LUV My dogs: Shih Tzu

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Showing posts with label Shih Tzu. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Shih Tzu. Show all posts

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Everything about your Zuchon

Everything about your Zuchon
  No, that’s not a teddy bear – it’s a Zuchon! A non-shedding, designer dog breed, the Zuchon is a mix of Shih Tzu and Bichon Frise. This breed is also known by the names of Shichon and Teddy Bear Zuchon . No matter what you call it, this dog will melt your heart and make a wonderful addition to your family.
  Because he gets along with everyone, there isn’t a lifestyle this dog won’t fit into. They rarely bark, are hypo-allergenic, love kids and other animals and can be active or laid back. Boasting a happy disposition and a passion for playtime, the Zuchon will be a loving companion for many years to come. Please read on to learn more about this hybrid breed.

Overview
  The Zuchon is also known as a Shichon, teddy bear dog, or fuzzy wuzzy puppy. They reach an average height of 9-12 inches from the shoulder, and a weight of 8-25 pounds fully grown. 'Dog Breed Info' says the Zuchon is a dog "known for his endearing face, large expressive eyes, and his soft teddy-bear coat." The Zuchon usually has a longer coat that does not shed very much, if at all. This longer coat may lead to more time for maintenance and grooming. As hypoallergenic dogs, Zuchons are generally more suitable for homes with allergy problems amongst the inhabitants, although allergic reactions may still occur.
  This toy dog is said to have a "great" personality, and it is playful, lively and well-mannered. They can be a bit stubborn, but when they are trained well, they are a good family pet. They are easily trained. The Zuchon is a well-mannered dog known to be social, happy, and gentle. They become devoted to their families but need much attention and do not do well when left alone for long periods of time. They are good therapy dogs.   Sometimes the Zuchon may be stubborn and in need of training. The Zuchon will remain active. They make fairly good watch dogs. When necessary, this dog will bark to alert its family that someone is nearby. This breed is typically good with other pets, especially when socialized at an early age. This dog gets along well with children, but it may be a good idea to socialize this breed at an early age as well as to supervise play time with children to make sure that the dog does not get hurt as a result of its small size.

Breed standards
Group: Not Applicable
Average lifespan: 15-18 years
Average size: 40-55 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky, Smooth, and Soft
Coloration: Apricot, Black, Cream, Gray,Red,Silver,White
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Friendly, well mannered, affectionate, loving
Comparable Breeds: Shih Tzu, Bichon Frise

History
  Americans began breeding designer dogs in the 1990s. The Zuchon is a cross between an oriental Shih Tzu and a Mediterranean Bichon Frisé. Although this breed of dog is relatively new, its popularity and fame is growing quickly. The Zuchon is still not thought of as an official breed of dog, only a cross-breed. This may change as the dog is becoming a popular toy dog being classified with all other toy dog purebreds. Organizations that recognise this breed include the American Canine Hybrid Club and the Designer Dogs Kennel Club.

Temperament
  Sporting an excellent temperament, you’ll find that your pup is eager to please you. With a lively and spunky personality, Zuchons are known to be well-mannered, making them great with children of all ages and all kinds of animals. Intelligent and affectionate, your pooch is sociable, so be sure to take your pooch to the dog park and around town so he can socialize. Playing and hogging attention is high on their list of priorities, so make sure your dog gets plenty of both. But this breed isn’t all about just fun and games – he will also serve as a watchdog, letting you know when someone is at the door. And this is generally the only time when he will bark. Even though the Zuchon is small, it’s not a yappy dog.

Health
  An important feature with the Zuchon hybrid breed is its longevity. The average life-expectancy of a Zuchon is around 12–15 years. The Zuchon, like many hybrid breeds, is usually healthy without showing the congenital defects that purebreds can have from inbreeding. However, this is only true if the Zuchon is a first generation dog. When a multi-generation Zuchon is born, the possibility of health issues increases. Some possible defects known to designer dogs include canine hip dysplasia, deafness, epilepsy, and liver disease.

Training
 High trainability, they are known for their high intelligence and train-ability and are always eager to please their loved ones. They are very responsive to facial expressions and body language, and love nothing more than to spend time close to the people they love. 

Exercise Requirements
  The Zuchon loves to play, so most of his exercise requirements can be met with a game of catch or tug of war. That means he is the ideal roommate for people who live in apartments and condos. But he’ll still need fresh air and visits to the bathroom, so make sure he gets his daily walk and makes a few trips outdoors. A trip to the dog park will also help tire him out.
   This is an intuitive breed, so the Zuchon will match your energy level. Whether you want to get outside for a walk or want to relax on the couch, the Zuchon will be by your side, content to do whatever it is you want to do.

Grooming
  Very little grooming is needed if their hair is kept in a low maintenance "teddy bear cut” or "puppy cut" every 3 months. It best represents the Teddy Bear Zuchons look.  Regular combing is recommended it is great for bonding and mat prevention. Regular nail trims and eye trims are all that’s required between trims. As with all dogs regular teeth cleaning and removal of tarter is important for overall health.

Children And Other Pets
  Being so patient, cuddly and gentle in temperament they are excellent with children. They pay attention to children of all ages and love to interact, make eye contact and play with them creating uniquely special bonds with them to remember for a lifetime. Teddy Bear Zuchons are calm, gentle, lovable and cuddly, and because of this, they were originally bred as companions for handicapped children who needed a cuddly and squeezable dog that would gladly handle hours of snuggling without becoming irritated or nippy.
  They are excellent with other pets of various types. 

Is the Zuchon the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Moderately Easy Training: The Zuchon is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.


Hypoallergenic
  Their fur is hypoallergenic, meaning most individuals will not be allergic to them as they may be to other breeds, making them great companions for allergy sufferers. Their hair is easy to groom, and they love baths, gladly jumping in when they are asked to.
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Thursday, August 4, 2016

Which Small Dog Breed Is Right For Me?

Which Small Dog Breed Is Right For Me?
  Toy dogs, lapdogs and other tiny canines are incredibly popular as pets, as they can be comfortably housed in smaller apartments and homes and are of course, undeniably cute!
   If you’re thinking of getting a small dog because they’re cute, cuddly and quiet, you probably should think again; what they lack in stature, they often make up for in arrogance. Sure, small dogs are cute, and some of them look cuddly, but not all small dog breeds have meek personalities. Like people, small dog breeds come with different personalities, so before you pick up your small-framed dog, it’s a good idea to know exactly what you’re getting.
  Small dogs have been known to bite, in some cases more than larger dogs. Yet small dogs do have a certain advantage. For starters, they can go with you virtually anywhere. There are so many purse and bags out now in pet stores that you can literally take your dog with you everywhere you go.
  For the many city dwellers who still really want to share their lives with a canine companion, a small dog is the way to go.


1. Chihuahua
  • The Chihuahua comes in two varieties: long and smooth coat.
  • A graceful, alert, swift-moving compact little dog with saucy expression, and with terrier-like qualities of temperament.
  • Legend and history are rich in tales of the ancestors of the present Chihuahua. He is described as a popular pet, as well as a religious necessity.
  • Chihuahuas are tiny dogs that come in many different colors and markings, and can have either long or short coats, but they all have large, alert ears, big moist eyes, and huge personalities. Inside each little Chihuahua is a miniature king or queen ready to rule their realms, so they need to be taught what is acceptable in human kingdoms. They are intelligent and enthusiastic, so they usually don’t need extensive training.
  • More : Everything about your Chihuahua.

2. Yorkshire Terrier
  • The Yorkie became a fashionable pet in the late Victorian era.
  • That of a long-haired toy terrier whose blue and tan coat is parted on the face and from the base of the skull to the end of the tail and hangs evenly and quite straight down each side of body. The body is neat, compact and well proportioned. The dog's high head carriage and confident manner should give the appearance of vigor and self-importance.
  • The Yorkshire Terrier traces to the Waterside Terrier, a small longish-coated dog, bluish-gray in color, weighing between 6 and 20 pounds.
  • The Waterside Terrier was a breed formed by the crossing of the old rough-coated Black-and-Tan English Terrier  and the Paisley and Clydesdale Terriers. It was brought to Yorkshire by weavers who migrated from Scotland to England in the mid-19th century.They do not realize how small they are. Yorkies are easily adaptable to all surroundings, travel well and make suitable pets for many homes. Due to their small size, they require limited exercise, but need daily interaction with their people. Without strong leadership they tend to become bossy, especially if their owners allow them to get away with naughty behaviors - like yapping and pulling - that would never be acceptable in a larger dog.
  • More: Everything about your Yorkshire Terrier.

3. Papillon
  • The name Papillon means "Butterfly" in french.
  • The Papillon is a small, friendly, elegant toy dog of fine-boned structure, light, dainty and of lively action; distinguished from other breeds by its beautiful butterfly-like ears.
  • The dwarf spaniel of the 16th century, depicted in many paintings by the Masters of that era, is the dog that became known as the Papillon.
  • Although the Papillon owes its name and much of its breed development to the French, it was Spain and Italy that gave rise to its popularity.
  • Papillons are more robust than they look. They thrive in warm or cool climates, in the country or city, and are eager to join family fun. Papillons are athletic, fast, and versatile. They’re especially good in competitive agility trials, and are regular winners at the sport’s highest levels. For less ambitious owners, Papillons can be trained to do all kinds of tricks. Not particularly yappy for a small dog, requiring just routine grooming, and drop-dead adorable, Papillons are little dogs for all seasons and reasons.
  • More:  Everything about your Papillon.

4. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
  • The Cavalier was featured on the hit HBO series, "Sex and the City", as Charlotte York's dog.
  • The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is an active, graceful, well-balanced toy spaniel, very gay and free in action; fearless and sporting in character, yet at the same time gentle and affectionate. It is this typical gay temperament, combined with true elegance and royal appearance which are of paramount importance in the breed. Natural appearance with no trimming, sculpting or artificial alteration is essential to breed type.
  • Dogs of the small spaniel-type have existed for centuries and the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel has documented its place among them.
  • The breed is adaptable in their need for exercise, happy with either sleeping on the couch or taking long walks. The Cavalier does not demand more than a loving home…and a fenced yard. Cavaliers are not reliable to obey commands if they are too busy chasing butterflies or birds, so a good fence is a must. Well-behaved children are happy companions, but parent must be careful that the kids are not too rough on their small charges.
  • More : Everything about your Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.

5. Dachshund
  • The Dachshund was developed in Germany more than 300 years ago to hund badgers.
  • Low to ground, long in body and short of leg, with robust muscular development; the skin is elastic and pliable without excessive wrinkling. Appearing neither crippled, awkward, nor cramped in his capacity for movement, the Dachshund is well-balanced with bold and confident head carriage and intelligent, alert facial expression. His hunting spirit, good nose, loud tongue and distinctive build make him well-suited for below-ground work and for beating the bush. His keen nose gives him an advantage over most other breeds for trailing. 
  • The Dachshund can be found in historical accounts dating back to the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, when illustrations reflected badgers being hunted with dogs with elongated bodies, short legs and hound-type ears.
  • The dogs of medieval Europe were noted to have the tracking ability of hounds and the proportions and temperament of terriers, much needed to pursue their main quarry of badgers.
  • You should always choose a dog based on what he’s like, not what he looks like, and the Dachsie’s unique physical appeal easily becomes the focal point. Luckily, he is as much fun to live with as he is to look at. But because he was an eager hunter, he can be a bit stubborn and sometimes wonders why you’re not onboard with his plans. It’s hard to stay in a bad mood with a Dachsie around—his upbeat, curious, and friendly nature is contagious.
  • More: Everything about your Dachshund.

6. Havanese
  • The Havanese is the National Dog of Cuba and the country's only native breed.
  • The Havanese is a small, sturdy dog of immense charm. The native dog of Cuba, he is beloved as a friendly, intelligent and playful companion. He is slightly longer than tall, with a long, untrimmed, double coat. The Havanese has a short upper arm with moderate shoulder layback and a straight topline that rises slightly from the withers to the croup. The plumed tail is carried arched forward up over the back. The unique springy gait is a result of the breed's structure and playful, spirited personality. These characteristics of temperament, coat, structure and gait are essential to type.
  • The Havanese, new to the AKC, is an old breed with title to a colorful history. The Havanese is the National dog of Cuba and its only native breed. The dog's journey to Cuba most likely was aboard the trade ships sailing from the island of Tenerife chronicled in ship's logs of the early sixteenth century.
  • Cuban trade was highly restricted by the Spanish, for many years allowing Tenerife to be one of the only open ports, and it would appear these little dogs who had found their way into homes of Cuban aristocracy developed without much outside influence.
  • Basic obedience training will teach skills you will use on a daily basis. The time you spend in training, especially during the first year of your pet’s life, will be repaid by giving you a well-behaved companion that is bonded to you and your family for the rest of his life. Today Havanese are seen in many areas of dog activities and competitions that are sanctioned by the AKC. Havanese excel in all levels of competition in Obedience, Rally, Agility and Tracking as well as Conformation, and owners are enjoying the challenge. The Havanese are happy little athletes and loyal family companions. As therapy dogs Havanese bring smiles to faces in hospitals, nursing homes and libraries around the country. The Havanese is trainable and intelligent and possesses a naturally affectionate temperament, which making the breed an ideal family pet. Although a toy dog, they remain energetic and require some form of daily exercise.
  • More: Everything about your Havanese.

7. Maltese
  • The greeks erected tombs to their Maltese.
  • The Maltese is a toy dog covered from head to foot with a mantle of long, silky, white hair. He is gentle-mannered and affectionate, eager and sprightly in action, and, despite his size, possessed of the vigor needed for the satisfactory companion. Size: Weight under 7 pounds, with from 4 to 6 pounds preferred. Overall quality is to be favored over size.
  • The Maltese, the ancient dog of Malta, has been known as an aristocrat of the canine world for more than 28 centuries. Their place in antiquity is well documented.
  • The Greeks erected tombs to their Maltese, and from the ceramic art dating to the 5th century innumerable paintings of the little dog are evident.
  • These living artifacts from antiquity can charm the most jaded modern sensibility. Like the little aristocrats they are, Maltese love sitting in the lap of luxury. But they’re also feisty watchdogs and game agility competitors. Maltese are low-shedding, long-lived, and happy to make new friends of all ages. Sometimes stubborn and determined, they respond well to rewards-based training. Many pet owners trim Maltese in a “puppy clip” to reduce grooming time. Happily, the dog beneath the ’do is irresistibly cute. 
  • More : Everything about your Maltese.

8. Pekingese
  • Introduction of the Pekingese into the western World occurred as a result of looting of the Imperial Palace at Peking by the British in 1860.
  • The Pekingese is a well-balanced, compact dog of Chinese origin with a heavy front and lighter hindquarters. Its temperament is one of directness, independence and individuality. Its image is lionlike, implying courage, dignity, boldness and self-esteem rather than daintiness or delicacy.
  • The legend of the lion that fell in love with a marmoset is at the foundation of Pekingese lore. In order for him to be wedded to his lady-love, the lion begged the patron saint of the animals, Ah Chu, to reduce him to the size of a pigmy, but to let him retain his great lion heart and character.
  • The offspring of this union are said to be the dog of Fu Lin, or the Lion Dog of China.
  • An untrained dog, regardless of its size or its breed, can be a problem to its owner and to society in general. However if you get a puppy from a responsible breeder, you have a greater assurance that training and socialization began from the puppy’s early stages of awareness. Training should begin as early as possible and continue as the puppy grows into adulthood. Always reward your Pekingese with praise and encouragement when it has responded to a command, remembering that good habits are built upon positive reinforcement. It is advisable to take your puppy to training class as well as to public places to get it used to noises, different people and situations. Always be patient and convey to your puppy confidence, nonchalance and good manners, and it will adapt to your attitudes and make a well mannered pet throughout its life. Pekingese possess a regal dignity, intelligence and self-importance, making them good natured, opinionated and affectionate family companions. Their small size makes them a good choice for apartment life, but they are sometimes difficult to housebreak. They are relatively inactive indoors and do not need a yard, but enjoy walks.
  • More: Everything about your Pekingese.

9. Pomeranian
  • He Pomeranian is a member of the family of dogs knows unofficially as the "Spitz Group".
  • The Pomeranian is a compact, short-backed, active toy dog of Nordic descent. The double coat consists of a short dense undercoat with a profuse harsh-textured longer outer coat. The heavily plumed tail is one of the characteristics of the breed. It is set high and lies flat on the back. He is alert in character, exhibits intelligence in expression, is buoyant in deportment, and is inquisitive by nature. The Pomeranian is cocky, commanding, and animated as he gaits. He is sound in composition and action.
  • The Pomeranian descended from the Spitz family of dogs, the sled dogs of Iceland and Lapland.
  • The breed takes its name from the historical region of Pomerania that makes up the southern coast of the Baltic sea (now present day Germany and Poland), not because it originated there, but because this was most likely where it was bred down to size.
  • Because of their outgoing temperaments, they can be very good family dogs with the right training. ​Spritely and intelligent, Pomeranians are easily trained and make for great family pets. Poms are active, but can be thoroughly exercised with indoor play and short walks, so they’re happy both in the city and the suburbs. They will do well in certain dog sports, like agility and tracking, but at the end of the day, they’ll take comfort in curling up on your lap.
  • More : Everything about your Pomeranian.

10. Pug
  • The Pug is one of the oldest breed of dog; has flourished since before 400 BC.
  • Symmetry and general appearance are decidedly square and cobby. A lean, leggy Pug and a dog with short legs and a long body are equally objectionable.
  • The truth of how the Pug came into existence is shrouded in mystery, but he has been true to his breed down through the ages since before 400 B.C. Authorities agree that he is of Oriental origin with some basic similarities to the Pekingese.
  • China is the earliest known source for the breed, where he was the pet of the Buddhist monasteries in Tibet. The breed next appeared in Japan and then in Europe, where it became the favorite for various royal courts.
  • Basic obedience training is a must for all dogs. Learning a simple “stay,” “sit,” or “come” may save your dog’s life. Many kennel clubs provide obedience classes. You and your dog will enjoy them. Many Pugs compete in AKC obedience trials, dog shows, and agility trials. The Pug’s reason for living is to be near their people and to please them, and their sturdiness makes them a family favorite. They are comfortable in small apartments because they need minimal exercise, but the breed can adapt easily to all situations.
  • More: Everything about your Pug.

11. Shih Tzu

  • The Legend of the Shih Tzu has come to us from documents, paintings, and objects d'art dating from AD 624.
  • The Shih Tzu is a sturdy, lively, alert toy dog with long flowing double coat. Befitting his noble Chinese ancestry as a highly valued, prized companion and palace pet, the Shih Tzu is proud of bearing, has a distinctively arrogant carriage with head well up and tail curved over the back. Although there has always been considerable size variation, the Shih Tzu must be compact, solid, carrying good weight and substance. Even though a toy dog, the Shih Tzu must be subject to the same requirements of soundness and structure prescribed for all breeds, and any deviation from the ideal described in the standard should be penalized to the extent of the deviation.
  • The exact date of origin of the Shih Tzu is not known, but evidence of its existence has come to us from documents, paintings and objets d'art dating from A. D. 624. During the Tang Dynasty (618 to 907 A.D.), the King of Viqur gave the Chinese court a pair of dogs said to have come from the Fu Lin (assumed to be the Byzantine Empire).
  • Another theory of their introduction to China was recorded in the mid-17th century when dogs were brought from Tibet to the Chinese court. These dogs were bred in the Forbidden City of Peking.
  • Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your pet. Their strong fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.
  • More : Everything about your Shih Tzu.

12. Poodle
  • The denominations standard, miniature, and toy are used tot describe size only. All the Poodles are one breed, governed by the same standard.
  • That of a very active, intelligent and elegant-appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly. Properly clipped in the traditional fashion and carefully groomed, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself.
  • The Poodle is supposed to have originated in Germany, where it is known as the Pudel or Canis Familiaris Aquatius.
  • However, for years it has been regarded as the national dog of France, where is was commonly used as a retriever as well as, the Caniche, which is derived from chien canard or duck dog. Doubtless the English word "poodle" comes from the German pudel or pudelin, meaning to splash in the water.
  • There’s the old stereotype of Poodles as a foofy velvet-pillow dogs looking down their long noses at us. Not true. Poodles are eager-to-please, highly trainable “real dogs.” They like to work closely with their humans and can master all kinds of tricks and dog sports. The Standard, with his greater size and strength, is the best athlete of the Poodle family, but all Poodles can be trained with great success. The Miniature can be shy around strangers; the Standard tends to be more outgoing.
  • More : Everything about your Poodle.

   Small dogs come from a variety of AKC groups, so there is a perfect breed for every lover of little dogs with regards to personality, activity level and coat type. Keep in mind, small dogs are not just lapdogs – many of them are tough as nails. Smaller dogs don’t necessarily need to work off loads of energy, so they are quite suitable for apartment life. But not all small dogs live to be lap warmers! Certain breeds like Dachshunds or small terriers would also love country life and the opportunity to run around on a farm. If your family includes very young children, ensure that your small dog has a space to get away from the kids, or reconsider your choice of breed. Many Toy breeds are too delicate to compete with a boisterous family of young children and need to live in a quieter environment.
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Saturday, November 15, 2014

Everything about your Shih Tzu

Everything about your Shih Tzu
  Shih Tzu are lively and energetic companions. Yet, they are also amazingly low-key and satisfied—assuming they get an adequate amount of attention. They like nothing better than to be held, stroked, petted and pampered by their owners, and are perfectly happy sitting on the couch with you for hours while you dote on them. This is a noble breed—sometimes translating into arrogance and haughtiness, other times into courageousness and politeness—but they are never too proud for a roll on the floor with a treasured squeaky toy.

Overview
  Compact, yet slightly longer than it is tall, the Shih Tzu hides a sturdy body beneath its mantle of luxurious hair. It has a smooth, effortless stride with good reach and drive. Even though its function is that of companion, it should nonetheless be structurally sound. Its expression is warm, sweet and wide-eyed, imparting the impression of trust and friendliness. The long, dense coat is double and fairly straight. 
  The spunky but sweet Shih Tzu is both a gentle lap dog and a vivacious companion. It has an upbeat attitude and loves to play and romp. It is affectionate to its family and good with children. It is surprisingly tough and does have a stubborn streak.


Highlights
  • There is no such breed as an "imperial" or "teacup" Shih Tzu. These are simply marketing terms used by unscrupulous breeders use to indicate a very small or large Shih Tzu.
  • Shih Tzus are difficult to housebreak. Be consistent, and do not allow a puppy to roam the house unsupervised until he is completely trained. Crate training is helpful.
  • The flat shape of the Shih Tzu's face makes him susceptible to heat stroke, because the air going into the lungs isn't cooled as efficiently as it is among longer-nosed breeds. He should be kept indoors in air-conditioning rooms during hot weather.
  • Be prepared to brush and comb the Shih Tzu coat every day. It mats easily.
  • While Shih Tzus are trustworthy with children, they're not the best choice for families with toddlers or very young children because their small size puts them at risk for unintentional injury.
  • The Shih Tzu tends to wheeze and snore, and can be prone to dental problems.
  • While all dogs eat their own or other animals' feces (coprophagia), the Shih Tzu seems especially prone to this behavior. The best way to handle the problem is never let it become a habit. Watch your Shih Tzu closely and clean up poop right away.
  • To get a healthy pet, never buy a puppy from a backyard breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Find a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs for genetic health conditions and good temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Shih Tzus are often called chrysanthemum dogs because of the way their hair grows up from the nose and around the face in all directions.
  • The Shih Tzu may have originated in Tibet, bred by Tibetan lamas to be a tiny replica of a lion, which is associated with Buddhist mythology.
  • The Shih Tzu is prized for his small size, sweet nature, flowing coat, and intelligent mind.
  • The name is pronounced SHEED-zoo.
  • Comparable Breeds: Lhasa Apso, Pekingese
History
  DNA analysis placed the ancestors of today's Shih Tzu breed in the group of "ancient" breeds indicating "close genetic relationship to wolves". Another branch coming down from the "Kitchen Midden Dog" gave rise to the Papillon and Long-haired Chihuahua and yet another "Kitchen Midden Dog" branch to the Pug and Shih Tzu.
  It is also said that the breed originated in China, hence the name "Lion Dog", in 800BC. There are various theories of the origins of today's breed. Theories relate that it stemmed from a cross between Pekingese and a Tibetan dog called the Lhasa Apso. Dogs during ancient times were selectively bred and seen in Chinese paintings. The dogs were favorites of the Chinese royals and were so prized that for years the Chinese refused to sell, trade, or give away any of the dogs. The first dogs of the breed were imported into Europe (England and Norway) in 1930, and were classified by the Kennel Club as "Apsos". The first European standard for the breed was written in England in 1935 by the Shih Tzu Club, and the dogs were recategorised as Shih Tzu. The breed spread throughout Europe, and was brought to the United States after World War II, when returning members of the US military brought back dogs from Europe, in the mid 1950s. The Shih Tzu was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1969 in the Toy Group.
  The breed is now recognized by all of the major kennel clubs in the English-speaking world. It is also recognised by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale for international competition in Companion and Toy Dog Group, Section 5, Tibetan breeds. In the United States, the Shih Tzu ranked the 15th most popular breed in 2013, falling slightly in popularity since 2012, when it was placed in 11th position.



Temperament
  The Shih Tzu is an alert, lively, little dog. It is happy and hardy, and packed with character. The gentle, loyal Shih Tzu makes friends easily and responds well to consistent, patient training. It makes a very alert watchdog. It is courageous and clever.
  Playful and spunky, this affectionate little dog likes to be with people and is generally good with other pets. Some can be difficult to housebreak. The Shih Tzu needs all of the humans in the house to be pack leaders, with the rules of the house made consistently clear.   Owners who allow their dogs to take over may find them to be snappish if they are surprised or peeved. Because of this dog’s small size and its adorable face, it commonly develops Small Dog Syndrome, human induced behaviors where the dog believes he is the boss of humans. This causes a varying degree of behavioral issues, such as, but not limited to separation anxiety, guarding, growling, snapping, and even biting. These dogs may become untrustworthy with children and sometimes adults, as they try and tell the humans what THEY want THEM to do. They will be obstinate as they take their stand and defend their top position in the pack. They may bark obsessively as they try and TELL you what they want. These behaviors are NOT Shih Tzu traits, but rather behaviors brought on by the way they are treated by people around them. Give this dog rules and limits as to what it is and is not allowed to do. Be its firm, stable, consistent pack leader. Take it for daily pack walks to burn mental and physical energy. Its temperament will improve for the better, and you will bring out the sweet, trustworthy dog in it.

Health
  The Shih Tzu has a lifespan of 11 to 16 years. Some of the minor diseases that can affect this breed are renal dysplasia (abnormal growth of tissue), trichiasis (eyelash malformation), entropion, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), otitis externa, patellar luxation, and inguinal (groin) hernia, as well as a major concern like canine hip dysplasia (CHD). This breed is also prone to cataract and dental problems. Eye, hip, and DNA tests can be good for preventive health care, or for management of non-preventive conditions.

Care
  The Shih Tzu doesn't really mind where he lives, as long as he's with you. He's a very adaptable dog who can be comfortable in a small city apartment or a large suburban or country home. He is definitely a housedog and should not be kenneled outside, though he enjoys a bit of backyard play.
  The Shih Tzu is content with short walks each day. He is not an extremely active dog; he's content to sit in your lap, wander around the house, play with his toys, or run to the door to  greet visitors.
  Like other breeds with short faces, the Shih Tzu is sensitive to heat. He should remain indoors in an air-conditioned room (or one with fans) on hot days so he doesn't suffer from heat exhaustion.
  No, the breed cannot fly; but owners commonly report that their Shih Tzu thinks he can. It not unusual for a Shih Tzu to fearlessly jump from a bed or a chair. While they may not seem high to you, these heights are towering to the small Shih Tzu. And, unfortunately, these jumps often end in injury. The breed is front heavy and crashes forward, causing injury or even a concussion to the head. Be very careful when carrying your Shih Tzu. Hold him securely and don't let him jump out of your arms or off furniture.
Even though he's naturally docile and friendly, the Shih Tzu needs early socialization and training. Like any dog, he can become timid if he is not properly socialized when young. Early socialization helps ensure that your Shih Tzu puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Shih Tzus are often considered difficult to housebreak. Most important is to avoid giving your puppy opportunities to have accidents inside — you don't want him to become accustomed to using the carpet. (Some Shih Tzu owners teach their dogs to use a doggie litter box so they don't need to walk them in bad weather or rush home to take them out.) A Shih Tzu puppy should be carefully supervised inside the house until he has not eliminated indoors for at least four to eight weeks. Crate training is helpful for housetraining and provides your dog with a quiet place to relax. A crate is also useful when you board your Shih Tzu or travel.

Living Conditions
  The Shih Tzu is good for apartment life. These dogs are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard. This breed is sensitive to the heat.

Exercise
  The Shih Tzu needs a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of its exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill its primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard. Do not overfeed this breed or it will quickly become fat.

Grooming
  These little dogs require a good daily grooming using a bristle brush. When kept in a long coat a topknot is usually tied to keep the hair out of the dog's eyes. Some owners prefer to have them trimmed to make the coat easier and less time-consuming to care for. Keep the ear passages and area around the eyes clean. Shih Tzus have sensitive eyes that need to be kept clean. There are special drops you can buy to put in them if needed. Ask your vet what to use on your dog. This breed sheds little to no hair and is good for allergy sufferers if its coat is kept very well groomed, due to the fact that they shed little skin dander.

Children and other pets
  The Shih Tzu is a wonderful family pet. He gets along with other dogs or animals, and his docile personality makes him a good companion for children. Kids should sit on the floor to play with a Shih Tzu puppy, however, so there is no risk of carrying and dropping him. Children should also learn to keep their fingers away from the Shih Tzu's prominent eyes, which can be easily injured.

Did You Know?
One of the more ancient breeds in existence, Shih Tzus are believed to have been bred by Tibetan lamas to be a tiny replica of a lion, which is associated with Buddhist mythology.
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Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Reasons Why Shih Tzu Become Violent

Reasons Why Shih Tzu  Become Violent
  Dog aggression is a major dog problem for owners. I want to help you understand the causes of dog aggression, so you can overcome this dog problem. Dog aggression stems from the dog's frustration and dominance. The dog's frustration comes from a lack of dog exercise, and the dog's dominance comes from a lack of calm-assertive leadership.

  Shih Tzu are small cute dogs that don't look like they could harm a fly. This then means that many of us make the mistake of thinking that they can get away with being aggressive and that we don't need to train it out of them.
  However this is a big mistake and while your Shih Tzu might not be a threat to your health, it is nevertheless still important to make sure that they aren't aggressive and that they recognise you as in charge. For one this is important because while you may not be afraid of a little bad pup, your visitors and other people might and this can be very upsetting for them if they have to deal with a dog that is constantly growling at them. At the same time if they are aggressive to other dogs they might well get themselves into a fight that they can't win – so it's important for their safety too. And anyway it is simply not pleasant to have a little dog who you love growling at you every time you move – you're supposed to be friends.
  Aggressive Shih Tzu behavior specially when it is a family dog should be resolved quickly or it may lead to danger and scare not just people in your family but also visitors and others who are around you. This aggressive behavior is a condition that might have developed since it was a puppy, like being attacked by another dog or it might not like the feeling of being dominated by a master.


Reasons behind Aggressive Behavior in Dogs- The delicate age for a Shih Tzu behavior development is at the 6th week. Whatever the environment gives makes it significant like socializing with other dogs and training to ensure they are people-friendly. You can easily apply this to a dog until it is 14 weeks old or can extend longer as you deem necessary.


How Does a Dog Become Aggressive?
  So the question is, how did your Shih Tzu get to be aggressive in the first place? Well there are a couple of ways. Firstly aggression can sometimes gradually occur as your dog grows up through play. If you dog bites and mouths you and you don't ever teach it to stop, then this biting can increase to the point where it is drawing blood and leaving teeth marks and it is then somewhat too late to stop it. 
  At the same time you might find that your dog is aggressive because it believes itself to be the leader of the pack or the 'alpha male'. Dogs are descended from wolves and they are pack animals as a result. Thus your dog will conclude that it's in charge if you pander to its every need and will use aggression to keep you in line. Lastly, sometimes aggression can be learned, and if you are very aggressive towards your dog, and to each other, your dog might simply learn the behaviour and might act out because it's unhappy.

What you should do to bring up a non-aggressive Shih Tzu are:

1. Let the Shih Tzu puppy on it's own with its litters until 2 months old. Do not use violent practice to a puppy aged between 8 and 10 weeks but alternatively address it tenderly. Talk to it softly and avoid hurting it physically if you would like grow a dog without aggressive Shih Tzu habits.
2. The Shih Tzu have to understand how to get along with other dogs (many dogs that are highly sociable can get along well together with other pets like cats, birds, horses, etc.) and more importantly with people. At the age of 14 weeks, if your puppy had been taught how to socialize you've great probability of an aggressive Shih Tzu.
3. Provide a conducive and wholesome setting whenbreeding up a puppy, totally free of mean masters, appropriate and enough living conditions with socialization, and protect it from attack by not just other dogs but in addition other animals.
4. Aggression is also seen as a hereditary and genetics affect.meaning that naturally some breed of dogs are aggressive but some are friendly. But it does not follow that a naturally aggressive breed can't be nurtured to lose its aggressive behavior.
5. A dog that would like to establish dominance over a territory displays aggression. Your shih tzu should learn that you're the master of the house at a very early age.


Reward Your Dog
  But the rest of your time should be spent petting your dog and rewarding it for all its good behaviour. Make sure you pay it attention and stroke it as often as possible. This will make your dog feel happy and loved and as a general rule a happy dog is a well behaved dog.

What to Do If a Shih Tzu Shows Aggressive Behavior

  A dog actually reaches sexual maturity at age of 14 months. If it shows signs of aggression during this period, take best suited actions straight away. At the moment the Shih Tzu puppy must have understood it that you are the master. It should not get any reward after expressing aggression out of being fearful. That will teach the dog a lesson.
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