LUV My dogs: Scotland

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Showing posts with label Scotland. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Scotland. Show all posts

Monday, February 26, 2018

Everything about your Collie

Everything about your Collie
  The Collie, also known as the Scottish Collie or the Scotch Collie, is perhaps most famous due to the television series about “Lassie.” There are two varieties of Collie: rough-coated, which is the recognizable long-haired Collie, and smooth-coated, which is becoming increasingly popular. Famous for their loyalty, bravery and kind spirit, the Collie is one of the most glamorous and well-known of all dog breeds. Its name is thought to come from the name of the Scottish black-faced sheep called “Colleys” – the animal that this breed was assigned to watch. 
  The Collie was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1885, one year after the AKC was established. The Collie Club of America was formed in 1886 and was the second parent club to join the AKC.

Overview
   While the breed certainly has qualities that bolster that impression, it’s a disservice to any dog to load him up with baggage that he can’t possibly carry. The Collie is gentle, affectionate and sensitive, but Collie puppies don’t come fully trained and ready to rescue Timmy from the well.
  There are two types of Collies. The most common is the Rough Collie, the classic Lassie, with a long coat. The Smooth Collie sports a short, dense and flat coat that has a lot of undercoat.  In the show ring they are considered the same breed and are judged by the same standard.
  Collies love children, love playing with them, and bond closely with all family members. They are not a one-person dog and are protective of everyone in the family. Collies think of everyone as their friend. They are an excellent choice as a family dog and get along with other pets. Be aware that their herding heritage may cause them to nip at heels, which can frighten some children. The Collie will also herd your neighbor's chickens, the neighborhood kids, and other dogs and cats.

Highlights
  • The Collie is usually quiet unless she has a reason to bark. However, if she is left alone too often or if she is bored, she will bark excessively.
  • Both varieties need grooming, but the Rough Collie especially needs regular brushing to keep her coat clean and free of tangles.
  • Many Collies are sensitive to medications including ivermectin, the drug used in heartworm preventives. Be sure to talk with your veterinarian before giving your Collie a heartworm preventive or any other drug.
  • Be careful from whom you acquire a Collie. The Collie's popularity has given rise to unethical breeders acting with no regard for temperament, health, or conformation.
  • Collies are sensitive and can become depressed if spoken to harshly.
  • Collies don’t have a “doggie odor” as long as they are brushed regularly. 
Breed standards

AKC group: Herding

UKC group: Herding dog

Average lifespan: 14 - 16 years
Average size: 50 - 75 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, thick, dense
Coloration: Sable, tricolor, white and blue merle
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Large and lean, chiseled face, ears never pricked or sticking straight up and always have a folded tip.
Possible alterations: Some Collies have a smooth coat verses the common rough coat.
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, farms/rural areas
Comparable Breeds: Border Collie, Shetland Sheepdog

History of Collies
  The ancestors of today’s Collies worked as herding dogs in the Scottish highlands, driving cattle and sheep to the market. They may take their name from a Scottish breed of black-faced sheep called the Colley. Not much is known about their origins, shepherds being more interested in working ability than in keeping pedigrees or studbooks.
  The Collie might have remained a humble, little-known herding dog, but fate had a different plan. Queen Victoria, who frequently vacationed in Scotland at Balmoral Castle, fell in love with Collies in the 1860s. Royal patronage caused a demand for the breed. They went from being the helpmeets of humble shepherds to the cherished companions of the wealthy. By 1877, Collies were being exhibited at the Westminster Kennel Club show, and they again were taken up by wealthy dog lovers, including J. P. Morgan. In 1886, two years after the American Kennel Club was created, the Collie Club of America became the second parent club to join the AKC.
  The Collie has been a main character, and appeared as a perfect family dog, in such books as Albert Payson Terhune's "Lad of Sunnybank" and Eric Knight's “Lassie Come Home." The Collie’s popularity leapt to its greatest heights during the nearly two-decade run of the television show “Lassie,” which aired from 1954 to 1973. The series captured the fancy of the American public, and the Rough Collie because widely known and loved.
  Today, the Collie ranks 38th among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club.



Personality

  Just about anyone who has been around since the advent of television knows who Lassie is. She is the loyal, intelligent, fearless star of TV and movies and we've been following her adventures for the last sixty years. Lassie is an excellent ambassador for the entire Collie breed, as they are just as intelligent and loyal as the silver screen portrays. Collies are fantastic family dogs, they love to be with people and are highly patient and loving with children.



Health Problems
  The Collie has a few health concerns you should be aware of. Collies are prone to eye ailments such as Progressive Retinal Atrophy. This means it’s important to keep regular appointments with the vet for eye checkups, so that problems can be identified before they become too serious. This breed can also be affected by Neutropenia , gastric torsion, hip dysplasia , dermatomyositis  and arthritis. Like all breeds, Collies can be susceptible to disease because of trauma, infections, and abnormalities of the immune system, genetic influences or degenerative conditions.

Care
  The Collie lives comfortably in the city or the country, as long as she has enough exercise. A brisk, daily walk and yard play are sufficient. Mostly, she wants to be with her family, meaning she is not a candidate for a backyard lifestyle.
  If left alone for too long, she tends to bark excessively. While some barking is normal in this herding breed — that's how she warned the shepherd of wolves — she will bark her head off when she's bored, lonely, or otherwise frustrated. Excessive barking can be avoided by letting the Collie join in all family activities, and by keeping her mentally challenged with ongoing obedience training or dog sports.
  Training the Collie is a breeze, but — like any dog — she needs early socialization to prevent her from becoming timid. She also benefits from obedience training; a "Quiet" command should be a part of every Collie's training program.

Living Conditions
  The Collie will dog okay in an apartment as long as it is sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with at least an average-sized yard. Sensitive to the heat. Provide plenty of shade and fresh water in warm weather.

Trainability
  Collies are easy to train, though sometimes they can be stubborn. They should always be treated gently, with positive reinforcement and treats. Collies are sensitive animals, and when treated harshly they can become timid and skittish. After mastering basic obedience, Collies should be allowed to move on to more advanced training or participate in agility activities.
  Collies are highly intelligent and have been used as service dogs, guard dogs and search and rescue dogs.

Exercise Requirements
  To maintain its strong and lean physique, Collies need a lot of exercise. To keep your dog in peak physical and mental condition, be sure to play, take your dog for long walks and give it plenty of activity every day.

Grooming Needs
  Rough Collies will need to be brushed at least twice a week to maintain the proper texture and appearance of the coat. Smooth Collies, however, only need to be brushed once per week to remove loose and dead hair. They require a bath every six to eight weeks, and most owners prefer to hire a groomer to do this, as the thick hair of the Rough Collie can be challenging to handle. New owners may wish to consult a groomer or breeder for instruction on brushing and bathing.
  In addition to brushing and bathing, ear cleaning and teeth cleaning should be part of a Collie's grooming regimen. Check ears weekly for signs of infection or irritation, and use only a veterinarian-approved cleanser on the ears. Regular brushing of the teeth prevents bad breath and tartar buildup which can lead to gum disease and tooth loss.



Children And Other Pets
  The playful Collie is known for her love of children, even those she wasn't raised with. She's highly protective of the kids in her family, watching over them and keeping them safe from danger, just like Lassie did for Timmy.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Collie is also protective of and gentle with other pets in her family. She's an affectionate, tender guardian, willing to watch over baby rabbits, chicks, or goats.

Is the Collie the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Constant and Seasonal Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Easy Training: The Collie is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
  These dogs love and live for a working lifestyle. Whether it is mental or physical stimulation, the Collie needs to keep occupied. A family that has time to dedicate to proper exercise and training would be best fit for a loving Collie. Due to its complex double coat, daily grooming is a must to prevent discomfort and tangles, as well as ease the amount of constant shedding. Collies love kids and make excellent guard dogs; however, as natural-born herders, they may develop tendencies to herd younger family members and should therefore be socialized early on.

Did You Know?
  The TV show “Lassie” made the Collie - and the phrase “Timmy fell into the well!”-famous. Lassie rescued Timmy from falls into mine shafts, rivers and quicksand. However, during the show’s 19 year run, Timmy never once fell into a well.

Tommy Rettig with Lassie Junior,
 son of Pal, the first Lassie,
in the Lassie television series
Famous collies
  • Silverton Bobbie, the Wonder Dog who in 1923, traveled 2,800 miles from Indiana back home to Silverton, Oregon.
  • Blanco, pet of Lyndon Johnson
  • Reveille, a Rough Collie, official mascot of Texas A&M University
  • Lad, pet of Albert Payson Terhune. He is chronicled through several short stories, most famously in the collection Lad, A Dog.
  • Shep, Blue Peter dog
  • Lassie was a fictional Rough Collie dog character created by Eric Knight who originally was featured in a short story expanded to novel length called Lassie Come-Home. The character then went on to star in numerous MGM movies, a long running classic TV series, and various remakes/spinoffs/revivals.
  • Pal, who played Lassie.
  • Bessy, a long-running Belgian comics series which also was very successful in French, German and Swedish translations. It also featured a collie, obviously based on Lassie, but in a Wild West setting.
  • Fly and Rex, herding dogs of the movie, Babe.
  • Colleen, a female collie in Road Rovers.
  • Shadow, collie from Enid Blyton's book Shadow the Sheepdog. The collie type is not identified in the text, but the illustrations in an early edition look vaguely like a border collie.
  • Fly, the sheep dog featured in Arthur Waterhouse's "Fells" trilogy for children, Raiders of the Fells (1948), Rogues of the Fells (1951), and Fly of the Fells (1957). The collie type is not specified, but the illustrations look rather like a rough collie.
A dream day in the life:
  Helping, guarding or just hanging out makes a perfect day for the social Collie. An off-leash run in the great outdoors or on leash by your side would exert the energy this pup needs to let out on a daily basis. Collies love the challenge of learning new tricks and have the brains to handle even advanced levels of training. Easygoing and carefree, Collies are happy in just about any climate as long as they have work to do 
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Saturday, November 25, 2017

Everything about your Gordon Setter

Everything about your Gordon Setter
  Originally deployed in Scotland to retrieve hunted birds that had fallen to the ground, the Gordon Setter’s strong hunter’s instinct, skill with scents, and general companion qualities have made it a very popular breed indeed, as well as an enduring one. Having been officially recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1884, it is far ahead of many modern breeds that could be considered more popular. Today, a Gordon Setter is known as an excellent, loyal, and obedient breed that looks great with a properly-groomed coat but is also an ideal exercise partner and friend in the outdoors.

Overview
  This Scottish breed has been established since the 17th century and takes his name from Gordon Castle, where he was developed by the fourth Duke of Gordon. Dressed in sophisticated black and tan, the Gordon Setter is the heaviest and most muscular of the three Setter breeds. In the field, his job is to find and point gamebirds, working at a slow, methodical pace. Hunters appreciate his intelligence and scenting ability, but his good qualities aren’t limited to the field. enjoys participating in dog sports such as agility, obedience, rally, and tracking.
  The gentle and protective Gordon can be a good choice for families with children. He’s tolerant toward toddlers and energetic enough to play catch for hours on end. He also gets along well with other pets such as cats if he’s raised with them. Gordon Setters are alert and will bark to let you know that someone is approaching. They are reserved toward strangers, preferring to save their affection for their families.
  The Gordon is smart and easy to train with positive reinforcement techniques. Be patient and gentle, and he’ll respond eagerly. He’s not necessarily a barker, but he is vocal, expressing himself with mumbling and grumbling to tell you about his day, what he thinks of his meals, and when it’s a good time to take him for a walk.
  Last but not least, it should go without saying that a people-loving dog like the Gordon Setter needs to live in the house. He'll grow despondent relegated to the backyard with little or no human interaction.

Highlights
  • Adult Gordon Setters require one to two hours of daily exercise. This can be a game of fetch in a field or backyard, a run, or a couple of long walks.
  • Being an intelligent, hardworking breed, the Gordon Setter can become destructive if his needs for exercise and mental stimulation are not met. Boredom and extra energy are not a great mix to have, and the best way to avoid any destructiveness is through proper exercise and training.
  • Gordon Setters are not backyard dogs. They are much happier when they are with their families and should not live away from them. They enjoy personal attention and family activities.
  • Strong temperaments are well known in the breed and many owners have the feeling that they are "owned" and not owner. Gordons are independent and determined, qualities that can translate to stubbornness to some.
  • Gordon Setters can suffer from separation anxiety and may become destructive when they do.
  • Although Gordon Setters are known for their stubbornness, they can be sensitive and easily cowed with abuse and neglect. Never treat your dog harshly but instead give him firm, fair, consistent training without the use of anger or physical force. If Gordon Setters aren't trained they may become destructive, wilful, and dominant.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Gordon is the largest of the three setter breeds.
  • The Gordon dresses to the nines in a silky black coat with rich mahogany markings and feathering on the legs and tail.
  • The Gordon is an uncommon breed. You may have a wait of a year or more before a puppy is available.

Breed standards

AKC group: Sporting
UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 45-80 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, Silky, and Thick
Coloration: black and tan coat, with the tan markings being a rich chestnut or mahogany 
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Devoted, gentle, affectionate, enthusiastic
Comparable Breeds: Golden Retriever, Irish Setter

History
From a painting - Gordons Working
  Black and tan setting dogs were known in Scotland as early as 1620, but it was their presence in the kennels of the fourth Duke of Gordon 200 years later that brought them to prominence. The Castle Gordon Setters had first-class hunting skills and were beautiful as well.
  The early Gordons also came in black and white, tricolor, and red, but the Duke was said to favor the dogs with black and tan coloring, and that's what has prevailed over the years. When the Duke died in 1827, his heir, the Duke of Richmond, carried on his kennels.
  Between 1859 and 1874, England's Kennel Club listed 126 Black and Tan setters in its studbook. In June of 1859, at the first official dog show, a Black and Tan Setter by the name of Dandie, took first prize for setters, who could trace his pedigree back to the kennels of the Duke of Gordon. The breed officially took the name Gordon Setter in 1924.
  The first Gordon Setters imported into the United States came from the kennel at Gordon Castle. The dogs, Rake and Rachel, were purchased by Daniel Webster and George Blunt in 1842. They were the foundation of the breed in the United States.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the Gordon Setter in 1892, and the Gordon Setter Club of America, Inc., was formed in 1924. The club is still in existence today and boasts a membership of more than 1,000. Today the Gordon Setter ranks 88th among the 155 breeds and varieties registered by the AKC.

Personality
  The loyal Gordon Setter is intensely devoted to his family but wary of strangers, characteristics that make him an excellent watchdog. He's mannerly and eager to please, but like any dog he'll take advantage of lax leadership and can become dominant, wilfull, and stubborn if not provided with firm, fair, consistent training.
  A Gordon Setter expert once wrote of the breed that if he acts sorry for a misdeed, he's probably more sorry that he got caught than that he misbehaved. In the field or in any competitive situation, he's alert, fearless, intelligent, and capable. He's a personal hunting dog, in the sense that he works nearby rather than ranging far afield. Gordons aren't fast, but they have a lot of stamina.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Gordon Setters need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Gordon Setter puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health

  The Gordon Setter, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is prone to major health issues such as gastric torsion and canine hip dysplasia, and minor problems like cerebellar abiotrophy, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), hypothyroidism, and elbow dysplasia. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend regular eye, hip, thyroid, and elbow exams for this breed of dog.

Care
  Regular combing, which should be done every two to three days, is a must for the Gordon Setter, though an occasional trimming may also be required. A thorough daily exercise regimen is also essential for the breed. And although it is adaptable to temperate climates outdoors, it should be given plenty of human companionship.

Living conditions
  The Gordon Setter is not recommended for apartment life. It is relatively inactive indoors (if a Gordon Setter gets enough outdoor activity it will be calm when it is indoors) and does best with at least a large, safely fenced yard where it can run free. Their hunting instincts lure them to roam, so a good fence around your property is essential.

Trainability

  Gordons have a mind of their own and do not like to be bossed around. Training can be difficult and takes a strong, steady leader. Sessions should be conducted with an abundance of positive reinforcement and very little harsh discipline. Though establishing leadership can be a challenge, Gordons actually pick up on tasks quickly and have excellent memories. Once basic obedience is mastered and the Gordon Setter knows his place in the family hierarchy, he should be graduated on to advanced obedience or agility training to keep his mind active.
  Housebreaking takes anywhere from four to six months with a Gordon Setter. They do not like to be told what to do or when to do it, so this process can be quite drawn out. Crate training is the best method for housebreaking a Gordon.

Exercise Requirements
  These are voracious exercisers and will require plenty of it to keep from bouncing around the walls indoors. For this reason, it’s not recommended that you keep a Gordon Setter as a city pet. They’re more suited for plenty of space to have their “outdoor” itch scratched on a daily basis, and they generally require plenty of activity to feel calm at the end of a day.

Grooming

  The Gordon has a long, thick coat with feathering on the ears, legs, belly, and tail. Depending on the type of terrain your Gordon is out in every day, you will probably need to brush and comb him one to three days a week to prevent or remove tangles and mats, remove dead hair, and distribute skin oils. In addition to brushing, you’ll need to trim the hair on the bottom of his feet and between his toes.
  The Gordon Setter sheds moderately. The more often you brush him, the less hair you will find on your floor, furniture, and clothing.
  Gordons love swimming and playing in water. Be sure to keep the ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections from taking hold.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Gordons are fond of and protective toward children. They'll put up with a lot, and when they've had enough teasing or roughhousing, they'll walk away. They may be a bit much for toddlers, though, being large enough to accidentally knock them down.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Gordons get along with other dogs and cats if they're raised with them, but they might not be so friendly toward strange dogs.

Is the Gordon Setter the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The Gordon Setter is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Developed by the Dukes of Gordon, the black and tan dogs were originally known as Gordon Castle Setters.


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Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Everything about your Scottish Deerhound

Everything about your Scottish Deerhound
  With impeccable manners and a good attitude, Scottish Deerhounds are welcoming, warm and easygoing. While they are active and sporty  outside, they are perfectly content to curl up on the couch after a long walk and snore the afternoon away. They crave attention and togetherness. When ignored or bothered, they sometimes let out a peculiar whining sound.

Overview
  Just like the name suggests, the Scottish Deerhound originated from Scotland and was bred to hunt deer. A descendant of the Greyhound and kept only by high-class individuals in the 16th century, the breed nearly became extinct due to excessive hoarding. In the 1800s it was revived in England and shown in its first dog show. It almost became extinct again during World War I but managed to survive the era. And although there are still not many Scottish Deerhounds around today, the dog is said to stay true to its class and breed.
  The Scottish Deerhound, also at times known as the Fleethound, Rough Highland Greyhound, Irish Wolf Dog, Scottish Wolfhound, Scotch Greyhound, Rough Coated Greyhound, Rough Greyhound, Scotch Deerhound, Highland Greyhound, Highland Deerhound, Wolfdog and Staghound, is a very ancient breed that was originally bred to hunt wolves, rather than deer. This breed has a strong prey drive for smaller, furry animals. It is a wonderful, calm and gentle family dog, with quiet yet courageous devotion to its family members. The Scottish Deerhound normally does not make a good watch or guard dog, because he is too polite and kind-hearted.

Highlights
  • Scottish Deerhounds need a securely fenced yard to keep them from chasing prey. Underground electronic fencing will not prevent them from giving chase.
  • The Scottish Deerhound is not recommended in homes with smaller animals and pets that could be considered as "prey." If they are not properly socialized, and for some Scottish Deerhounds even socialization does not curb it, they will give chase whenever they see the other animal. This could result in the smaller animal being killed or injured.
  • Scottish Deerhounds are not recommended for apartment living. Although they have relatively low activity levels indoors, they are a large dog and require lots of room to run. They require daily exercise and do best in a home with a large yard or acreage.
  • Scottish Deerhounds should be walked on leash to prevent them from chasing a moving animal, but be aware that they can and will lift you off your feet if they do decide to take off and you're hanging on to the leash.
  • The Scottish Deerhound is a very affectionate breed and will generally befriend everyone he meets. He gets along well with other dogs if they are large and don't trigger his prey drive. He doesn't make the best alert or guard dog because of his loving nature.
  • Housetraining can take a bit longer with the Scottish Deerhound than with other breeds. Be patient and consistent.
  • Scottish Deerhounds are relatively inactive inside but still need a lot of daily exercise to maintain their huge bodies. They make great jogging companions and enjoy long, long walks. Many people are surprised when their active Scottish Deerhound puppy turns into a couch potato adult.
  • Scottish Deerhounds do very well with older children, but take into account their size and energy level when they're outdoors. Don't let a child walk a Scottish Deerhound; he won't be able to hang onto him if he decides to run after something. Regardless of breed, no dog should ever be left alone with a young child.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • Other names by which the Deerhound has been called include Highland Deerhound, Rough Greyhound, and Scotch Greyhound. He is also known as the Royal Dog of Scotland.
  • When you look at a Deerhound, you see a dog whose long head is broadest at the ears, with the muzzle tapering to the black nose, and adorned with a mustache of silky hair and a fair beard. The soft, glossy, dark ears fold back, raised up only in excitement. Dark brown or hazel eyes hold a keen, far away expression that softens when the dog is relaxed. The long, tapering tail is carried down or curved.
  • The Scottish Deerhound is the second-tallest of all dog breeds, after the Irish Wolfhound. He weighs between 70 and 130 pounds, with females typically being smaller than males.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Sighthound
Average lifespan: 9-11 years
Average size: 75-110 pounds
Coat appearance: Wiry and harsh on the body, soft and smooth on the belly
Coloration: Brindle and black, blue, blue gray, gray
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Typical body of a Greyhound, smaller face with longer nose; high-set and folded ears; dark, brown or hazel eyes; long legs and low swooping tail
Comparable Breeds: Borzoi, Irish Wolfhound

History
  The origins of the Scottish Deerhound are lost in the Highland mists. Over the centuries, they've been known as Irish wolfdogs, Scottish greyhounds, rough greyhounds, and Highland deerhounds. Whether they were originally used to hunt wolves and then repurposed to hunt the great stags of the Highlands is unknown, but we do know that they were used as far back as the 16th century to hunt and bring down deer. The deerhounds were highly regarded for their courage and gentle dignity. A nobleman condemned to death could purchase his life with a gift of deerhounds. And only a nobleman could do so; no one beneath the rank of earl could lay claim to a deerhound, which was commonly known as the Royal Dog of Scotland.
Scottish Deerhound circa 1910
  The breed suffered under its restricted ownership, however, and there were many times it came close to extinction, most nearly when the clan system of Scotland collapsed in 1745 after the fateful battle of Culloden during the Jacobite rebellion against English rule. By 1769 the breed was in dire straits. Efforts were made to restore the breed to its original glory in the 1820s by Archibald and Duncan McNeill. The breed made its way to America as well. The first Scottish Deerhound registered by the American Kennel Club was Bonnie Robin in 1886.
  During World War I, the breed suffered another decline in numbers when many large estates in Scotland and England were broken up. The Scottish Deerhound became a rare breed again, enjoyed only by a select few.
  Today the Scottish Deerhound is still a fairly uncommon breed, appreciated by those who love sighthounds or have an interest because of their Scottish heritage, but more are coming to learn that this is a versatile breed and an all-around exceptional dog. Today the Scottish Deerhound ranks 135th among the 155 breeds and varieties registered by the American Kennel Club.

Personality
  The Scottish Deerhound can best be described as chivalrous. He's gentle yet strong, sensitive yet brave. Loyal, devoted, quiet, dignified, and alert are all terms that apply to this dog. He is courageous in the face of danger but never aggressive.
  Of course, those characteristics don't just appear. Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Scottish Deerhounds need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Deerhound puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
  The Scottish Deerhound breed, which has an average lifespan of 7 to 9 years, is susceptible to major health issues such as cardiomyopathy, gastric torsion, and osteosarcoma. Hypothyroidism, neck pain, atopy, and cystinuria may also plague this dog. To identify some of the issues early, a veterinarian may recommend regular cystinuria and cardiac exams for this breed of dog.

Care
  The Scottish Deerhound breed loves to spend time inside the home with its human family. Nevertheless, the dog can adapt to living outdoors in warm or cool climate. Routine exercise is essential for the breed, ideally in the form of a long walk or running in an enclosed area.
  The hair should be clipped on occasion to prevent it from tangling; combing, meanwhile, will help remove any dead hair. Additionally, the hair around the dog's face and ears should be stripped.

Living conditions
  Scottish Deerhounds can do okay in an in apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors. If they are taken for walks they can live without a yard, but they do best with a large, fenced yard.

Trainability
  Deerhounds are moderately easy to train. They pick up new behavior quickly, especially when praise and food are the motivation, but some can be quite stubborn and simply choose to ignore the rules. The good news is that they are not particularly destructive or ill behaved, so a Deerhound who doesn't listen is easier to live with than some other breeds. Practice makes perfect, so patience is necessary, but even the most stubborn Deerhound comes around in time. When your Deerhound isn't listening, you should never treat him harshly. They are sensitive dogs who will respond to harsh treatment by completely shutting down. Polite praise and encouragement will help motivate him to repeat good behavior and abandon bad.
  Housebreaking can be a long process with Deerhounds. They don't respond well to crating, so as puppies, they require a lot of attention. Some owners prefer the breeder housebreak their dog before bringing him home.

Activity Requirements
  Deerhounds are athletes. They were designed to hunt deer twice their size, so they are built for stamina and endurance. They need several long walks every day and should be allowed to run whenever possible. Joggers enjoy Scottish Deerhounds because they can keep pace on long runs. Though they are well behaved indoors, Deerhounds do not make the best apartment dwellers because they require a bit of room to move around.

Grooming
  The Deerhound’s harsh coat is usually easy to care for, but some Deerhounds have a silkier, longer coat that can become quite tangled. Usually, though, all he needs is a good brushing with a pin brush or slicker brush two or three times a week. Give the coat a going over with a stainless steel Greyhound comb to make sure you didn’t miss any tangles and to comb out the hair on the face  and you’re done. Only a few baths a year, when the dog is dirty, are necessary.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually once every week or two, and keep his ears clean and dry. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian.
  Good dental hygiene is also important. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Introduce your Deerhound to grooming early in life so that he learns to accept it willingly and patiently.

Children And Other Pets
  Deerhounds can get along with children, but they're not really a playmate kind of dog, being more into body slams than playing fetch. They're best suited to homes with older children who understand how to interact with dogs. Deerhounds aren't best pleased by the poking, prodding, and pulling of toddlers and will generally stalk off rather than put up with it. Their size also makes them unsuited to life with small children; they can easily knock them over without meaning to.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  While your Deerhound may learn to live peaceably with small dogs or cats indoors, if he sees them running around outdoors it can be a different story.

Is this breed right for you?
  A very friendly and pleasing breed, the Scottish Deerhound is a wonderful family dog and companion. Docile and best kept as an inside dog with its own bed, it does well inside of an apartment but will need some space to stretch out and daily exercise. A sensitive dog, it can be shy with strangers but does well with other pets in the home. A natural born hunter, it may chase after animals unknown to it. Requiring weekly grooming, the Scottish Deerhound is prone to calluses.

Did You Know?
  Scottish Deerhound GCH Foxcliffe Hickory Wind made history in 2011 by becoming the first of her breed to win Best in Show at Westminster.

Notable Deerhounds
  • A Scottish Deerhound named Foxcliffe Hickory Wind won Best In Show at the 2011 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show February 14–15, 2011.
  • Maida was a cross-bred Deerhound belonging to Sir Walter Scott.
  • A Scottish Deerhound named Cleod played the role of Padfoot, Sirius Black's canine Animagus form, in two films, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2005) and Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007).
A dream day in the life
Waking up to a run around the neighborhood, the Scottish Deerhound will then enjoy a nice breakfast with its family. A watchdog, it will keep a good eye on the home while you are away, although it would prefer to stay in your company. After an afternoon nap, it'll run about the yard and chase after any four-legged visitors. In the evening, it'll snuggle up at the foot of your bed on its very own pillow.
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