LUV My dogs: Ireland

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Showing posts with label Ireland. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ireland. Show all posts

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Irish Water Spaniel

Everything about your Irish Water Spaniel
  He may look and act like a curly-coated clown, but the Irish Water Spaniel is a serious water retriever with excellent hunting skills. Given plenty of exercise and training, he can also be a wonderful family companion. Choose him if you enjoy running, hiking, water sports, or other activities that he can do with you. His coat is high maintenance but sheds little.

Overview
  The Irish water spaniel is built like no other spaniel, being much taller and racier. The body is of medium length, the whole dog being slightly rectangular in appearance. The general appearance suggests both dash and endurance. The gait is smooth and ground-covering. The coat is one of the breed's distinctive features. The body is covered with a double coat consisting of crisp ringlets. This combination imparts water, weather and thorn resistance to the dog, enabling it to hunt in the harshest of conditions. The Irish water spaniel's expression says it all: alert, intelligent and quizzical.
  Like most dogs of the American Kennel Club Sporting group, the Irish Water Spaniel is essentially an active, willing and energetic companion. Because it has been bred from stock used to fetch game and return it to hand without a fuss, it has the natural instinct of wanting to please. Its keen sense of working as a team makes it a relatively easy dog to train and discipline. Because of its great intelligence and quizzical nature, it has the reputation of being the clown of the spaniel family and will do ordinary things in extraordinary ways to achieve that which is asked of it. Some individual dogs can be very wary of strangers and not every IWS can be trusted to get along with other pets. Early socialisation and training is a must.

Highlights
  • Can have life-threatening reaction to sulfa drugs, Ivermectin and vaccines especially the leptospirosis component.
  • This is a breed that is probably not suitable for the first time dog owner because he can be headstrong, and an independent thinker.
  • Irish Water Spaniels have lots of energy and need daily exercise.
  • Socialization — exposure to many different people, places, sights, sounds, and experiences — at an early age is needed.
Other Quick Facts

  • Among the distinguishing characteristics of the IWS are a topknot of long, loose curls; the crisply curled, liver-colored coat; and the smooth "rat tail," which is hairless except at the base where it is covered for two to three inches with curls.The face is entirely smooth and the feet are webbed between the toes.
  • When an Irish Water Spaniel’s feet are properly conditioned, the tough pads allow the dog to go over sharp saw grass or river rocks without injury.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group: Gun Dogs
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 45 to 68 pounds
Coat appearance: double coated,consisting of dense curls, sheds very little
Coloration: liver/puce
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with older children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, hunters
Temperament: Enthusiastic, energetic, mischievous, independent
Comparable Breeds: Portuguese Water Dog, Irish Setter

History
  The Irish Water Spaniel is a native Irish breed dating back at least 1000 years. It is believed in Irish folklore to be the descendant of the Dobhar-chú. It is probable that more than one ancient breed of spaniel has gone into its makeup. It is not known from which other breeds Irish Water Spaniels were developed. 
 The acknowledged father of the breed, Justin McCarthy from Dublin, left no breeding records. All manner of dogs have been suggested including: the Poodle, Portuguese Water Dog, Barbet, generic old water dog, the now-extinct English Water Spaniel as well as the Northern and Southern Water Spaniels, but whether Irish Water Spaniels are antecedents, descendants, or mixtures of these other breeds is a matter of some speculation. What is clear is that the breed has ancient roots.   The modern breed as we know it was developed in Ireland in the 1830s.
The breed has retained type for over 150 years, and is very popular in Ireland. The Irish Water Spaniel was recognized by the AKC in 1884.

Personality
  The individual personality of Irish Water Spaniels vary from dog to dog. Some are energetic and outgoing, others are shy and prefer to laze around the house. You can't really tell what your adult Water Spaniel will be like based upon his behavior as a puppy, either. However, all Water Spaniels are loving family companions who adore their families, have a zest for life and have a propensity for clowning around. 
  He can make a game out of just about any activity, and no matter what he's doing he appears to be having the time of his life. Water Spaniels are spirited companions and will want to be included in all family activities. They are polite to strangers and can be trusted around well mannered children.

Health
  The Irish Water Spaniel, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is prone to otitis externa and canine hip dysplasia (CHD). It may also succumb to to minor health problems like distichiasis, and a major issues such as nail-bed disease, seizures, and megaesophagus. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip ear exams on this breed of dog. Be aware that the dogs of this breed may react negatively to ivermectin or sulfa drugs.

Care
  To properly care for an Irish Water Spaniel provide it daily mental and physical exercises such as running, playing, and obedience lessons (the earlier, the better). Otherwise, brush comb, and trim your Spaniel's coat regularly to prevent its hair from becoming coarse and twisting on itself.

Living Conditions
  Because he needs plenty of daily exercise and loves the outdoors, he does best in the suburbs or country. This breed does best with at least an average-sized yard.

Trainability
  Water Spaniels are fairly easy to train, but they do have a willful streak which can can make them inconsistent students. Positive reinforcement and lots of treats help the process along, as does mixing up training activities. Keeping training sessions light and fun is also helpful, as Water Spaniels will enjoy any activity he thinks is a game. Once leadership is established and basic obedience mastered, Water Spaniels should graduate on to advanced obedience or agility training to keep their bodies and minds active.
  Early and frequent socialization is important to building an even tempered Water Spaniel. While they adore their own family, they are often wary of strangers. Teaching him early on to accept new people and new situations can keep them from becoming shy or fearful.

Exercise 
  Irish Water Spaniels are bundles of energy and quite athletic by genetics. They thrive when they are able to run, play, chase down game and retrieve fowl. They are not at all happy leading sedentary lives and can become destructive without regular activities that will enthrall and exert them. 
  They require at least an hour of playtime daily in order to keep them in tiptop shape. Of course, they love water so if you sit in your yard and have a hard plastic wading pool, they will happily retrieve dummies for hours. This is what makes Irish Water Spaniels awesome companions for families with sturdy kids.

Grooming
  The Irish Water Spaniel’s dense, tightly curled double coat is short and thick next to the skin, for warmth, and topped with a long outer coat for extra protection. The coat sheds slightly, but it doesn’t cling to the fabric of furniture and clothing quite as much as other types of hair.
  Comb the coat one to three times a week, as needed. Be sure you comb all the way down to the skin to remove any mats or tangles. Use a slicker brush to remove dead hair. For a neat look, the coat must be scissored every six to eight weeks, including trimming the fur around the foot pads. Ask the breeder to show you how to do this, or take your IWS to a professional groomer who is familiar with the breed or willing to learn how to achieve the proper look.
  Any time your IWS goes in a pool, lake or ocean, give him a thorough freshwater rinse to remove chlorine, algae, and salt, all of which can dry and damage the coat. He doesn’t need frequent baths, which could dry out his protective oily coat, but getting wet helps to ensure that the coat has those pretty ringlets that give the IWS his distinctive look.
   The rest is basic care. Keep the ears clean and dry, especially if your IWS goes swimming a lot. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Irish Water Spaniels do best with children if they are raised with them. Early socialization — exposure to a variety of peoples, places, sights, sounds, and situations — also helps. Always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left    unsupervised with a child.
  Irish Water Spaniels can get along well with other pets in the family if introduced to them at a young age. Otherwise, supervise them carefully. They are hunting dogs and may view smaller animals, especially birds, as prey. Protect pet birds even if you're sure your IWS understands they're off limits. Some spaniels can learn that, if they're taught from puppyhood, but don't assume that it will happen with every dog. You may always need to keep the two separated, if only so your IWS doesn't pull your parakeet's tail or your parrot won't take a bite out of your Irish Water Spaniel's sensitive nose.

Did You Know?
The Irish Water Spaniel’s coat is naturally oily to repel water and keep the skin underneath dry even after he has been in the water numerous times.

Famous Irish Water Spaniels
As an Irishman, I may be accused of having a chip on my shoulder, but the Irish Water Spaniel does not seem to get the credit it deserves when appearing in the media. Though the breed appears in the television series The Irish R.M. and in The Long Kiss Goodnight, starring Samuel L. Jackson, the names of the dogs involved have never been revealed.

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Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Everything about your Kerry Blue Terrier

Everything about your Kerry Blue Terrier
  The Kerry Blue Terrier is the quintessential working dog. He hails from County Kerry, Ireland, where he was bred to hunt small game and birds, kill rodents, and herd sheep and cattle. Intelligent and brave, he became a cherished pet as well, displaying fierce devotion to his family or pack. While not a particularly well-known dog breed, the Kerry Blue enjoys a dedicated following of fanciers, thanks to his working abilities and loyal companionship.

Overview
  The Kerry Blue Terrier, also known as the Irish Blue Terrier, is a breed of dog.Originally bred to control "vermin" including rats, rabbits, badgers, foxes, otters and hares, over time the Kerry became a general working dog used for a variety of jobs including herding cattle and sheep, and as a guard dog. Today the Kerry has spread around the world as a companion and working dog. Despite a Kerry Blue winning Crufts,the most important UK dog show, in 2000, it remains an "unfashionable" breed, and is distinctly uncommon; however, it not as threatened as some of the other terrier breeds such as Skye Terrier, Sealyham Terrier, and Dandie Dinmont Terrier.

Highlights
  • The Kerry Blue Terry is a quick study, though he can be strong willed at times. You'll need a lot of patience and firmness, plus a good sense of humor, when training this breed.
  • The Kerry Blue is friendly to people, but his distaste for other dogs is well known. He can be aggressive and quarrelsome. Owners must be vigilant when taking the Kerry Blue in public. If he's socialized and well trained, he probably won't pick a fight, but he might try to end it if he's taunted.
  • Keeping your Kerry Blue groomed is expensive and, if you do it yourself, it's hard work.
  • Like all terriers, the Kerry Blue can be feisty. He loves to dig, chase, chew, and sometimes bark.
  • This is an active breed. He needs plenty of exercise, every day. A yard to play in is best, combined with daily walks.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
More Quick Facts:
  • The Kerry Blue has a long head, dark eyes with a keen expression, small V-shaped ears that fold forward, a squarish body, and a medium-length tail carried up.
  • Coat and color are the Kerry’s defining characteristics. A proper Kerry coat is soft, dense, and wavy in any shade of blue gray, or gray blue. Those shades can range from deep slate to light blue gray, with darker to black areas on the muzzle, head, ears, tail, and feet.
  • Comparable Breeds: Airedale Terrier, Border Terrier
History
  The Kerry Blue Terrier was first observed in the mountains of Kerry in Ireland, hence the name of the breed.There is a romantic story of a blue dog swimming ashore from a shipwreck: the coat of this dog was so lovely that it was mated with all the female Wheaten Terriers in Kerry, producing the Kerry Blue. Perhaps this story is not entirely myth, as the Portuguese Water Dog is often suggested as part of the Kerry's makeup. Others suggest the Kerry was produced by the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier crossed with the Bedlington
Philip Doyle with his dog "Terri" at the Killarney Show,1916.
Terrier with or without some Irish Wolfhound or Irish Terrier blood. The extinct Gadhar herding dog is also mentioned as another possible branch of the Kerry's family tree. One certain fact is the breed became very popular as an all-around farm dog in rural Ireland.

National Dog of Ireland
  With the development of dog shows in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the breed became standardised and "tidied up" for the show ring. The Irish nationalist leader Michael Collins owned a famous Kerry Blue named Convict 224. Collins even made an attempt to have the Kerry blue adopted as the national dog of Ireland. Love of dogs did, however, cross political divides. The first show of the Dublin Irish Blue Terrier club took place outside official curfew hours and was entered both by those fighting for and against an Ireland republic. The Dublin Irish Blue Terrier Club was so successful it led directly to the foundation of the Irish Kennel Club, and a Kerry blue was the first dog that club registered.




Personality
  The Kerry Blue Terrier is an energetic and often rambunctious dog who loves to play hard. They are true family dogs who love to be surrounded by the ones they love and insist upon being included in all family activities. They have enough stamina to accompany people on long walks and hikes, but prefer yard games like catch, fetch, or plain old games of tag. Kerry Blues can be trusted around children of all ages, though their yen for rough housing makes them a poor choice for homes with toddlers. They are reliable watchdogs, quick to sound the alarm that someone is approaching, and they are fearless protectors of their property and family. They are not aggressive, however, unless absolutely provoked and are a great choice for families with experience raising dogs.


Health
  The Kerry Blue Terrier, which has a lifespan of 12 to 15 years, may suffer from clotting factor XI deficiency and retinal folds. It is also prone to minor health problems like cataract, entropion, Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS), canine hip dysplasia (CHD), spiculosis, otitis externa, and hair follicle tumors, and a major issues such as cerebellar abiotrophy. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip and eye exams on the dog.

Care
  The Kerry Blue should be able to spend time lots of time with its family, both outdoors and indoors. Exercise is required for the breed, but this can be accomplished with a vigorous game, a leash-led walk, or a nice romp in the backyard.
  Coat care consists of combing twice a week and shaping and clipping at least once a month. The Kerry Blue's ears will also need to be trained during its early stages of development so that its ears will be properly shaped as an adult.

Living Conditions
  Kerry Blues are good for apartment life. They are fairly active indoors and a small yard will do.

Training
  The Kerry Blue Terrier is intelligent, but being a typical terrier, he’s also quite stubborn. Being such an observant dog, the Blue will watch to see who is in charge and how they can turn any situation to their advantage. If he senses that you’re not in charge at all times, your Kerry Blue Terrier will gladly take charge. Be consistent and confident when training your Blue and never let him get the upper hand. You’ll find that you’ll make much more progress by using positive training techniques. Come to training prepared with plenty of treats and keep these sessions interesting – your Kerry will lose focus if he gets bored.
  After he masters basic obedience training, your Kerry Blue Terrier is ready to move onto advanced obedience, agility and earthdog training. Because this is an intelligent breed, you need to keep his mind stimulated, otherwise he’ll engage in destructive behaviors.

Activity Requirements
  This mid-sized terrier needs a lot of physical and mental activity in order to maintain happiness and health. They have energy to spare, and just when you think you've tired our your Kerry Blue, he'll come back for more. This breed is not for couch potatoes, and don't do well in apartments. Houses with open space and a yard to play in are the ideal living situation for a Kerry Blue Terrier. They need about one hour of vigorous exercise every day which can include brisk walks, jogs, or romping in the yard.
  In addition to physical activity, it is important to keep the Kerry Blue's mind active. A bored Kerry is a destructive Kerry. Agility training is a good option to work both his mind and his body.

Grooming 
  Even though the Kerry Blue sheds very little, or not at all, the coat requires daily brushing to prevent tangles, mats, remove dirt and distribute oils. Trimming and bathing need to occur every four to six weeks. It is recommended that a professional groomer handle the bathing and trimming of a Kerry Blue, but because the breed is not common, it can be difficult to find a groomer who is familiar with the proper Kerry Blue style. Breeders can provide references for groomers.
  Check the ears on a regular basis for signs of wax buildup, irritation or infection. Clean the ears with a cotton ball and a veterinarian-approved cleanser; never use a cotton swab in a dog's ear canal. Teeth should be brushed on a weekly basis to prevent tartar buildup, promote gum health and keep bad breath at bay. Trim nails monthly if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally outdoors.

Children And Other Pets
  The Kerry Blue loves kids, and because he is a sturdy dog, he can take a few knocks if the play gets rough. He is good-natured, and isn't normally grouchy with children.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  He is grouchy, even aggressive, with other dogs, though with socialization and training — and altering — this tendency can be minimized. Never let your guard down, though, when the Kerry Blue is around other dogs, especially those unfamiliar to him.
  The Kerry Blue isn't especially fond of small animals either, given his strong prey drive. His instinct tells him to chase, so keep him leashed in public. The best way to ensure he'll get along with cats or small mammals in his home is to raise him with them and introduce them properly. Following that, close supervision is advised.

Did You Know?
  Kerry Blue Terrier puppies are born black. The coat should reach its mature color by the time the dog is 18 months old.

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Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Everything about your Redbone Coonhound

Everything about your Redbone Coonhound
  As you can tell from its name, the Redbone Coonhound is a breed made famous by hunting raccoon and a few other animals. In fact, this is what it was originally bred for, having first been an “unofficial” breed in the American south for a number of years. This was before people serious about hunting wanted not only a superior Redbone Coonhound in terms of athleticism, but in coat color and overall breed quality. The result is the modern-day Redbone Coonhound, an excellent companion for families and a dog with keen hunting instincts that have also been measured against bears and cougars.
  What’s interesting about the Redbone Coonhound is just how well-suited it is for a number of households and family types. A good dog to have around children and sturdy enough to enjoy farm life and the outdoors, the Redbone Coonhound can make a highly versatile breed that brings a lot of joy to a family in so many ways.

Overview
  The Redbone Coonhound, also known as the Redbone, the Redbone Hound and the Red Coon Dog, is truly an all-American breed. This is an easy-going, friendly, good-natured hound dog that is immediately recognizable by its beautiful, deep red coat. Redbones were bred to perpetuate their instinctive desire and talent for hunting and treeing raccoons and other large game, including bobcat, cougar and even bear. Redbone Coonhounds are surefooted and swift.   They also are fantastic family dogs; they adore children and get along famously with other companion animals. Today, this is the only solid-colored purebred coonhound. The American Kennel Club accepted the Redbone Coonhound for full registration as a member of its Hound Group in 2009.

Other Quick Facts
  • Colonial settlers, especially those from Scotland and Ireland, brought red hounds with them to the United States, and those dogs are the ancestors of the Redbone.
  • The Redbone is a cold-nosed dog, meaning he’s good at following an old, or “cold,” trail.
  • Redbones occasionally have a small amount of white on their chest or feet, said to be a result of their Irish hound background.
  • The Redbone’s main quarry is raccoons, but he can also track bigger game.
  • The Redbone has a pleading expression with dark brown or hazel eyes and a sweet voice that carries over long distances.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound

UKC group: Scenthound

Average lifespan: 11-12 years
Average size: 35-65 pounds
Coat appearance: Flat, shiny, and smooth
Coloration: Rich red
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Strong, vigorous, and striking all around, clean, well-proportioned head, black nose, strong chest, brown eyes, long, floppy ears that are close to the nose, upright tail, and small paws with thickened pads.
Possible alterations: Some may have white markings on chest and feet.
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, American Foxhound

History
  In the late 18th century, many European-type hunting dogs were imported to America, most of them of Scottish, French, English, and Irish ancestry: the English Foxhound, the Harrier, the Grand Bleu de Gascogne, the Welsh Hound, the Beagle, and the Bloodhound were among these. Most often, these dogs were imported so that wealthy planters of the Tidewater could engage in foxhunting. Over time, Southern hunters selectively bred dogs that would not back down, had great stamina, and would "hound" their prey until they treed or cornered their exhausted quarry, leading to modern coonhounds.
  In the late 18th century Scottish immigrants brought red-colored foxhounds to Georgia, which would be the foundation stock of the Redbone. Later, approximately 1840, Irish-bred Foxhound and Bloodhound lines were added. The name came from an early breeder, Peter Redbone of Tennessee, though other breeders of note are Redbone's contemporary,   George F.L. Birdsong of Georgia, and Dr. Thomas Henry in the 19th century.Over time, breeders followed a selective program that led to a coonhound that is specialized for prey which climbs trees, was unafraid of taking on large animals, was agile enough to carry on over mountain or in meadow, and liked to swim if necessary. They were ideal for pack hunting of both small and larger prey. Originally, the Redbone had a black saddleback, but by the beginning of the 20th century, it was an uninterrupted red tone.
  Like many American hunting dogs, especially those from the South, they were widely known by hunters and farmers, but not well known in the show ring. The Redbone has found recognition by the two major American kennel clubs. Because of of its main use as a hunting dog rather than a show dog Redbones are extremely rare dogs outside of the United States. There are very few breeders outside of North America and it is virtually unknown in Europe or Australia.
  The Redbone Coonhound was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1902, becoming the second coonhound breed to gain recognition.
  The Redbone Coonhound was popularized after the novel Where the Red Fern Grows, written by Wilson Rawls, was published in 1961. It told the story of Billy Colman and his Redbones.
  The Redbone Coonhound was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2010. It was shown at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show for the first time in 2011.

Personality
  Redbone Coonhounds are determined, energetic, tenacious, tireless and fearless, especially while on the hunt. These personality traits are part of what make Redbones such fantastic scenthounds. In addition, Redbone Coonhounds are affectionate, friendly, kind-hearted, sensitive and extremely good with children and other animals. This is not a high-strung, fussy or clingy breed. Redbones adapt effortlessly to a wide variety of new situations. They are not suspicious or wary around strangers, nor are they overly boisterous or pushy. These are solid, stable hound dogs that can work in the field all day, and then comfortably relax with the family for a nice evening at home.

Health Problems
  Problems with hip dysplasia affect this dog, but that is not uncommon and they have few other health problems, making them generally pleasant around veterinarians.

Care
  Traditionally used as an outdoor dog, the Redbone has become more adaptable to indoor living with a family. It should be taken out on routine jogs, walks, or be allowed to swim nearby. However, these activities should only be done in safe and secure locations, as the dog can quickly roam off if it picks up a curious scent. While trailing or when excited, it has a loud and melodious voice.
  To maintain its coat, the Redbone should be brushed weekly. Many Redbone Coonhounds also have a tendency to drool.

Living Conditions
  The Redbone Coonhound will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. These dogs are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. Their all-weather coat allows them to live and sleep outdoors and work in all kinds of terrain.

Training
  Redbone Coonhounds take well to training, and are so versatile and athletic that they can accomplish a high variety of tasks. Giving them tasks to fulfill – from swimming to hunting – can help it not only feel fulfilled, but help it feel like it plays a role in your pack. Every dog should certainly feel this way about humans, but should be trained with the discipline to realize that its role is subservient to every human in the house.

Exercise Requirements
  Capable of a lot of exercise – and indeed, they were bred that way – this is a great outdoor dog and a good companion for someone who wants to get plenty of vigorous exercise. If you’re looking for a low-maintenance dog that likes to lay around the house, this is not your breed.

Training
  Redbone Coonhounds take well to training, and are so versatile and athletic that they can accomplish a high variety of tasks. Giving them tasks to fulfill – from swimming to hunting – can help it not only feel fulfilled, but help it feel like it plays a role in your pack. Every dog should certainly feel this way about humans, but should be trained with the discipline to realize that its role is subservient to every human in the house.

Grooming
  The Redbone has a flashy, dark-red coat that’s short and smooth. Weekly brushing with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush will keep it clean and shiny, as well as remove dead hair so it doesn’t land on your floor, furniture or clothing.
  Bathe your Coonhound as needed. He may have a bit of a “houndy” odor, which some people love and others hate. Bathing can help reduce the smell if you don’t like it, but it won’t take it away completely or permanently.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every week or two, and keep the ears clean and dry. Brush the teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Great with children, the Redbone Coonhound will adapt to family life with ease. Loving and loyal, this dog loves his owner with passion. A great hunter, he can adapt well to the working life or be happy as a playmate. In need of a fenced-in yard, he has the natural instinct to sniff out his prey, including cats. Trained easily if done so at a young age, this breed is a great addition to add to a household.
Did You Know?
  The man who did the most to develop the breed was named George E. L. Birdsong, a well-known fox hunter and dog breeder who lived in Georgia.

A dream day in the life of a Redbone Coonhound
  Waking up ready to play, he'll greet you with a lick. Once you pet him and show him love, he's ready for his meal. After breakfast, he'll enjoy a fun walk and sniff around the block. Engaging in any activity the kiddos present him, he'll follow them around with ease. Happy to nap inside or outside, he'll need a lot of time in the backyard. After dinner, he'll enjoy a good rubdown, a swim in the pond and a lot of attention before he takes a snooze with his master.




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Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Everything about your Irish Wolfhound

Everything about your Irish Wolfhound
  Known as the tallest of dog breeds, Irish Wolfhounds are truly gentle giants. This breed is famous for being easy going, soft natured, calm, sensitive, sweet, and patient. A relatively good watch dog that can provide some protection, the Irish Wolfhound is excellent with children, strangers, pets, and other dogs.
  Friendly and loving to its owners, the Irish Wolfhound is intelligent, which makes it an easy dog to train. It needs regular exercise so it can stretch those long legs. If you’ve been toying with the idea of bringing an Irish Wolfhound into your home, read on to find out more.

Overview
  Royal and popular in Ireland, the Irish Wolfhound gained much fame when showing off its ability to fight off wild animals in arena sports. With an ability to hunt elk and wolves, the breed gained a high honor in the hunting world. Given as gifts of stature in the days of the Greeks, this gentle giant is seen as a kind-natured breed with a large body and heart.

Highlights
  • Irish Wolfhounds are not recommended for apartment living. Although they have relatively low activity levels inside, they need room to stretch out and aren't built for negotiating stairs.
  • Irish Wolfhounds require at least 40 minutes of daily exercise and do best in a home with a large fenced yard.
  • Irish Wolfhounds need a fenced yard to keep them from chasing prey away from their yards. They should not be kept in a yard with underground electronic fencing. The desire to chase is too strong to be overcome by the threat of a momentary shock.
  • The Irish Wolfhound is a gentle dog who usually gets along well with everyone. With early socialization and training, he'll be gracious toward other dogs and forbearing of indoor cats. He'll view outdoor cats and other animals as fair game.
  • If you are looking for a long-lived breed, the Irish Wolfhound is not for you. He lives roughly 6 to 8 years and his giant size predisposes him to many health problems.
  • Irish Wolfhounds do not make good guard dogs although their size can be a deterrent to a would-be intruder.
  • The Irish Wolfhound is an average shedder and only needs to be brushed on a weekly or bi-weekly basis. You'll need to strip the longer portions of his coat if you want to keep him looking like the Irish Wolfhounds that compete in the conformation ring.
  • Irish Wolfhounds should be walked on leash to prevent them from chasing animals or other moving objects, such as radio-controlled cars.
  • The Irish Wolfhound is not a pony and should not be ridden by children, no matter how small. His joints aren't built for the strain. Nor is he built for pulling a cart or other vehicle.
  • Irish Wolfhounds thrive when they are with their owners. They are not outdoor dogs, although they enjoy playing outside.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • When you look at an Irish Wolfhound, you’ll see a dog of great size and commanding appearance with dark eyes, small ears, and a rough coat that can be gray, brindle, red, black, white or fawn.
  • Over the centuries, the Irish Wolfhound has been known as the Big Dog of Ireland, Greyhound of Ireland, and Great Hound of Ireland.
  • Comparable Breeds: Borzoi, Scottish Deerhound

History
  In 391 CE, all Rome marveled at seven giant dogs from Ireland presented as a contribution to the city’s shows and games by consul Quintus Aurelius Symmachus. The consul’s thank-you note to his brother, who had procured the dogs, is thought to be the first written mention of what was to be called the Irish Wolfhound.
  Over the centuries, the enormous Irish hounds populated a number of royal courts, including those of England’s Edward III, Henry VIII, and Elizabeth I, as well as France's Henry IV. The dogs were also presented as royal gifts to the courts of Sweden, Denmark, and Spain.
  Unfortunately for the Wolfhounds, they did their job a little too well. By the 18th century, their numbers had decreased. They were no longer needed because they had hunted Britain and Ireland’s wolves to extinction. The Earl of Chesterfield complained in 1750 that, despite a two-year search, he had been unable to obtain any of the dogs because the breed had become so rare. Twenty years later, author Oliver Goldsmith wrote that the dogs were kept only as curiosities in the houses of gentlemen and noted “He is extremely beautiful and majestic in appearance, being the greatest of the dog kind to be seen in the world.”
  The great dogs might have faded into the history books had it not been for the efforts of Captain George Graham. In 1862, he managed to obtain some of the few remaining Wolfhounds and crossed them with Scottish Deerhounds, the Tibetan Borzoi, a Pyrenean wolfhound, and a Great Dane. It took 23 years to restore the breed.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the Irish Wolfhound in 1897. The breed ranks 79th among the dogs registered by the AKC, a respectable showing for a giant dog.

Personality

  Irish wolfhounds have a heart as big as the rest of them. They are gentle, noble, sensitive and easygoing. Despite the fact that they can run at great speed, most of their actions around the house are in decidedly slow motion, and they are definitely not snap-to-it obedience prospects. They will eventually mind you, just at their own pace!

  Just under the surface of their gentle exterior does lie the nature of a coursing hunter, so Irish wolfhound owners must be vigilant when outdoors. Like all sighthounds, Irish wolfhounds love to chase animals that are running away from them, and they can take their time responding to your calls to come back. Yet Irish wolfhounds are generally model citizens with other dogs, pets and children. Their great size is usually enough to scare away intruders; this is fortunate, as most Irish wolfhounds are pacifists and not great protection dogs.

Health Problems
  Just like all dog breeds, the Irish Wolfhound can suffer from health problems. Some health issues that are common to this breed are bone cancer, cardiomyopathy, hip dysplasia, Von Willebrands, PRA and bloat .
  To keep your Irish Wolfhound healthy, make sure to take your dog out for regular exercise and visit the veterinarian when needed.

Care
  When it comes to the dog’s care, its coat requires to be combed or brushed two times in a week and at times it is a good idea to trim its stray hair. Dead hair needs to be stripped twice a year. The hound loves stretching its legs and long walks, thus daily exercise is a must. Indoors the dog requires a lot of good space to stretch its body on a soft surface. Lying frequently on hard areas can cause the development of calluses.

Living Conditions
  The Irish Wolfhound is not recommended for apartment life. It is relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. This is a giant breed that needs some space. It may not fit well in a small or compact car.It needs to be part of the family and would be very unhappy in a kennel. Being a sighthound, it will chase and so need a secure, fenced area for exercise.

Training
  Training an Irish Wolfhound is quite easy, since this breed is intelligent and loves to please. Start training as early as possible, as you will find a puppy easier to handle. Start your training with leash control. The Irish Wolfhound likes to pull on the leash, so you need to teach your dog that this behavior is unacceptable. Leash training is especially important because as your dog grows bigger, it will have no problems dragging you along on its leash.
  The best way to train an Irish Wolfhound is to be consistent and patient. When your dog follows a command, reward it with a treat, and when it does something wrong, firmly but positively correct the behavior.
  Because the Irish Wolfhound is smart, it will quickly understand what is expected. You should continue to work with your dog, even when it starts to mature. As well, be sure to socialize your Irish Wolfhound with other dogs and people so that it does not become frightened.

Exercise
  This is one large dog and it needs a large area to play and exercise in. You’ll need to take your Irish Wolfhound out for a walk or run at least twice a day. You can incorporate your dog’s exercise routine into your workout routine if you like to ride a bike, run or rollerblade. This is where leash training comes in handy, so be sure to start this training from the time your dog is a puppy.

Grooming
  The Wolfhound has a rough coat that is especially wiry and long over the eyes and beneath the jaw. Extensive grooming is done to give the dog a perfect appearance in the show ring, but for a pet owner the coat is easy to maintain. There's just a lot of dog to groom.
  Brush or comb the shaggy, wiry coat once or twice a week to remove dead hair and prevent or remove any mats or tangles. The double coat sheds moderate amounts year-round but doesn’t go through a heavy annual or biannual shed. A bath is rarely necessary.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Irish Wolfhounds are gentle with children, but simply because of their large size they can accidentally knock toddlers down and scare or injure them. They're best suited to homes with older children. Irish Wolfhounds are not ponies, and children cannot ride them. Your Wolfhound can be injured if children try to ride him.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  With early socialization and training, your Irish Wolfhound should get along well with other dogs. He may chase small animals such as cats unless brought up with them and taught not to. It's vital to properly introduce him to other animals in the household and supervise their interactions. He'll consider outdoor cats and other small animals fair game.

Is this breed right for you?
  A large and loving breed, he does well with both children and other animals. Mostly inactive indoors, this dog is not suited for apartment life based on his size. In need of a large yard and living space, he does best when part of the family. A devoted and friendly pet, he has a sincere sense of loyalty to his owners. More likely to say hello to a stranger than to ward him off, most people are scared of him based on his size. A smart pup, he'll love you unconditionally until his short life ends.

Did You Know?
  Welsh folklore tells the story of Gelert, a brave Wolfhound who protected his master’s son when a wolf broke into the house. When the father returns, he sees the dog with blood on his mouth and kills him in a rage. He then finds the baby, safe, next to the body of the dead wolf. A village named Beddgelert (Gelert’s Grave) commemorates the story.

A dream day in the life of an Irish Wolfhound
Waking up to sniff out the home, the Irish Wolfhound will lazily greet you awake with a swipe of his tongue. Going downstairs to check on the rest of the family, he may take a snooze again before breakfast. After a good meal, he'll run outside for a bit to sniff out the yard for any new smells. After a nap in the sun, he'll head back inside to hang out with the family. Watching the house while his owner is away at work, the Irish Wolfhound will only ask for a good petting before going to bed with you.

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