LUV My dogs: Herding Dog

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Showing posts with label Herding Dog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Herding Dog. Show all posts

Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your Entlebucher Mountain Dog

Everything about your Entlebucher Mountain Dog
  The athletic and physical Entle makes an excellent family dog; he is known for his extreme devotion to his family. He is a great watchdog, as he is aloof with strangers and has a big bark for his size. Self-assured and determined, he is intelligent and thrives on being with his people.

Overview
  The Entlebucher, or Entle for short, is a Swiss herding breed related to the Appenzeller, the Bernese Mountain Dog, and the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog; of the four, he's the smallest.
  He's known for his intelligence, personable attitutude, agility, and loyalty. He's independent and self-confident, yet he bonds strongly to his person and is happiest spending the day at his family's side. He's got energy to burn, and needs an owner who can give him about an hour of vigorous exercise a day — if not herding flocks, then competing in dog sports like tracking, frisbee, or agility. Like other smart working dogs, he loves having jobs to do, so begin training this smart cookie early, teaching him to gather up dirty laundry, bring in the newspaper, fetch your slippers, or other useful tasks.
  The Entlebucher can be territorial and will bark to announce the presence of strangers or arrival of guests. He's aloof with people he doesn't know, and like any dog, he needs early socialization to learn how to behave around strangers and other dogs. He loves his kids but, because he also loves roughousing, he must learn to be gentle with little ones. He may try to "herd" his kids by nipping at their heels.

Other Quick Facts
  • There are two common pronunciations for Entlebucher: Ent’-lee-boo-ker or Entel-boo-ker. He is also known as the Entlebucher Sennenhund (which means dog of the Alpine herdsman) and Entlebucher Cattle Dog.
  • The Entlebucher is a medium-size dog with a compact but muscular body. Dark-brown eyes have an alert, attentive, friendly expression. Triangular ears, rounded at the tips, hang down, raising up slightly when the dog is alert. The tricolor coat is black with symmetrical white markings on the face, chest and feet and rich fawn to mahogany markings on the eyebrows and between the black and white markings.
Breed standards

AKC group: Herding
UKC group: Guardian Dog
Average lifespan: 11-15 years
Average size: 55-66 pounds
Coat appearance: double coat that consists of short, tight, harsh and glossy outer coat and a dense undercoat
Coloration:  black with symmetrical tan and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards and farms/rural areas
Temperament: Devoted, loyal, intelligent, independent
Comparable Breeds: Appenzeller Sennenhunde, Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

History 
  All of the Swiss mountain dogs, including the Entlebucher, descend from mastiff-type dogs brought by the Romans more than 2,000 years ago. The dogs that became the Entlebucher was used to herd cattle to and from mountain pastures.
  The dogs were first called Entlebucherhund in 1889. They were little known and generally considered the same breed as the Appenzell Cattle dog until 1913. That year, four of the dogs were exhibited at a Swiss dog show. Based on the judges’ reports, they were classified in the Swiss Canine Stud Book as a fourth Mountain and Cattle Dog breed. Even so, it wasn’t until 1927 that a standard was written for them, after the founding of the Swiss Club of Entlebuch Cattle Dogs in 1926. 
  The breed developed slowly but was eventually recognized for his lively, tireless nature and excellent qualities as both a working and family dog. The American Kennel Club recognized the Entlebucher in 2011

Temperament
  Entlebucher Mountain Dogs are intelligent and very quick to learn new things. They are agile, active dogs by nature which means they enjoy being given things to do. In their native Switzerland, the Entlebucher is still used as a herding dog and are highly prized because they are so reliable and biddable by nature.
  They form extremely strong bonds with their owners whether in a working or home environment and are known to become totally devoted to their families and children. They are very people-oriented by nature and enjoy nothing more than being included in a household although they form the strongest bond with the person who usually feeds and takes care of them.
  Being so smart and so active, the Entlebucher thrives in a country environment and with people who live active, outdoor lives. They are a very good choice as a family pet in homes where one person is usually around when everyone else is out of the house. They are highly trainable and love nothing more than to learn new things. Entlebuchers excel at all sorts of canine sports which includes activities like agility and flyball.
  They are not the best choice for first time owners, because the Entlebucher needs to be trained and handled by someone who is familiar with the breed or similar type of active, intelligent working dog. Without the right amount of daily exercise and mental stimulation, an Entlebucher would quickly become bored and find new ways to amuse themselves which could result in them becoming wilful and unruly making them a lot harder to handle.
  If left to their own devices for long periods of time, the Entlebucher can also suffer from separation anxiety which could lead to a dog becoming destructive around the house. These hard working dogs are never happier than when they are being given something to do that occupies their minds. 

Health Problems
  Because the foundation stock of Entlebuchers was so small, these dogs are known to suffer from several hereditary ailments such as hip dysplasia, hemolytic anemia and progressive retinal atrophy.

Care
  As with any other breed, Entlebuchers need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, dogs need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs throughout their lives.

Living Conditions
  The Entlebucher Mountain Dog is not recommended for apartment life.

Trainability
  The Entlebucher Mountain Dog is highly intelligent and therefore in the right hands and environment they are easy to train. They revel in learning new things and are very quick to pick up on things. However, this means they quickly learn both the good and the bad, which is why their socialisation and training has to start early. It also has to be consistent throughout their lives because these active dogs like nothing more than knowing their place in the pack and who they can look to for direction and guidance.
  They excel at many canine sports which includes activities like flyball and agility because they adore the one-to-one attention they are given during a training session and remain highly focused when they take part in any competitions. Entlebuchers are always keen and alert, but they do not answer well to any sort of harsh correction or heavy handed training methods which would not achieve any sort of good results with these highly intelligent and voice sensitive dogs. An Entlebucher needs to know what is expected of them to be truly well rounded dogs.



Exercise Requirements
  Bred to herd cattle across the Swiss Alps for days on end, Entlebuchers have a virtually inexhaustible amount of energy. Therefore it is important that they be provided with at least an hour of vigorous exercise each day. It is also beneficial for these dogs to have a meaningful task to which they can devote themselves to.

Grooming
  The Entlebucher has a short, thick, double coat. The coat is easy to care for, but it sheds. Brush the dog weekly with a rubber curry brush to remove dead hair. The Entle sheds a little more heavily in spring, so you may need to brush a little more often for a few weeks until he has lost all of his winter coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once a month. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian.

Children and Other Pets
  Entlebuchers are known to be friendly, devoted dogs by nature and they love nothing more than to be part of a family. As such they are generally very good around children although they can play a little rough at times which means any interaction between younger children should always be well supervised by an adult to make sure things don't get too boisterous.
  If they have grown up with a family cat in a household, they usually get on well with them although they will think nothing of chasing off a neighbour's cat whenever they can. If well socialised from a young enough age, the Entlebucher generally gets on well with other dogs and smaller pets as long as they were introduced when a dog was younger. Care always has to be taken when they are around any small animals they don't already know just in case.

Is the Entlebucher Mountain Dog the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. Little to no trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Difficult Training: The Entlebucher Mountain Dog isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Entlebucher is one of four farm dogs native to Switzerland. He takes his name from the Entlebuch valley where he originated.
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Wednesday, December 27, 2017

Everything about your Icelandic Sheepdog

Everything about your Icelandic Sheepdog
  Thought to be companions to the ancient Vikings, the Icelandic Sheepdog dog breed was used to protect flocks, especially lambs, from birds of prey. They still retain the habit of watching the sky and barking at birds — as well as everything else they see or hear.

Overview
  It's thought that invading Vikings brought the ancestors of this breed with them to Iceland in the ninth century. Thanks to the isolation of Iceland, today's Icelandic Sheepdogs — also called the Icelandic Spitz or Icelandic Dog — probably look a lot like their ancestors.
   He's too friendly to be much of a guard dog, but you'll never be surprised by visitors.
  Affectionate, confident, and playful, the Icelandic Sheepdog gets along well with people and other dogs. Males tend to be more laidback and cuddly than females. Trained with consistency and patience, Icelandics learn quickly and willingly.

Quick Facts
  • The Icelandic Sheepdog’s thick, straight or slightly wavy double coat comes in two lengths and several colors — shades of tan, ranging from cream to reddish brown; chocolate brown; gray and black — all with white markings and sometimes with a black mask.
  • Icies typically have double dewclaws on their hind legs.
Breed standards

AKC group: Herding
UKC group: Herding Group
Average lifespan: 11-14 years
Average size: 20 - 30 pounds
Coat appearance: medium or longer, always with a thick, soft undercoat
Coloration: Tan, reddish-brown, chocolate, gray, black, white is a prominent required color
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards, farms/rural areas
Temperament: Affectionate, confident, playful, loving
Comparable Breeds: American Eskimo Dog, Norwegian Elkhound

Miscellaneous
  The breed is sometimes denoted in Latin as canis islandicus, though it is a breed and not a species.
  As the name implies, it is a sheep dog, but is also used as a watch dog and general working dog. When herding, the Icelandic Sheepdogs were not mainly used to take the sheep from one point to another, but to prevent animals from straying. Additionally, the dogs were in charge of herding horses and other animals, as well. When herding failed, the dogs drove the animals by barking. Thus, they tend to bark when they want something, although this behaviour can be controlled by training.
The Icelandic Sheepdog often has
 two dewclaws on each hind leg.
  In the Icelandic landscape, sheep often get lost and it has historically been the dog's job to find them and return them to the herd. They are, therefore, used to working on their own and to figuring things out for themselves, so owners have to beware lest they learn things they should not. As a watch dog, their main task was to alert the inhabitants when somebody was coming, so these dogs tend to bark a lot when they see people approaching.
  The Icelandic Sheepdog is very loyal and wants to be around its family constantly. It follows its owner everywhere. Unlike most working dogs, these calm down when indoors and happily lie down at their master's feet.



History
  The Icelandic Sheepdog is native to, yes, Iceland — the only breed that originated there. It’s thought that Vikings brought the ancestors of this breed with them to Iceland in the 9th century. The dogs were used to protect flocks, especially lambs, from birds of prey.
  The breed has been brought from near-extinction in the 1950s, when only about 50 of the dogs remained, to a population of more than 800 in the United States alone. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed as a member of the Herding Group in 2010.

Temperament
  This breed is prone to separation anxiety, so it is not recommended as an outside-only dog. The breed is social, affectionate, playful and friendly, making it a great option for families.
  Icelandic sheepdogs are great with children, other dogs and smaller pets. The prey drive is not strong in this breed, so smaller pets should be welcomed by them. Always supervise your dog with smaller animals because the hunting instincts can vary depending on the individual dog. Calm but firm training is recommended.
  Icelandic sheepdogs bark when active, working or excited, so apartment residents should take this into consideration.

Health 
  The Icelandic Sheepdog generally has little health issues with an average life expectancy of 12 to 16 years. Main health concerns associated with the Icelandic Sheepdog include hip dysplasia and an eye disorder called distichiasis.

Care
  With such a thick coat, this dog breed does require weekly brushing. An active exercise plan is best for the Icelandic Sheepdog. It should never be left alone for too long as isolation may result in anxiety issues.

Living Conditions
  The Icelandic Sheepdog needs a lot of activity and exercise and needs close contact to the family. Many of these dogs have "home-alone anxiety" problems, because they don't like to be home alone.

Trainability
  As a breed, Icelandic Sheepdogs are smart, willing and eager to please. This makes them pretty easy to train. However, because they are so intelligent and enthusiastic, they should be kept challenged with a variety of different training, exercise and play activities, so that they don’t become bored. It can be helpful to rotate their activities every few days, to keep them alert and happy.

Activity Requirements
  Icelandic Sheepdogs are active, athletic, energetic animals that need lots of exercise to  keep them in tip-top physical and mental shape. They enjoy all sorts of outdoor activities, such as taking long rambling walks with their owners, romping at the dog park and frolicking at the beach or along a river. They love to play with other dogs. They also love to participate in obedience, agility, utility, flyball, herding and other competitive dog sports, at which they excel.

Grooming
  The Icelandic’s coat of many colors can be short or long, with both lengths having an outer coat and an undercoat.
  Brush the Icie’s coat once or twice a week to remove loose fur and reduce the amount of hair you find floating around the house or attached to your clothes. Be sure you have a good vacuum cleaner to keep your home tidy. Icie lovers say he doesn’t shed as much as you might think, but don’t get this breed thinking that he is a low shedder.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every three to four weeks or as needed. You may also want to clip the tufts of hair between the toes, but other than that, the coat needs no trimming. Brush the teeth often — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is the Icelandic Sheepdog the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Moderately Easy Training: The Icelandic Sheepdog is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Icelandic Sheepdog is also known as the Iceland Spitz.



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Everything about your Irish Dane

Everything about your Irish Dane
  The Irish Dane is a hybrid that is a cross-breed of a Irish Wolfhound and Great Dane and may demonstrate any combination of traits from those two breeds. Hybrids have become very popular in the past few years. They play a big role in the current designer dog trend. 
  The experimentation of these hybrid or designer dogs has not been recognized by the American Kennel Club or Canadian Kennel Club. The key to cross breeding to purebred dogs is what is called hybrid vigor, the breeding resulting in a healthier dog with superior genetic constitution can come from dogs purebred for so long that they have common genetic disorders.

Overview
  Irish Danes are imposing animals with big hearts – literally and figuratively. They are sweet and social creatures with a great appreciation for companionship. They do like to stay active and will seek out opportunities to gallop in open spaces. Irish Danes have a life span of 6 to 10 years and can weigh up to 150 pounds.
   When they are full grown, they can be anywhere between 30 and 35 inches tall. Irish Danes have a harsh, rough, short to medium coat that comes in solid or multi-color combinations of black, white, blue, fawn, silver, gray, red, and cream. They can have various pattern and markings on their coat as well. In terms of large designer breeds, this one fairly established. Even so, Irish Danes can vary widely in appearance and temperament. Accordingly, they are not yet recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Breed standards
Breed Type: Mix
Group: Herding
Average lifespan: 8-10 Years
Average size: 100 to 150 pounds
Coat appearance: Harsh, rough, short to medium
Coloration:  black, tan, brown, red, blue, gray, and white
Hypoallergenic: No

History
  As a hybrid dog the Irish Dane can have any combination of traits and appearances from either parent, the Irish Wolfhound and Great Dane. Hybrids have had a recent surge of popularity in the last twenty years or so, also known as designer dogs. It has caused a huge variation in prices for such dogs and many puppy mills and disreputable breeders are taking advantage of this trend. Therefore be careful from whom you buy. Unlike many designer dogs the Irish Dane actually does have more of a history to them as they were first bred in the 1800s during an attempt to save the Irish Wolfhound.


Temperament
  Though the Irish Dane has an imposing presence, it is anything but scary. Irish Danes are friendly and gentle dogs that love being around others. They will never pass up an opportunity to cuddle and play. Because they are quite social, Irish Danes also do well in multi-pet households. In fact, this breed is prone to separation anxiety if it does not receive enough attention and affection from those around it. The best way to overcome this is to ensure Irish Danes are surrounded by loving people and have a relatively consistent schedule. 
  Beyond this, the Irish Dane inherits a strong hunting impulse and guard dog mentality from its parent breeds. This can make it territorial and weary of strange adults at first. Owners can combat any negative behaviors from these instincts by socializing their Irish Danes early and consistently. Nonetheless, this breed is not known to be aggressive and can be a great family dog in the right environment.

Health
  The best way to ensure you have a healthy dog is to buy from a good breeder and ask to see health clearances for both parents. While there is some argument to hybrid vigor there is a chance in any dog of inheriting the conditions their parents are prone to. In the Irish Dane's case these conditions to be aware of include Development Issues, cancer , bloat, heart problems, surgical issues, Anesthesia Sensitivity, liver problems, Fibrocartilaginous Embolic Myelopathy, OCD, eye problems and joint dysplasia.

Care
  Irish Danes are relatively easy to maintain and do not require heavy grooming. This breed will shed moderately, however, and is not hypoallergenic or suitable for owner with allergies. If your Irish Dane has a particularly long coat, it may benefit from occasional brushing. Either way, Irish Danes only need occasional baths. They should also have their teeth cleaned on a daily basis. Beyond this, Irish Danes should have their nails clipped at least once or twice a month to avoid split or cracked nails and ears clean regularly with a damp cloth to avoid wax build up and infection.

Trainability
  He should be easy to train as he is eager to please and listens to commands and is inclined to obey. In general the Irish Dane will need fewer repetitions than many other dogs so will train quicker. Because of his size it is important to train him in good behavior from a young age when on the leash, as he will be super powerful when he is an adult and you do not want him pulling at you then. Also teach him not to jump up at people. Establish yourself as pack leader and use positive but firm methods of training. Early socialization and training are very important to get a well rounded dog.

Activity Requirements
  Irish Danes have above average levels of energy. They enjoy being active and require quite a bit of daily exercise. This breed loves running and galloping in open spaces, as well as playing with other people and large animals. Owners should aim to provide their Irish Dane with this type of activity about 45 to 90 minutes each day. Beyond this, Irish Dane also like to cuddle with family members and lay around the house. This breed is suited for all types of environments, though it should not be over exercised in extreme hot or cold conditions. Additionally, Irish Danes are not suited for apartment, urban, or suburban living due to their large size. They do best in larger homes with lots of outdoor space.

Grooming 
  The Irish Dane is a low shedding dog and grooming him is quite easy to do. If he has a coat more like the Irish Wolfhound you may need to have it clipped occasionally. Bathe him as he needs it, it is a good idea to train him for this from a young age, as when he is full sized you will not be lifting him in and out of the bath. You could also opt to use the hose in the yard or use a bathing station at a groomers. Make sure you use a dog shampoo. Once a week you need to check his ears and wipe them clean. His teeth should be brushed at least three times a week. His nails may need clipping if he does not naturally keep them worn down.

Children and other animals?
  He is good with children as he has a gentle nature. His size does mean he may knock over small children without meaning too so they may need to be watched. Children should also be taught how to play with him and that things like pulling ears, trying to ride him and messing with his food are not things that are acceptable to do. Irish Danes are also good with other pets if they have been socialized though they can see smaller animals as prey to chase.

Is the Irish Dane the Right Breed for you?
Easy Training: The Irish Dane is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

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Everything about your King Shepherd

Everything about your King Shepherd
  The King Shepherd is self-confident with a well-balanced personality and healthy nervous system. They should not exhibit any shyness or nervousness. They are extremely intelligent, easy to train and eager and faithful to please their owners. This breed makes a fine sheepherder and working dog. They are also a naturally courageous guard and watchdog, showing courage, strength, and hardiness in their role of protector.

Overview
  The King Shepherd is a large breed. The build of this dog is muscular, long, and robust; the structure is solid. The head is in good proportion with the body and moderately wide between the eyes. The forehead is slightly rounded. The cheeks are not too full and moderately curved when viewed from the top. The thick, firm ears are medium-sized and moderately wide at base. The eyes are medium-sized and almond shaped. The shades of the eyes can be varying shades of brown ranging from golden brown to almost black. The chest is broad and deep. Thickly feathered, the tail reaches at least to the hocks and is slightly curved.
  The King Shepherd is self-confident with a well-balanced personality and healthy nervous system. They should not exhibit any shyness or nervousness. They are extremely intelligent, easy to train and eager and faithful to please their owners. This breed makes a fine sheep-herder and working dog. They are also a naturally courageous guard and watchdog, showing courage, strength, and hardiness in their role of protector. They make very nice companions and are friendly to other animals and children.

Breed standards
Breed Group: Herding
Breed Type: mixed breed
Average lifespan: 10 - 14 years
Average size: 90-150 pounds
Coat appearance: Coarse and Long
Coloration: Sable, black saddle with tan, gold, cream, tan or silver markings
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Singles and families with children and other pets living in a house with a yard
Temperament: Intelligent, eager to please, energetic, protective, loyal, loving, playful
Comparable Breeds: German Shepherd, Shiloh Shepherd

History
  Two American dog breeders Shelly Watts-Cross, and David Turkheimer created this large breed from the Shiloh Shepherd (American and European German Shepherd Dogs and Alaskan Malamutes), additional American-bred German Shepherd Dogs and the Great Pyrenees. An organized dog breed club was started in 1995.


Temperament
  The King Shepherd isn't solely valued extremely for its head turning good looks however the dog is gaining popularity for its working skills and glorious temperament similarly. Loving and loyal to their family, these excellent looking dogs will be trained simply as a result of their wanting to please nature and high levels of intelligence. Its protecting instincts, loyalty to its family and aloofness towards strangers create it a superb watch and working dog though' it's not hostile to strangers. As a mild, kind and playful breed, the King Shepherd makes a really smart fellow of kids and may be a trust worthy nanny for youngsters. 
  This simple to train dog is employed in search and rescue missions, as therapy dogs and in police work similarly as sheepherders. It gets on well with other dogs and pets within the family. it's not an appropriate dog for apartment living, not solely thanks to its giant size however conjointly thanks to its high exercise demands that decision for at least an oversized yard wherever the dog will look out of its exercise desires. The King Shepherd is a superb family pet, working dog and a trustworthy guardian of the family.

Health Problems
  As is the case with all other hybrid canine breeds, the King Shepherd might be susceptible to the health conditions that commonly affect its parent breeds. However, hybrid dogs can be surprisingly healthy and hardy, and you simply can’t predict an individual dog’s long-term health. Therefore, being aware of what to look out for, and working closely with your vet, will ensure you are able to give your pet the best care possible.
  King Shepherds may be prone to conditions that include Von Willebrand’s disease, hypothyroidism, joint dysplasia, eye issues, degenerative myelopathy, allergies, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, thrombopathia, and bloat.

Care
  King Shepherds are very intelligent and energetic, and needs both challenging mental stimulation and plenty of exercise. The King Shepherd takes well to strenuous activity.

Living Conditions
  The King Shepherd dog is a large breed that requires more space. They are not recommended for apartments or other small living spaces. A large fenced in yard is ideal so the dog can get the exercise required to stay healthy and happy.

Training
  Because King Shepherds are highly intelligent, training your pet will be a pleasure. Your dog will be eager to follow your commands in order to please you, especially if you use a positive, consistent, and firm approach. Start training your King Shepherd from an early age to ensure your dog will learn all of the rules and will grow up to be a fantastic family pet.

Exercise
  Because the King Shepherd is a large breed, you will need to find time to exercise your dog every day. These canines thrive on physical and mental stimulation, and they have a lot of energy. They do best in homes with yards where they can run around and play off-leash, and they should have toys to play with while they are indoors as well.
  Use a combination of games, training, and outdoor activities to keep your King Shepherd active and healthy. Going for jogs or long walks, as well as hiking or bicycling, are great options. The key is to ensure your dog gets enough exercise to release his energy so he doesn’t become restless and potentially destructive. If you are not an active person, the King Shepherd isn’t the best choice for your lifestyle.

Grooming
  The coat is highly weather-resistant. The King Shepherd should be brushed regularly. Bathe only when necessary.

Children and other pets
  Loving and loyal to their family, these excellent looking dogs will be trained simply as a result of their wanting to please nature and high levels of intelligence. Its protecting instincts, loyalty to its family and aloofness towards strangers create it a superb watch and working dog though' it's not hostile to strangers. As a mild, kind and playful breed, the King Shepherd makes a really smart fellow of kids and may be a trust worthy nanny for youngsters.

Is the King Shepherd Right For You?
Difficult Training: The King Shepherd isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
The chief qualities of this outstanding breed are : a well-balanced nervous system, readiness, lack of inhibition, vigilance, incorruptibility, combined with courage and cleverness in defense. It is known to be an excellent watch-dog and guard-dog. The King Shepherd is characterized by unsurpassed loyalty towards its master and eagerness to please.
Owing to its huge size, the King Shepherd is not recommended for apartment life. Though the King Shepherd can prove to be a good companion for kids, they should be allowed to interact with kids only under close supervision because of their stature.
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Friday, December 22, 2017

Everything about your Spanish Water Dog

Everything about your Spanish Water Dog
  The Spanish Water Dog is one of the lesser known breeds here in the UK, although their numbers are slowly rising with more pedigree puppies being bred and registered with The Kennel Club every year. The SWD is a medium sized dog that boasts having a distinct and attractive corded coat that covers their entire body. 
  They are intelligent dogs with a tremendous amount of stamina which is one of the reasons they have always been so highly prized for their sporting abilities. However, the Spanish Water Dog is just as happy in the home environment and thrives on being part of family which makes them a great choice as a family pet thanks to their kind and loyal natures.

Overview
  The Spanish Water Dog (perro de agua español) breed dates back several hundred years and has its origins most likely in Turkey from where it was imported into Spain as a general purpose sheepdog and guard. It is also used sometimes as a gundog, and is skilled at retrieval from water. The SWD has strong genetic links to other ancient water breeds such as the Portuguese Water Dog, the French Barbet and the Irish Water Spaniel.
  If you were to imagine a medium-sized dog with thick, curly fur and a penchant for herding, you might be thinking of the Spanish Water Dog. These dogs are an old Spanish breed that has been used for herding for many centuries. The Spanish Water Dog is a highly intelligent breed that does best when given a job to do but, at the end of the day, they love nothing more than to spend time with family.

Quick Facts
  • Approximately 1,000 Spanish Water Dogs live in the United States and Canada, with most of them in the Northeast.
  • The SWD’s coat may be black, brown, beige, white or particolor (with the second color being white).
  • Spanish Water Dogs have webbed feet. On fishing boats, their jobs probably include retrieving nets and guarding the catch.    
Breed standards

AKC group: Herding

UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 12 to 15 years
Average size: 30 to 50 pounds
Coat appearance: curly coat which is woolly in texture and may form cords when long
Coloration: solid black, beige, brown, or white; bicolour where the second colour is white; or particolour
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards, farms/rural areas
Temperament: Hardworking, intelligent, loyal, friendly
Comparable Breeds: Portuguese Water Dog, Puli

History 
  Little is known of the SWD’s origins. Some dog experts theorize that they descended from African dogs or that they are related to other European water dogs, such as the Portuguese Water Dog, or to Turkish or Hungarian herding and flock-guarding breeds.
  Dogs of this type were hard-working aides on Spanish farms, at mines and in fishing villages, where they filled many roles, including herding, retrieving, rat patrol and protection. The breed’s curly single coat is thought to be an adaptation to the various climates found on the Iberian Peninsula, which range from dry to humid.
  With mechanization and the migration of people to cities from rural areas, the dogs were less needed for their traditional work, but people interested in the breed made efforts to preserve it, starting in 1975 by collecting a variety of the dogs from various areas, selectively breeding them to maintain their appearance and working ability, and turning their talents toward new jobs such as search and rescue and drug and bomb detection.
  Today, the SWD is recognized by European and American registries. The American Kennel Club classifies it as a herding dog and granted it full recognition in January 2015, paving the way for the SWD’s participation in conformation showing and other AKC events. 

Temperament
  The Spanish Water Dog boasts having a tremendous sense of smell, sight and sound. As such they are true working dogs that enjoy nothing more than being out and about in the great outdoors. They are intelligent and sensitive by nature being just at ease in a home environment as they are working in the field. They form strong bonds with their owners and families and are known to be even-tempered dogs which is just one of the reasons they make such great family pets.
  They are also known to have a very enthusiastic personality which sees these dogs being ultra-willing and eager to please. However, puppies have to be well socialised from a young enough age for them to mature into well-rounded, obedient adult dogs. They are a great choice for families where the children are slightly older and who therefore know how to behave around dogs. Spanish Water Dogs tend to be a little aloof and wary of people they don't already know, but rarely would one of these dogs ever show any sort of aggressive behaviour towards a stranger, preferring to keep their distance until they get to know someone.
  They are not the best choice for first time owners because a Spanish Water Dog needs to be handled and trained by someone who is familiar with this type of sporting dog and their specific needs. However, in the right hands, these striking dogs can be trained to be obedient dogs with particular attention being paid to the "recall" command. They are never happier than when they know their place in the pack and who they can look to for direction and guidance. They also need to know what an owner expects of them which in short, means their training has to be consistent and always fair right from the start and then throughout a dog’s life.
  As their name suggests, SWDs love being in water and are naturally strong swimmers  which means care has to be taken when walking them anywhere near more dangerous water courses just in case they decide to jump in.    

Health Problems
  While the SWD seems to be a very healthy breed there are some issues that it has, just like all other breeds. There are cases of hip dysplasia in the breed, so choose your breeder carefully. All breeding dogs should have their hips tested, either by OFA or PennHIP. There have been a few cases of PRA reported in Europe so it is advised that all breeders should test their breeding stock for PRA and other such genetic eye diseases with a yearly CERF exam.
   A responsible breeder will be able to produce the results in writing. Like other Water Dogs and related breeds, they grow hair in their ear canals and can be prone to ear infections. The ears must be kept dry and clean. Because these dogs are (as a general rule) so active and energetic as puppies, they may seriously injure themselves from too much running and jumping when their skeletal structure is still developing.

Living Conditions
  The Spanish Water Dog can adapt to almost all environments or circumstances, as long as it gets enough exercise. These hardy dogs can endure both extreme heat and cold with no problem.



Trainability
  The Spanish Water Dog is an intelligent character, but they do have a bit of a "wandering off" streak in them which is why it's so important to teach these dogs a strong "recall" command from a very young age. With this said, socialising them from a young enough age is extra important and their training also has to start too. It's best to teach a SWD the basics when they are still puppies and to start their training in earnest as soon as they have been fully vaccinated and slightly older.
  Being sensitive dogs by nature, a Spanish Water Dog does not respond well to any sort of harsh correction or heavy handed training methods. The key to successfully training them is to use positive reinforcement and to make a training session as interesting as possible. It’s best to keep things nice and short without too much repetition which helps keep a Spanish Water Dog more focussed on what is being asked of them which as a result achieves the best results.

Exercise Requirements
  Because the Spanish Water Dog is a herding breed it has fairly high requirements for exercise. These dogs require at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise per day plus some active play time, if possible. Training these dogs for herding or other dog sports is a great way to meet both their physical and mental stimulation needs.

Grooming
  The Spanish Water Dog has a single coat, meaning there’s little or no undercoat. He doesn’t shed heavily, although he does lose hairs, just as people do. The single, curly coat often leads people to believe that the SWD is hypoallergenic, but all dogs produce allergens to some extent in their dander, saliva and urine. If you have allergies, you should spend time with several Spanish Water Dogs to determine whether you react to them.
  Grooming the Spanish Water Dog is easy. Typically, the coat is clipped once or twice a year to approximately 1 inch over the entire body, including the head and ears. Between clips, there’s no need to comb, brush or blow-dry the coat, all of which can damage the texture and shape of the curls.
  When your Spanish Water Dog gets dirty, bathe him with a mild, pet-safe shampoo. Work it through the coat gently, as if you were hand-washing a cashmere sweater. Rinse thoroughly with lukewarm water, then use your hands to squeeze out excess water. Blot the coat with a towel, being careful not to rub the coat roughly. Let your dog air-dry in a warm spot with no drafts.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every week or two, and brush his teeth often — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath.    

Children and Other Pets
  Spanish Water Dogs make great family pets in households where the children are older and who therefore know how to behave around dogs. With this said, any interaction between younger children or toddlers and an SWD should always be well supervised by an adult to make sure things stay nice and calm.
  If they have grown up with a family cat in the house, they usually get on well together, however, a Spanish Water Dog would not hesitate in chasing any other cats they don't know. Care has to be taken when they are around any other smaller animals and pet, just in case.

Is the Spanish Water Dog the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. No trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The Spanish Water Dog is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.

Did You Know?
  The Spanish Water Dog also goes by other names. In Spain, he’s known as Perro de Agua Español (Spanish water dog), Perro Rizado (curly coated dog), Turco Andaluz (Andalusian Turkish dog) and Barbeta.
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Everything about your Beauceron

Everything about your Beauceron
  Expect to be herded by this stubborn French beauty. Highly versatile and intelligent, the protective Beauceron is an excellent watchdog for his family and home, but he's not for first-time dog owners. He is an athlete and will make sure you get outside for exercise and fun. His short coat is easy to groom.

Overview
  The Beauceron, also known as the Bas Rouge, the Beauce Shepherd, the Berger de Beauce and the French Shorthaired Shepherd, is the largest of the French sheepherding dogs. It is closely related to the longhaired Briard (Berger de Brie) and has been controlling flocks of sheep and herds of cattle since at least the 16th century. The Beauceron is a muscular, deep-chested and imposing dog with a short coat and a long tail, somewhat resembling a cross between a Doberman Pinscher and a German Shepherd Dog. This is a potentially aggressive breed, always ready to attack if it deems it necessary to protect its people, property or livestock. However, if gently and consistently trained and socialized, thye Beauceron can make a loyal and trusted companion. One of the more unusual features of the breed is the required presence of double dewclaws on its rear legs. The Beauceron was only recently recognized by the American Kennel Club, becoming a member of the Herding Group in 2007.

Other Quick Facts
  The Beauceron is a “mouthy” dog. Be sure you have plenty of tough toys on hand for him to carry around and chew on. Don’t let him gnaw on your hands, feet, or other body parts.

Breed standards
AKC group: Herding
UKC group: Herding dog
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 80 to 110 pounds
Coat appearance: Harsh outer coat with woolly, fluffy undercoat
Coloration: Black with tan markings, or black and mottled grey with tan markings
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, farms
Temperament: Calm, reliable loyal, devoted
Comparable Breeds: Doberman Pinscher, German Shepherd

History
  A French herding breed known for centuries in western Europe, the Beauceron is noted as one of the breeds used to create the Doberman Pinscher. The regional name is somewhat misleading: the breed was found throughout northern France, rather than just in the Beauce region. Although quite different in appearance, the Beauceron and the long-haired sheep dog, the Briard, stem from similar ancestral stock, sharing the trait of double dewclaws on the hind legs. Both were used to herd sheep and cattle. Like the Beauceron, the Briard is found throughout northern France, and despite implications from its name, also did not come exclusively from the Brie region.
  In 1809, Abbé Rozier wrote an article on these French herding dogs, in which he described the differences in type and used the terms Berger de Brie and Berger de Beauce.
  In 1893, the veterinarian Paul Megnin differentiated between the long-haired Berger de la Brie and the short-haired Berger de Beauce. He defined the standard of the breed, with the assistance of M. Emmanuel Ball. In 1922, the Club des Amis du Beauceron was formed under the guidance of Dr. Megnin.
  In 2008, the Beauceron made its debut in the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

Temperament
  The Beauceron is known as a calm, intelligent and gentle dog and one that enjoys being in a family environment. They are agile, athletic and brave becoming totally devoted to their families and children. They can be a little wary and aloof around people they don’t already know, but rarely would a Beauceron show any sort of aggression towards strangers, preferring to just keep their distance until they get to know someone.
  Beaucerons mature slowly which has to be taken into account during their training. These handsome dogs don't really reach their full mental maturity until they are around 3 years old. With this said, they are intelligent dogs and therefore in the right hands and in the right environment, they are easy to train, but because they mature so slowly, it's important that their education not be rushed, but rather broken down into shorter sessions that are fun and which keep a Beauceron focused. Long, repetitive training sessions do not suit these dogs because they would not only find them tiring, but boring too.
  They are not the best choice for first time owners, unless the person is prepared to dedicate a lot of time to satisfy the needs of such a high energy, intelligent dog. However, they make wonderful family pets for people who lead active, outdoor lives and in households where at least one person remains at home when everyone else is out. They do not answer well to any sort of harsh correction or heavy handed training methods, however, they do respond well to positive reinforcement which gets the best results from these sensitive, intelligent dogs.

Health Problems
  The Beauceron is generally a healthy, hardy breed. Some lines are prone to bloat and like any breed over 40 pounds, Beaucerons are prone to hip dysplasia. Ninety-five percent of all breeders in the U.S. breed only hip certified stock.

Care
  The Beauceron loves spending time with its human family and performs best when kept inside the house with access to the outdoors. It is highly active and enthusiastic in nature. Exercise on a regular basis is essential, otherwise they tend to get bored and frustrated. But exercise does not mean only physical exercise, a great deal of mental exercise is also required to keep them absolutely fit and fine.

Living Conditions
  The Beauceron will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are moderately active indoors and will do best with at least a large yard.


Training
  Even though this is a highly trainable breed, the Beauceron is not the dog for first-time owners or timid trainers. With its high intelligence, this breed is also known as being independent. You should take on training responsibilities seriously, as you’ll need to be consistent and confident. If you don’t prove that you are in charge, the Beauceron will quite willingly take that position.
  Once you’ve proven who is in charge, you’ll find that your Beaucerons will flourish when it comes to basic obedience. In no time at all, you can move onto more advanced training with tricks, tracking or agility lessons. Not only does this dog need lots of exercise, it also needs plenty of mental stimulation, as boredom leads to destructive behaviors.

Exercise Requirements
  Get ready to move – the Beauceron loves its exercise. You’ll need a lot of room for this dog, so stay away from this breed if you live in an apartment or want a dog that’s laid back. The Beauceron is not your typical family dog, but it will keep an eye out for children when playing outdoors.
  Because Beaucerons were bred for herding and guarding duty, this breed needs to be active. A walk around the block just won’t do. Active owners will love this breed, as this dog can keep up with hikes, bikes, jogs, runs and swims. If you have a farm or a lot of room to roam, the Beauceron is the right dog for you.

Grooming
  When it comes to grooming, the Beauceron is an easy keeper thanks to his short, double coat. A bath every three to four months with a mild shampoo is all that is needed. Brush his sleek coat with a natural bristle brush or rubber hound mitt several times a week to remove dead hair.
  The Beauceron sheds small amounts year-round and more heavily in spring and fall. He will need more frequent brushing during seasonal shedding periods to control the amount of loose hair floating around your house.
  The rest is basic care. His ears need to be checked every week and cleaned if needed. Trim his toenails once a month. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Is the Beauceron the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Difficult Training: The Beauceron isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Beauceron is a French herding breed used on sheep. In his home country he is known as the Berger (bair-zhay) de Beauce (bohs). The name means “shepherd of the Beauce.”

Popular culture
  • There is a Beauceron named Bosco in the film Marmaduke.
  • A dog of the same breed is also in the film Hotel for Dogs. His name is Henry.
  • A pack of hunting Beaucerons appeared in the 1988 movie The Bear.
  • A Beauceron was also seen in the film The Wild Child.
  • Two Beauce Shepherds appear in the James Bond movie Moonraker.
  • There was a Beauceron used extensively in the search and rescue efforts in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City on September 11, 2001.
  • There was a Beauceron in a brief scene in the Martin Scorcese directed movie Gangs of New York.

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