LUV My dogs: UK

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Showing posts with label UK. Show all posts
Showing posts with label UK. Show all posts

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in UK

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in UK
  There are an estimated 9 million dog owners in the UK. This figure is rising year on year as new generations become dog parents and our canine companions become our surrogate children.
  Over the years, the list of most popular dog breeds has fluctuated, with new breeds emerging and taking pole position. However there are some breeds that have maintained their ranking and remain amongst the most popular breeds owned in the UK.
Here’s a list of the top 10 most popular dog breeds based on The Kennel Club registration in 2016.

10. Border Terrier
  In 10th place is the Border Terrier , part of the KC’s Terrier Group. Boasting a rustic, working appearance, the breed is easily identifiable and held in high esteem. First developed in the early 18th century in the Cheviot Hills, the Border Terrier was primarily bred for the purpose of flushing out and killing foxes that were attacking the farmer's livestock. Highly valued for its willingness and stamina, the Border Terrier rose to tremendous popularity in the century, also hunting otters, badgers and vermin.
  The Border’s wiry double coat is commonly coloured wheaten, blue, tan, grizzle, red and white, which may have aided the breed's camouflage in the outland terrains of the border.   The Border Terrier is an affectionate, loyal and mannered breed, displaying a relaxed temperament that makes for an ideal companion. Compatible with children and other house pets as well as being a practical size, it is unsurprising that this breed appears on the popularity list.

9. Miniature Schnauzer
In ninth place is the Miniature Schnauzer. The miniature schnauzer is a robust, sturdily built terrier of nearly square proportion. It was developed as a ratter and is quick and tough. Its gait displays good reach and drive. Its coat is double, with a close undercoat, and hard, wiry, outer coat which is longer on the legs, muzzle and eyebrows. Its facial furnishings add to its keen expression. 
  The miniature schnauzer deserves its place as one of the most popular terrier pets. It is playful, inquisitive, alert, spunky and companionable. It is a well-mannered house dog that also enjoys being in the middle of activities. It is less domineering than the larger schnauzers and less dog-aggressive than most terriers. It is also better with other animals than most terriers, although it will gladly give chase. It is clever and can be stubborn, but it is generally biddable. It enjoys children. Some may bark a lot. 

8. Golden Retriever 
  In eighth place is the Golden Retriever.Lower in the list than some might have assumed, the Golden Retriever is widely considered one of the most popular breeds, not only as a companionable house dog but in obedience, service and therapy. Believed to have been developed by Lord Tweedmouth in the late 1800s, the Golden Retriever has its roots in the Scottish Highlands where it was selectively bred for the purposes of hunting, tracking and retrieving upland game, as its name would suggest.
  Easily identifiable for its wavy golden coat, the Retriever is medium-sized with a straight muzzle, large brown eyes, feathering on ears, back of legs, underside of tail and front of neck. Highly trainable, the breed is the ideal choice for the modern family, being devoted to children and demonstrating love, loyalty and affection. Like the Labrador Retriever, the breed’s natural love of people is showcased at every opportunity.

7. German Shepherd Dog
   In seventh place is the German Shepherd Dog, a member of the Herding Group.
Despite falling fourth on the list, the German Shepherd – otherwise known as the Alsatian – is arguably the most popular breed worldwide. Founded in 1899, the Shepherd was primarily bred as a versatile working dog, developed to be fearless and agile for the purposes of military and police work. The German Shepherd retained its concrete reputation across Europe and the United States following its wide usage during World War I.
  Athletically built to change direction at full speed, the appearance of the German Shepherd reflects its versatile working capabilities. Contrary to popular belief, a socialised and consistently trained German Shepherd will not display undue aggression. Instead, a Shepherd will demonstrate a calm and gentle manner - having an enormous capacity for love, loyalty and affection. Inherently able-minded and intelligent, the Shepherd can be trained to a very good degree and is known for being incredibly devoted to children.

6. Bulldog
  In sixth place is the Bulldog, which is included in the Utility Group. Less of a lap dog, more of a fully-fledged canine side-kick, the Bulldog is just behind its smaller counterpart on the list of popular breeds. Commonly entitled the National Dog of Great Britain, the breed features in various patriotic pictorials – for this reason alone, the Bulldog simply had to appear on the list! Once the so-called sport of bull and badger baiting was finally dispensed with in 1850, the Bulldog grew in popularity as a fearless yet increasingly placid companion dog, hence its positioning on the list.
  Bearing in mind its early sporting heritage, the appearance of the Bulldog is somewhat intimidating, however such is not a fair reflection of its nature. The breed possesses an easy and affectionate temperament, is protective of children and its home, and is a great lover of people. The appearance of the Bulldog is distinctive and clearly desirable. Anyone wanting a dog with an outwardly fierce appearance but a mellow interior should seriously consider buying a Bulldog.

5. English Springer Spaniel 
  In fifth place is the English Springer Spaniel, part of the KC ’s Gundog Group.Larger than its cousin the Cocker Spaniel, the English Springer is a strong competitor in the popularity contest. Deriving its name from its early usage as a game flusher, 'springing' furred and feathered game from the bush in order for the hunter to shoot it, the breed is revered for its ability to work tirelessly in a variety of working fulfillments. Having retained its popularity as a companion dog since its early prevalence in the Renaissance, the English Springer Spaniel is often described as the ideal family dog.
  The coat of the English Springer Spaniel is typically wavy and feathered, common in colours of white and liver, usually with black, liver or tan markings. The breed possesses an amiable and relaxed temperament, displaying affection and loyalty towards its family and engaging well with children. Owners have described the Springer Spaniel as being ‘full of life and character,’ and making a great addition to active family life.

4. Pug
  In fourth place is the Pug, a member of the Toy Group. This entry might come as a surprise to some. Much conjecture surrounds the ancestry and origin of the Pug, although it was made popular during the Victorian period when it was commonly observed atop private carriages. As a breed, it has boasted many notable admirers throughout history, including Napoleon's wife – Josephine, Queen Victoria, and the Duke and Duchess of Windsor.
  The breed boasts several distinctive features, including a broad, flat and pronounced muzzle, prominent eyes, low-set, triangular ears and a short tail, arching over the back. The Pug is a suitable and delightful breed choice for families or a dedicated sole owner wanting a lap dog, due to its calm and amiable temperament and its compact proportions. Animated and spirited, a Pug is guaranteed to liven up any home setting – perhaps accounting for its popularity!

3. French Bulldog
  In third place is the French bulldog, which is included in the Utility Group. Another close contender, the French Bulldog is the eighth most popular breed choice in the UK – up four places from last year. Contrary to popular belief, the French Bulldog hails from Nottingham, England, where it was the breed choice of lace makers and craftsmen in the city. Popular amongst the artistic and eccentric of Parisian city dwellers also, the French Bulldog grew in favour, retaining its name on its return to England, as well as its concrete reputation.
  A compact dog of reduced proportions, the French Bulldog possesses a steady and easy temperament, despite its bullish appearance. A popular lap dog and ladies’ companion, the Bulldog is well suited to the home setting, being compatible with both children and other house pets. Time has proven the popularity of this breed, which is unlikely to ever go out of favour.

2.  Cocker Spaniel
  In second place is the Cocker Spaniel, a member of the Gun Dog Group. Taking second position is this versatile hunting gun-dog. The Cocker Spaniel was prominent during the Tudor reign of Henry VIII and proved a favourite in the royal courts of the 16th and 17th centuries. Until 1990, the breed was considered the most popular as registered by the American Kennel Club, however it now ranks 25th.
  Characterised by an arched head, low-set ears, ovular eyes and a soft, wavy coat in colour deviations of solid black, red or liver, the Cocker Spaniel is a highly attractive breed and is considered the original family companion, proceeding the Labrador and Golden Retriever as the dog most compatible with children, other pets and domestic living. The breed experienced a resurgence in popularity following the acquisition of a black Cocker Spaniel, named Lupo, by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge before Christmas of last year.

1.  Labrador Retriever
  In first place is the Labrador retriever, a friendly and active member of the Gundog Group. The KC (UK) recognized the breed in 1903. The Labrador retriever, the most popular dog breed in the United Kingdom, comes in three colors: yellow, black, and chocolate.   Labrador Retrievers are among the most popular dog breeds out there today. 
  The fact the Labrador Retriever takes pole position is probably not surprising. Described as 'the best all-round dog' by the Kennel Club, the Labrador Retriever has enjoyed great popularity throughout its existence, both as a domestic pet and service dog. This traditional working animal was originally utilised off the coast of Labrador and neighbouring Newfoundland in Canada, helping Portuguese fishermen to trawl, retrieve fish and retract the nets. The modern Labrador was developed in 19th century England and was officially recognised by the Kennel Club in 1903.
  Typically a proportioned and sprightly-looking breed, the Labrador Retriever boasts strong legs, a broad head, medium-sized pendant ears, and wide-set eyes. Today, the Labrador is observed in hunting, tracking, retrieving, military and police work, search and rescue, competitive obedience, agility and as a guide dog to the blind. Highly valued for being inherently gentle, affectionate and obedient, the Labrador is well suited to the home setting and is neither unduly shy nor aggressive. The Labrador is a great lover of people, perhaps why people are a great lover of it!
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Thursday, April 20, 2017

Everything about your Manchester Terrier

Everything about your Manchester Terrier
   The Manchester Terrier is quite an old breed that was developed for the purpose of hunting and killing rats, rabbits and other rodents in urban Great Britain. Named after the city of Manchester in northwestern England, this breed has also been referred to as the English Gentleman’s Terrier and the Gentleman’s Terrier. The Manchester Terrier is a direct descendant and very close relative of the old Black and Tan Terrier and shares many of its physical and mental attributes, although the Black and Tan was a heavier, coarser dog with shorter legs. The Manchester is a leaner, more athletic animal, due to outcrosses with Whippets during the early development of the breed. 

Overview
  The oldest-known terrier, the Manchester Terrier was bred in England to hunt rats. The best vermin-hunting breed, the Manchester Terrier is extremely fast. Available in both standard and toy varieties, both are considered companion dogs with the same personality traits. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Manchester Terrier has gone down in recent years.

Highlights
  • Life expectancy can be up to 15 years.
  • Manchesters can become obese if overfed and under-exercised.
  • You can find them in two sizes: small and smaller.
  • They excel at sports such as agility, obedience, and rally.
  • They are great watchdogs and will bark enthusiastically if not trained to be quiet on command.
  • Manchester Terriers can be stubborn and difficult to housebreak. Crate training is recommended.
  • Manchesters are energetic dogs and like to go for walks. Be care in off-leash or unsecured areas; when their hunting instincts kick in, training is out the window. It's all about the chase.
  • They bark, dig, and kill vermin and small critters, including pocket pets.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.

Other Quick Facts

  • The Manchester Terrier is a small dog, slightly longer than he is tall, with a short coat in jet black with rich mahogany markings. He has a wedge-shaped head with a keen, bright expression shining out of black, almond-shaped eyes. This is a breed with curves. The neck is slightly arched; the topline (back) is slightly arched over the loins; and the abdomen is tucked up with an arched line. The tail tapers to a point and is carried in a slight upward curve.
  • With the exception of size, the only difference between the Standard and Toy Manchester is ear shape. The Standard Manchester has a naturally erect ear, a cropped ear or a button ear. Cropped ears are long and pointed. A Toy Manchester has a naturally erect ear, never one that has been cropped.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 15 - 18 years
Average size: 6 - 8 pounds
Coat appearance: Smooth-haired, shiny
Coloration: Black and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Muscular, long tapered head, V-shaped erect ears, dark almond-shaped eyes, black nose, pointed and erect tail.
Possible alterations: Standard versions are larger in size. Ears are known to naturally flop over.
Comparable Breeds: Italian Greyhound, Whippet

History of the Manchester Terrier
  The sleek and handsome Manchester Terrier is thought to have been created by crossing Britain’s black and tan terrier with the Whippet and possibly other breeds such as the Italian Greyhound. He originated in Manchester, where popular sports included rat killing and rabbit coursing. The Manchester was designed to excel at both and became popular throughout Britain.
  The dogs were eventually imported into the United States. The American Kennel Club recognized the Toy variety in 1886 and the Standard in 1887. The Manchester Terrier Club of America was formed in 1923. Today the breed ranks 121 st among the dogs registered by the AKC.

Temperament
  Manchester Terriers are lively, spirited, sharp-witted dogs. Although they look like small Dobermans, Manchesters are true terriers, through and through. They are extremely smart, somewhat independent and devoted to the people in their close circle. This is neither a cuddly nor a clingy breed. In fact, Manchester Terriers can be stubborn and, like most other terriers, they have a tendency to test boundaries. Manchesters can become destructive and noisy if left unattended for long periods of time. They typically get along well with children, as long as they are well-socialized with kids from an early age. Manchester Terriers are not particularly suspicious of strangers, although they can be a bit aloof and stand-offish. All in all, this is an alert, attentive breed that makes an ideal companion for city-dwellers.

Health 
  Manchester Terriers have an average life span of about 15 years. Breed health concerns may include von Willebrand disease, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, pattern baldness (mainly in females), Ehler-Danlos syndrome (cutaneous asthenia), lens luxation, cataracts and generalized progressive retinal atrophy (GPRA). These short-haired dogs become easily chilled and should wear a sweater or coat when outside in icy weather for any length of time.

Care
  Minimal coat care is required for the Manchester Terrier. It is an active and alert breed that should be led on moderate on-leash walks, off-lead outings in safe areas, or fun romp in the garden. Although it likes to spend the day in the yard, it should not be allowed to live outdoors and it needs a soft, warm bed.

Living Conditions
  The Manchester Terrier is a good dog for apartment living. They are very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. Manchester Terriers prefer warm climates.

Training
  Not the easiest breed in the world when it comes to training, the Manchester Terrier needs a patient and calm trainer. His stubborn streak means that the trainer must always have loads of cookies to keep him interested in the session. Harsh methods and yelling will cause this breed to shut down.
  Many owners have found that their Manchester Terriers can be great therapy dogs. They are easy to put in the car and actually like going for rides, which makes visiting hospitals and nursing homes easy. Providing they were socialized properly and had basic obedience training, Manchesters can do good things for those in less than ideal health.

Activity Requirements
  Manchester Terriers are active, athletic dogs, but unlike some little breeds they typically are not neurotic or excessively busy. A healthy dose of moderate exercise should suffice to keep them happy, healthy and fit. Manchesters love to accompany their human family members on all sorts of outings, from a simple stroll around the neighborhood to a trip to the grocery store. They absolutely adore playing fetch.

Grooming
  When it comes to grooming, the Manchester Terrier is an easy keeper. Though the breed is naturally clean with little doggie odor, a bath every three months (or when he gets dirty) in a mild shampoo is a good idea. Brush his sleek coat with a natural bristle brush or mitt. Use coat conditioner/polish to brighten the sheen.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.   Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Introduce the ManchesterTerrier to grooming when he is very young so he learns to accept it, particularly nail trimming, patiently.

Children And Other Pets
  Typically, a Manchester is devoted to his family and likes children but his small size makes him vulnerable to youngsters who aren't old enough to know it hurts when you yank his ears. Some breeders prefer homes without very young children. It helps to expose him to a lot of children, small and not so small, when he's young.
  Show your children how to approach and touch dogs, and supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should be left unsupervised with a child.
  Manchesters and other pets depends on... the other pets. They are less scrappy than many terriers, but don't lose sight of why they were bred: to kill vermin. They have a strong prey drive. So while they generally do well with other dogs, cats might be pretty nervous around them, and small critters like rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs would be in permanent danger around this terrier.

Is this breed right for you?
  A completely devoted breed, the Manchester Terrier is very loyal, loving and faithful. Active and full of life, it needs a lot of mental and physical stimulation to avoid behavioral problems. Not capable of being left alone for long periods of time, it is in constant need of human companionship. With a natural instinct to hunt, it does not do well with cats but can get along with other dogs if raised with them. Enjoying walks, games of fetch and other forms of activity, it does best with a large yard. A good family pet, it does best with children if introduced to them as a puppy.

Did You Know?
  The Manchester Terrier and Toy Manchester were registered as separate breeds until 1959. They are now treated as one breed — the Manchester Terrier — with two varieties: Toy and Standard.

A dream day in the life of a Manchester Terrier
  A breed that enjoys snuggling with its favorite humans, it will enjoy waking up to the alarm in its owner's bed. Known for cuddling, it will wait to get out of bed until its master does. Once up for the day, it'll greet the kids with affection before going for a romp in the yard. After a good breakfast, it will enjoy engaging in a game of fetch. After a nap with the smaller humans, the Manchester Terrier will follow them outside to sniff out the perimeter for any unwelcome visitors. Ending its day exactly as it started, it'll be keen for a nightly snuggle session.


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Thursday, December 8, 2016

Everything about your English Toy Spaniel

Everything about your English Toy Spaniel
  A true lapdog, the English Toy Spaniel is dedicated to becoming the world’s best couch potato. This breed does like to play too but he prefers doing so on the living room carpet as opposed to outside in the dirt and grass. After all, the dirt and grass could make his beautiful, silky coat dirty! English Toy Spaniels love being spoiled and absolutely enjoy living in the lap of luxury. To them, luxury doesn’t have to be an English estate. It could very well be a small and cozy apartment providing the dog is with the people he loves.

Overview
  Originally bred as a woodcock hunter, the English Toy Spaniel was loved by royalty as a constant companion and foot and lap warmer. Very similar to the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, the two are often confused with each other and bred together as well. A preferred lap dog, he's a good companion that gets along well with school-aged children and other animals. Not prone to barking, he does need regular grooming and a push for regular exercise.
  English Toy Spaniels (nicknamed Charlies or ETs) are not as well known as their Cavalier King Charles Spaniel cousins, and that’s too bad. People who know them appreciate their small size and calm, devoted nature. Even though his ancestors lived in palaces, the ET is the perfect roommate for an apartment dweller. If you're allowed to bring a dog to work, he’s a good cubicle pal, too. And if you like to travel? Well, he fits perfectly in a carrier beneath your seat.

Highlights
  • Socialization is important with this breed because they can be timid when they are exposed to new people or situations.
  • Considered to be an average shedder, the English Toy Spaniel should be brushed every week to remove loose hair and to keep the coat from tangling.
  • For the dog's own safety, the English Toy Spaniel should be kept on leash whenever they are walked and they should also have a fully fenced yard.
  • English Toy Spaniels do well in apartments.
  • English Toy Spaniels do not handle heat very well and need to be monitored on hot days to ensure that they do not overexert themselves. It is recommended that the dogs reside in an air-conditioned dwelling.
  • English Toy Spaniels have low energy levels and low exercise requirements. They are happy spending their days sitting on your knee, and a leisurely walk around the neighborhood will meet their exercise needs. They make excellent companions for older owners.
  • English Toy Spaniels are loving dogs that usually do well with children, but they are not the ideal breed for a home with busy children since they can become overwhelmed by the noise and excitement children make.
  • English Toy Spaniels are companion dogs and thrive when they are with the people they love. They should not live outside or in a kennel away from their family.
  • Separation anxiety is a common problem in the English Toy Spaniel and they can become destructive when they are separated from their owners for a period of time.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store.
Other Quick Facts

  • The most recognizable feature of the English Toy Spaniel is his head, with its domed skull, large eyes, black nose, and soft, intelligent expression.
  • The English Toy Spaniel comes in four colors or patterns: Blenheim (red and white), Ruby (solid red), Prince Charles (tricolor), and King Charles (black and tan). In dog shows, the Blenheim and the Prince Charles compete in one class and the King Charles and the Ruby in another.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
Average size: 8 - 14 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky, medium-length
Coloration: Tricolored (beige, white and black), black and tan, red and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Dark eyes and dark-eyed rims; well-proportioned body; scissor-bite teeth; long ears with feathering and medium-to long-length wavy coat; soft expression
Possible alterations: Coat may be straight
Comparable Breeds: Japanese Chin, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

History
  Little spaniels probably descend from dogs that were popular in Chinese and Japanese imperial courts. They may share an ancient ancestor with the Pekingese and the Japanese
Portrait of Queen Mary I and King Philip of England
 by Hans Eworth (1558)
Chin. At some point, they made their way to Europe and became prized as companion dogs. Johannes Caius mentioned toy spaniels in his book, Of English Dogges, which was published in 1574. Mary, Queen of Scots had at least one toy spaniel, and it’s said that her son, King James I, received a litter in 1613 as a gift from the Emperor of Japan.
  In England, this breed is known as the King Charles Spaniel, because both Charles I and Charles II were very fond of the little dog. Because they were popular with royalty, they were also popular with everyone else, and it wasn’t unusual to see one pictured with the family in a portrait painted by Gainsborough, Rubens, Rembrandt, or Van Dyck. After the death of Charles II and the ouster of his brother, James II, Charles’ niece Mary and her husband William ascended to England’s throne. They brought their own favorite dogs with them: Pugs. Some people bred the toy spaniels and the Pugs together, eventually changing the look of the breed. The body became wider, the face flatter, and the skull more domed.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the English Toy Spaniel as a member of the Toy Group in 1886. Today, the ET ranks 126th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Personality
  The sweet and lovable English Toy Spaniel is a true companion dog. He has an aristocratic bearing, but he's not a snob at all; picture instead a happy, devoted, quiet dog. He enjoys spending time with the people he loves and will fit himself into their lives. The ET requires little exercise and is happiest perched on his owner's knee. He does well with other dogs and cats if socialized to them and is gentle and loving to children although he's not best suited to living with them. He can become overwhelmed by excitement and can be shy and timid when he meets new people or is exposed to new situations.

Health
  The English Toy Spaniel, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is susceptible to major health conditions like patellar luxation, and minor issues like early tooth loss, and "lazy tongue," a condition which causes the tongue to protrude from the mouth. A veterinarian may recommend regular knee tests for the dog.
  Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), hydrocephalus, and fused toes are also seen in some English Toy Spaniels, as well as a soft spot in the dog's skull due to an incomplete fontanel closure. Some English Toy Spaniels react adversely to anesthesia.

Care
  Even though the English Toy Spaniel is not very active, it enjoys a fun indoor or outdoor game or a good on-leash walk. Hot weather does not suit it and, by nature, it cannot live outdoors, away from the comfort of its family. It has a long coat that requires combing twice a week.

Living Conditions
  They are good for apartment life, relatively inactive indoors, and will do okay without a yard if they are sufficiently exercised. English Toy Spaniels do not do well in temperature extremes.

Training
  English Toy Spaniels are pretty bright dogs. They have a strong desire to please their owners however; they have a short attention span. To keep this breed interested during training sessions, delectable treats are necessary. Charlies love tasty treats so this will keep him focused and be his reward for working hard during the session.
  This breed makes a wonderful therapy dog. Their small size and love for riding in the car make traveling to hospitals and nursing home facilities easy. Patients enjoy allowing this cute little dog to sit on their laps while stroking their soft coats. Everybody feels better with an English Toy Spaniel around!

Exercise Requirements
  English Toy Spaniels are not fans of exercise. They would much rather chill on the couch than to chase a ball in the yard. Although this breed does not require a lot of activity, he does need some exercise to stay healthy and fit. Regular walks are important, but the occasional brisk trot will be beneficial to the Charlie. He might not like it; but it is needed.
  This breed is easily enticed with tasty treats. Puzzle toys which hide a treat within tend to keep the English Toy Spaniel intrigued and active inside of the house. Those that have a fenced yard for the dog to play in will find that the Charlie’s playfulness will have him chasing balls and other toys around the yard. Though not the most energetic breed of dog, the English Toy Spaniel will happily spend time playing with kids. That is, until he becomes bored and needs a nap.

Grooming
  The English Toy Spaniel has a long, silky coat that is usually straight but can be slightly wavy. Despite his long coat, this is a wash-and-go dog. Comb him out weekly to prevent mats and tangles, especially those that form behind the ears, elbows, and back legs. A bath every two to four weeks will keep him smelling good, and it doesn’t hurt to wash his face daily — mainly to prevent him from doing it himself by rubbing it on your furniture.
  Otherwise, simply clean the ears, trim the toenails, and brush the teeth frequently. The latter is especially important with toy breeds, which are often prone to dental disease. Charlies often have fused toes, which are a normal characteristic of the breed and not something to be concerned about.

Children And Other Pets
  English Toy Spaniels can be loving toward children, but they can become overwhelmed by the noise and stimulation young children create. This can lead to biting if they are handled roughly. English Toy Spaniels do very well with other pets, especially if they are raised with them.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although the English Toy Spaniel enjoys engaging in play and walks, it is necessary that he lives indoors with his family. Good with school-aged children, the breed is completely content sitting on his owner's lap all day. In need of regular companionship, he will need to be with a family that is home and available to him constantly.

Did You Know?
  English Toy Spaniels used to have their tails docked, and some still do, but this practice is becoming less common. Tail docking is done at an early age, so if you want a puppy with a natural tail, let the breeder know before the pups are born.

Urban myth
Portrait of a King Charles Spaniel,
 by Jean-Baptiste Huet 1778
  An urban legend claims that Charles II issued a special decree granting King Charles Spaniels permission to enter any establishment in the UK,overriding "no dog except guide dogs" rules. A variant of this myth relates specifically to the Houses of Parliament. This myth is sometimes instead applied to the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.
  The UK Parliament website states: "Contrary to popular rumour, there is no Act of Parliament referring to King Charles spaniels being allowed anywhere in the Palace of Westminster. We are often asked this question and have thoroughly researched it." Similarly, there is no proof of any such law covering the wider UK. A spokesman for the Kennel Club said: "This law has been quoted from time to time. It is alleged in books that King Charles made this decree but our research hasn't tracked it down."

A dream day in the life of the English Toy Spaniel
  The English Toy Spaniel will be in no rush to wake up in the morning. Perfectly happy staying in bed with his family members, he will follow you to breakfast once you finally move from your comfort zone. Fill up his bowl to allow him to leisurely eat for the remainder of the day. Engage in a bit of play with his favorite toys, take him for a short walk and end the day with your English Toy Spaniel on your lap.

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