year, people interested in the breed formed the German Shepherd Dog Club of America.
World War I put a dent in the breed’s burgeoning popularity because the dogs were associated with the enemy. German Shepherds braved artillery fire, land mines and tanks to supply German soldiers in the trenches with deliveries of food and other necessities.
  After the war, movies featuring Rin Tin Tin and fellow German Shepherd Strongheart brought the breed back into favor. American audiences loved them. For a time, the German Shepherd was the most popular breed in the United States.
  One of the best known modern German Shepherds was the first and so far only member of the breed to win Best in Show at Westminster Kennel Club, in 1987. His name was Ch. Covy Tucker Hill’s Manhattan, ROM, nicknamed Hatter. Hatter drew crowds wherever he went and loved meeting his fans, especially children.
  These days, the breed’s star is rising again. Current AKC rankings place him second only to the Labrador Retriever.

Personality
  The German Shepherd personality is aloof but not usually aggressive. He's a reserved dog; he doesn't make friends immediately, but once he does, he's extremely loyal. With his family he's easy-going and approachable, but when threatened he can be strong and protective, making him an excellent watchdog.
  This highly intelligent and trainable breed thrives on having a job to do — any job. The German Shepherd can be trained to do almost anything, from alerting a deaf person to a doorbell ring to sniffing out an avalanche victim.
  One thing he's not good at is being alone for long periods of time. Without the companionship he needs — as well as exercise and the chance to put his intelligence to work — he becomes bored and frustrated. A German Shepherd who's under-exercised and ignored by his family is likely to express his pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as barking and chewing.
  Like every dog, the German Shepherd needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your German Shepherd puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  The German Shepherd has an average lifespan of between 10 to 12 years. It is, however, susceptible to some serious health conditions like elbow dysplasia and canine hip dysplasia (CHD), as well as minor problems like cardiomyopathy, hemangiosarcoma, panosteitis, von Willebrand's Disease (vWD), degenerative myelopathy, cauda equina, malignant neoplasms, pannus, hot spots, skin allergies, gastric torsion, cataract, and perianal fistulas. This breed is also prone to a fatal fungal infection due to the Aspergillus mold. Because of these susceptibilities German Shepherds, like most other dogs, need to be seen by a veterinarian for routine checkups. There they will undergo hip, elbow blood, eye and other tests.

Care
  The German Shepherd can live outdoors in cool or temperate climates, but enjoys living indoors too. Frequent training or exercise sessions are essential for keeping its mind and body active, and because the German Shepherd sheds throughout the year, its coat should be brushed once or twice a week to encourage turnover as well as to minimize buildup in the home.

Living Conditions
  The German Shepherd will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with at least a large yard.

Exercise
  German Shepherd Dogs love strenuous activity, preferably combined with training of some kind, for these dogs are very intelligent and crave a good challenge. They need to be taken on a daily, brisk, long walk, jog or run alongside you when you bicycle. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Most shepherds love to play ball or Frisbee. Ten to fifteen minutes of fetching along with daily pack walks will tire your dog out quite nicely as well as give him a sense of purpose. Whether it is ball chasing, Frisbee catching, obedience training, participation in a canine playgroup or just taking long walks/jogs, you must be willing to provide some form of daily, constructive exercise. The daily exercise must always include daily walks/jogs to satisfy the dog’s migration instinct. If under-exercised and/or mentally challenged, this breed can become restless and destructive. Does best with a job to do.

Grooming
  The German Shepherd Dog has a thick, medium-length double coat that sheds, a lot and constantly, so much that even his fans call him a “German shedder.” The undercoat sheds heavily in spring and fall, and the German Shepherd must be brushed and bathed frequently during that time to get out all the loose hair. The rest of the year, weekly brushing is generally enough to keep him clean. If the German Shepherd is your breed of choice, purchase a heavy-duty vacuum cleaner; don’t get a German Shepherd if you have allergies or are a fussy housekeeper.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails every few weeks, as needed, and brush his teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Any household and any lifestyle are ideal for this versatile breed. Excellent family members and wonderful with children, German Shepherds make great companions and watchdogs with proper training. They can adapt to apartment living with proper daily exercise and can adjust to a variety of climates. Although they make excellent family pets, they take loyalty to their masters extremely seriously. With a long muzzle that can exert up to 238 pounds of pressure, this breed has the capability to cause serious damage. Early training and adaptation is necessary for responsible ownership. If you suffer from allergies or are bothered by dog hair, think twice before getting this breed.


Children and other pets
If he's well trained and has had plenty of exposure to kids, especially as a puppy, a German Shepherd is a great companion for children. In fact, some say he's a cross between a babysitter and a cop, both gentle with, and protective of, the children in his family.
This is a big dog, though, capable of mistakenly bumping a toddler or small child. True to his reserved nature, he's not tail-wagging friendly with kids he doesn't know, but he's generally trustworthy.
  The German Shepherd can also live peacefully with other dogs and pets, as long as he was taught to do so from puppyhood. Introducing an adult German Shepherd to a household with other pets can be more difficult if the dog isn't used to getting along with other dogs or cats. You may need to hire a professional trainer to help, or get advice from the rescue organization if that's where you acquired the adult German Shepherd.

In popular culture
  German Shepherds have been featured in a wide range of media. In 1921 Strongheart became one of the earliest canine film stars, and was followed in 1922 by Rin Tin Tin, who is considered the most famous German Shepherd. Both have stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. German Shepherds were used in the popular Canadian series The Littlest Hobo. Batman's dog Ace the Bat-Hound appeared in the Batman comic books, initially in 1955, through 1964. Between 1964 and 2007, his appearances were sporadic. A German Shepherd called Inspector Rex, is the star of Austrian Police procedural drama program, which won many awards, where German Shepherd Rex assists the Vienna Kriminalpolizei homicide unit. The show was aired in many languages.

Did You Know?
  President Herbert Hoover owned a German Shepherd named King Tut, who was perhaps the first dog to play a successful role in a presidential campaign, helping Hoover to appear kind and approachable.

A dream day in the life of a German Shepherd
  Tall, svelte and athletic with a nose for sniffing out trouble, German Shepherds are most often recognized for their work on the police force. German Shepherds are a product of very careful breeding solely intended for the creation of an ideal service dog. A solid combination of brains and brawn made this breed brave enough to be four-legged soldiers of war while their natural charm made them big-screen approved as seen in the likes of tail-wagging greats, including Rin Tin Tin and Strongheart. Loyal to the core, this breed can be protective and territorial.
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Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Everything about your Doberman Pinscher

Everything about your Doberman Pinscher
  Although the Doberman has a reputation as a sharp and even sinister dog, his devoted fans consider him the most loving and loyal of companions. Believe it or not, a good Doberman is a stable, friendly dog - unless you threaten his family.
  The Doberman Pinscher was developed in Germany during the late 19th century, primarily as a guard dog. His exact ancestry is unknown, but he's believed to be a mixture of many dog breeds, including the Rottweiler, Black and Tan Terrier, and German Pinscher. With his sleek coat, athletic build, and characteristic cropped ears and docked tail, the Doberman Pinscher looks like an aristocrat. He is a highly energetic and intelligent dog, suited for police and military work, canine sports, and as a family guardian and companion.


Overview
  Because the Doberman Pinscher came into existence at the end of the 19th century, he is, in the world of dogs, the new kid on the block. This hasn't stopped the Dobie, as he is affectionately called, from becoming one of the most popular and recognized breeds in the United States.
  His look is elegant and his style is athletic; the Dobie is also intelligent, alert, and loyal. He is a courageous guard dog as well as a beloved family companion.
  The Dobie's fierce reputation precedes him. He is feared by those who don't know him, stereotyped as highly aggressive and vicious. True, he is a formidable guardian, but he is usually a gentle, watchful, and loving dog. He does not go looking for trouble, but he is fearless and will defend his family and turf if he perceives danger.
  The Doberman Pinscher enjoys being part of a family. He likes to be close to those he loves and, when this love is present, he is a natural protector. He is trustworthy with his family's children, friends, and guests as long as he is treated kindly.
  In spite of his positive qualities, the Dobie isn't the right breed for everyone. He's large, at 60 to 80 pounds, and he's extremely active, both physically and mentally. He needs a lot of exercise.
  He also needs plenty of mental challenges to keep him from becoming bored. He needs a strong owner/pack leader who can take time to properly socialize and train him, and who will keep him busy every day. This may be too much to handle for people who lead a more laid-back lifestyle.
  The current look of the Dobie is slimmer and sleeker than that of past years. His temperament has also changed somewhat, say breed enthusiasts, softening a bit from his early days in Germany, though he is still an excellent guard dog.
  Originally, Dobies' ears were cropped to increase their ability to locate sounds, and tail docking gave the breed a more streamlined look. North American breeders usually dock the tails and crop the ears of Doberman puppies, though it's not mandatory. Docking and ear cropping is illegal in some countries.
  Those who know him say that a well-bred and properly socialized Dobie is an excellent pet and companion, suitable for families with other dogs, gentle with young children, and overall a loyal and devoted family member.

Highlights
  • The Doberman has a great deal of energy and needs a lot of exercise.
  • This breed can be protective, so don't be surprised when he assumes the role of household guardian.
  • The Dobie will assume the alpha role in your household if you're not a strong leader. Early, consistent training is critical to establish your role as pack leader.
  • The Dobie is sensitive to cold weather and needs adequate shelter in winter (he likes to be in the house next to the fireplace).
  • The Doberman Pinscher is a family dog and shouldn't be left alone. He thrives when he's included in family activities.
  • The Doberman has gained a reputation as being vicious. Even though your Doberman may have a sweet personality, neighbors and strangers may be afraid of him.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Doberman originated in Germany, created by tax collector Louis Dobermann to keep himself and the taxes he carried safe from thieves.
  • In the 1950s, long before the advent of agility and freestyle competitions, the Doberman Drill Team thrilled audiences with their amazing physical feats. Today the breed is highly competitive in obedience and agility trials as well as many other dog sports and activities.
  • The Doberman who is raised with children and other pets will love and protect them and be a good companion for kids.
  • The first Doberman to win Best in Show at Westminster was Ch. Ferry v Raufelsen of Giralda in 1939. He was followed by his grandson, Ch. Rancho Dobe's Storm, who had back to back wins in 1952 and 1953 and more recently by Ch. Royal Tudor Wild as the Wind in 1989.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Guardian Dog
Average lifespan: 10-11 years
Average size: 66-88 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, hard, thick
Coloration: Black, red, blue, and fawn
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Athletic build, muscular body, ears pricked and erect, tail short and cropped
Possible alterations: Dobermans are born with floppy ears and long tails.
Comparable Breeds: Dalmatian, Rottweiler
History
  Doberman Pinschers were first bred in the town of Apolda, in the German state of Thuringia around 1890, following the Franco-Prussian War by Karl Friedrich Louis Dobermann. Dobermann served in the dangerous role of local tax collector, and ran the Apolda dog pound. With access to dogs of many breeds, he aimed to create a breed that would be ideal for protecting him during his collections, which took him through many bandit-infested areas. He set out to breed a new type of dog that, in his opinion, would be the perfect combination of strength, speed, endurance, loyalty, intelligence, and ferocity. Later, Otto Goeller and Philip Greunig continued to develop the breed to become the dog that is seen today.
  The breed is believed to have been created from several different breeds of dogs that had the characteristics that Dobermann was looking for, including the German Pinscher, the Beauceron, the Rottweiler, the Thuringian Sylvan Dog, the Greyhound, the Great Dane, the Weimaraner, the German Shorthaired Pointer, the Manchester Terrier, the Old German Shepherd Dog, the American Pit Bull Terrier, Thuringian Shepherd Dog . The exact ratios of mixing, and even the exact breeds that were used, remain uncertain to this day, although many experts believe that the Doberman Pinscher is a combination of at least four of these breeds. The single exception is the documented crossing with the Greyhound and Manchester Terrier. It is also widely believed that the old German Shepherd gene pool was the single largest contributor to the Doberman breed. Philip Greunig'sThe Dobermann Pinscher (1939), is considered the foremost study of the development of the breed by one of its most ardent students. Greunig's study describes the breed's early development by Otto Goeller, whose hand allowed the Doberman to become the dog we recognize today. The American Kennel Club believes the breeds utilized to develop the Doberman Pinscher may have included the old shorthaired shepherd, Rottweiler, Black and Tan Terrier and the German Pinscher.
  After Dobermann's death in 1894, the Germans named the breed Dobermann-pinscher in his honor, but a half century later dropped the 'pinscher' on the grounds that this German word for terrier was no longer appropriate. The British did the same a few years later.
During World War II, the United States Marine Corps adopted the Doberman Pinscher as its official War Dog, although the Corps did not exclusively use this breed in the role.
In the post war era the breed was nearly lost. There were no new litters registered in West Germany from 1949 to 1958. Werner Jung is credited with single-handedly saving the breed. He searched the farms in Germany for typical Pinschers and used these along with 4 oversized Miniature Pinschers and a black and red bitch from East Germany. Jung risked his life to smuggle her into West Germany. Most German Pinschers today are descendants of these dogs. Some pedigrees in the 1959 PSK Standardbuch show a number of dogs with unknown parentage.
  In the United States, the American Kennel Club ranked the Doberman Pinscher as the 12th most popular pure-breed in 2012 and 2013.





Personality
  A super-intelligent and super-active dog — that's what you get when you get a Doberman Pinscher. You also get an extremely loyal, trustworthy dog who's playful and fun-loving with his family. He's a natural protector who won't hesitate to act when he thinks his family is under threat, but he is not aggressive without reason.
  The Dobie likes to be busy, physically and mentally. He learns quickly, and training him is easy. Because he learns so fast, it's challenging to keep lessons fresh and interesting. He can have his own ideas about things, though typically he's not overly stubborn or willful with an owner who provides consistent, kind leadership.
  The Dobie takes a while to grow up. He remains puppyish until he is three to four years old.
Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.
  Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, the Dobie needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Dobie puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.



Health
  The Doberman Pinscher has a lifespan of 10 to 12 years. Wobbler's syndrome, cervical vertebral instability (CVI), and cardiomyopathy are some serious health problems affecting Dobermans; some minor diseases seen in this breed of dog include canine hip dysplasia (CHD), osteosarcoma, von Willebrand's disease (vWD), demodicosis, and gastric torsion. Albinism, narcolepsy, hypothyroidism, and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) are occasionally seen in Dobermans, while the Blue Doberman is more prone to hair loss. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run cardiac, eye, hip, and DNA tests.


Living Conditions
  Will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised, but does best with at least an average-sized yard. Dobes are very cold sensitive and are not outside dogs. That is why police in areas where it gets cold are not able to use them.

Exercise
  The Doberman is very energetic, with great stamina. They need to be taken on a daily, long walk or jog, and need to be made to heel beside or behind the human holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the humans.

Care
  The Doberman requires mental and physical exertion daily or it may become destructive or frustrated. This need can be easily met with a walk on a leash, a run in an enclosed area, or a long jog. And while it can live outdoors in cool climate, the Doberman is most effective indoors as a guardian and a family companion. Its coat requires minimal care.

Grooming
  Grooming is a breeze. Brush the Doberman with a slicker brush or hound glove every week, or even just run a wet towel over him. On the days he needs a bath, use a dog shampoo, not a human product. Rinse thoroughly and let him shake dry or towel-dry him.
  The Doberman sheds moderately. Regular brushing will help keep him and your home neat.  As with any dog, brushing before a bath helps eliminate more dead hair, which leaves less hair to shed. Your vacuum cleaner will work longer if you brush your Doberman regularly.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush his teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  The Doberman Pinscher is definitely not right for everyone. This is a highly intelligent breed meant to guard and work, and its owners must have the time and dedication to provide proper upbringing to this potentially dangerous breed, especially for households with young children. Highly trainable and loyal, the Doberman Pinscher makes a wonderful addition to an experienced household. This is a tidy breed as it does not shed much and has a low-maintenance grooming routine.

Children and other pets
  The well-bred Doberman is a wonderful family dog. He is trustworthy and protective of the children in his family, as long as he's been socialized and trained appropriately. Children must be respectful and kind to the Dobie, and he will be just that in return.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  He's also friendly with other dogs and animals in his home, especially if he has been raised with them. He can be aggressive toward dogs outside his family if he considers them a threat to his loved ones.

Famous Doberman Pinschers
  • Graf Belling v. Grönland: first registered Dobermann, in 1898.
  • First Doberman registered with the American Kennel Club, 1908
  • Ch. Big Boy of White Gate (owner/breeder Howard K. Mohr) wins the 1st Best in Show for an American-bred Doberman at the Rhode Island Kennel Club show, 1928.
  • Ch. Ferry v Raufelsen of Giralda (owner/breeder Mrs. M Hartley Dodge) is the first Doberman to win Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club show, 1939
  • Kurt, A Doberman who saved the lives of 250 U.S. Marines when he alerted them to Japanese soldiers. Kurt became the first k-9 casualty, July 23, when he was mortally wounded by a Japanese grenade. He was the first to be buried in what would become the war dog cemetery and he is the dog depicted in bronze sitting quiet but alert atop the World War II War Dog Memorial. Kurt, along with 24 other Dobermans whose names are inscribed on the memorial, died fighting with the US Marine Corps against Japanese forces on Guam in 1944.
  • Ch. Rancho Dobe's Storm: back to back Westminster Best in Show (1952, 1953). While other Dobermans may have more group or best in show or even more breed wins than Ch Rancho Dobe's Storm, he remains the only Doberman that has never been defeated by another Doberman.
  • Bingo von Ellendonk: first Dobermann to score 300 points (perfect score) in Schutzhund.
  • Ch. Cambria Cactus Cash: Sired 155 AKC champions as of January 2011.
  • Ch. Borong the Warlock: won his championship title in three countries, including 230 Best of Breed, 30 Specialty Show "bests," six all-breed Best in Show, and 66 Working Groups. He was the only Doberman ever to have won the Doberman Pinscher Club of America National Specialty Show three times, and in 1961 five Doberman specialists judged him Top in the breed in an annual Top Ten competition event.
  • Am. Ch. Brunswigs Cryptonite: achieved Best In Show on 124 occasions
Did You Know?
  Doberman’s get a bad reputation as attack dogs. Alpha in the Academy Award-winning film “UP” embodies every stereotype of the Doberman Pinscher: he’s both mean and not very smart. Fortunately, he’s also fictional and nothing like a real Doberman.

A dream day in the life of a Doberman Pinscher
  The Doberman Pinscher is a dog who thrives on work. Give this workaholic a job and he'll be the happiest pup on the block. Whether it's standing guard for the household, getting involved with search and rescue or any other type of accelerated training, this no-nonsense breed is up for the challenge.
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Friday, May 2, 2014

Everything about your Miniature Schnauzer

Everything about your Miniature Schnauzer
  Known for his distinguished, handsome appearance, the Miniature Schnauzer is characterized by its whiskers and double coat, which has a hard, wiry outer coat and close, soft undercoat.   Coat colors can be salt and pepper, black and silver and solid black.  Despite his small stature, the Miniature Schnauzer can give an alarm just as well as a larger dog.  That, combined with his naturally protective nature, makes him an excellent watchdog.   He is also the most popular of the three Schnauzer breeds, which include the Giant and the Standard.
  He a dog breed who's got it all in one small package: intelligence, affection, an extroverted temperament, humor, and a personality that's twice as big as he is. Throw in that walrus moustache and quivering enthusiasm, and he'll make you laugh every day. With a Miniature Schnauzer in the house, you'll never be alone, not even when you go to the bathroom. He's got personality-plus, and whether he's bounding around ahead of you or curled up snoozing on your lap, you'll never be bored with him around.

Overview
 The miniature schnauzer is a robust, sturdily built terrier of nearly square proportion. It was developed as a ratter and is quick and tough. Its gait displays good reach and drive. Its coat is double, with a close undercoat, and hard, wiry, outer coat which is longer on the legs, muzzle and eyebrows. Its facial furnishings add to its keen expression. 
  The miniature schnauzer deserves its place as one of the most popular terrier pets. It is playful, inquisitive, alert, spunky and companionable. It is a well-mannered house dog that also enjoys being in the middle of activities. It is less domineering than the larger schnauzers and less dog-aggressive than most terriers. It is also better with other animals than most terriers, although it will gladly give chase. It is clever and can be stubborn, but it is generally biddable. It enjoys children. Some may bark a lot.

Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 13-15 lbs
Coat appearance: Hard, wiry, glossy
Coloration: Black, gray, silver
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Square body frame; small and compact build; outer coat longer on the legs, muzzle and eyebrows.
Comparable Breeds: Airedale Terrier, Giant Schnauzer
Other Quick Facts
  Miniature Schnauzers shed only a tiny bit, and might be a good choice for some people who are typically allergic to dogs. However, it's not a dog’s hair that triggers allergies, but dander (dead skin flakes) and saliva. There’s no escaping any of those when you live with a dog, no matter what breed it is. The best advice for an allergic person is to spend some up-close and personal time around the breed to assure themselves that there won't be a problem living with them.

  Despite his small stature, the Miniature Schnauzer is not a lap dog. He’s athletic and energetic, and needs more daily exercise than just going around the block.



Highlights
  • The Miniature Schnauzer is people-oriented and wants nothing more than to hang out with you. He's incredibly affectionate.
  • A Miniature Schnauzer is intelligent, mischievous, and often stubborn. He's full of life.
  • He's low-shedding, but high-maintenance in terms of grooming. He needs to be clipped every five to eight weeks or so.
  • He's noisy. Protective of home and family, he'll bark even at slight noises.
  • He's good with kids and other dogs, but not to be trusted around small mammals.
  • Always keep your Miniature Schnauzer on a leash when you're not in a fenced area. If he sees something and wants to chase it, he will likely ignore your calls.
  • A bored Miniature Schnauzer is an unhappy Miniature Schnauzer. Because he's intelligent and energetic, he thrives on varied activities and exercise. Make sure that you give him both, or he'll become destructive and ill-tempered.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Is this breed right for you?
  Miniature Schnauzers are highly versatile and known to fit in well in most environments. Whether they are part of a big family with lots of kids or in an apartment with one or two owners, this breed simply loves companionship of any sort. Apartment dwellers should be aware that this is a very vocal breed, and unless training starts early on, you may have barking issues to work through. This highly intelligent breed does very well with training, from basic commands to more advanced teachings. Owners must dedicate ample time and money toward grooming this breed's unique and high-maintenance coat.


Did You Know?
  Miniature Schnauzers can only be shown in American Kennel Club conformation shows in salt and pepper - by far the most common color - black and silver, or black. White Miniature Schnauzers cannot be shown in conformation in the U.S., although they can in some other countries.

History
  Miniature Schnauzers were originally bred to be ratters and guard dogs on farms. They were developed in the mid-to-late 19th century in Germany by crossbreeding the Standard Schnauzer with smaller breeds, such as the Miniature Pinscher, Affenpinscher, and perhaps the Poodle or Pomeranian. In Germany, he's known as the Zwergschnauzer (zwerg means "dwarf").
  There aren't any records on how the Miniature Schnauzer was developed, but it's clear the intent was to create a smaller version of the well-established Standard Schnauzer. The earliest record of a Miniature Schnauzer was a black female named Findel, born in October 1888. In 1895, the first breed club was formed in Cologne, Germany, although it accepted several types of dogs.
  World Wars I and II were hard on dog breeding, particularly in Europe, where some breeds were nearly lost. But interest in Miniature Schnauzers boomed after WWI, and the dog's popularity has never waned since.
  One aspect that has changed since the early days is the preferred colors. You used to be able to find a Schnauzer of almost any size in red, black and tan, yellow, or parti-color — but not today, when shades of black and silver are the rage. Just as feelings about ear cropping shift with the times, the Miniature Schnauzer's look may change again.
  An interesting aside: While the Miniature Schnauzer is considered a Terrier by the AKC, the Standard Schnauzer is classified as a member of the Working group.

Personality
  A Miniature Schnauzer is full of life. An extrovert, he loves to be in the thick of the family action. He may even run up to you while you're sitting down and throw his paws around your neck. He wants to touch you and be next to you all the time, and you can bet he'll want to sleep plastered to your side.
  A bit of a spitfire, the Miniature Schnauzer is a terrier , that means he's full of himself. He's a feisty type A and his work involves amusing himself. He is not aloof or independent but needs to be with people, and what's more, he wants to be in close physical contact. 
  He's very intelligent, which makes training easy, but it also means he's a master of manipulation. That combined with his stubbornness will keep you on your toes. He's not as feisty as some terriers, however, nor as dog-aggressive.
  As with every dog, the Miniature Schnauzer needs early socialization,exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences , when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Miniature Schnauzer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Children and other pets
  The Miniature Schnauzer likes hanging out with his people — he lives for it, as a matter of fact. He's good with children, particularly if he's raised with them. He'll play with them and protect them and they'll help each other burn off steam: kids and Miniature Schnauzers are a great combination.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  A Miniature Schnauzer usually plays well with other dogs — he isn't one of those terriers who can't play nicely with others. He typically isn't as aggressive toward other dogs as many other Terriers are, but he is brave and fearless around large dogs, a trait that can get him into trouble. He is large and in charge, at least in his own mind.
  Small mammals such as rats and gerbils, however, aren't good matches for the Miniature Schnauzer, who is hardwired to kill them. Training won't change that; that's what he's bred for.

Health
  The Miniature Schnauzer, with a lifespan of 12 to 14 years, sometimes suffers from health problems like mycobacterium avium infection, cataract and retinal dysplasia. Other major health issues that may affect it are urolithiasis and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), while some minor health problems include von Willebrand's disease (vWD), myotonia congenita, Schnauzer comedo syndrome, and allergies. A veterinarian may run DNA or eye exams to identify some of these issues.

Care
  The Miniature Schnauzer is active when inside the house, playing with toys and following you from room to room. He loves to have a yard to play in, but he'll do well without one if you give him a long walk every day. He needs 45 minutes of daily exercise — remember, a tired Miniature Schnauzer is a good Miniature Schnauzer.
  Crate training benefits every dog and is a kind way to ensure that your Schnauzer doesn't have accidents in the house or get into things he shouldn't. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your Miniature Schnauzer accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized.
  Never stick your dog in a crate all day long, however. It's not a jail, and he shouldn't spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he's sleeping at night.

Grooming
  The Miniature Schnauzer’s grooming needs are fairly extensive. He needs regular clipping or hand stripping. Pets are usually clipped because hand stripping is a time-consuming effort typically reserved for show dogs. Clipping will soften the coat, though, so if you like the hard texture, resign yourself to stripping it.
  Miniature Schnauzers have a double coat. The undercoat is soft and the top coat is wiry. They can either be shaved with an electric clipper by you or a professional, or plucked (hand stripped), which is a labor-intensive process that is best done while he's on your lap watching television.  Most hand strippers do it one section at a time, and do it throughout the year. For some, hand stripping takes too long to be affordable at a professional groomer's. Fortunately, it's not hard to learn to use a clipper, and you can buy the equipment for the equivalent of a few grooming sessions. If you want to learn how to get a typical Miniature Schnauzer cut, check out the AMSC grooming chart.
  Because he’s small, his dental needs can be significant unless care is taken to brush his teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste, and schedule dental cleanings with your veterinarian.

A dream day in the life
  This happy go lucky breed is content doing just about anything that involves being with you. The perfect size for a tag-a-long companion, you can bring this friendly pooch just about anywhere. Whether it's at the park playing with other dogs, at a training class learning new tricks or simply snuggling on a cozy lap, the Miniature Schnauzer is easy to please. To keep it extra happy, each day should involve a light coat brushing to prevent uncomfortable mats in its double-coated fur.
  
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