LUV My dogs: Scenthound

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Showing posts with label Scenthound. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Scenthound. Show all posts

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Hamilton Hound

Everything about your Hamilton Hound
  The Hamilton Hound (the Hamiltonstövare or the Swedish Foxhound) is one of the most numerous breeds in Sweden although is remains very rare in other countries except for Great Britain where it becomes more and more popular as a show and working dog. It is an elegant, gentle and even-tempered hunting breed. The Hamilton Hound will be a great companion for a family with children and an excellent pack hunter for tracking and flushing the small game. 

Overview
  Rectangular, well proportioned, giving impression of great strength and stamina. Tricoloured.
  Hamilton Hounds are very easy going, but can be stubborn. They are very patient with children. This breed makes a fantastic hunter as it has a very high prey drive, so caution needs to be taken with small animals. Owners must provide plenty of daily exercise, and be the dog's firm, but calm, confident, consistent pack leader to avoid behavior issues.

Breed standards
AKC group: not yet eligible for AKC registration
UKC group: Scenthound
Average lifespan: 10 - 13 years
Average size: 50 - 60 pounds
Coat appearance: Undercoat short, close and soft, especially thick during winter. Upper coat strongly weather resistant lying close to body.
Coloration: tricolor: black, tan & white
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: active singles, house with a yard, experienced dog owners, hunters
Temperament: noble, active, even-tempered, affectionate
Comparable Breeds: Harrier, Ariegeois

History
  The Hamiltonstövare is a breed of dog, bred as a hunting hound. The breed was developed in Sweden by the founder of the Swedish Kennel Club, Count Adolf Hamilton. Its ancestry includes several German hounds as well as English Foxhounds and Harriers.
  The Hamilton Hound originated in was created in Sweden in the late XIX century by Adolf Patrick Hamilton, who also was among the founders of the Swedish Kennel Club. Count Hamilton crossed different German Beagles with English Foxhounds and now extinct German hounds . This experiment resulted the breed that was named in honor of its creator – the Hamiltonstövare. 
  Although the similar hounds existed in Sweden already in the Middle Ages, the first breed member was shown only in 1886. The Hamilton Hound was used for hunting the small game and vermin. It was also good in tracking and retrieving and was able to work in a very rough terrain and severe climate. 
  Today, the Hamilton Hound is still very rare outside Scandinavia and Great Britain where it is widely used as a companion animal and for hunting. This breed is currently recognized by the Kennel Club (England) and FCI. 


Temperament
  A typical hound in temperament—sweet and friendly to all—the Hamiltonstövare is also a hardworking hunter. It is happy to be with its family, but it is also happy to be out hunting.
The Hamiltonstövare is its "own hound," and although it is friendly and gregarious, it naturally defers to doing what it wants rather than what might be requested of it. It takes enthusiasm and praise to persuade the Hamiltonstovare to comply with its owner's requests, but it'll do it if it's inspired.

Health 
  When it comes to the health of this dog, he is susceptible to conditions such as hip dysplasia and epilepsy. Nonetheless, his chances of contracting these conditions are very low. He is full of health generally.

Care
  The Hamiltonstovare is easy to maintain. He requires at least weekly brushing with a slicker brush or a natural bristle brush. A hound mitt can also be used. Weekly brushing keeps any dead hairs from collecting on carpets, furniture or clothing.  Since the Hamiltonstovare loves to play outside, he can have a dog smell. However, constant bathing can cause dry skin so he should be bathed a maximum of once a month using a mild dog shampoo. 
  Trim his nails as needed, generally every two to three weeks. Most hounds do better with a nail grinder rather than nail clippers as they do not like the sound of the nail clippers. His ears should be checked weekly for dirt or moisture to keep infection at bay. A routine dental plan should be put in place. His teeth should be brushed weekly using dog safe toothpaste. A yearly deep cleaning should also be scheduled.

Living Conditions
  They are very adaptable and will suit any environment, given they have enough exercise.

Training 
  The Hamilton Hound is an intelligent, docile and obedient dog that is willing to learn and is quite easy to train. However, this breed is also independent, can be stubborn and without proper training methods there won’t be any success. 
  Obedience training is very important for this breed, as it prefers to do what it likes rather than what it is asked for. If your dog trusts and respects you it will learn quickly all the basic commands. The sensitive Hamilton Hound needs to be trained only with positive methods like treats, reward and praise. 
  With a competent trainer this dog will be able to learn and perform almost any task or a trick. Socialization must start from the very young age as in case with any other dog. 

Exercise
  The Hamilton Hound is a very energetic breed with a great stamina that needs to be exercised a lot and daily. Your dog will need both physical and mental stimulation. A long, brisk walk on a leash every day is a must. This breed makes an excellent jogging and cycling companion. 
  The Hamilton Hound loves to hunt, run and play. But you can let your dog off the leash only in a fully secured area as if it starts following the scent it can run away and never come back. This breed is definitely suited only for an individual or a family with an active lifestyle. It also needs a lot of space to run , therefore the Hamilton Hound is not for an apartment living.

Grooming
  The Hamiltonstövare boasts having a double coat which consists of a soft, dense undercoat and a harsher, extremely weather resistant topcoat and their undercoat tends to grow a lot thicker during the colder winter months than the rest of the year. However, these handsome dogs are low maintenance on the grooming front and only really need to be brushed on a weekly basis to remove dead and loose hair. Wiping a dog's coat over with a chamois leather helps keep a nice sheen on it too.
  It's also important to check a dog's ears on a regular basis and to clean them when necessary. If too much wax is allowed to build up in a dog's ears, it can lead to a painful infection which can be hard to clear up. In short, prevention is often easier than cure when it comes to ear infections.


Children and Other Pets
  Hamiltons are known to love people and they thrive in a family environment. They are gentle characters by nature and in particular when they are around children. However, they can be a little boisterous which means they are not the best choice for families where the children are still young and any interaction between toddlers and a dog should always be well supervised by an adult to make sure things stay calm and nobody gets knocked over, albeit by accident.
  Having been bred to work with other dogs, the Hamilton is known to be good around them more especially if they have been properly socialised from a young enough age. If they have grown up with a family cat in a household, they usually get on well together. However, a Hamilton would think nothing of chasing any other cats they come across. Because of their strong hunting instincts, care has to be taken when a Hamilton is anywhere near smaller animals and pets because they may well see them as prey so any contact is best avoided.




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Wednesday, December 20, 2017

Everything about your Basset Bleu de Gascogne

Everything about your Basset Bleu de Gascogne
  The Basset Bleu de Gascogne is a medium French purebred also called the Blue Gascony Basset and the Bleus de Gascogne. It is a hound and the Basset part of its name refers to it being short legged and long bodied. The bleu part of its name refers to the ticked appearance it has and Gascogne is the region of France it comes from. 
  Descendent of the Grand Bleu de Gascogne it is an ancient breed and was bred to be a scent hound tracking larger prey like boar and wolf but also used as well as to track rabbits and hare.

Overview
  The Basset Bleu de Gascogne is one of the oldest breeds of French Basset and is descended from the large Grand Bleu de Gascogne and the Petit Bleu de Gascogne.  It is not known whether the Basset Bleu de Gascogne is a natural mutation of the larger Bleu de Gascognes or whether the breed was created by crossing a larger Bleu de Gascogne with another breed of Basset, most likely the Saintongeois Basset.
   As the breed was created well-before the keeping of records of dog breeding, the true origin of the breed may never be known.  What is known is that the breed originated in the Gascony region of France, and that the first appearance of what may be a Basset Bleu de Gascogne comes from paintings made in Gascony in the 1300’s.  It is widely believed that Gaston III of Fox-Bearn, the writer of what is considered the classic treatise on medieval hunting, The Livre de Chasse, kept a pack of Basset Bleu de Gascognes.

Quick Facts
  • How can you tell the difference between the Basset Bleu and the Basset Hound? The Basset Bleu has a lighter build, his skin fits more tightly to the body and his legs appear slightly longer. In height, he reaches a maximum of 15 inches at the shoulder, rather than the 14 inches called for by the Basset Hound standard. 
  • The Basset Bleu’s mottled black-and-white coat gives a slate-blue effect, hence the word “bleu” in his name. The coat usually has black patches, plus tan markings above the eyes, on the cheeks and lips, inside the ears, on the legs and beneath the tail. A white blaze on top of the head may include an oval black spot in the center.
  • The Basset Bleu has a narrow, elegant head with very long ears that fold inward. The ears contribute to the Basset Bleu’s scenting ability by sweeping scent up toward the nose.
Breed standards
UKC group: Scenthounds

Average lifespan: 12-13 years

Average size: 30-45 lb
Coat appearance: Dense and Short
Coloration:White, black, blue
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: active singles, apartment or condo, house with a yard, hunting
Temperament: friendly, affectionate, mild, adaptable, social, active
Comparable Breeds: Basset Hound, Grand Bleu de Gascogne

History
  The Basset Bleu is an old breed, dating to the 14th century. He hails from the region of Gascony in southwest France, where he was bred down in size from the Grand Bleu de Gascogne and used to hunt small game, such as rabbits.
  The breed faced extinction by the 1890s, but in the early 20th century, a man named Alain Bourbon came to the breed’s rescue. It’s likely that he ensured its survival by crossing the few remaining dogs with the Basset Saintongeois and the Grand Bleu de Gascogne.
In Europe, the Basset Bleu is recognized by the Federation Cynologique Internationale. The United Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1991. A few people in the United States have the breed, but it is rarely seen outside of France.

Recognition and categorisation
  The Kennel Club of the UK recognizes the Basset Bleu De Gascogne in the imported breed register and in the Hound Group. The United Kennel Club recognised the breed in 1991, and both they and the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) list the Basset Bleu De Gascogne in the Scenthound Group. The breed is also known as the Blue Gascony Basset in the FCI. The Basset Bleu De Gascogne is not recognized by the American Kennel Club or the Canadian Kennel Club. In addition to the major registries, the Basset Bleu De Gascogne is also recognized by many minor registries and specialty registries, including as a rare breed under the American Rare Breed Association which uses the FCI standard.

Personality
  Basset Bleu de Gascognes tend to be lively, happy, active and affectionate dogs. When outside in a hunt they are very agile, focused, full of vigor and stamina. In the home it is more laid back, friendly and social and steady. It wants to be a part of family activities and it can be a loud dog, barking, howling and so on. Training will be needed to stop that on command and understanding neighbors or no close neighbors would be best! It has a very curious nature and will want to explore everything. It is a pack dog though and enjoys having other Bassets around it especially for times when you are out as it does not like to be left alone for long periods.
  This dog tends to be quite friendly with everyone even strangers so it is not the best option if you want a dog that can act as a watchdog. As mentioned in most cases they are an affectionate dog but there are some that a bit more reserved, but a well bred and raised one should never by shy or aggressive. It will be devoted to its owners but can suffer from separation anxiety so is best in a home where someone is there more often than not. It can be stubborn and independent sometimes but is fairly adaptable too.

Health
  The Basset Bleu de Gascogne is generally a healthy and hardy breed not prone to any major inherited conditions. Like all dogs, however, this breed is prone to certain minor health problems which may include bloating, back problems, hip dysplasia, ear infections, and gastric torsion.


Training
  The Basset Bleu de Gascogne is an intelligent breed that excels in hunting so they are fairly easy to train. The best way to train this breed is to use positive reinforcement training methods and to maintain a firm and consistent hand in leadership. This breed does have a bit of an independent streak due to its hunting background, so be sure to maintain a position of authority in the home. This dog is not meant to be kept solely as a family pet, so be prepared to train your Basset Bleu de Gascogne for hunting or for other dog sports. Generally, they are happen when given a job to do, even if it is not hunting.

Exercise Requirements
  As a hunting breed, the Basset Bleu de Gascogne has moderate needs for exercise. They generally do well with 30 minutes of moderate exercise daily and much of their exercise needs can be met with active playtime or tracking games. These dogs do not do well when left alone for long periods of time.

Grooming
  The Basset Bleu has a short, thick coat that is easy to groom. Give it a good brushing once or twice a week to help remove dead hair and keep the coat shiny.
He may also be prone to ear infections. Keep his ears dry and check them weekly to make sure they’re not red or smelly. If they look dirty, wipe them out with a cleanser recommended by your veterinarian.
  Bathe your dog as needed. That may be weekly, monthly or quarterly, depending on how dirty he gets and your toleration of the houndy odor, often described as musty.
The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every week or two or as needed. Brush the teeth often — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is the Basset Bleu de Gascogne the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Difficult Training: The Basset Bleu de Gascogne isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Basset Bleu is one of the rarest, if not the rarest, of the French hound breeds. In English, his name translates to Blue Gascony Basset.
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Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Everything about your American English Coonhound

Everything about your American English Coonhound
  A true Southern U.S. dog, the American English Coonhound loves to hunt. Loud-voiced and hard-working, the American English Coonhound is one of six official Coonhound breeds. Renowned for its speed, endurance, intelligence, and athleticism, this dog loves to be on the move. 
  Good with children and friendly with strangers, you’ll find this dog to be fairly easy to train, making it a great family pet for novice owners. It will alert you  of strangers entering your property, but will make fast friends with anyone who gives it attention. This makes the American Coonhound a good watchdog, but not the best guard dog.

Overview
  Evolved as a descendant of the English Foxhound, the American English Coonhound is a natural-born hunter. Loving barking and hunting rocky and natural terrain, this breed is a loud athlete. A pleasant and nice pup, he's sociable to both humans and animals.
  Alert, confident and friendly to people and dogs, the American English Coonhound fits in well with a variety of households. Active owners will find that it makes a wonderful companion, especially if you like to spend time outdoors with a high-energy pet. Although not suited to apartment living, this breed loves to be with its people and will thrive in a loving household. If this is the first time you’ve heard of the American English Coonhound, read on – this dog may just be the perfect fit for your family.

Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Scenthound
Average lifespan: 11 - 12 years
Average size: 40 - 75 pounds
Coat appearance: Rough, hard, short- to medium-length
Coloration: Red, black, blue, yellow and tricolored with ticking
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Strong build; graceful and fast-running athlete; muscular chest, back, hips, thighs and neck; Straight and strong hind legs with sloping shoulders; overall square shape; deep padded paws and medium-length, high tail; large, open nostrils; deep brown eyes and scissor-bite teeth
Possible alterations: Long, soft ears can be stretched to nose; may be post-legged
Comparable Breeds: Redbone Coonhound, English Foxhound

History
  The breed traces its ancestry from Foxhounds brought to the United States by European settlers during the 17th and 18th centuries. It shares a common ancestry with all other coonhounds with the exception of the Plott Hound. The breed developed from the "Virginia Hounds", which were developed over time from dogs imported to the United States by Robert Brooke, Thomas Walker and first President of the United States, George Washington. The dogs had to adapt to more rigorous terrain, with the breed being specifically bred over time to suit these new conditions. They were used to hunt raccoons by night and the American red fox by day. It was recognized by the United Kennel Club (UKC) in 1905 as the English Fox and Coonhound.
  The Treeing Walker Coonhound was recognized separately by the UKC in 1945, splitting it off from the English Fox and Coonhound breed. The following year the Bluetick Coonhound was also split.
  The breed was accepted into the American Kennel Club's Foundation Stock Service as the American English Coonhound in 1995. It was moved up to the Miscellaneous Class on 1 January 2010. Following the recognition of the breed by the AKC in the hound group on 30 June 2011 as the 171st breed,the American English Coonhound became eligible to compete in the National Dog Show in 2011 and both the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show and the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship for the first time in 2012.

Temperament
  English Coonhounds are energetic, intelligent and active. Loving and eager to please their owners, their great senses make them excellent hunters. This breed is an extremely fast, hot-trailing competitive type coonhound. Very devoted to its family, it makes a good companion dog. It does well living indoors and plays a fine guardian to his family and home.
  They are usually best with older considerate children, but can also do well with younger ones. Without proper human to canine leadership and communication some can be a bit dog-aggressive and/or develop behavior issues. They need owners who are firm, confident and consistent with an air of authority. Socialize this breed well, preferably while still young to prevent them from being reserved with strangers. Do not let this breed off the leash in an unsafe area, as they may take off after an interesting scent. They have a strong instinct to tree animals. Without enough mental and physical exercise they will become high-strung.

Health
  Due to its size, the American English Coonhound’s most common health issue is hip dysplasia. Other health problems that may occur include ear infections, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and polyradiculoneuritis.

Living Conditions
 These dogs are not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and do best with acreage.

Trainability
  The American English Coonhound needs a kind but firm hand for successful training. In order to make headway, owners should maintain calm, confident, consistent authority as leader of the pack. This breed may require more time, repetition and patience than other Coonhounds to reach the owner’s training goals, because it tends to be more easily distracted than its Coonhound cousins and likes to learn at its own pace. Some American English Coonhounds find it difficult to focus on anything but hunting and treeing other animals. Those dogs need extra motivation to learn their manners and basic obedience skills. Without steady, consistent, gentle guidance, this breed can develop undesirable traits such as dominance or excessive shyness. Socialization and training should start at an early age and continue for life.

Exercise Requirements
  No surprise here – the American English Coonhound has lots of energy to burn. This is high-energy breed needs plenty of daily exercise. If you’re an active owner, make your American English Coonhound a jogging or biking partner. As a family, you can enjoy playing games such as fetch and hide-and-seek with your dog, along with long brisk walks. Another idea to consider is to get active in competitive outdoor canine sports, including field trials, tracking, agility and obedience. There are organizations that put on events such as night hunts, water races, field trials and benched conformation shows. Hunters will find faithful companions in the American English Coonhound – this dog is an energetic hunting and will happily carry out all the hunting duties it was bred for.
  Of course, if your American English Coonhound doesn’t get enough exercise, it can become bored, depressed, frustrated, anxious or hyperactive. On top of all of that, these dogs can become destructive. To ensure that the American English Coonhound is happy, you’ll need to provide plenty of mental and physical stimulation. If you don’t have enough time to exercise and socialize this dog, you should consider a different breed. The American English Coonhound needs room to run around in, so they do not do well in apartments, condominiums or houses without fenced yards. The American English Coonhound needs a fenced-in yard, where there is room to run.

Grooming
  The American English Coonhound's short, close-fitting coat is easy to care for. This certainly is not a breed that requires religious grooming or meticulous trimming. However, they do shed quite a bit throughout the year and should be brushed regularly to keep household hair build-up at bay. A thorough brushing once a week with a clean, firm-bristled brush should suffice. Coonhounds don’t need to be bathed very often. 
 Usually, they only require a good shampooing after they have romped in mud puddles or otherwise had a particularly eventful frolic in the out-of-doors. Of course, a bath is an excellent idea after a Coonhound is sprayed by a skunk or rolls in any of the wild animal or livestock feces that they find so appealing. It’s a good idea to brush them before their bath, to minimize the mess caused by excess dirt and hair. Owners can discuss a dental care regimen with their veterinarian. They should clip their Coonhounds’ nails monthly, or as often as necessary to keep them fairly short and tidy.

Is this breed right for you?
  Perfect for an athlete, this dog will keep you company on long runs. Loving other people, he would be a good fit in a family or an active single person's best friend to tag along on car rides. Best for people who live on lots of land, this dog might disturb neighbors with his loud howling and barking.
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Easy Training: The American English Coonhound is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

A dream day in the life of an American English Coonhound
  A real-life alarm system, this breed will wake you up in the morning. After sharing breakfast, he's ready to go on a daily run with his owner. Stopping to sniff out possible raccoons, he may even chat with anyone you meet as you run your usual route. Coming home for a nap, he'll engage in after-school play as soon as the kiddos arrive. Tuckered out at the end of a busy day of exercise and play, he'll lounge around and drool while listening for possible visitors to greet with a bark.



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Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Everything about your Rhodesian Ridgeback

Everything about your Rhodesian Ridgeback
  The Rhodesian Ridgeback is easy to spot among a canine crowd: He’s the one with the tiny Mohawk running down his spine. Expressive eyes reflect the sensitive spirit of this large, intelligent dog who loves to run and play. He’s not a barker, but a Ridgie will protect his family.

Overview
  Derived from Africa, the Rhodesian Ridgeback was bred to guard and protect children and family when parents were away. Designed to hunt lions and retrieve needed objects, the breed does well hunting with humans when on horseback. Doing well in African climates, the breed was brought to America in 1950. With high endurance and the ability to outlast humans, this dog is a strong, smart and loyal breed.
  As a pup, the Rhodesian Ridgeback is active and exuberant, but he matures into a dog with moderate exercise needs. Give him a vigorous walk or game of fetch a couple of times a day, plus a chance to run in a safely fenced area a couple of times a week, and he'll be satisfied — at least in terms of physical exercise. This intelligent breed also needs mental stimulation: a bored Rhodesian Ridgeback is a destructive Rhodesian Ridgeback.

Highlights

  • The Rhodesian Ridgeback is tolerant of kids, but can be too rambunctious for toddlers.
  • Because of their size, intelligence, and power, Rhodesian Ridgebacks aren't recommended for first-time or timid owners.
  • If a Rhodesian Ridgeback is raised with other pets, he'll be accepting of them. However, he can still be aggressive toward strange animals outside the family, even if he's well socialized and trained. Males can be aggressive toward other males, especially if they're not neutered.
  • If bored, the Rhodesian Ridgeback can become very destructive.
  • The Rhodesian Ridgeback needs a high fence to keep him from escaping and roaming. An underground electronic fence won't contain him.
  • Rhodesian Ridgebacks shed little, and you can keep them clean with a weekly brushing and a wipedown with a damp cloth. They also need regular nail trims and tooth brushing.
  • Training can be difficult if you don't start at a very young age. Rhodesian Ridgebacks can be stubborn and strong willed, but if you're consistent, firm, and fair, you can train your Ridgeback to a high level.
  • The young Rhodesian Ridgeback is energetic and active, but with maturity and training, he generally becomes a calm and quiet dog. He needs at least a half hour of daily exercise.
  • Rhodesian Ridgebacks can adapt to a number of living situations, including apartments, if they're properly exercised. The ideal is a home with a large fenced yard.
  • Ridgebacks generally don't bark a lot. Many will bark to alert you to something unusual, and some will bark when they are bored, but for the most part, this isn't a yappy breed.
  • Rhodesian Ridgebacks aren't serious diggers, but they'll dig a large hole if they're bored or to escape the heat.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Ridgeback is the only dog who has a ridge of hair running down his spine in the opposite direction from the rest of his coat, though some purebred Ridgebacks do not have ridges.
  • The Ridgeback was created to help big game hunters go after lions, which is why he’s sometimes called the African Lion Hound.
  • Comparable Breeds: Bullmastiff, Great Dane

History
  The Rhodesian Ridgeback, once known as the African Lion Hound, was developed in South Africa by Boer farmers. The farmers needed a versatile hunting dog who could withstand the extreme temperatures and terrain of the bush, survive when water rations were low, protect property, and be a companion to the entire family.

  They started by crossing dogs they'd brought from Europe — such as Great Danes, Mastiffs, Greyhounds, and Bloodhounds — with a half-wild native dog kept by the Khoikhoi, a pastoral people. This dog had a distinctive ridge of hair along its back, and breeders noticed that crosses who had this ridge tended to be excellent hunters.
  At first, the Boers primarily used the dogs to flush partridge or bring down a wounded buck. When big-game hunting became popular, they found that the dogs were well suited for accompanying them when they hunted lions from horseback. The dogs would hold the lion at bay until the hunters arrived.
  A hunter named Cornelius von Rooyen began a breeding program in what was then known as Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe). A breed standard — a written description of what the breed should look and act like — was set down in 1922, and it's changed little since then. In 1924, the Rhodesian Ridgeback was officially accepted by the South African Kennel Union.
  Some Rhodesian Ridgebacks may have made it to the United States as early as 1911, but it wasn't until after World War II that large numbers were imported to the U.S., Britain, and Canada. The first Rhodesian Ridgeback registered by the American Kennel Club (AKC) was Tchaika of Redhouse, in 1955. The AKC recognized the breed that same year.
  Today, the Rhodesian Ridgeback ranks 54th in popularity among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC. The Ridgeback is quite popular in South Africa, where he first began his journey as a breed.

Personality
  Rhodesian Ridgebacks are dignified, athletic dogs whose expressive eyes always look deep in thought. Developed in Africa, this breed was used by lion hunting parties to track, corner, and hold lions. The breed is still used for hunting in some circles, but has come to be more of a family companion than anything else. As puppies they have energy to spare, but with proper exercise and training grow into quiet, dignified housemates. They are not for novice dog owners, as it takes a lot of time and energy to properly train this breed, but for those who are experienced and who are already committed to an active lifestyle, the Rhodesian Ridgeback can be an ideal family dog.

Health Problems
  The biggest health concern for Rhodesian Ridgeback presents at birth. The condition is Dermoid Sinus, one that is closely related to Spina Bifida found in humans. Painful and sometimes fatal, most puppies born with this condition are put to sleep. If not, surgery is necessary and not always successful.

Care
  As a house pet, it is a wonderful family member. The Ridgeback prefers to sleep indoors, spending its days both out in the yard and indoors. The Ridgeback is a good hiking and jogging companion. Fond of running, the Ridgeback needs physical and mental exercise daily, to prevent boredom setting in. Coat care for the dog is minimal, requiring occasional brushing to get rid of dead hair.

Living Conditions
  Rhodesian Ridgebacks will do okay in an apartment as long as they get enough exercise. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with a large yard.

Trainability
  Training a Rhodesian Ridgeback can be a challenge. They are independent thinkers who also have a tendency to exhibit dominance. They need to be trained with firmness to establish leadership, but never harshness. Strong discipline will cause a Ridgeback to shut down and ignore you completely. 100% consistency is also crucial when training because Ridgebacks will constantly test boundaries, especially in adolescence, and if you bend the rules just once, he'll take that as an invitation to rule the house.

Exercise Requirements
  It may not be able to chase lions in your neighborhood, but your Ridgeback needs daily exercise. To release pent up energy, take your dog for a long run or jog. Tire them out with play time – get your kids involved in the fun. You’ll need to put aside time every day in order to ensure your Rhodesian Ridgeback gets enough exercise.

Grooming
  Ridgebacks have an easy-care short coat. A Ridgie will shed a bit all year long, but it’s not bad. Run a brush over his coat once a week, and bathe him when you think he needs it. Brush his teeth with a vet-approved pet toothpaste, clean his ears, and trim his nails regularly, and that’s it.

Children And Other Pets
  The Rhodesian Ridgeback is tolerant with children of all ages, but he's large and can be too rambunctious for a toddler.
  As with any dog, always teach children how to approach and touch your Rhodesian Ridgeback, and supervise all interactions between dogs and young kids to prevent any biting or tail pulling from either party.
  The Rhodesian Ridgeback does well with other pets if he's raised with them. Males tend to be aggressive to other males, especially if they're not neutered. It's important to properly socialize a Rhodesian Ridgeback to other dogs and animals — expose him to lots of other creatures beginning in puppyhood — because the tolerance he shows animals in his home is often not extended to animals outside his family.

Is this breed right for you?
  A strong and protective breed, the Rhodesian Ridgeback is a great family pet. Playful and sometimes rough, he's best with older children. Athletic and in need of space, he does best living in a home with a large and spacious fenced-in yard. In need of exercise, he must be walked and jogged daily. If not given proper leadership from his master, he may become mischievous and begin to rebel. Best with cats when raised with them, the Rhodesian Ridgeback is a natural hunter. An excellent jogging and hiking companion, this pup is extremely loyal and loving.

Did You Know?
  Ridgebacks are also known as the African Lion Hound. Big-game hunters found that the dogs were good at distracting a lion, allowing the hunters to take a shot.

A dream day in the life of a Rhodesian Ridgeback
  Waking up in the bed of his owner, he's ready for his morning jog. Back at the home, he'll eat breakfast with the family prior to taking a run in the backyard. After ensuring that all is well and in its place, he'll head back inside for playtime with the kiddos. A snooze on the couch and he'll be up for any type of love that you can give him. After a hike later in the day, he'll be happy to watch TV while snuggled on the couch with the family.





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Monday, April 10, 2017

Everything about your Portuguese Podengo Pequeno

Everything about your Portuguese Podengo Pequeno
  The Portuguese Podengo Pequeno is an ancient, no-nonsense hunting hound from Portugal. They are multi-sensory hounds that hunt using both their sight and scent and come in three distinct sizes: The smallest Pequeno, the medium sized Médio and the large Grande. These three sizes are generally not cross-bred and each has their own purpose. Podengos also comes in two coat variants – wiry haired and soft haired.

Overview
  One of the later breeds to come to the U.S., the Portuguese Podengo Pequeno arrived in America in the 1990s. The National Dog of Portugal, these smaller pups are bred to chase rabbits. Traced back to 1000 B.C. from breeds that were trained to hunt the thickets of Portugal, this breed has a high endurance and obedience level. The smallest of the three Portuguese Podengo breeds, he's also the fastest.

Other Quick Facts
  • The largest of the Podengos, the Grande, hunts larger prey than rabbit, including boar.
  • The Podengo has a slender, rectangular body, well muscled, with a wedge-shaped head and large, upright ears. The coat can be short and smooth or somewhat wiry and comes in any shade of red, with or without white markings. Most Pequenos in the U. S. are the wirecoated variety.
  • Podengos have appeared in several movies, including Three Wishes, Soccer Dog, and Zeus and Roxanne.
  • Comparable Breeds: Andalusian Podenco, Basenji

History 
  Like his cousins the Cirneco dell Etna, Ibizan, and Pharaoh Hounds, the Podengo is known as a rabbit hunter in his homeland of Portugal. The breeds probably share a common ancestor back through the sands of time.
  The dogs were first imported into the United States in the 1990s, so their history in the U. S. is young. They are recognized by the Federation Cynologique Internationale in Europe, as well as the United Kennel Club and the American Rare Breed Association in the U. S.   They are also part of the American Kennel Club’s Foundation Stock Service, a first step toward AKC recognition. The Podengo Pequeno is now a member of AKC’s Miscellaneous Class, the last step before AKC recognition.

Temperament
  The Portuguese Podengo Pequeno is a cheerful, versatile, rambunctious little dog with a strong desire to please the people he loves. However, it is an independent thinker and is naturally wary around strangers. Though they are lovable and loving, Pequenos are not lap dogs. They are tireless hunting hounds that need to actively engage with people and other animals to stay physically and mentally fit. They should be treated like the bright, active animals that they are. This is not to say that they are stodgy. To the contrary, Podengo Pequenos are known for their silliness. They run around the house with wild abandon, jumping onto and banking off of furniture and engaging in any number of other amusing antics. They become very attached to their owners, are patient with children and make terrific family companions. Loyal, tenacious and fearless, they also make great watchdogs.

Health Problems
  The Portuguese Podengo Pequeno is a breed that has had little to no human intervention over the years and as a result does not suffer from any known hereditary health conditions.

Living Conditions
  The Podengo Portugueso Medio is not recommended for apartment life. This breed is well-suited for hot sunny climates and can live and sleep outdoors so long as they have adequate shelter.

Trainability
  The Podengo Pequeno is a very bright breed and is easy to train. Reward-based techniques, using positive reinforcement rather than harsh verbal or physical corrections, makes teaching these dogs standard obedience commands a breeze. Training them to do things that exploit their physical prowess is another good strategy. Recall training is important for all dogs, but a reliable recall is especially important for this independent, sometimes willful breed. Podengo Pequenos’ independence and intelligence should be harnessed and focused, not suppressed.

Exercise Requirements
  Podengo Pequenos were bred to have enough stamina and endurance to hunt throughout the day, for consecutive days. As such, they have seemingly limitless amounts of energy and require a great deal of exercise. Although their small size makes them suitable for small homes or apartments, they should only be housed in small living quarters if their owners are able to cater to their exercise needs each day. They often do best in houses with large gardens or rural farm yards where they can frolic about at will.

Grooming
  The smooth Podengo has a short, dense coat. The wirecoated variety has a medium-length coat with a harsh texture. On his face he has a distinctive beard. Neither type has an undercoat, so the dogs don’t shed much.
  Whether he has a smooth or wire coat, the Podengo is easy to groom. Both varieties can be brushed weekly. The smooth will probably enjoy being groomed with a rubber curry brush or hound mitt, while the wire is probably best cared for with a pin brush. The wirecoated Podengo should not be trimmed; his coat is supposed to have a rustic look, as if he just came in from a field in Portugal. Baths are rarely necessary for either type. Every three to six months is plenty.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Remember that sighthounds are sensitive about having their feet handled. Be careful not to cut into the quick—the blood vessel that feeds the nail. This is painful and your Podengo will put up a fuss the next time you try to trim the nails. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  A wonderful companion, the Portuguese Podengo Pequeno is devoted to a confident leader. Good with children, the breed is a wonderful family pet and watchdog, and does best with human interaction. Suited for apartment life if exercised regularly, this pup is in need of an active lifestyle. Due to a high jumping ability, he does best if living in a home with a high fence in a sunny and warm climate. Like other hounds, he only does well with cats if raised with them, otherwise his instinct will be to chase them.

Did You Know?
  The Podengo is a multitasker who hunts by sight and scent. The dogs can be hunted in a pack or separately, and when they sight their prey they jump straight up.

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Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Everything about your Norwegian Elkhound

Everything about your Norwegian Elkhound
  This gorgeous dog breed with the wolflike face delights in life. Smart as can be, he also has a wonderful sense of humor. He’ll race you around the kitchen island, reverse directions when you do, and then howl for sheer fun. Bold, energetic, and protective, he makes an excellent watchdog and guardian. Elkhounds are utterly devoted to their families. When you’re upset, this tenderhearted Viking will plop his head on your lap.

Overview
  Around since the Stone Age, the Norwegian Elkhound is known for its great hunting and watchdog skills. A better hunter at night than during the day, this breed can hunt small to large animals, including its namesake, elk. A Scenthound, this dog is known to hunt an animal from a mile away, find it, and bark a notification to his hunting companion for retrieval. A prized sled dog, this breed is athletic and has a strong ability to handle rough terrains.

Highlights
  • The Norwegian Elkhound is loyal and affectionate, and he does very well with children and is generally friendly with strangers. However, he can be aggressive to other dogs and animals, so it's important to properly socialize your Elkhound from puppyhood to a variety of new experiences and dogs.
  • The Elkhound can be dominant and difficult to train, but training can nonetheless be enjoyable and effective as long as the approach is consistent and firm.
  • Being a working breed, the Elkhound has a level of intelligence, independence, and energy that can be overwhelming for timid or inconsistent owners. You should expect him to need at least 30 minutes of exercise twice per day, which will also fight this food-motivated dog's tendency toward obesity. He'll also need some form of mental stimulation to keep him from becoming bored.
  • The Norwegian Elkhound does fine in apartments if he's properly exercised, but the ideal setting is a large, fenced yard. Despite his outdoor hardiness, he needs to live indoors with his family.
  • He can be a barker, which you should keep in mind before bringing one home. Although some Elkhounds can be trained to not bark, this is not the norm.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • According to Norse sagas, Elkhounds traveled with the Vikings.
  • The Elkhound tends to be friendly to family and strangers alike.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Scenthound
Average lifespan:  12 - 15 years
Average size:  50 - 60 pounds
Coat appearance: Coarse and weatherproof
Coloration: Gray and silver
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Square, medium-sized body; black, wide nose; dark brown oval eyes; broad, strong chest; straight and strong legs; thick muzzle; strong, pointed ears on top of head and fluffy tail that points upwards
Possible alterations: Puppies are born black and turn silver within a few weeks of birth
Comparable Breeds: Keeshond, Swedish Elkhound

History
  Dogs like the Elkhound accompanied the Vikings, the Norse sagas tell us; after all, a man’s dog is as important as his weapons. Over the centuries, the Elkhound’s ancestors guarded farms, herded and protected flocks from predators, and hunted big game such as elk and bear.
  Though these dogs have been known in Norway for hundreds of years, it wasn’t until 1877 that they began to be exhibited in dog shows. The Norwegian Hunters Association held its first show that year, and owners began to keep better records of pedigrees and trace them back as far as possible. They wrote a breed standard and published a stud book. A photograph of a well-known dog of that time — Gamle Bamse Gram — looks much like an   Elkhound of today, lacking only some of the modern dog’s refinement.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the Elkhound in 1913. Today the breed ranks 106th among the dogs registered by the AKC.



Temperament
  The Norwegian Elkhound is well-known for his friendly nature and outgoing personality. He loves people however; he has a unique ability to tell which people are welcomed guests and which are unwanted. Very protective of his family, he makes an awesome watchdog. Barking is the Norwegian Elkhound’s forte. He loves to bark and will simply bark because he likes the sound of his own voice! It is imperative that he be trained to be quiet on command or he will drive you crazy.
  A family-oriented breed, the Norwegian Elkhound craves affection. Many suffer from separation anxiety which could lead to the dog becoming destructive of your possessions. Exercise and plenty of toys can help to minimize his anxiety. This breed does not fare well when left alone for long periods of time.

Health
  This Norwegian Elkhound, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, occasional suffers from intracutaneous cornifying epithelioma, patellar luxation, Fanconi Syndrome and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA).
  The most serious aliment affecting it is canine hip dysplasia (CHD), while minor health problems such as renal dysplasia, hot spots, and sebaceous cysts are common. Hip, eye, and urine tests are good for this breed of dog.

Care
  The Norwegian Elkhound requires daily exercise, not only to burn off energy but also to help him maintain a healthy weight. Exceptionally food-motivated, he can become obese, and proper feeding and exercise are required throughout his life.
  He does all right in apartments, but he is a barker, so take that into consideration. A home with a fenced yard is more suitable. He could live outside because he's so hardy, but he'd much rather be indoors with you.
  Crate training benefits every dog and is a kind way to ensure that your Elkhound doesn't have accidents in the house or get into things he shouldn't. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your Elkhound accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized.
  Never stick your Elkhound in a crate all day long, however. It's not a jail, and he shouldn't spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he's sleeping at night. Elkhounds are people dogs, and they aren't meant to spend their lives locked up in a crate or kennel.

Living Conditions
  The Norwegian Elkhound will be okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is fairly active indoors and does best with at least a large yard. Elkhounds prefer cool climates.

Trainability
  Elkhounds are intelligent dogs and have minds of their own, making them challenge to train. This breed needs firm leadership and absolute consistency or they will take over the household. Calm-assertive leadership is required, and many trainers suggest exercising your Elkhound before training sessions to ensure they are in the right frame of mind to accept leadership.
  Once leadership has been established and basic obedience has been mastered, Norwegian Elkhounds should graduate on to agility training. The obstacle course gives them an outlet to burn off physical energy, while keeping their minds sharp and active.

Activity Requirements
  Norwegian Elkhounds are bundles of energy and need a lot of vigorous activity in order to maintain health and an even temperament. Several walks a day are great, but that is just a start for this breed. They need time to run every single day, and should be exercised for one to two hours. If your Elkhound is not getting enough physical activity, he will become hyperactive and resort to destructive chewing when left alone.
  Norwegian Elkhounds are best suited for those who already have an active lifestyle. People who walk, jog, bike, hike and camp will find that an Elkhound fits seamlessly into these activities. Couch potatoes, or those who want a docile family dog should look to another breed. 

Grooming
  The Elkhound has a soft, woolly undercoat and a coarse, straight top coat. The thick double coat is easy to groom with brushing several times a week, but it sheds heavily. During seasonal sheds, you’ll think it’s snowing Elkhound hair. At those times, daily brushing and warm baths will help remove the loose hair so the new hair can grow in. On the plus side, there’s never any need to trim his coat or whiskers and baths are rarely necessary.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every six weeks. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  An Elkhound is excellent with children and will play with and protect them. However, without careful obedience training, they may take over the role of pack leader and become dominant, especially toward children, less strong-willed adults, or other dogs.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Norwegian Elkhound generally gets along with other pets, including cats, but remember his prey drive and willingness to hunt big game.

Is this breed right for you?
  The Norwegian Elkhound does extremely well with children, especially when introduced to them when a puppy, and is a loyal and loving family dog. Protective of and affectionate to his family, he's very devoted to his owners and does best in a family setting. An active and people-loving breed, he does best when exercised daily. A big shedder, the Norwegian Elkhound will need to be groomed at least twice a week. In need of a yard and a known barker, this breed does best in homes located in colder climates.

Did You Know?
  The Norwegian Elkhound’s job is to track elk, bear, or moose, and then keep the animal in place by barking at him until the hunter arrives.

Famous Norwegian Elkhounds
  • President Herbert Hoover's "Weejie"
  • "Canute" and others, in Virginia Woolf's novel, Orlando: A Biography
  • In The X-Files, Mulder blocks Eugene Victor Tooms when stalking a potential victim by asking him about his Norwegian Elkhound, Heinrich, in the episode "Tooms."
A dream day in the life of a Norwegian Elkhound
  A lover of his people, the Norwegian Elkhound will ideally wake up at the foot of the bed of his owner. After breakfast with his family, he'll enjoy a morning job outdoors. Coming home to a good brushing, he'll inspect the house to ensure it's safe and secure for the homeowners. Playing with the kids all day, he'll nose up to the cat, and bark away any possible intruders. After a game of Frisbee and tag in the backyard, this pup will head back inside to enjoy the evening with his loving humans.


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