LUV My dogs: Irish

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Showing posts with label Irish. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Irish. Show all posts

Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your Irish Doodle

Everything about your Irish Doodle
  The Irish Doodle is a medium to large hybrid or mixed breed that crosses the Irish Setter with the Standard Poodle. She has a life span of 12 to 15 years and has talents in guarding. She is sometimes also called the Irish Doodle Setter or an Irish Setter/Poodle hybrid. She is known for being very lighthearted and is also a devoted dog.

Overview
  Also known as the Irish Doodle Setter, Irish Poo Setter, Irish Setterdoodle, and Irish Setterpoo, the Irish Doodle is a super cute, friendly, and light-hearted medium-sized crossbreed. A mix of Irish Setter and Poodle, it’s ideal for anyone seeking a dog who won’t shed a lot and who will be loyal, social, and intelligent. This dog rarely barks and will even get along great with children and pets.
  If the Irish Doodle sounds too good to be true, rest assured that it isn’t. Combing adorable looks and an equally loveable attitude, this crossbreed is becoming hugely popular. To find out if this dog would be the right fit for your family, check out some quick facts below.

Breed standards
Breed Type: Crossbreed
Breed Group: Watchdog, Sporting Dog, Guard Dog
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 40-70 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, soft, wavy
Coloration: Apricot, black, white, black and tan, brown
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Singles, families with children and other pets, seniors, and those living in apartments or houses with or without yards
Temperament: Loyal, devoted, quiet, social, intelligent, friendly
Comparable Breeds: Irish Setter, Poodle

History
  The Irish Doodle is a hybrid canine, a cross between two very different breeds of hunting dog; a German retrieving dog, the Poodle, and an elegant red field hunting dog called the Irish Setter. The Poodle is often associated with France but it was actually developed in Germany, where it was known as a Pudlehund; Pudle meaning to splash around, and hund meaning dog.
  Poodles today are still sometimes employed to retrieve waterfowl, although the modern hunter is more likely to clip them short all over to prevent tangling in the brush and weeds. The Irish Setter was developed in Ireland, at some point in the 1700s as a field hunting dog and by the early 1800s, the breed was popular not just in Ireland, but also throughout the British Isles. Most experts believe that the Irish Setter is an ancestor of breeds such as the Irish Water Spaniel, the Gordon Setter, and the Irish Terrier, but written records from the time are nonexistent. The earliest Irish Setters were bred to be able to search out birds then hold their position, preventing them from entering the line of fire and they often came in either red and white or yellow and white, but in the mid-1800s their characteristic deep red color became the ideal. 
  They were imported into the United States as gun dogs and retrievers that specialized in retrieving gamebirds during the mid-1800s as well and were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1878. Although the Irish Setter could be crossed with a Miniature or Toy Poodle, the most commonly included Poodle for this hybrid is the Standard Poodle.


Temperament
  These dogs are loving and affectionate, and are characterized by loyalty and devotion. They are eager to please and have significant native intelligence inherited from their parents. It is their intelligent mind and careful disposition that have made them equally good with kids and other family pets. This makes them an excellent family dog ideal for apartment life. Not do they just love the members of their families, but they are also comfortable meeting strangers.
  These dogs, especially the puppies, love attention until they’re well along in years. Though, it is alert and attentive. If it happens to come across anything suspicious, it would immediately alert its family.

Health
  She is generally a healthy dog and whether or not you believe in the idea of hybrid vigor there is still the possibility a puppy might inherit conditions one or both its parents are at risk of. For the Irish Doodle these include Addison's Disease, Bloat, Cushing's disease, epilepsy, Hypothyroidism, Legg-Perthes, Patellar Luxation, SA , Von Willebrand's Disease, OCD, CAD, HOD, Joint dysplasia, eye problems and Panosteitis. To avoid getting a dog with health problems you can improve the odds by only buying after seeing health clearances for both parents.

Care
  Bathing need not be a frequent occurrence with these canines, usually just a few times a year, but thorough brushing and styling will generally be needed on a regular basis. They type of grooming implements that will be required for this animal can vary a bit, depending on which parent breed they most resemble, although most will need clipping or trimming of some sort on a regular basis. 
  Crossbreeds that inherit the single-layer Poodle coat are less likely to shed and in some cases, may even be low shedding enough to be considered hypoallergenic, however, the coat of the Irish Setter is decidedly not hypoallergenic, and the full composition of the coat may not reveal itself until your Irish Doodle has reached maturity. It is also quite important to check and clean this dog’s ears on a regular basis as they can be prone to internal and external infections.

Training
  The trainability of the Irish doodle is unpredictable. The standard poodle is a happy-go-lucky and easily trainable dog. But the Irish setters are not always so, but would rather get bored easily. Those Irish doodles that take after their setter parents sometimes demand commitment and patience from their trainers. But once the training process is successfully over, your Irish doodle will be the best trained dog in the neighborhood.
  Begin obedience and pack leader trainings from an early age. Train them to socialize and get accustomed to meeting new faces. Like their parents, the Irish doodles are naturally clean, and hence, are easy to be housetrained.

Exercise Requirements
  The Irish Doodle doesn’t need a lot of exercise. Instead, a moderate amount of daily activity, through games like fetch and a walk or jog, will help keep your dog happy and in great shape. If you do have an enclosed, safe yard, you can even let your pooch play freely outside when the weather permits.

Grooming 
  She does not shed much and is hypoallergenic so is good for those with allergies. She should be brushed at least twice a week still to remove mats and tangles and keep the coat looking bright and healthy. Use a solid bristle brush and you should find her coat easy to brush. She will need to have a bath as and when she gets dirty enough to need one! Check her ears once a week and wipe them clean and clip her nails if they grow too long.

Children and other animals
  When training and early socialization is completed she is very good with children and other pets. They will be happy to play and affectionate towards them. Children should be taught how to play nicely with any dog, and that things like ear or tail pulling or messing around with their food at feeding time is not acceptable.

Is the Irish Doodle the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Difficult Training: The Irish Doodle isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Slightly Active: Not much exercise is required to keep this dog in shape. Owners who are frequently away or busy might find this breed suitable for their lifestyle.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
The Irish Setter is a more energetic dog, but when combined with the Poodle, the puppies settle down a great deal. However, I recommend these pups for more active people and families with more energetic children. They will be perfect for the person wanting a devoted running companion, as well as a therapy dog
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Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Everything about your Irish Dane

Everything about your Irish Dane
  The Irish Dane is a hybrid that is a cross-breed of a Irish Wolfhound and Great Dane and may demonstrate any combination of traits from those two breeds. Hybrids have become very popular in the past few years. They play a big role in the current designer dog trend. 
  The experimentation of these hybrid or designer dogs has not been recognized by the American Kennel Club or Canadian Kennel Club. The key to cross breeding to purebred dogs is what is called hybrid vigor, the breeding resulting in a healthier dog with superior genetic constitution can come from dogs purebred for so long that they have common genetic disorders.

Overview
  Irish Danes are imposing animals with big hearts – literally and figuratively. They are sweet and social creatures with a great appreciation for companionship. They do like to stay active and will seek out opportunities to gallop in open spaces. Irish Danes have a life span of 6 to 10 years and can weigh up to 150 pounds.
   When they are full grown, they can be anywhere between 30 and 35 inches tall. Irish Danes have a harsh, rough, short to medium coat that comes in solid or multi-color combinations of black, white, blue, fawn, silver, gray, red, and cream. They can have various pattern and markings on their coat as well. In terms of large designer breeds, this one fairly established. Even so, Irish Danes can vary widely in appearance and temperament. Accordingly, they are not yet recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Breed standards
Breed Type: Mix
Group: Herding
Average lifespan: 8-10 Years
Average size: 100 to 150 pounds
Coat appearance: Harsh, rough, short to medium
Coloration:  black, tan, brown, red, blue, gray, and white
Hypoallergenic: No

History
  As a hybrid dog the Irish Dane can have any combination of traits and appearances from either parent, the Irish Wolfhound and Great Dane. Hybrids have had a recent surge of popularity in the last twenty years or so, also known as designer dogs. It has caused a huge variation in prices for such dogs and many puppy mills and disreputable breeders are taking advantage of this trend. Therefore be careful from whom you buy. Unlike many designer dogs the Irish Dane actually does have more of a history to them as they were first bred in the 1800s during an attempt to save the Irish Wolfhound.


Temperament
  Though the Irish Dane has an imposing presence, it is anything but scary. Irish Danes are friendly and gentle dogs that love being around others. They will never pass up an opportunity to cuddle and play. Because they are quite social, Irish Danes also do well in multi-pet households. In fact, this breed is prone to separation anxiety if it does not receive enough attention and affection from those around it. The best way to overcome this is to ensure Irish Danes are surrounded by loving people and have a relatively consistent schedule. 
  Beyond this, the Irish Dane inherits a strong hunting impulse and guard dog mentality from its parent breeds. This can make it territorial and weary of strange adults at first. Owners can combat any negative behaviors from these instincts by socializing their Irish Danes early and consistently. Nonetheless, this breed is not known to be aggressive and can be a great family dog in the right environment.

Health
  The best way to ensure you have a healthy dog is to buy from a good breeder and ask to see health clearances for both parents. While there is some argument to hybrid vigor there is a chance in any dog of inheriting the conditions their parents are prone to. In the Irish Dane's case these conditions to be aware of include Development Issues, cancer , bloat, heart problems, surgical issues, Anesthesia Sensitivity, liver problems, Fibrocartilaginous Embolic Myelopathy, OCD, eye problems and joint dysplasia.

Care
  Irish Danes are relatively easy to maintain and do not require heavy grooming. This breed will shed moderately, however, and is not hypoallergenic or suitable for owner with allergies. If your Irish Dane has a particularly long coat, it may benefit from occasional brushing. Either way, Irish Danes only need occasional baths. They should also have their teeth cleaned on a daily basis. Beyond this, Irish Danes should have their nails clipped at least once or twice a month to avoid split or cracked nails and ears clean regularly with a damp cloth to avoid wax build up and infection.

Trainability
  He should be easy to train as he is eager to please and listens to commands and is inclined to obey. In general the Irish Dane will need fewer repetitions than many other dogs so will train quicker. Because of his size it is important to train him in good behavior from a young age when on the leash, as he will be super powerful when he is an adult and you do not want him pulling at you then. Also teach him not to jump up at people. Establish yourself as pack leader and use positive but firm methods of training. Early socialization and training are very important to get a well rounded dog.

Activity Requirements
  Irish Danes have above average levels of energy. They enjoy being active and require quite a bit of daily exercise. This breed loves running and galloping in open spaces, as well as playing with other people and large animals. Owners should aim to provide their Irish Dane with this type of activity about 45 to 90 minutes each day. Beyond this, Irish Dane also like to cuddle with family members and lay around the house. This breed is suited for all types of environments, though it should not be over exercised in extreme hot or cold conditions. Additionally, Irish Danes are not suited for apartment, urban, or suburban living due to their large size. They do best in larger homes with lots of outdoor space.

Grooming 
  The Irish Dane is a low shedding dog and grooming him is quite easy to do. If he has a coat more like the Irish Wolfhound you may need to have it clipped occasionally. Bathe him as he needs it, it is a good idea to train him for this from a young age, as when he is full sized you will not be lifting him in and out of the bath. You could also opt to use the hose in the yard or use a bathing station at a groomers. Make sure you use a dog shampoo. Once a week you need to check his ears and wipe them clean. His teeth should be brushed at least three times a week. His nails may need clipping if he does not naturally keep them worn down.

Children and other animals?
  He is good with children as he has a gentle nature. His size does mean he may knock over small children without meaning too so they may need to be watched. Children should also be taught how to play with him and that things like pulling ears, trying to ride him and messing with his food are not things that are acceptable to do. Irish Danes are also good with other pets if they have been socialized though they can see smaller animals as prey to chase.

Is the Irish Dane the Right Breed for you?
Easy Training: The Irish Dane is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

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Friday, April 21, 2017

Everything about your Irish Terrier

Everything about your Irish Terrier
  The Irish Terrier dog breed was once described as the “poor man’s sentinel, the farmer’s friend, and the gentleman’s favorite.” Rugged and stouthearted, he has the advantages of a convenient size, versatile abilities as a companion, watchdog, and vermin dispatcher, and high train-ability.

Overview
  Versatility should be the middle name of the Irish Terrier. This breed is full of energy and has the courage of a lion. He doesn’t realize that he is a medium-sized dog. To him, he is the King and will take out any animal that he has not befriended. This breed will also chase anything that runs, including your neighbors and their children. A fenced yard is a must for this energetic fellow.
  The Irish Terrier is playful. He will happily spend hours in the yard with your kids playing ball, hide and seek, fetch or even Frisbee. After a tough day of play, he will snuggle up to you on the couch and expect that his tummy will be rubbed until he drifts off to sleep. To learn more about the Irish Terrier, please read on.

Highlights
  • Irish Terriers will not necessarily get along with any other dog. They will fight if challenged by another dog and will not back down.
  • Irish Terriers can be stubborn.
  • They are terriers and will dig if your yard has moles or other rodents.
  • Irish Terries can be barkers.
  • Irish Terriers must have regular opportunities to burn off their energy.
  • Irish Terriers need mental challenges such as training and play to thrive.
  • Obedience training is highly recommended. The "come" command can be difficult to teach.
  • They can be dominant and attempt to take over the household. You must be consistent and teach them that you are in charge at all times.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Irish Terrier has a longer body and longer legs than other terriers.
  • The Irish Terrier has a long head with strong jaws; dark brown eyes full of fire and intelligence; small V-shaped ears that drop forward; and a docked tail. His dense, wiry coat hugs the body and can be bright red, golden red, red wheaten or wheaten.
  • Comparable Breeds: Airedale Terrier, Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier
History
Irish Terrier circa 1915
  This red-headed son of Ireland — the only terrier with an all-red coat — is thought to be one of the oldest of the terrier breeds, although little is known of his origins. One writer referred to him as “the poor man’s sentinel, the farmer’s friend, and the gentleman’s favorite.
  A dog show in Glasgow in 1875 was the first known appearance of the breed under the name Irish Terrier. Four years later, Erin and Killney Boy were bred and produced a large number of champions, securing for themselves the titles “mother” and “father” of the Irish Terrier. The breed quickly rose in popularity and in the 1880s was the fourth most popular breed in England.
  Those early Irish Terriers came in several colors, including black and tan, gray, and brindle, but by the end of the 19th century the solid-red color seen today had won out.
The Irish Terrier soon became popular in the United States as well. There was a class for the breed at the Westminster Kennel Club show in 1881, and the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1885. The Irish Terrier Club of America was founded in 1896.
  The breed proved its usefulness during World War I, serving as a messenger and sentinel. Afterward, he continued to be popular. In 1929, the Irish Terrier ranked 13th among the 79 breeds then recognized by the American Kennel Club. His place has fallen somewhat since then; today he ranks 128th, but those who love him consider him a well-kept secret.

Personality
  Like most terriers, the Irish packs a lot of personality into a small body. They are lively dogs who love to play and like to hear themselves bark. They are quick to posture around other dogs and won't back down if challenged. In the home, they love to be the center of attention, and aren't above making mischief to receive the attention they crave. Irish Terriers have spunk and sass, and many owners swear their dogs “talk back” to them. They are generally patient with kids, and enjoy playing in the yard with anyone willing to give chase. But at the end of the day, the Irish Terrier will want to curl up on someone's lap for some affection and relaxation.

Health Problems
  The Irish Terrier is one of the healthiest dog breeds. There are no known conditions or problems that are seen consistently within the breed.

Care
  The Irish Terrier’s wire coat requires combing about twice a week, in addition to shaping and trimming about four times a year. Show dogs need stripping. For household pets, clipping is enough  it helps in softening the coat but may make the color dull.
  An active breed, the Irish Terrier requires daily exercise and entertaining games. Apart from making a good jogging and walking companion, it is also a preferred hunting and hiking partner.

Living Conditions
  The Irish Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised; a small yard will do. If given sufficient exercise, it is surprisingly well-mannered and dignified indoors.

Trainability
  Irish Terriers, like many terrier breeds can be a challenge to train. They have a mind of their own and prefer that they be the ones in charge of the home. Training an Irish Terrier requires absolute consistency – if you bend the rules once for these guys, they'll walk all over you. Training should be conducted with lots of treats and even more patience. Never treat an Irish Terrier harshly, as they will stop responding to you all together. They are prone to defensive reactions – if an Irish Terrier does not like the way he is being treated, he will snap or bite.
  Once leadership is established, however, Irish Terriers can pick up on tricks and can be graduated on to advanced obedience or agility training. These activities are a good way to keep the dog's mind active, as they require a lot of mental stimulation.

Exercise Requirements
  Irish Terriers, although energetic, don’t need tons of exercise. A good, brisk walk each day and a trip to the dog park for rip roaring fun each week will suffice. This breed does enjoy running, so a fenced yard would surely be a plus. When not inside of a secure area, the Irish Terrier should always be kept on a leash.
  His playful nature makes the Irish Terrier the perfect family companion. Children love the Irish Terriers desire and ability to catch a ball and bring it back to them. Both the dog and the kids will be tuckered out by the end of the day! This is a definite asset of living with an Irish Terrier.

Grooming
  The Irish Terrier doesn’t require a lot of grooming. Weekly brushing with a slicker brush keeps the coat in good condition. Bathe him only if he gets dirty. Trimming isn’t necessary, but many owners have their Irish Terriers groomed professionally three to four times a year for a neat appearance. The coat is trimmed with clippers or by stripping, a process by which coat is thinned and shortened with a stripping knife, a sharp, comb-like tool, or a combination of both. The Irish Terrier Club of America has a helpful guide to grooming the coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian.
  Even though his grooming requirements are minimal, it is important to begin grooming the Irish Terrier when he is very young. An early introduction teaches him to accept grooming without any fuss. 

Children And Other Pets
  It's said that the little people  gave Irish Terriers to children to be their playmates. Their size and energy level make them great companions for active kids, but as always, they should both be supervised, especially if children are very young. Teach your puppy not to be rough or mouthy, and teach your child not to pull the dog's tail or ears or hit him. Children should never approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Irish Terriers don't like strange dogs, and they can be aggressive toward other dogs of the same sex. Early socialization with lots of other dogs, strong leadership on your part, and neutering can go a long way toward reducing an Irish Terrier's dog aggression, but they're not a guarantee that you'll turn him into a dog who's buddy-buddy with other canines.
If you have one Irish Terrier, he can probably learn to get along with one or more cats. Early socialization is key. More than one Irish Terrier may gang up on a cat or cats. Always supervise their interactions and, if necessary, separate them when you're gone.

Did You Know?
  Intrepid and stylish, the Irish Terrier has been nicknamed the d’Artagnan of the show ring for his smooth confidence and winning ways. His other nickname is Daredevil, a nod to his utter contempt for danger.

Appearances in arts and culture
  • Jack London's books Jerry of the Islands and Michael, Brother of Jerry were about Irish Terriers that, according to the bloodlines recorded in the beginning of the book, may actually have lived.
  • The 2007 film Firehouse Dog features an Irish Terrier as the title character.
  • Former Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King owned several Irish Terriers,all named Pat, and had séances to "communicate" with the first Pat after the dog's death.
  • William Wordsworth's poem "Fidelity" was written after the death of Charles Gough, who fell from Striding Edge, Helvellyn in 1805. His body found below Red Tarn some months later by a shepherd, his body still being guarded by his Irish Terrier, Foxey. Nearby were discovered the bones of her dead puppies.



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Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Everything about your Irish Wolfhound

Everything about your Irish Wolfhound
  Known as the tallest of dog breeds, Irish Wolfhounds are truly gentle giants. This breed is famous for being easy going, soft natured, calm, sensitive, sweet, and patient. A relatively good watch dog that can provide some protection, the Irish Wolfhound is excellent with children, strangers, pets, and other dogs.
  Friendly and loving to its owners, the Irish Wolfhound is intelligent, which makes it an easy dog to train. It needs regular exercise so it can stretch those long legs. If you’ve been toying with the idea of bringing an Irish Wolfhound into your home, read on to find out more.

Overview
  Royal and popular in Ireland, the Irish Wolfhound gained much fame when showing off its ability to fight off wild animals in arena sports. With an ability to hunt elk and wolves, the breed gained a high honor in the hunting world. Given as gifts of stature in the days of the Greeks, this gentle giant is seen as a kind-natured breed with a large body and heart.

Highlights
  • Irish Wolfhounds are not recommended for apartment living. Although they have relatively low activity levels inside, they need room to stretch out and aren't built for negotiating stairs.
  • Irish Wolfhounds require at least 40 minutes of daily exercise and do best in a home with a large fenced yard.
  • Irish Wolfhounds need a fenced yard to keep them from chasing prey away from their yards. They should not be kept in a yard with underground electronic fencing. The desire to chase is too strong to be overcome by the threat of a momentary shock.
  • The Irish Wolfhound is a gentle dog who usually gets along well with everyone. With early socialization and training, he'll be gracious toward other dogs and forbearing of indoor cats. He'll view outdoor cats and other animals as fair game.
  • If you are looking for a long-lived breed, the Irish Wolfhound is not for you. He lives roughly 6 to 8 years and his giant size predisposes him to many health problems.
  • Irish Wolfhounds do not make good guard dogs although their size can be a deterrent to a would-be intruder.
  • The Irish Wolfhound is an average shedder and only needs to be brushed on a weekly or bi-weekly basis. You'll need to strip the longer portions of his coat if you want to keep him looking like the Irish Wolfhounds that compete in the conformation ring.
  • Irish Wolfhounds should be walked on leash to prevent them from chasing animals or other moving objects, such as radio-controlled cars.
  • The Irish Wolfhound is not a pony and should not be ridden by children, no matter how small. His joints aren't built for the strain. Nor is he built for pulling a cart or other vehicle.
  • Irish Wolfhounds thrive when they are with their owners. They are not outdoor dogs, although they enjoy playing outside.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • When you look at an Irish Wolfhound, you’ll see a dog of great size and commanding appearance with dark eyes, small ears, and a rough coat that can be gray, brindle, red, black, white or fawn.
  • Over the centuries, the Irish Wolfhound has been known as the Big Dog of Ireland, Greyhound of Ireland, and Great Hound of Ireland.
  • Comparable Breeds: Borzoi, Scottish Deerhound

History
  In 391 CE, all Rome marveled at seven giant dogs from Ireland presented as a contribution to the city’s shows and games by consul Quintus Aurelius Symmachus. The consul’s thank-you note to his brother, who had procured the dogs, is thought to be the first written mention of what was to be called the Irish Wolfhound.
  Over the centuries, the enormous Irish hounds populated a number of royal courts, including those of England’s Edward III, Henry VIII, and Elizabeth I, as well as France's Henry IV. The dogs were also presented as royal gifts to the courts of Sweden, Denmark, and Spain.
  Unfortunately for the Wolfhounds, they did their job a little too well. By the 18th century, their numbers had decreased. They were no longer needed because they had hunted Britain and Ireland’s wolves to extinction. The Earl of Chesterfield complained in 1750 that, despite a two-year search, he had been unable to obtain any of the dogs because the breed had become so rare. Twenty years later, author Oliver Goldsmith wrote that the dogs were kept only as curiosities in the houses of gentlemen and noted “He is extremely beautiful and majestic in appearance, being the greatest of the dog kind to be seen in the world.”
  The great dogs might have faded into the history books had it not been for the efforts of Captain George Graham. In 1862, he managed to obtain some of the few remaining Wolfhounds and crossed them with Scottish Deerhounds, the Tibetan Borzoi, a Pyrenean wolfhound, and a Great Dane. It took 23 years to restore the breed.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the Irish Wolfhound in 1897. The breed ranks 79th among the dogs registered by the AKC, a respectable showing for a giant dog.

Personality

  Irish wolfhounds have a heart as big as the rest of them. They are gentle, noble, sensitive and easygoing. Despite the fact that they can run at great speed, most of their actions around the house are in decidedly slow motion, and they are definitely not snap-to-it obedience prospects. They will eventually mind you, just at their own pace!

  Just under the surface of their gentle exterior does lie the nature of a coursing hunter, so Irish wolfhound owners must be vigilant when outdoors. Like all sighthounds, Irish wolfhounds love to chase animals that are running away from them, and they can take their time responding to your calls to come back. Yet Irish wolfhounds are generally model citizens with other dogs, pets and children. Their great size is usually enough to scare away intruders; this is fortunate, as most Irish wolfhounds are pacifists and not great protection dogs.

Health Problems
  Just like all dog breeds, the Irish Wolfhound can suffer from health problems. Some health issues that are common to this breed are bone cancer, cardiomyopathy, hip dysplasia, Von Willebrands, PRA and bloat .
  To keep your Irish Wolfhound healthy, make sure to take your dog out for regular exercise and visit the veterinarian when needed.

Care
  When it comes to the dog’s care, its coat requires to be combed or brushed two times in a week and at times it is a good idea to trim its stray hair. Dead hair needs to be stripped twice a year. The hound loves stretching its legs and long walks, thus daily exercise is a must. Indoors the dog requires a lot of good space to stretch its body on a soft surface. Lying frequently on hard areas can cause the development of calluses.

Living Conditions
  The Irish Wolfhound is not recommended for apartment life. It is relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. This is a giant breed that needs some space. It may not fit well in a small or compact car.It needs to be part of the family and would be very unhappy in a kennel. Being a sighthound, it will chase and so need a secure, fenced area for exercise.

Training
  Training an Irish Wolfhound is quite easy, since this breed is intelligent and loves to please. Start training as early as possible, as you will find a puppy easier to handle. Start your training with leash control. The Irish Wolfhound likes to pull on the leash, so you need to teach your dog that this behavior is unacceptable. Leash training is especially important because as your dog grows bigger, it will have no problems dragging you along on its leash.
  The best way to train an Irish Wolfhound is to be consistent and patient. When your dog follows a command, reward it with a treat, and when it does something wrong, firmly but positively correct the behavior.
  Because the Irish Wolfhound is smart, it will quickly understand what is expected. You should continue to work with your dog, even when it starts to mature. As well, be sure to socialize your Irish Wolfhound with other dogs and people so that it does not become frightened.

Exercise
  This is one large dog and it needs a large area to play and exercise in. You’ll need to take your Irish Wolfhound out for a walk or run at least twice a day. You can incorporate your dog’s exercise routine into your workout routine if you like to ride a bike, run or rollerblade. This is where leash training comes in handy, so be sure to start this training from the time your dog is a puppy.

Grooming
  The Wolfhound has a rough coat that is especially wiry and long over the eyes and beneath the jaw. Extensive grooming is done to give the dog a perfect appearance in the show ring, but for a pet owner the coat is easy to maintain. There's just a lot of dog to groom.
  Brush or comb the shaggy, wiry coat once or twice a week to remove dead hair and prevent or remove any mats or tangles. The double coat sheds moderate amounts year-round but doesn’t go through a heavy annual or biannual shed. A bath is rarely necessary.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Irish Wolfhounds are gentle with children, but simply because of their large size they can accidentally knock toddlers down and scare or injure them. They're best suited to homes with older children. Irish Wolfhounds are not ponies, and children cannot ride them. Your Wolfhound can be injured if children try to ride him.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  With early socialization and training, your Irish Wolfhound should get along well with other dogs. He may chase small animals such as cats unless brought up with them and taught not to. It's vital to properly introduce him to other animals in the household and supervise their interactions. He'll consider outdoor cats and other small animals fair game.

Is this breed right for you?
  A large and loving breed, he does well with both children and other animals. Mostly inactive indoors, this dog is not suited for apartment life based on his size. In need of a large yard and living space, he does best when part of the family. A devoted and friendly pet, he has a sincere sense of loyalty to his owners. More likely to say hello to a stranger than to ward him off, most people are scared of him based on his size. A smart pup, he'll love you unconditionally until his short life ends.

Did You Know?
  Welsh folklore tells the story of Gelert, a brave Wolfhound who protected his master’s son when a wolf broke into the house. When the father returns, he sees the dog with blood on his mouth and kills him in a rage. He then finds the baby, safe, next to the body of the dead wolf. A village named Beddgelert (Gelert’s Grave) commemorates the story.

A dream day in the life of an Irish Wolfhound
Waking up to sniff out the home, the Irish Wolfhound will lazily greet you awake with a swipe of his tongue. Going downstairs to check on the rest of the family, he may take a snooze again before breakfast. After a good meal, he'll run outside for a bit to sniff out the yard for any new smells. After a nap in the sun, he'll head back inside to hang out with the family. Watching the house while his owner is away at work, the Irish Wolfhound will only ask for a good petting before going to bed with you.

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