LUV My dogs: Miniature Schnauzer

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Showing posts with label Miniature Schnauzer. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Miniature Schnauzer. Show all posts

Friday, September 15, 2017

Top 10 Dog Breeds For Seniors

Top 10 Dog Breeds For Seniors
  One of the best things a person can do at any age is to adopt a dog.  Dogs can provide a tremendous amount of love and joy, and are a great way to overcome loneliness or boredom, which sometimes can affect seniors in their retirement. There are so many different breeds that sometimes it can be difficult to decide which dog is best for you. Seniors need to think about how much exercise certain types of dogs need, and whether they can provide it. 
  Owning a pet has it's pros and cons, and you have to really think what type of pet, whether a cat or dog, and what type of breed is right for you.  For example, you have to factor in if you will have the time and energy for a larger dog, or whether a small lap dog is more your speed. There are an almost infinite amount of sizes and temperaments when it comes to dogs.  If you do choose to adopt a furry friend, they quickly become a loving and wonderful addition to any family.

1. Pug
  The short-faced pug is both gentle and quiet. But don’t let their laid-back nature fool you. These compact dogs have a lot of personality! They don’t need tons of exercise, but they love being social and definitely need to be a part of the group.
  Pugs are known as adaptable, charming, and eager to please — affectionate and playful without requiring a lot of exercise to maintain their health. They are small, so they generally meet the size requirements of assisted living communities. They can be a bit mischievous, and they tend to shed quite a bit, especially in warmer climates.

2. Bichon Frise

  Independent spirit, intelligent, affectionate, bold and lively. They are bright little dogs that are easy to train and love everyone. They need people to be happy and always love to tag along. They are competitive and obedient.

  The fluffy little Bichon Frise is a joyful and affectionate dog that makes an excellent companion. With an average weight of about 7-12 pounds, this small breed is extremely easy to handle for most people. Bichons are also relatively simple to train. The Bichon will need to be groomed periodically but is otherwise fairly low-maintenance. Many Bichon owners choose to take their dogs to a professional groomer every month or two. Moderate daily exercise is usually enough to keep the Bichon healthy and happy as long as he has your companionship.

3. Miniature Schnauzer

  Schnauzers come in various sizes, including miniature, so they offer a lot of choice to a senior trying to meet a community’s pet size requirements. They are energetic, playful, trainable, and good with children, although they can have strong guarding instincts. They can be quite active; the AKC notes that they have a medium energy level, so playtime with your schnauzer can help keep you active as well.

  Miniature Schnauzers are the smallest of the Schnauzers and they are intelligent, fun-loving dogs that are a great choice for a more active lifestyle. They are the perfect choice for an older individual looking to maintain a relatively active lifestyle, as they enjoy exercise but not so much as a larger breed. 


4. Beagle

  Beagles are moderately active dogs that can do well with a daily walk. They are social dogs that enjoy spending time with their people and make an excellent choice for someone older looking for a companion. 

  Beagles are cute (think Snoopy), funny, loyal, and friendly, enjoying the company of other dogs and humans. They love to play and are excellent family dogs. They can also be independent, which may make training a challenge, and they do need plenty of exercise – which is great for fitness-minded seniors. They shed a lot, but their coat is relatively easy to care for with regular brushing.

5. Chihuahua
  If you live in a small assisted living apartment, why not consider one of the smallest dogs there is?Chihuahuas make a great choice for seniors because they are relatively low maintenance and small enough to be easily handled. They require minimal exercise and are perfectly happy being lapdogs. 
 Chihuahuas have a ton of personality for their size, and love being showered with affection; on the flip side, they are so loyal and protective that they might need a bit of training before dealing with children, and some Chihuahuas bark a lot. They can be active, but being small, they can often get sufficient exercise by playing indoors.

6. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

  Another dog bred for companionship, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a great option if you want a dog that is as happy to snuggle in your lap as they are to be out exploring with you. They’re also great family dogs, and love nothing more than to be the center of attention.

  The Cavalier is a beloved puppy-like dog that is affectionate and adaptable. This is a small dog that is often happiest when snuggled up beside her owner. This breed typically weighs about 11 to 18 pounds and is easy to handle and train. The Cavalier has some grooming needs, such as regular hair brushing, ear cleaning, and possibly the occasional trip to a groomer. Overall, Cavaliers are favored among those who love small, snuggle companions.

7. Pembroke Welsh Corgi

  If you want a small to medium dog that makes a great companion, the Corgi might be for you. Weight 24 to 30 pounds, this breed is still small enough for most people to handle. Corgis are smart and fairly easy to train. They are also quite adorable with those short little legs! A herding dog by nature, your Corgi will need routine exercise, but daily walks will often be enough. The Corgi has minimal grooming needs, which can be very convenient. 

  The spunky corgi is the perfect companion for an active senior. Compact in size, this herding breed has the energy of larger dogs, but in a more manageable package. They’re the favored companions of Queen Elizabeth and are a loving—albeit stubborn!—breed.

8. Boston Terrier

  The Boston Terrier is a loving, gentle and clownish breed with an endearing personality. They make a great choice for seniors because of their outstanding temperaments and easy keeping. 
  Boston Terriers often make the list of top dogs for seniors because of their manageable size, friendliness, ease of grooming, and love of spending time with their owners. 

  Known as the American Gentleman, the Boston Terrier is lively, smart, and affectionate with a gentle, even temperament. They can, however, be stubborn, so persistence and consistency are definite musts when training.

9. Poodle

  Poodles are great companions. They’re easy to train, devoted to their families, and a low-shedding breed (though they still need to be groomed). 

  Coming in different sizes from large to tiny, there’s a poodle out there for everyone, even if you live in a small apartment. Smart, proud, and active according to the AKC, it’s no surprise that poodles are the 7th most popular breed overall. They’re easily trained and enjoy a variety of activities, which makes them very adaptable to different-sized living situations. Their coats require regular grooming, but they are also hypo-allergenic.

10. Greyhound

  The biggest dog on our list best dog breeds for seniors is also the laziest. Retired racing greyhounds are a great option for seniors because they are huge couch potatoes. If you adopt a greyhound from the track, you’re also getting a furry friend who has seen a lot and is well socialized.

  How can a racing dog be good for older adults? You may be surprised to learn that Greyhounds are not the high-energy dogs many think they are. Although Greyhounds will enjoy daily walks and the occasional chance to run, most tend to be "couch potatoes" that enjoy loafing around with their owners. They are usually very responsive to training and therefore easy to handle, even though most weight about 60 to 80 pounds. If you like larger dogs but worry about being able to handle one, the Greyhound is a breed to consider.
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Friday, May 2, 2014

Everything about your Miniature Schnauzer

Everything about your Miniature Schnauzer
  Known for his distinguished, handsome appearance, the Miniature Schnauzer is characterized by its whiskers and double coat, which has a hard, wiry outer coat and close, soft undercoat.   Coat colors can be salt and pepper, black and silver and solid black.  Despite his small stature, the Miniature Schnauzer can give an alarm just as well as a larger dog.  That, combined with his naturally protective nature, makes him an excellent watchdog.   He is also the most popular of the three Schnauzer breeds, which include the Giant and the Standard.
  He a dog breed who's got it all in one small package: intelligence, affection, an extroverted temperament, humor, and a personality that's twice as big as he is. Throw in that walrus moustache and quivering enthusiasm, and he'll make you laugh every day. With a Miniature Schnauzer in the house, you'll never be alone, not even when you go to the bathroom. He's got personality-plus, and whether he's bounding around ahead of you or curled up snoozing on your lap, you'll never be bored with him around.

Overview
 The miniature schnauzer is a robust, sturdily built terrier of nearly square proportion. It was developed as a ratter and is quick and tough. Its gait displays good reach and drive. Its coat is double, with a close undercoat, and hard, wiry, outer coat which is longer on the legs, muzzle and eyebrows. Its facial furnishings add to its keen expression. 
  The miniature schnauzer deserves its place as one of the most popular terrier pets. It is playful, inquisitive, alert, spunky and companionable. It is a well-mannered house dog that also enjoys being in the middle of activities. It is less domineering than the larger schnauzers and less dog-aggressive than most terriers. It is also better with other animals than most terriers, although it will gladly give chase. It is clever and can be stubborn, but it is generally biddable. It enjoys children. Some may bark a lot.

Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 13-15 lbs
Coat appearance: Hard, wiry, glossy
Coloration: Black, gray, silver
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Square body frame; small and compact build; outer coat longer on the legs, muzzle and eyebrows.
Comparable Breeds: Airedale Terrier, Giant Schnauzer
Other Quick Facts
  Miniature Schnauzers shed only a tiny bit, and might be a good choice for some people who are typically allergic to dogs. However, it's not a dog’s hair that triggers allergies, but dander (dead skin flakes) and saliva. There’s no escaping any of those when you live with a dog, no matter what breed it is. The best advice for an allergic person is to spend some up-close and personal time around the breed to assure themselves that there won't be a problem living with them.

  Despite his small stature, the Miniature Schnauzer is not a lap dog. He’s athletic and energetic, and needs more daily exercise than just going around the block.



Highlights
  • The Miniature Schnauzer is people-oriented and wants nothing more than to hang out with you. He's incredibly affectionate.
  • A Miniature Schnauzer is intelligent, mischievous, and often stubborn. He's full of life.
  • He's low-shedding, but high-maintenance in terms of grooming. He needs to be clipped every five to eight weeks or so.
  • He's noisy. Protective of home and family, he'll bark even at slight noises.
  • He's good with kids and other dogs, but not to be trusted around small mammals.
  • Always keep your Miniature Schnauzer on a leash when you're not in a fenced area. If he sees something and wants to chase it, he will likely ignore your calls.
  • A bored Miniature Schnauzer is an unhappy Miniature Schnauzer. Because he's intelligent and energetic, he thrives on varied activities and exercise. Make sure that you give him both, or he'll become destructive and ill-tempered.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Is this breed right for you?
  Miniature Schnauzers are highly versatile and known to fit in well in most environments. Whether they are part of a big family with lots of kids or in an apartment with one or two owners, this breed simply loves companionship of any sort. Apartment dwellers should be aware that this is a very vocal breed, and unless training starts early on, you may have barking issues to work through. This highly intelligent breed does very well with training, from basic commands to more advanced teachings. Owners must dedicate ample time and money toward grooming this breed's unique and high-maintenance coat.


Did You Know?
  Miniature Schnauzers can only be shown in American Kennel Club conformation shows in salt and pepper - by far the most common color - black and silver, or black. White Miniature Schnauzers cannot be shown in conformation in the U.S., although they can in some other countries.

History
  Miniature Schnauzers were originally bred to be ratters and guard dogs on farms. They were developed in the mid-to-late 19th century in Germany by crossbreeding the Standard Schnauzer with smaller breeds, such as the Miniature Pinscher, Affenpinscher, and perhaps the Poodle or Pomeranian. In Germany, he's known as the Zwergschnauzer (zwerg means "dwarf").
  There aren't any records on how the Miniature Schnauzer was developed, but it's clear the intent was to create a smaller version of the well-established Standard Schnauzer. The earliest record of a Miniature Schnauzer was a black female named Findel, born in October 1888. In 1895, the first breed club was formed in Cologne, Germany, although it accepted several types of dogs.
  World Wars I and II were hard on dog breeding, particularly in Europe, where some breeds were nearly lost. But interest in Miniature Schnauzers boomed after WWI, and the dog's popularity has never waned since.
  One aspect that has changed since the early days is the preferred colors. You used to be able to find a Schnauzer of almost any size in red, black and tan, yellow, or parti-color — but not today, when shades of black and silver are the rage. Just as feelings about ear cropping shift with the times, the Miniature Schnauzer's look may change again.
  An interesting aside: While the Miniature Schnauzer is considered a Terrier by the AKC, the Standard Schnauzer is classified as a member of the Working group.

Personality
  A Miniature Schnauzer is full of life. An extrovert, he loves to be in the thick of the family action. He may even run up to you while you're sitting down and throw his paws around your neck. He wants to touch you and be next to you all the time, and you can bet he'll want to sleep plastered to your side.
  A bit of a spitfire, the Miniature Schnauzer is a terrier , that means he's full of himself. He's a feisty type A and his work involves amusing himself. He is not aloof or independent but needs to be with people, and what's more, he wants to be in close physical contact. 
  He's very intelligent, which makes training easy, but it also means he's a master of manipulation. That combined with his stubbornness will keep you on your toes. He's not as feisty as some terriers, however, nor as dog-aggressive.
  As with every dog, the Miniature Schnauzer needs early socialization,exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences , when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Miniature Schnauzer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Children and other pets
  The Miniature Schnauzer likes hanging out with his people — he lives for it, as a matter of fact. He's good with children, particularly if he's raised with them. He'll play with them and protect them and they'll help each other burn off steam: kids and Miniature Schnauzers are a great combination.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  A Miniature Schnauzer usually plays well with other dogs — he isn't one of those terriers who can't play nicely with others. He typically isn't as aggressive toward other dogs as many other Terriers are, but he is brave and fearless around large dogs, a trait that can get him into trouble. He is large and in charge, at least in his own mind.
  Small mammals such as rats and gerbils, however, aren't good matches for the Miniature Schnauzer, who is hardwired to kill them. Training won't change that; that's what he's bred for.

Health
  The Miniature Schnauzer, with a lifespan of 12 to 14 years, sometimes suffers from health problems like mycobacterium avium infection, cataract and retinal dysplasia. Other major health issues that may affect it are urolithiasis and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), while some minor health problems include von Willebrand's disease (vWD), myotonia congenita, Schnauzer comedo syndrome, and allergies. A veterinarian may run DNA or eye exams to identify some of these issues.

Care
  The Miniature Schnauzer is active when inside the house, playing with toys and following you from room to room. He loves to have a yard to play in, but he'll do well without one if you give him a long walk every day. He needs 45 minutes of daily exercise — remember, a tired Miniature Schnauzer is a good Miniature Schnauzer.
  Crate training benefits every dog and is a kind way to ensure that your Schnauzer doesn't have accidents in the house or get into things he shouldn't. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your Miniature Schnauzer accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized.
  Never stick your dog in a crate all day long, however. It's not a jail, and he shouldn't spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he's sleeping at night.

Grooming
  The Miniature Schnauzer’s grooming needs are fairly extensive. He needs regular clipping or hand stripping. Pets are usually clipped because hand stripping is a time-consuming effort typically reserved for show dogs. Clipping will soften the coat, though, so if you like the hard texture, resign yourself to stripping it.
  Miniature Schnauzers have a double coat. The undercoat is soft and the top coat is wiry. They can either be shaved with an electric clipper by you or a professional, or plucked (hand stripped), which is a labor-intensive process that is best done while he's on your lap watching television.  Most hand strippers do it one section at a time, and do it throughout the year. For some, hand stripping takes too long to be affordable at a professional groomer's. Fortunately, it's not hard to learn to use a clipper, and you can buy the equipment for the equivalent of a few grooming sessions. If you want to learn how to get a typical Miniature Schnauzer cut, check out the AMSC grooming chart.
  Because he’s small, his dental needs can be significant unless care is taken to brush his teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste, and schedule dental cleanings with your veterinarian.

A dream day in the life
  This happy go lucky breed is content doing just about anything that involves being with you. The perfect size for a tag-a-long companion, you can bring this friendly pooch just about anywhere. Whether it's at the park playing with other dogs, at a training class learning new tricks or simply snuggling on a cozy lap, the Miniature Schnauzer is easy to please. To keep it extra happy, each day should involve a light coat brushing to prevent uncomfortable mats in its double-coated fur.
  
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