LUV My dogs: Rottweiler

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Showing posts with label Rottweiler. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Rottweiler. Show all posts

Saturday, July 8, 2017

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in America

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in America
  Americans really, really love their dogs. And that’s in spite of dogs not being the easiest pet you could bring into your home. Training a dog is difficult, especially if you end up with a headstrong canine. Choosing the right dog breed for your lifestyle or your family can be a challenge. And owning a dog can be surprisingly expensive thanks to an assortment of hidden costs.
  So which dog breeds do Americans love the most? Take a look at the American Kennel Club’s ranking of the most popular dog breeds in America for 2016. Some of them might surprise you.

10. Boxers
  In 10th place is the boxer, part of the AKC’s Working Group. The boxer is a fun-loving dog that, interestingly enough, was one of the first breeds selected in Germany for police training. The AKC recognized the boxer in 1904. This breed is a medium-sized, square-built dog with an alert, curious face and a distinctive muzzle. Boxers move smoothly and gracefully. They’re related to practically all recognized breeds of the bulldog type. Boxers are patient and protective, which makes them great family dogs.
  Boxers were originally bred to be medium-size guard dogs. Today, although they are a part of the AKC’s Working Group, they mostly find homes as loving family companions.


  In ninth place is the Yorkshire terrier. The AKC first recognized this member of the Toy Group in 1885. Yorkies first became popular pets in the late Victorian era, and they have a distinctive coat and confident manner of carrying themselves. The AKC notes that Yorkshire Terriers “offer big personalities in a small package.” They’re brave and energetic, and most owners would say these dogs don’t know how small they are.
  Small in size but big in personality, the Yorkshire Terrier makes a feisty but loving companion. The most popular toy dog breed in the U.S., the “Yorkie” has won many fans with his devotion to his owners, his elegant looks, and his suitability to apartment living.

  In eighth place is the Rottweiler. This breed, a member of the Working Group, is one of the descendants of Roman drover dogs. The AKC recognized it in 1931. Rottweilers are powerful dogs, and the AKC notes that “the Rottweiler is happiest when given a job to perform.” The breed’s intelligence and endurance makes Rottweilers great service dogs and companions. And according to the AKC, “No one told him that he’s not a toy breed, so at some point he’s going to plop onto your lap for a cuddle.”
  If you want a Rottweiler, learn how to raise it first! If you don't get these dogs off to the right start, you may never be able to control them, and they will be a constant danger to you, your family, and others. With a bite strength roughly 25% greater than a German Shepherd, they must be trained - it isn't optional. If you do learn to do it right, you will own one of the best and safest pets it is possible to own.

  In seventh place is the poodle, a member of the Non Sporting Group. Poodles, officially recognized by the AKC in 1887, are a single breed commonly divided into standard, miniature, and toy sizes. Poodles are known for being very intelligent and active dogs. They excel in obedience training and are eager to please their humans. All sizes of poodles can be trained successfully. The standard poodle tends to be more outgoing.
  These fluffy dogs weren't always the delicate beauties they are today. Poodles were once natural-born hunters and were originally bred as water retrievers. These prim and proper pups are still excellent swimmers with a knack for anything that involves using their brains as well as their brawn. Named after the German word for puddle, this breed's webbed feet and water-resistant coat make them great lake and pool companions who love the challenge of obedience training at the highest levels.

  In sixth place is the French bulldog, which is included in the Non Sporting Group. The AKC notes that two distinctive features of this breed, which it recognized in 1898, are its bat ears and the unique silhouette of its skull. French bulldogs are affectionate and playful. And the AKC reports that this breed “is a great companion for single pet owners, as well as families with young children.” They’re a little bit stubborn in nature, so you’ll need to exercise some patience when training a French bulldog. But in general, Frenchies are intelligent and eager to please their family.
  The Frenchie will make you laugh. He's a charming, clever dog with a sense of humor and a stubborn streak. Bred for centuries as a companion, he's very fond of people, and becomes particularly attached to his family. In fact, sometimes he becomes a little too attached, which means he's not the best choice for someone who'll be away long hours every day. It also means he absolutely, positively cannot live in the backyard or garage, but only indoors as a member of the family. That's doubly true given that he, like all brachycephalic, or "flat-faced" breeds, has difficulty regulating his body temperature and needs to live in a climate-controlled environment.

  In fifth place is the beagle, part of the AKC’s Hound Group. The AKC first recognized the breed in 1885. The beagle was bred primarily for hunting rabbits and hares, and beagles are still excellent hunting dogs and companions. They enjoy the company of people and other dogs; however, they’re a challenge to train because they want to follow their noses. As the AKC puts it, “Beagles are at best temporarily obedient due to their independent nature, which is common among most hounds.”
   Small, compact, and hardy, Beagles are active companions for kids and adults alike. Canines in this dog breed are merry and fun loving, but being hounds, they can also be stubborn and require patient, creative training techniques. Their noses guide them through life, and they're never happier than when following an interesting scent. The Beagle originally was bred as a scenthound to track small game, mostly rabbits and hare. He is still used for this purpose in many countries, including the United States.

  In fourth place is the bulldog, a member of the Non Sporting Group. The bulldog originated in the British Isles, and the AKC recognized it in 1886. Bulldogs are thick-set dogs with short faces and sturdy limbs. The AKC describes these medium-sized dogs as “equable, resolute and dignified.” Despite a “well-earned” reputation for stubbornness, bulldogs are very intelligent and can be very successfully trained.
  Bulldogs originally were used to drive cattle to market and to compete in a bloody sport called bullbaiting. Today, they’re gentle companions who love kids. A brief walk and a nap on the sofa is just this dog breed’s speed.

  In third place is the golden retriever, a highly identifiable breed, which the AKC recognized in 1925. Golden retrievers are a member of the Sporting Group and are active, alert, and confident. As the AKC explains, “It’s not surprising that golden retrievers are one of the most popular dog breeds in the United States. Along with being exuberant and friendly, they are strong dogs and hard workers.”
  The Golden Retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds in the U.S. The breed's friendly, tolerant attitude makes him a fabulous family pet, and his intelligence makes him a highly capable working dog. Golden Retrievers excel at retrieving game for hunters, tracking, sniffing out drugs, and as therapy and assistance dogs. They're also natural athletes, and do well in dog sports such as agility and competitive obedience.
 This sporting breed has a sweet, gentle, people-pleasing personality. A well-bred Golden Retriever does not have strong guarding instincts, so don’t expect him to protect your home from burglars. He will, however, make friends with them and show them where the treats are.

  In second place is the German shepherd, a member of the Herding Group. The AKC recognized this breed in 1908. These dogs are smart and courageous, and they come from a long lineage of old herding and farm dogs. German shepherds are loyal family dogs and good guard dogs. According to the AKC, German shepherds are “considered dogdom’s finest all-purpose workers.”
 The German Shepherd Dog is a natural protector and so adaptable and intelligent that he has performed just about every job known to dog. If he had opposable thumbs, he would be unstoppable.
  The German Shepherd Dog is one of America's most popular dog breeds — for good reason. He's an intelligent and capable working dog. His devotion and courage are unmatched. And he's amazingly versatile, excelling at most anything he's trained to do: guide and assistance work for the handicapped, police and military service, herding, search and rescue, drug detection, competitive obedience and, last but not least, faithful companion.

  In first place is the Labrador retriever, a friendly and active member of the Sporting Group. The AKC recognized the breed in 1917. The Labrador retriever, the most popular dog breed in the United States, comes in three colors: yellow, black, and chocolate. These dogs are eager to please, which means they excel not only as family dogs, but also “as guide dogs for the blind, as part of search-and-rescue teams, or in narcotics detection with law enforcement.”
  Labrador Retrievers are among the most popular dog breeds out there today. Loyal, easy to get along with, and easy to train, these retrievers could be considered a neighborhood classic all around the United States and even in other parts of the world. But what exactly makes them such popular, well-respected dogs… and does a strong breed always mean that a Labrador Retriever will be the right dog for you?
  The Labrador Retriever was bred to be both a friendly companion and a useful working dog breed. Historically, he earned his keep as a fisherman’s helper: hauling nets, fetching ropes, and retrieving fish from the chilly North Atlantic. Today’s Labrador Retriever is as good-natured and hard working as his ancestors, and he’s America’s most popular breed. These days the Lab works as a retriever for hunters, assistance dog to the handicapped, show competitor, and search and rescue dog, among other canine jobs.



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Thursday, September 8, 2016

Top 10 Black Dogs Breeds

Top 10 Black Dogs Breeds
  Black colored dogs are usually rarer than the other color varieties. From all dog coat colors, the black color is also the most fascinating and one of the few ones that has been purposely bred for a specific function. In the Northern countries for example, the Black Norwegian Elkhound was bred as a separate breed since 1877 because its distinctive color helps the hunter see his dog in the snowy landscape.
  There's no doubt that black dogs have a bad reputation. According to the ASPCA, they are the last to be adopted and the first to be euthanized. What's worse is that many people perceive them as less lovable because they are harder to see, and have been negatively portrayed in the media. In celebration of black dogs, we've rounded up 10 of the most popular black dog breeds that are giving it their all to proudly represent their coat color.

1. Great Dane
  The Great Dane was originally bred to hunt wild boar, but he probably wouldn't be very good at it today. The ferociousness necessary to track down such a large, wily animal was eventually bred out of the Great Dane. He's now a gentle soul who generally gets along well with other dogs, animals, and humans.
AKC standard for Black Great Danes: The color shall be a glossy black. White markings at the chest and toes are not desirable.  Any variance in color or markings as described above shall be faulted to the extent of the deviation. Any Great Dane which does not fall within the above color classifications must be disqualified.

2. Rottweiler
  Rottweiler dogs are sturdy build rectangular proportioned energetic dog which is a little longer in length than in height. The body structure is heavy boned with powerful muscle and dense substantial physique. Great stamina to drive cattle throughout the day, Rottweiler is not ignorant in its duty of herding. The powerful and elegant gait of the dog is full of confidence, signifies good drive and approach. The coat of Rottweiler is dense and straight but moderately rough; collectively expression projects a keen, alert responsive and confident investigator.
  "Rottweiler breeders aim at a dog of abundant strength, black coated with clearly defined rich tan markings, whose powerful appearance does not lack nobility and which is exceptionally well suited to being a companion, service and working dog."This breed is all about balance, endurance, proportionality, intelligence and strength. The various standards in place for the Rottweiler's physical appearance specify these characteristics.

3.Cane Corso
  The black breed Cane Corso originates from Italy. They are a large Italian breed of dog that is also known as Italian mastiffs. This breed is reserved, calm, quiet and evenly tempered. They are also very well muscled and less bulky than other mastiff dogs. Cane Corsos are closely related to Neapolitan mastiffs and have many similarities with them. Most of the Cane Corso assist in guarding big properties and hunt big wild boars. For many people, they are the favourite black dog breed.
  Majestic look Cane Corso is a muscular dog with massive build. The look is furious rather dreadful to warn intruder without any action by dog. Cane Cosro can spring into action with astonishing speeds to pin culprits. This is a versatile breed domesticate able to a variety of applications starting from hunting, guardian, watchdog , general working dog besides trustworthy companion. Its short coat is coarser; some could be near to smooth while dense to offer resistance to water and other climatic severe effects. Favourite color is Black to achieve formidable expression.

4. Doberman Pinscher
  Doberman pinscher, popularly known as Doberman is a medium large sized domestic dog. They originate from Germany and in the early 19th century, they were used as guard dogs. They are a mix breed of Rottweiler, Black Terriers and German Pinscher. Dobermans are strong and sometimes they can also be stubborn. Height of a male Doberman is around 66-72 cm whereas females are around 61-68 cm. A Male Doberman weighs around 34-45 kg and female ones weigh 27-41 kgs. They are highly energetic and intelligent dogs, best used for police and military work.
  The Doberman is compactly built, muscular, powerful and square-proportioned. It combines elegance and strength with speed and endurance. Its carriage is proud and alert, and its gait is free and vigorous. Its coat is short, smooth and hard, showing off the exceptionally clean-cut lines of this athletic breed.
  The Doberman pinscher is an intelligent capable guardian, ever on the alert and ready to protect its family or home. It is also a loyal and adventurous companion. It likes to be mentally challenged and is a gifted obedience pupil. It is sensitive and very responsive to its owner's wishes, though some can be domineering. It is generally reserved with strangers. It can be aggressive with strange dogs.

5. Newfoundland
  Newfoundland is one of the strongest breeds of dog which is perfect for being a lifeguard. He was originally used as a working dog for pulling nets for fishermen and haul wood from the forest. The breed Newfoundland originates from Canada. It is well suited for working on both land as well as water. It is known for its giant size, calm dispositions, loyalty and also forbeing anexcellent swimmer.
  Brown, black, gray and black with white are the recognized Newfoundland colors. Solid colors and white with black may have white on the chest, chin, toes and on the tip of the tail. A tinge of bronze may appear on a gray or black coat and lighter furnishings may appear on a brown or gray coat. Facial and muzzle hair is short and fine. The back legs are feathered for the entire length. The hair on the tail is long and dense.

6. Portuguese Water Dog

  Classified as a working dog, the Portuguese Water Dog is a hard worker and a loyal companion. It has been appreciated for its strength, soundness and spirtit for centuries along the coast of Portugal. This robust breed has a waterproof coat, giving it the ability to swim for hours. Called a Cao de Aqua, or dog of water in Portugal, the dog was bred as a working dog for fisherman on boats. The breed has dove for fish, retrieved broken nets, carried messages back to shore and guarded his master's boats while in foreign ports.
  The Water Dog has a thick coat of strong hair. It covers the body evenly except where the forearm joins the groin area where it is thinner. Some coats are curly and lusterless. Other coats are more wavy than curly with a slight sheen. 
  Coat color is white, black or tones of brown. The coat may also be a combination of brown, black and white. Water Dogs with white, black or black and white coats have bluish skin.

7.Neapolitan Mastiff 

  With its massive size made even more imposing by its abundant loose skin and dewlap, the Neapolitan Mastiff may have the most alarming appearance of any dog, and some say this look was purposefully bred in order to scare away intruders without the dog having to act. However, when forced to act, the Neo can spring into action with surprising speed. Its massive muscular body can knock down almost any intruder. Its huge head with short, powerful jaws and large teeth can crush or hold an opponent. The skin is tough and hanging, adding to the imposing impression of size as well as formidable expression.
  The Neapolitan Mastiff was bred for centuries to guard its family. As such, it is incredibly loyal and devoted to its family, watchful and suspicious of strangers, and tolerant of acquaintances. It is a stay-at-home-type dog. Although it is loving toward children, its sheer size can make accidents possible. It may not get along well with other dogs, especially domineering-type dogs. Because of its size, it should be carefully socialized at an early age.
  The Neo is short-haired with straight hairs that are one inch long or shorter. The coat is dense with hair uniform in length, giving a smooth appearance all over the body. There are no tufts or fringed hair anywhere. 
  Solid colors for coats include light and dark shades of black, gray-blue, tawny and mahogany. The AKC allows some brindling in all colors if the brindling is tan. This is known as reverse brindling. Some may have white markings on the chest, throat, underside of the body or on the toes. White hairs behind the wrists are accepted by the AKC.

8. Havanese
  Known for being the “National Dog of Cuba” and the only dog breed native to the island country, the Havanese is a small dog breed known for its silky coat that protects it against the harsh heat of the tropics. As a trainable and intelligent dog that possesses a naturally friendly and affectionate disposition, the Havanese is currently ranked as the 28th most popular dog breed in the United States by the American Kennel Club. If you are wondering whether the Havanese is the perfect match for you, the following is a complete description on this energetic toy breed.
  The abundant coat of the Havanese is acceptable in all coat colors, with white, fawn, red, cream brown, beige, orange, black, blue, chocolate, and silver being quite common. While the coat may be one solid color, others will have markings that create sable, brindle, black and tan, Irish piebald, part-colored, piebald, beige black, and more color patterns.
  Sometimes referred to as “Havana Silk Dogs,” the Havanese is a double-coated breed with soft, wavy, and silky lightweight hair on both the outer coat and undercoat. Reaching six to eight inches in length if never clipped or altered, the profuse coat is extremely light and insulating with a sheen appearance.

9.Yorkshire Terrier
  Affectionately referred to as “Yorkies” by their loyal owners, Yorkshire Terriers are members of the Toy Group that offer big personalities in a small package. As a portable pooch prized for its compact size and luxurious long-haired coat, the Yorkshire Terrier is currently ranked as the 6th most popular breed in the United States by the American Kennel Club. Read on to find a full breed description on the Yorkshire Terrier to determine whether the active dog will be an ideal match for your family’s lifestyle.
  Since the breed is often defined by its color, the breed standard indicates that the only acceptable coloring for the Yorkshire Terrier is steel blue and tan. While the body and tail are typically blue, the remainder of the dog’s body is tan. Puppies are often tan, black, and brown with white markings, but the pups will usually reach its final coloring by their third birthday.

10. Affenpinscher
  The Affenpinscher is a terrier type breed that originated in Central Europe, specifically Munich, Germany and France. The name Affenpinscher translates from German into Monkey Terrier. It is one of the oldest breeds in the Toy Group. During the 17th century they were kept on farms and stores to serve as ratters and in the home to keep mice out of the mistresses' boudoirs. It is an energetic little dog with the face and impishness of a monkey. They strut around with all the confidence of a larger dog. Their small size makes them a good dog for city and apartment dwellers. They are active indoors and can most of their exercise inside.
  The Affenpinscher's coat hair is thick and rough and about one-inch in length on the shoulders and body. The hair may be shorter on the backside and the tail. The hair on the head, chest, neck, stomach and legs is a little longer and softer. An adult will have a cape of sturdy hair that blends into the back coat near the withers. Longer hair on the head, beard and eyebrows frames the face to form the monkey-like expression. 
  Coat colors include black, red, silver, gray, black and tan or belge (a mixture of black and reddish brown.) Dogs with a black coat may have a few silver or white areas mixed in or may have a rusty cast. Reds vary from orange-tan to brownish red. The belge color coats have black, brown and/or white mixed in the red. Some dogs may have a small white spot on the chest. This is not penalized by kennel clubs but large white patches are not desirable.


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Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Everything about your Rottweiler

Everything about your Rottweiler
   Choosing to add a furry friend to your growing household is a long-term commitment, and picking a breed that fits your lifestyle presents the key to a happy home. With over 160 American Kennel Club-recognized breeds, that decision can seem overwhelming. We're here to help you meet the breed that's right for you. If you're looking for a gentle four-legged giant to add to your pack, find out everything you need to know about the Rottweiler.
  Rottweilers are one of the breeds that tends to be misunderstood and misrepresented way too much. They are NOT mean dogs, nor are they wantonly aggressive or 'born fighters'.
Photo by Vladyslav Dukhin from Pexels

  The REAL Rottweiler is a highly intelligent, brave, loyal and loving dog who will be your companion for life. Bred and raised properly, a Rottweiler puppy is the perfect 'mans-best-friend'.
  If you want a Rottweiler, learn how to raise it first! If you don't get these dogs off to the right start, you may never be able to control them, and they will be a constant danger to you, your family, and others. With a bite strength roughly 25% greater than a German Shepherd, they must be trained - it isn't optional. If you do learn to do it right, you will own one of the best and safest pets it is possible to own.

History
  The breed's history likely dates to the Roman Empire. It is likely that the Rottweiler is a descendant of ancient Roman drover dogs, a mastiff-type dog that was a dependable, rugged dog with great intelligence and guarding instincts. During their quest to conquer Europe, the Roman legion traveled in large numbers across the continent. The non-existence of refrigeration meant the soldiers had to bring herds of cattle with them on their excursions for food. These drover dogs were not only used to keep the herds of cattle together, but to guard the supply stock at night. Around 74 A.D. the Roman army travelled across the alps and into the southern part of modern day Germany. For the next two centuries the Roman drover dogs were continually utilized in herding and driving cattle for trade even after the Romans were driven out of the area by the Swabians.
  A town in this region was eventually given the name Rottweil. It became an important trade center and the descendants of the Roman cattle dogs proved their worth by driving the cattle to market and protecting the cattle from robbers and wild animals. The dogs are said to have been used by traveling butchers at markets during the Middle Ages to guard money pouches tied around their necks. The dogs eventually came to be called Rottweiler Metzgerhunds, or butcher dogs. As railroads became the primary method for moving stock to market, the need for the breed declined, as did the number of Rottweilers. The number of Rottweilers diminished so severely that by 1882 in a dog show in Heilbronn, there was only one very poor representative of the breed.
  The buildup to World War I saw a great demand for police dogs, and that led to a revival of interest in the Rottweiler. During the First and Second World Wars, Rottweilers were put into service in various roles, including as messenger, ambulance, draught, and guard dogs.
  The Deutscher Rottweiler-Klub (DRK, German Rottweiler Club), the first Rottweiler club in Germany, was founded on 13 January 1914, and followed by the creation of the Süddeutscher Rottweiler-Klub (SDRK, South German Rottweiler Club) on 27 April 1915 and eventually became the IRK (International Rottweiler Club). The DRK counted around 500 Rottweilers, and the SDRK 3000 Rottweilers. The goals of the two clubs were different. The DRK aimed to produce working dogs and did not emphasise the morphology of the Rottweiler.
  The various German Rottweiler Clubs amalgamated to form the Allgemeiner Deutscher Rottweiler Klub (ADRK, General German Rottweiler Club) in 1921. This was officially recorded in the register of clubs and associations at the district court of Stuttgart on 27 January 1924. The ADRK is recognised worldwide as the home club of the Rottweiler.
  In 1931 the Rottweiler was officially recognised by the American Kennel Club. In 1936, Rottweilers were exhibited in Britain at Crufts. In 1966, a separate register was opened for the breed. In fact, in the mid-1990s, the popularity of the Rottweiler reached an all-time high with it being the most registered dog by the American Kennel Club.

Overview
  This breed continues to excel at serving its original breeding purpose: to protect and serve. The fierce and friendly Rottweiler is known for its territorial instincts and warrior traits. It's so well known as a fighter that some cities have chosen to ban this tough breed from households. Without a doubt, the no-nonsense Rottweiler has massive power — we're talking 328 pounds of pressure from a single bite. As tough as this pup can be, it's also known to show kindness and loyalty to its human masters.

Should you get a puppy or an adult dog? 

  I've had both, and there are several factors that play into this decision. A puppy will give you the advantage of starting all training from scratch, on a clean slate if you will. This is helpful because training a Rottie can be tricky, so the earlier the better! An adult dog may come with some excess baggage, such as a history of abuse (like my female, "Roxy") or neglect, lack of training, etc. However, these are not impossible to overcome for an experienced dog owner. In fact, not enough can be said for how wonderful it can be to rescue an adult Rottie from a shelter! Giving one a second chance may be the best for you both, it’s just important to be patient and allow extra time for the dog to adjust. So many animals are killed every year in shelters because there aren’t enough homes for them all, so adoption could be a great option! Also keep in mind that a puppy will need potty training, while many adult shelter dogs already have that experience. If you do decide on a puppy, never purchase one from a pet store; those usually come from puppy mills, which are kept in deplorable condition and usually result in pets with many health problems! 

Breed at a glace:
  • Active lifestyle;
  • Environmentally adaptable;
  • Easy grooming;
  • Guard dog capabilities;
  • Territorial.
  Grooming for Rottweilers is minimal, including bi-monthly baths, as well as regular nail trims and ear cleaning. Keep in mind, however, that they do shed quite a bit. Their fairly thick undercoat is short, but will still cause little black tumbleweeds of fur all around your house. Be prepared for weekly if not daily sweeping or vacuuming. Since they have black nails and you will be unable to see the “quick”  it is best to consult a professional groomer if you are not experienced with nail trimming.
  Considerable cost can be involved in caring for a Rottie. First you will definitely want to consider spaying or neutering your pet, not only to control pet overpopulation, but also to have a cleaner, healthier, more well-mannered dog. This can cost anywhere from $100 for a puppy to $400 or more for an adult. Shelter dogs should already be “fixed” before you adopt them. This procedure is routine and relatively safe, and reduces or even eliminates the risk of certain cancers and other health issues. Annual vaccinations can range in cost from $50-150, and monthly flea, tick, and heartworm preventative may cost around $30 per month.

  A Rottweiler’s lifespan can be 10-15 years with proper care. They can suffer from a number of health issues, for which you will need to be prepared financially, physically, and emotionally. Because of their size, they are prone to arthritis, which can make walking, standing and lying down very difficult, especially if they are overweight. If your dog needs help getting up from the floor, getting into the car for a vet visit, or using the stairs, are you physically capable of helping him? Also, there are a number of quality joint supplements on the market, which can be used as preventative care and for pain relief as well. These products will not come cheap for such a large breed, as the dosing is based on weight. Rotties are predisposed to different forms of bone cancer, and it is not uncommon for that to be the cause of death. There are conventional and holistic treatments available which can prolong and even improve the quality of your dog’s life, but currently there is no cure.  You may also encounter other less severe health problems, such as allergies, ear infections, or scrapes and cuts (they are a little clumsy!).


  Breed standards
  • AKC group: Working
  • UKC group: Guardian Dog
  • Average lifespan: 8 - 10 years
  • Average size:  75 - 110 pounds
  • Coat appearance: Short, sleek, coarse
  • Coloration: Black and tan markings
  • Hypoallergenic: No
  • Other identifiers: Large and muscular build; defined tan markings; small pendant ears
  • Possible alterations: Can be seen with either a natural-length tail or short-cropped tail
  • Comparable Breeds: Doberman Pinscher, Mastiff
  Is this breed right for you?
Rottweilers require immense amounts of constant training and discipline. This breed is not recommended for novice owners or those without the proper dedication to training this fierce dog. All potential owners should check their city guidelines, as some cities have created a ban against this tough breed. Due to its protective and territorial background, this breed requires early training and socialization to become a safe and loving family pet. Rottweilers can easily adapt to any living environment as long as daily exercise is part of their routine.

Steps
Do Your Research First
  Find out as much as you can about Rottweilers, read books, search online, go to local dog shows, talk to breeders and so on. As with any breed, Rotties have their own distinct personality traits and breed-specific characteristics. The better you understand them, the easier it will be to raise your pup properly.

Choose A Breeder Carefully
  There are lots of excellent Rottweiler breeders but also lots of not-so-good ones, take your time and don't go with the first one you see. Choose a breeder who does all the appropriate health-screenings (eg. OFA, cardiac, eyes) on their breeding stock. Also check for both conformation (show lines) and working ability (Schutzhund or tracking for example) as this shows that the dogs look and act like Rottweilers! Ask any potential breeder questions, and expect them to ask you questions too.

Take Time To Pick The Right Puppy
  Rottweiler puppies are irresistible, but you don't necessarily want to take home the first pair of puppy-dog eyes you see. Each pup is an individual with his/her own personality and combination of genes. A good breeder will be able to help you find the perfect pup for your home/lifestyle/plans.

Be Prepared For Puppy Parenthood
  • A new puppy will take a lot of time, patience, love and money and you need to be ready for that. The first few days can be a bit hectic but things will soon settle into a routine. Here are a few things you'll need to know/do.....
  • Make sure your pup stays up to date with vaccinations and de-worming treatments. Rottweilers are especially vulnerable to a viral disease called Parvo and you need to be extra-vigilant during these early weeks.
  • Start housebreaking right away and use a crate to help prevent 'accidents' in the house. One of the biggest parts of housebreaking a pup is not allowing bad habits to form. Always take your pup to the same spot outdoors to 'do his business' and only allow him free-reign indoors when you're supervising closely.
  • Begin training immediately too. Rottweilers are very intelligent and eager to please. Start with basic name recognition and housebreaking as soon as you get home, and add simple commands like 'sit' and 'stay' as soon as your pup feels at home. Rottweilers don't need (or respond well to) harsh corrections or training methods. They're sensitive and smart, and will learn quickly if you use positive, reward-based training methods. Once your pup is fully vaccinated enroll him in a formal Puppy Obedience Class.
  • Socialize him early, and throughout his life. Rotties are a guardian breed and are naturally reserved, tending to be a bit aloof or 'stand-offish' with strangers.
Love Him!
  Rottweilers may be big dogs, but they love to sit in your lap and are big 'softies'. Give your Rottweiler puppy lots of love and attention so that he grows up happy and confident.

Tips
  • Kids  Rotties are great family dogs. They love children. These are not "one man" dogs. They belong to whichever family member they are with at the time. No one will feel left out. Be prepared though - if given their way, they will spend most of their time with the kids; They really love kids. For those with small children, remember: NEVER leave a young child alone with any dog for any amount of time!

  • House Pets  Rotties love to lounge around the house and soak up love and laziness with their masters. They enjoy being "house dogs" as long as they have a yard in which to play and plenty of attention from their master. Rotties tend to follow their masters around the house from room to room, settling in wherever you do. They are part teddy bear, part ornery best friend, part draft horse and part guard dog, all in one truly beautiful package. They love to be handled and you should get them used to having their mouths and paws handled to make your vet's job easier down the road. This is really important - they should allow you to handle any part of their body without stiffening up or getting stressed. Keep gently doing it until they get used to it.

  • More Than One?  Having two Rotties is great fun and they provide each other extra exercise. If you want two, I strongly recommend getting a male and a female instead of two males. Males are far more aggressive and ornery than females and if they get in a fight, they are going to be badly hurt, possibly killed. I also recommend getting your dogs neutered after they reach 6 months of age. This does not reduce their effectiveness as watch dogs and males will still learn to pee with their legs raised.

  • Intelligence  Rotties are incredibly intelligent. Ours learned to turn light switches on and off, open fence gate latches and open sliding cabinet doors. These are things they learned on their own! We have taught them tricks in addition to the standard obedience commands. They are really fun dogs. They actually plan complex diversions to distract the other Rottie's attention while they steal the desired toy.  Think ahead if you want to be their boss because Rottweilers are problem-solving smart.

  • Crates  Get a crate and use it! This is the place your dog will go when he doesn't want to be disturbed. Respect that - always. Never try to pull him out of his crate for anything, including punishments and treats. His crate is his one place that you must respect. It is also the place you will put your dog when you don't want him to disturb you. He won't mind. After all, it's "his place."  I do not recommend having the dog's food and water dishes in his crate unless absolutely necessary. Because Rotties have such warm coats, I strongly recommend wire frame crates instead of the plastic ones. The extra ventilation is very important. Wire crates have the added advantage of folding for transport.
  • Grooming and Maintenance  Rotties only need to be brushed once a week. A slicker brush is good. Of course, you can brush them as often as you like, but only bathe them about twice a year. Over-bathing will dry out their skins and their coats. They are clean smelling dogs and their coat should not develop any odor unless something is wrong. Because they have folded-over ears, you should clean their ears once a week. You can buy a solution at a pet store or from your vet for this. I prefer a one-step solution. You put your dog in a down-stay, straddle him, and squirt solution into an ear until it is about to overfill. Then stick a regular cotton ball in the ear to keep the fluid in, and fold the ear down. Hold his ear against his head to keep the cotton ball and solution in. Repeat for other ear and then hold their ears shut for 10 full minutes; then release and remove the cotton balls. Some dogs don't mind it and some hate it but it really needs to be done once a week. Trimming toe nails is really not hard with good sharp clippers, some practice and a regular routine. I do it every 2 weeks. If you start all these routines when your Rottweiler is a little puppy (8 to 10 weeks), they are much easier to do when he is grown. That way he just accepts them as the routine order of life.
  • The Vet  Get a good one, and keep him! Work out a written schedule of shots and HeartGuard for heart worm protection, and stick to it like glue. We use an animal hospital that treats farm and zoo animals, including tigers and such. This helps us know that the vets there are experienced and stay on top of medical advances, but are also practical minded. Rottweilers' immune systems tend to over-react to shots (vaccinations) and drugs. Expect your Rottie to feel under the weather for a day or two after getting a shot or series of pills. Usually, this is not a problem, just something of which to be aware
  • Food  Feed your Rott a high quality food if possible. One reader suggests making sure your dog's food contains the amino acid taurine to avoid heart problems. Read the ingredients on the dogfood bag and talk to your vet and local breeders about this. If your dog needs weight control, I suggest controlling portion size instead of going to a lower protein-lower fat dog food.
  • Guard Dog Or Pet?  You do not need to train a Rottweiler to protect you and your family. It is a strong instinct in them and is absolutely trustworthy. 
  • Read The Book!  Go to your local library and get the oldest available copy of the Monks of New Skete's book - "The Art Of Raising A Puppy," follow their basic techniques, and your Rottie will never let you down - and you will never let him down either. If your dog is already an adult, they still have a book for you - "How To Be Your Dog's Best Friend." The Monks' latest books have gone politically correct and gotten away from their earlier strength, which was observing natural dog behavior and using it to teach humans how to be part of their own "pack." Think about it: Non-domestic canines (dogs and wolves) use the dominance down constantly to maintain pack order while at the same time avoiding real fights. If it's awful, why do dogs do it and why does it work for them? I strongly recommend trying to find an older version of this book at a local library. The older books are more factual and straightforward.
A dream day in the life of a Rottweiler
  Work must be a part of this breed's daily lifestyle. Whether it's daily training, herding on a farm, hunting or protecting, it must be kept occupied with a job to fulfill its natural instincts. With proper training this breed makes a loyal and loving family pet that's happy spending his days looking after the household and protecting his family.

Media portrayal
  The portrayal of Rottweilers as evil dogs in several fictional films and TV series, most notably in The Omen, along with sensationalist press coverage, has created a negative image of the breed. However, some films and television shows, such as Lethal Weapon 3, the 1998 Film Half Baked, and the hit HBO show Entourage, have portrayed Rottweilers in a positive light. They are also featured in the children's book series Good Dog, Carl by Alexandra Day.
  In an event widely reported by the media, a two-year-old UK Rottweiler named Jake owned by Liz Maxted-Bluck was recognised for his bravery by the RSPCA. The dog was out walking with his owner when they heard screams. Jake chased off a man as he molested a woman on Hearsall Common, Coventry, in July 2009. He located the attacker and his victim in thick scrub, chased off the attacker, led his owner to the scene, then stood guard over the victim until police arrived. The attacker was convicted of serious sexual assault and jailed for four years. Jake was nominated by police for the bravery award and medallion after the incident. Det Con Clive Leftwich, from Coventry police station, said: "From our point of view Jake the Rottweiler stopped a serious sexual assault from becoming even worse."

Enjoy that Rottweiler!

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