LUV My dogs: Northern breed

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Showing posts with label Northern breed. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Northern breed. Show all posts

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Swedish Lapphund

Everything about your Swedish Lapphund
  The Swedish Lapphund is a breed of dog of the Spitz type from Sweden, one of three Lapphund breeds developed from a type of dog used by the Sami people for herding and guarding their reindeer. The expression "the black beauty of Norrland" is very often attributed to the Swedish lapphund, which is most likely one of Sweden's oldest breeds. The Swedish name of the breed is Svensk lapphund.

Overview
  A typical spitz type dog of slightly less than medium size, with proud head carriage, and a weather resistant coat. The body is compact and slightly longer than tall. The chest is deep to the elbow, and there is prominent forechest. The ribcage is long and oval, with well developed last ribs. The back is level, strong, muscular and springy. The loin is short and broad. The croup is proportionally long, broad and slightly sloping. The belly is slightly tucked up.
  The breed is very receptive and willing to work, and its abilities as a guard and herder made it very useful in the reindeer trade. They are lively, alert, kind and affectionate, easy to train and suitable for many different endeavors such as obedience, agility, herding and tracking.

Other Quick Facts:
  • There are approximately 1,200 Swedish Lapphunds in the world, most of which live in Sweden. Others are located in Finland, Norway, England, Denmark, The Netherlands, France, Germany, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, Slovenia, Russia, and Australia. Only a few live in the United States.
  • The Lappie used to use his bark to scare off predators and alert reindeer to his presence. Although he doesn’t encounter many wolves or do much herding these days, he retains his tendency to bark.
Breed standards
Breed Group: Herding
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 33 to 53 pounds
Coat appearance: tight, harsh, medium length outer coat with a soft, dense undercoat
Coloration:  Black, Brown, White
Hypoallergenic: No

History
  The Swedish lapphund has its origins among the ancient hunting tribes of northern Scandinavia, from the land that the Sámi people call Sapmi. In Sámi mythology it is said that the lapphund sought the post of worker amongst the Sámi people in exchange that it would always be well-treated. The lapphund has been used mainly for hunting and guarding. When the Sámi people started to keep domestic reindeer in the mid-18th century, the lapphund's repertoire was expanded to include herding.
  Hard work in the barren landscape of northern Scandinavia has created a very resilient breed. The shifting climate demands a weatherproof coat that is easy to maintain. The rough terrain and the varied work demand a dog with endurance, agility, intelligence and independence. The resulting Swedish lapphund is a well-rounded working dog, well suited both for work as a farm, hunting, and herding dog, and as a pet.



Temperament
 Typical Swedish Lapphunds are clever, gentle, and biddable dogs. In their native Sweden, they undergo an assessment of their temperament – known as mentalbeskrivning – which has allowed breeders to select dogs with the most desirable behavioural traits, while avoiding more negative ones, and this seems to have been quite a successful approach.
  The Lapphund is generally tolerant and sociable with other dogs, and may accept cats if the two are raised together. Likewise, it is fond of children, but it is vital that this working breed is afforded plenty of exercise, as it can otherwise become excessively boisterous, especially when playing. The Lapphund has no tendency to be aggressive, but is aloof with strangers, and will respond to their approach with loud, enthusiastic barking.

Health
  Although the Swedish Lapphund is thought to be a relatively healthy breed, diabetes mellitus and progressive retinal atrophy are a few of the medical conditions that have been identified in the breed.And because they are so rare, popularity and overbreeding have yet to take a major toll on their health, it is advisable to ask the breeders about incidence of hip dysplasia and eye problems, since those are common in many different breeds.

Care
  Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness, or a bad odor that could indicate an infection. 
  If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Start grooming your Lappie at an early age so he learns to accept it willingly.Brush the coat weekly to keep it clean and remove dead hair.

Living conditions
  It is dog resistant to bad weather, which likes to live outdoors, in a colder climate with a loving and active family. It likes exercise, long walks and feels the need to burn its energy. It doesn't run away from its master. It needs socialization and training.

Trainability
  Controlling this tendency to bark is perhaps the greatest challenge in training a Swedish Lapphund, for it is otherwise a dog that learns quickly and responds well to praise and positive reinforcement. Teaching a “silent” command is a really useful technique to curtail any nuisance barking, but it requires patience and rigorous consistency in training.
  The other approach to managing this vocalisation is thorough socialisation, introducing the Lapphund to as many new people as possible during its formative months as a pup. While this will never completely eliminate this noisy instinctive behaviour, it is likely to make it a less frequent and persistent annoyance.

Exercise
  Naturally active little dogs, they should always be encouraged to remain so. They need to be taken on a daily walk.

Grooming
  The Lappie has a thick double coat that forms a ruff around the neck and is longer on the back of the legs and the tail. Brush the coat weekly to keep it clean and remove dead hair. During spring and fall shedding seasons, daily brushing will help keep excess hair under control.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness, or a bad odor that could indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Start grooming your Lappie at an early age so he learns to accept it willingly.

Children and Other Pets
  Swedish Lapphunds are known to be very good around children thanks to their gentle, placid natures. However, any interaction between toddlers and a dog should always be well supervised by an adult to make sure playtime does not get too boisterous which could end up with someone being knocked over and hurt, especially when dogs are still young.
  When dogs have been well socialised from a young enough age, they generally get on well with other dogs they meet and if they have grown up with a family cat in a household, they usually get on well together. However, a Lapp might decide to chase off any other cats they encounter in their travels. Care should be taken when they are around any smaller animals and pets just to be on the safe side.

Did You Know?
  • The Lapphund comes from the far north and is intolerant of heat. Keep him indoors on hot or humid days.
  • The Swedish Lapphund is the national breed of Sweden and was the first dog registered by the Swedish Kennel Club.
  • The Swedish Lapphund was added to the Foundation Stock Service program in 2007.
  • The Swedish Lapphund has been approved to compete in AKC Companion events since January 1, 2010.
  • The Swedish Lapphund has been assigned the Herding Group designation.
  • The Swedish Lapphund is an ancient breed, in existence for thousands of years. It is a natural breed believed to be a descendent of the ancient artic wolf.
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Everything about your Swedish Elkhound

Everything about your Swedish Elkhound
  Also known as the Jämthund and Moosehound, the Swedish Elkhound has a wolf-like appearance with a long tapered snout and a dark gray-and-white body. In fact, this breed of dog was developed to hunt moose so they may share more than just their looks with wild wolves. The Swedish Elkhound is an active and intelligent breed that requires a lot of exercise and attention but, if you are able to dedicate the time, they are a unique and wonderful breed.

Overview
  The Swedish Elkhound is a large, rectangular spitz breed, clean cut, strong, substantial and agile. It must not give the impression of having a long body or of being overly heavy in body, as it is a breed known for great endurance. Courageous and energetic, but also stoically calm.
  As with most breeds developed for hunting, the Swedish Elkhound requires a lot of regular exercise to stay fit, both physically and mentally. It quickly becomes bored if kept indoors for too long and can become destructive.

Breed standards
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 12-13 years
Average size: 55-77 lbs
Coat appearance: Close lying (not flat); smooth on head and front of legs
Coloration: Grey (light or dark); light markings on sides of the muzzle, cheeks, throat, chest, belly, legs and under the tail
Hypoallergenic: Unknown
Best Suited For: active singles, house with a yard, single dog family, experienced dog owners
Temperament: active, independent, affectionate, dominant
Comparable Breeds: Swedish Vallhund, Norwegian Elkhound

History
  The Jämthund received official recognition as a breed in 1946, due to intensive work by Aksel Lindström and others. Before that, the Jämthund and the Norwegian Elkhound were seen as the same breed. They are used for moose hunting and sled pulling. In the local dialect, it used to be referred to as bear dog. It is one of very few dogs that will not back off from a bear.


Personality
  The Swedish Elkhound is an intelligent and brave breed of hunting dog. They are hardy and courageous enough to face down a bear but gentle enough to make a wonderful family pet. Although calm and affectionate with its family, the Swedish Elkhound can be slightly dominant with other dogs and has a strong prey drive. 
  A truly all-around canine, it can go from a hunting trip and back to the family hearth with great aplomb. It takes things in stride and doesn't get ruffled easily, making it a steady partner in the field or at home.
  The Swedish Elkhound is a happy learner who loves to please its owner. It should be socialized early to prevent dominance issues later.

Health 
  As an ancient breed, the Swedish Elkhound is fairly health and hardy. Still, all dogs are prone to developing certain health conditions. Some of the conditions known to affect the Swedish Elkhound include hip dysplasia, skin allergies, elbow dysplasia, liver disease, and hearing problems. This breed is also prone to obesity which can increase the risk for other health problems like diabetes and heart disease.

Care
  The coat of this breed would need extensive grooming. The longish coat would need to be thoroughly brushed everyday to remove mats and tangles. These are hunting dogs and as such they need to be carefully cleaned and checked for burrs, thorns and foreign bodies on the ears and eyes after the dog has been hunting. The dog should be bathed only when necessary so as not to remove the weather proofing of the coat.

Living Conditions
  Best known for its curious and adventurous behaviour, the Swedish Elkhound is full of character. These dogs thrive on strong and dependable relationships with humans, and they often look to their owner for guidance and support. They are very bright, yet stubborn and overly confident, creating difficulty in training.
  As a pet, the Swedish Elkhound is loyal, loving, and affectionate, adores its family, loves and tolerates the children. These are probably the reasons why this breed makes wonderful family dogs.
  Swedish Elkhound's are active dogs; they would need large spaces to burn their excess energies. For this reason, an apartment or a home in the city would not be a suitable living arrangement for this breed. With the dense weather resistant coat, the dog is well equipped to withstand extreme weather conditions. These dogs would appreciate to be allowed to roam vast open spaces in the rural area.

Training
  The training of the Swedish Elkhound is a relatively challenging task. Because of its propensity to independent thinking and sharp mind it’s highly advisable to avoid dull or repetitive assignments during training sessions. Nonetheless this dog is always glad to please its master if he demonstrates qualities of a true leader.
  Consistency and adequately firm treatment are obligatory requirements of the breeds’ successful training. Reward your pet’s obedience with delicious treats and your Swedish Elkhound will readily follow your command. Housebreaking may be difficult for this breed and its puppy should be provided with lots of chances to roam around outdoor.

Exercise
  The Swedish Elkhound was developed as an all-around working dog and it still retains much of its industriousness. It won’t make the best four-legged companion for an apartment dweller, which will be off his feet trying to satisfy the dog’s need for exercises.
  Daily playtime in a safely enclosed area is essential for good mental and physical health of this breed. It also loves having some important job to perform and stands out for unbelievable endurance. Remember that your Swedish Elkhound will inevitably pick up habits to destructiveness and unreasonable barking if you don’t devote enough attention to walking and playing with your pet.

Grooming
  The coat of this breed would need extensive grooming. The longish coat would need to be thoroughly brushed everyday to remove mats and tangles. These are hunting dogs and as such they need to be carefully cleaned and checked for burrs, thorns and foreign bodies on the ears and eyes after the dog has been hunting. The dog should be bathed only when necessary so as not to remove the weather proofing of the coat.

Benefits and Disadvantages
  There are many benefits to owning a Swedish Elkhound. This active breed is always on the go, and often quite amusing and entertaining to watch while at play. When properly socialized from a young age, the Swedish Elkhound gets along well with small children and other pets, often making friends quickly due to its need to belong to a pack. 
  These dogs are alert and aware of their surroundings, making effective watch dogs by announcing the arrival of guests and unwanted visitors, and serving as a deterrent to would-be intruders. The Swedish Elkhound is loyal, loving, and affectionate, making an excellent hunting dog, family pet, and companion alike.
  There are also disadvantages to owning a Swedish Elkhound. These active and adventurous dogs require large amounts of daily exercise and room to run and play outdoors. Anyone wishing to purchase this breed lacking the adequate amount of time and space to dedicate to the dog is strongly advised against doing so. A Swedish Elkhound not receiving the proper amount of exercise and space will often act out by destroying property, chewing, barking, whining, and ignoring basic training such as housebreaking.
  The Swedish Elkhound has a strong instinct to hunt and will occasionally indulge in a good chase. When on the run, these dogs are surprisingly quick, and may pose a threat to other animals, neighbourhood pets, and small woodland creatures. The Swedish Elkhound must be leashed or properly secured at all times when outdoors.
  As previously mentioned the Swedish Elkhound remains rather rare outside of its native Sweden and can prove difficult to obtain. Individuals seeking to purchase this breed often encounter such challenges as inability to locate a breeder, high prices, and being placed on long waiting lists.
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Everything about your Canadian Eskimo Dog

 Everything about your Canadian Eskimo Dog
  The Canadian Eskimo Dog looks very much like a Husky being a Spitz-type breed that hails from the Arctic regions of the world. These handsome dogs are recognised by The Kennel Club and over the years, although their numbers still remain low here in the UK, they are becoming a popular choice with people who are familiar with the breed and who enjoy competing with dog teams. Often called Qimmiqs, the Canadian Eskimo Dog boasts a lot of stamina having been bred to pull sleds over vast distances in challenging conditions and arctic terrains. They are true working dogs rather than pets and are highly prized in Greenland where a renewed interest in cultural heritage saved the breed from extinction.

Overview
  Canadian Eskimo Dogs greatly resemble medium-sized American wolves. However, the dogs have shorter and curvier tails than their wild counterparts. They also lack the black wrist markings that are characteristic of European wolf breeds. Canadian Eskimo Dogs are part of the Spitz family of dogs. Therefore, they have the typical curly tails and thick coats that their kin do. These dogs also have strong, muscular bodies that are well-suited for working in harsh Arctic environments. Canadian Eskimo dogs typically have dark colored, yellow or hazel eyes. 
  Blue eyes are considered by the United Kennel Club to be a disqualifying flaw. These dogs also have wedge-shaped heads, broad skulls, short necks, and tapered muzzles. Their teeth should meet in a scissors bite. Erect ears with rounded tips are yet another breed feature. Canadian Eskimo dogs also have round feet and muscular limbs. These dogs should move at a brisk trot.

Breed standards
AKC group: Utility
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 10-15 years
Average size: 40-88 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, dense, double, thick
Coloration: Black, Black & White, Grey, Liver, Red, White
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards
Temperament: Affectionate, hard-working, gentle, brave
Comparable Breeds: Alaskan Malamute, Siberian Husky

History
  Canadian Eskimo Dogs are thought to date as far back as 1100 A.D. when the Inuit people and their pets arrived in the area that was to later become Canada. Members of this breed are very closely related to the Greenland dog. Eskimo dogs are among the oldest indigenous breeds in North America. They are also one of the few native Canadian dog varieties.
  Early members of this multi-purpose breed were used to pull sleds, hunt game, and carry goods. Canadian Eskimo Dogs became especially popular during the arctic explorations that took place in the 19th and 20th centuries, but demand for these dogs began to wane once snowmobiles became prevalent in the region. This breed was eventually recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1996.


Temperament
  Unsurprisingly, Eskimo Dogs are incredibly tough, stoical characters. They are also, in some ways, “softer” than other Spitzes, especially the Arctic breeds, with many people describing them as being naturally submissive, readily deferring to human authority rather than being inclined to challenge it. These hard workers are intensely loyal, and are gregarious with their own kind; indeed, Canadian Eskimo Dogs should be kept in groups, rather than as individuals.
  It is difficult to imagine that many homes can provide the right environment for this breed; it has colossal energy reserves, and is highly motivated by work. Owners involved in sledding or skijoring may be an exception, although they are likely to choose another more racy breed if they have any competitive inclinations.

Health 
  The Canadian Eskimo Dog is generally a healthy breed not troubled by the consequences of inbreeding due to a large foundation stock. Like all breeds, however, the breed is prone to several minor health issues including hip dysplasia, gastric torsion, entropion, cataracts, heat intolerance, and arthritis.

Living Conditions
  They are not usually recommended for apartments, however they can live in apartments if well trained and properly exercised. Canadian Eskimo Dogs are very active indoors and do best with a fenced-in large yard. Because of their heavy coats, these dogs prefer cool climates. One has to use common sense with respect to maintaining them in the heat by providing adequate shade and air conditioning. This breed prefers to live in packs.

Trainability
  The Canadian Eskimo Dog is a smart dog and a fast learner. The downside to this is they are just as quick to pick up lots of bad habits as they are the good. They need to be well socialised from a young age and their training has to begin early too. It also has to be very consistent and always fair throughout a dog’s life so they understand what their owner expects of them. They are a good choice for people who want to take part in sledding-type competitions and other pulling activities because these dogs like nothing more than to work.
  They excel at many canine sports which includes activities like dry land mushing because they thrive on the attention they are given during their training and the one-to-one contact when they are competing with their handlers.  The key to successfully training a Qimmiq is to make their training as interesting as possible and to avoid too much repetition. It's also a good idea to keep training sessions that much shorter which helps dogs stay more focussed on what it’s being asked of them, bearing in mind that the more intelligent a dog is, the faster they get bored and Qimmiqs are extremely smart.
  They do not answer well to harsh correction or any sort of heavy handed training methods, but they do respond extremely well to positive reinforcement which always brings the best out of these intelligent and quick witted dogs, especially when there are high value rewards involved bearing in mind that Qimmiqs find it hard to digest anything that contains grains.

Exercise
  Canadian Eskimo Dogs need a fair amount of exercise, including a daily walk or jog, but should not be excessively exercised in warm weather. They need a large yard with a high fence, but bury the wire at the base of the fence because they are likely to dig their way out and go off hunting.

Grooming 
  The CED's coat should be brushed at least a couple of times a week to keep in good condition. It does shed so some hair will be around the home at any time of the year, but then it has heavy shedding during seasonal times so then it needs daily brushing and clean up is quite a chore. When it is having its blow outs use a rake on its coat to stop clumps of hair forming mats. Bathe only when it needs one to avoid drying out its coat.
  Over needs will include trimming its nails of its activity does not wear them down, cleaning and checking its ears for infection and brushing its teeth. The latter should be done at least twice a week, the ears can be done weekly, but do not insert anything into them, and the nails done as needed taking care not to cut too far down. There are blood vessels and nerves in the lower half of the nail that if nicked or cut will cause pain to the dog and bleeding.

Children and Other Pets
  The Canadian Eskimo Dog is not the best choice as a family pet because these dogs thrive on being in a work environment rather than in a home. As such, they are not a suitable choice for families with children either and care has to be taken when they are around other pets and animals because they boast such a high prey drive. As such any contact is best avoided.
  They can be a little "off" with other dogs which is why it's so important for a Canadian Eskimo Dog to be well socialised from a young age and even then, they have a tendency to want to dominate other dogs they encounter or live with in a household because Qimmiqs like to establish a hierarchy which often leads to fights breaking out.

Is this breed right for you?
  The Canadian Eskimo Dog is a breed of working sled dog native to the far north of Canada. This ancient breed is famous for its ability to survive and work in some of the most difficult and challenging environments on the planet. This  dogs are incredibly loyal to their owners and often bond with one person or family, they are usually not aggressive towards unfamiliar people.
  Canadian Eskimo dogs can be domineering and stubborn, which means that they require an owner with plenty of experience, preferably one that has handled sled dog breeds in the past. These dogs will also need to be heavily socialized with children from a young age to prevent them from regarding youngsters as a threat to their own well-being.

Famous Canadian Eskimo Dogs
  An unnamed Canadian Eskimo Dog became a viral celebrity in 2016, when it was filmed being “petted” by a polar bear that approached the chained dog. However, the incident was misinterpreted by the public as the bear striking up a friendship with the animal; in fact, the same polar bear went on to kill and eat another dog belonging to the pack later the same day.

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