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Showing posts with label Herding Dog. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Herding Dog. Show all posts

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Norwegian Buhund

Everything about your Norwegian Buhund
  Intelligent, independent, and eager to please, the Norwegian Buhund dog breed can handle all kinds of dog jobs and sports with ease. He needs lots of exercise and attention, and is a quick learner.

Overview
  The Norwegian Buhund belongs to a large class of dogs called the Spitz type. Bred as an energetic working dog, Buhunds herd livestock and guard home and family. Today, they are also trained to aid the hearing impaired, perform some types of police work, and perform in obedience and agility trials. Their thick coat is wheaten  or black in color.
  While Norwegian Buhunds make excellent watch dogs, they are also content to lie at your feet at the end of a hard day. Training wise, the Buhund is considered by many to be the most trainable of the Spitz breeds, but obedience training is still a necessity. Because the Buhund was born to herd and sound the alarm, the Buhund needs training and a job to do. Because they are happiest near their owner, they have earned the nickname, “the friendly spitz.”

Other Quick Facts
  • Skeletons of six dogs found at the excavation site of a Viking grave may have been forebears of today’s Buhunds.
  • The Buhund was used by farmers to hunt or run off wolves and bears.
Breed standards

AKC group: Herding
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 12 to 15 years
Average size: 26 to 40 pounds
Coat appearance: Thick, hard, smooth-lying outer coat; soft, dense undercoat
Coloration: Wheaten – from cream to intense orange; black; white patches may appear on the face, neck, chest, feet, and tail; gray coats are rare
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, farm/rural areas
Temperament: Loving, loyal, active, intelligent

History
  This Norwegian farm dog, who guarded property, helped herd livestock, and hunted or ran off predators such as wolves and bears, is thought to have a long history. The excavation of a Viking grave dating to the 10th century turned up the skeletons of six dogs of various sizes. They may be the forebears of today’s Buhund. Over the years, Buhunds have escaped the bounds of their herding past to be trained for certain types of police work and as hearing dogs, as well as participating in agility and obedience trials.
  The dogs were first exhibited at dog shows in Norway in the 1920s, and a breed club was organized in 1939. The dogs were first imported to the United States in the 1980s.
  The United Kennel Club recognized the Buhund in 1996 and classifies him as a Northern breed. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 2009. He is a member of the AKC’s Herding group and ranks 159th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Temperament
  The Norwegian Buhund is vigilant, cheerful, active, untiring, intelligent and attentive. Very affectionate, it loves giving kisses and snuggling. This breed needs physical and mental stimulation and require consistent, firm leadership as it can be headstrong if it senses its handlers are not as strong minded as itself. These dogs like to be taught and learn very quickly. A natural watchdog, the Buhund is brave and vocal but not aggressive. It is unlikely to bite or snap unless provoked and led to believe it is alpha over the humans as a result of lack of leadership. Buhunds love their family and are known for their fondness of children. It is an ideal size for a house dog and a great people lover. This is a very trainable breed. 
  The Norwegian Buhund is very active and needs a lot of exercise. It needs obedience training to establish reliable manners. If your dog tends to bark at you when it wants something it is a sign that your dog believes he is above you in the pack order, and you not only need to hush him, but you also need to reevaluate your canine to human leadership skills. A dog that believes he is alpha can be very stubborn. May try to herd humans and needs to be taught this is not acceptable.

Health 
  Fortunately, the Buhund is a healthy dog. There have been cases of Pulverulent Nuclear Cataracts, epilepsy and skin allergies reported in the breed. On the flipside, the breed has a very high incidence of hip dysplasia. Considering that the Norwegian Buhund is not a large breed of dog, breeders and enthusiasts are alarmed at this quickly increasing problem.

Living Conditions
  The Norwegian Buhund would do best living in a house with at least a small fenced-in yard. These dogs are very active and should get plenty of chances to exercise. They can, however, live in an apartment if extra care is given for sufficient exercise and the apartment is fairly big for the dog to move around.

Training
  Norwegian Buhunds are highly intelligent dogs that have a strong desire to please their people. They are one of the easiest to train among the Spitz style breeds. They learn quickly provided the owner is consistent, gives plenty of praise and carries yummy rewards. Although he is independent and tough enough to herd and protect sheep on his own, the Buhund is offended by harsh words and responds well to assertiveness and kindness during training sessions.
  The Norwegian Buhund does very well in events such as obedience, herding and agility trials. This breed has also been used for service, search and police work. His versatility and intellect make him a great all around dog.

Exercise
  This is a very active breed that needs to be exercised every day, with a long, brisk walk or jog. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. In addition, they greatly enjoy sessions of play.

Grooming
  The Buhund has a thick double coat. Brush it weekly to keep it clean and remove dead hair. The coat sheds some all year round and more heavily once or twice a year. During shedding seasons, which are usually in the spring or fall, daily brushing will help to keep excess hair under control.
  Regular brushing will keep the Buhund clean. It’s rare that he will need a bath. The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is the Norwegian Buhund the Right Dog for You?
  Norwegian Buhunds are happy, active dogs who adore children and are very affectionate with their families. Although they do need a good amount of exercise each day, they are happy to settle down and snuggle in at the end of the day. They get along with other pets, too, and are regarded as a “people dog” since   they are happy to meet anyone they can.
  Although heavy shedding occurs 2 times a year, regular brushing the rest of the year is all that is needed. The dogs do best indoors with a yard, but they can live in large apartments if they are allowed to exercise outdoors daily. There are only two health problems considered common for this breed, and when added with the minimal grooming they are easy dogs to maintain. They do need training, however, but they are easy to train.
  If you are looking for a playful, affectionate family dog with minimal grooming, good health and a love of children, consider the Norwegian Buhund breed for your next dog.

Did You Know?
  In his homeland of Norway, the Buhund’s name means “farm dog.” He is also called the Norsk Buhund or the Norwegian Sheepdog.
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Everything about your Swedish Lapphund

Everything about your Swedish Lapphund
  The Swedish Lapphund is a breed of dog of the Spitz type from Sweden, one of three Lapphund breeds developed from a type of dog used by the Sami people for herding and guarding their reindeer. The expression "the black beauty of Norrland" is very often attributed to the Swedish lapphund, which is most likely one of Sweden's oldest breeds. The Swedish name of the breed is Svensk lapphund.

Overview
  A typical spitz type dog of slightly less than medium size, with proud head carriage, and a weather resistant coat. The body is compact and slightly longer than tall. The chest is deep to the elbow, and there is prominent forechest. The ribcage is long and oval, with well developed last ribs. The back is level, strong, muscular and springy. The loin is short and broad. The croup is proportionally long, broad and slightly sloping. The belly is slightly tucked up.
  The breed is very receptive and willing to work, and its abilities as a guard and herder made it very useful in the reindeer trade. They are lively, alert, kind and affectionate, easy to train and suitable for many different endeavors such as obedience, agility, herding and tracking.

Other Quick Facts:
  • There are approximately 1,200 Swedish Lapphunds in the world, most of which live in Sweden. Others are located in Finland, Norway, England, Denmark, The Netherlands, France, Germany, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, Slovenia, Russia, and Australia. Only a few live in the United States.
  • The Lappie used to use his bark to scare off predators and alert reindeer to his presence. Although he doesn’t encounter many wolves or do much herding these days, he retains his tendency to bark.
Breed standards
Breed Group: Herding
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 33 to 53 pounds
Coat appearance: tight, harsh, medium length outer coat with a soft, dense undercoat
Coloration:  Black, Brown, White
Hypoallergenic: No

History
  The Swedish lapphund has its origins among the ancient hunting tribes of northern Scandinavia, from the land that the Sámi people call Sapmi. In Sámi mythology it is said that the lapphund sought the post of worker amongst the Sámi people in exchange that it would always be well-treated. The lapphund has been used mainly for hunting and guarding. When the Sámi people started to keep domestic reindeer in the mid-18th century, the lapphund's repertoire was expanded to include herding.
  Hard work in the barren landscape of northern Scandinavia has created a very resilient breed. The shifting climate demands a weatherproof coat that is easy to maintain. The rough terrain and the varied work demand a dog with endurance, agility, intelligence and independence. The resulting Swedish lapphund is a well-rounded working dog, well suited both for work as a farm, hunting, and herding dog, and as a pet.



Temperament
 Typical Swedish Lapphunds are clever, gentle, and biddable dogs. In their native Sweden, they undergo an assessment of their temperament – known as mentalbeskrivning – which has allowed breeders to select dogs with the most desirable behavioural traits, while avoiding more negative ones, and this seems to have been quite a successful approach.
  The Lapphund is generally tolerant and sociable with other dogs, and may accept cats if the two are raised together. Likewise, it is fond of children, but it is vital that this working breed is afforded plenty of exercise, as it can otherwise become excessively boisterous, especially when playing. The Lapphund has no tendency to be aggressive, but is aloof with strangers, and will respond to their approach with loud, enthusiastic barking.

Health
  Although the Swedish Lapphund is thought to be a relatively healthy breed, diabetes mellitus and progressive retinal atrophy are a few of the medical conditions that have been identified in the breed.And because they are so rare, popularity and overbreeding have yet to take a major toll on their health, it is advisable to ask the breeders about incidence of hip dysplasia and eye problems, since those are common in many different breeds.

Care
  Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness, or a bad odor that could indicate an infection. 
  If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Start grooming your Lappie at an early age so he learns to accept it willingly.Brush the coat weekly to keep it clean and remove dead hair.

Living conditions
  It is dog resistant to bad weather, which likes to live outdoors, in a colder climate with a loving and active family. It likes exercise, long walks and feels the need to burn its energy. It doesn't run away from its master. It needs socialization and training.

Trainability
  Controlling this tendency to bark is perhaps the greatest challenge in training a Swedish Lapphund, for it is otherwise a dog that learns quickly and responds well to praise and positive reinforcement. Teaching a “silent” command is a really useful technique to curtail any nuisance barking, but it requires patience and rigorous consistency in training.
  The other approach to managing this vocalisation is thorough socialisation, introducing the Lapphund to as many new people as possible during its formative months as a pup. While this will never completely eliminate this noisy instinctive behaviour, it is likely to make it a less frequent and persistent annoyance.

Exercise
  Naturally active little dogs, they should always be encouraged to remain so. They need to be taken on a daily walk.

Grooming
  The Lappie has a thick double coat that forms a ruff around the neck and is longer on the back of the legs and the tail. Brush the coat weekly to keep it clean and remove dead hair. During spring and fall shedding seasons, daily brushing will help keep excess hair under control.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness, or a bad odor that could indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. Start grooming your Lappie at an early age so he learns to accept it willingly.

Children and Other Pets
  Swedish Lapphunds are known to be very good around children thanks to their gentle, placid natures. However, any interaction between toddlers and a dog should always be well supervised by an adult to make sure playtime does not get too boisterous which could end up with someone being knocked over and hurt, especially when dogs are still young.
  When dogs have been well socialised from a young enough age, they generally get on well with other dogs they meet and if they have grown up with a family cat in a household, they usually get on well together. However, a Lapp might decide to chase off any other cats they encounter in their travels. Care should be taken when they are around any smaller animals and pets just to be on the safe side.

Did You Know?
  • The Lapphund comes from the far north and is intolerant of heat. Keep him indoors on hot or humid days.
  • The Swedish Lapphund is the national breed of Sweden and was the first dog registered by the Swedish Kennel Club.
  • The Swedish Lapphund was added to the Foundation Stock Service program in 2007.
  • The Swedish Lapphund has been approved to compete in AKC Companion events since January 1, 2010.
  • The Swedish Lapphund has been assigned the Herding Group designation.
  • The Swedish Lapphund is an ancient breed, in existence for thousands of years. It is a natural breed believed to be a descendent of the ancient artic wolf.
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Monday, June 4, 2018

Everything about your Czechoslovakian Wolfdog

Everything about your Czechoslovakian Wolfdog
  Named for its wolf-like appearance, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is a new breed of dogs developed in Czechoslovakia and is considered to be rare. These herding dogs have a rectangular build with large barrel-shaped chest, broad neck, muscular belly and a bushy tail. They stand upon two pairs of straight forelimbs, and strong, long-calved hind limbs. Its muzzle is black, ears are erect and eyes are amber-colored and positioned obliquely. They are best suited for rural setting where they have lots of space to roam, and a family property to guard. They are used to living in cold climates.

Overview
  The Czechoslovakian Vlcak or Czech Wolf Dog is a relatively new breed of dog first bred as a military attack dog. This breed is the result of an experiment in 1955 that involved crossing 48 working line German Shepherds with Carpathian wolves. The idea behind creating the Czech Wolf Dog was to create a powerful breed with the trainability, temperament and pack mentality of the German Shepherd as well as the strength and endurance of the Carpathian Wolf. Although first used by the Czech Special Forces in special military operations, the breed has since been used successfully in search and rescue, tracking, herding, agility, hunting, obedience and drafting.
  The Czech Wolf Dog, like it name indicates, looks more like a wolf than it does a dog. Its body is lithe and powerful with long feet and a strong back. Its head too is like that of a wolf and its powerful teeth meet in a razor sharp bite. The dog’s chest is large and flat and its stomach is strong and drawn in. The Czech Wolf Dog’s coat too is reminiscent of that of the Carpathian Wolf and is short, thick and is yellow-grey or silvery-grey in color.
   The Czechoslovakian Vlcak is calm, self-assured and intelligent. It is extremely brave and protective over its masters but will rarely attack without cause or command. However, they do require a great deal of leadership and handling skills and are not recommended for beginner dog owners.

Breed standards
AKC group: The AKC Foundation Stock Service  is an optional recording service for purebred dogs that are not yet eligible for AKC registration.
UKC group: Herding
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 44-54 lb
Coat appearance: Double layer, Straight, and Thick
Coloration: Yellowish-gray to silver-gray with a characteristic light mask
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Active singles, houses with yards, guard duty, farms and rural areas
Temperament: Lively, quick, courageous, sociable
Comparable Breeds: German Shepherd, Alaskan Malamute

History
  The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog, also referred to as the Slovak Wolfdog, could be a new breed, developed in 1958 being the offspring of an experimental crossing of a German shepherd with a Carpathian Wolf to ascertain that wolf and dog genes can be combined to form a healthy specimen. In 1982, it absolutely was recognized as a separate breed. Today, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdogs are not any longer used as the military dogs they are being used as companion and guard dogs.


Temperament
  The Czechoslovak Wolfdog is lively, very active, capable of endurance, docile with quick reactions. It is fearless, courageous, suspicious, yet does not attack without cause. It shows tremendous loyalty towards its master. Resistant to weather conditions. Versatile in his use. The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is very playful. Without proper leadership it can be temperamental. 
  It learns easily. We can admire its all-around qualities rather than its specialization. However, we should not expect it should train spontaneously; the behavior of the CsV is strictly purposeful—it is necessary to find motivation for training. The most frequent cause of failure is usually the fact that the human is not as strong-minded as the dog, lacking leadership and/or the dog is tired out with long, useless repetitions of the same exercise, which results in the loss of motivation. These dogs have admirable senses and are very good at following trails. They are really independent and can cooperate in the pack with a special purposefulness. If required, they can easily shift their activity to the night hours. The independent work of the pack without the necessary control of a man was the reason for their use in the army. Sometimes problems can occur during their training when barking is required. 
  Czechoslovakian Wolfdogs have a much wider range of means of expressing themselves and in some situations barking is unnatural for them; they try to communicate with their masters in other ways. Generally, to teach CsVs stable and reliable performance takes a bit more time than it does to teach traditional specialized breeds. The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog can be a bit dog aggressive if the humans are not displaying the proper authority. It is not generally trustworthy with other pets. It is usually good with children, but suspicious and watchful with strangers.

Health 
  With his wild heritage, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is not known to be affected by any specific health problems. Because he is a larger breed, however, he may be prone to musculoskeletal issues like hip dysplasia and may also be prone to bloat.

Care
  The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog needs a lot of exercises, without which they would display restless behavior readily evident from their pacing back and forth inside the home. A minimum of 45 minutes of daily physical activities is recommended for this breed. Take them out every day for a long, brisk walk or jogging, leading their way, or allow them to play and run around openly in a broad, enclosed space.
  These dogs have a double coat and need special attention especially during heavy shedding seasons, occurring twice a year. Brush them thoroughly with a thick bristled brush.
  However, this dog is clean and do not typically develop any doggie odor. Hence, they seldom need bath since their coat can readily shed dirt. Although, you can dry shampoo them when required.

Living Conditions
  The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do best with a large yard. Well-suited for cold climates.

Training
  As a cross between the wild wolf and the German Shepherd, the Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is an extremely intelligent breed. These dogs learn quickly, though they can be tricky to train – they require a great deal of motivation since their behavior is strictly purposeful. It is also important to note that these dogs can be fairly independent as well, so they are best for experienced dog owners. You’ll need to maintain a firm hand in leadership with this breed and you’ll need to continue training throughout the dog’s life. Early socialization is also recommended, especially if you plan to keep the dog in a home with other pets.

Exercise Requirements
  The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is a highly active dog that requires a lot of daily exercise. This breed needs a long walk at least once a day and will also appreciate having an outdoor space in which to run.

Grooming
  This breed sheds heavily twice a year. Bathing is most unnecessary, as the coat sheds dirt readily. Dry shampoo occasionally. This dog is clean and odorless.

Good with Kids
 This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Interesting Facts

  • The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog has a distinct 'facial mask', which is common to most wolf-like breeds.
  • Although these dogs were extensively used in the army, but they were less of a barker, sometimes problems occurred during their training sessions, when barking was required.
  • To own a Czechoslovak Wolfdog wolfdog in the UK, one needs to obtain permission from the local council since the breed is listed under 'Dangerous Wild Animals' license.
  • Like wolves, these wolfdogs have the ability to go without food for 2 to 3 days.
  • In 1982, the Czechoslovak Wolfdog was officially recognized as a national breed in Czechoslovakia.

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Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Common Collie types and breeds

Common Collie types and breeds
  The collie is a distinctive type of herding dog, including many related landraces and standardised breeds. The type originated in Scotland and Northern England. The collie is a medium-sized, fairly lightly built dog, with a pointed snout. Many types have a distinctive white pattern over the shoulders. Collies are very active and agile, and most types of collies have a very strong herding instinct. Collie breeds have spread through many parts of the world  and have diversified into many varieties, sometimes with mixture from other dog types.
  Some collie breeds have remained as working dogs, used for herding cattle, sheep and other livestock, while others are kept as pets, show dogs or for dog sports, in which they display great agility, stamina and trainability. While the AKC has a breed they call "Collie", in fact collie dogs are a distinctive type of herding dog including many related landraces and formal breeds. There are usually major distinctions between show dogs and those bred for herding trials or dog sports. They typically display great agility, stamina and trainability and more importantly sagacity.
  Common use of the name "collie" in some areas is limited largely to certain breeds – such as to the Rough Collie in parts of the United States, or to the Border Collie in many rural parts of Great Britain. Many collie types do not actually include "collie" in their name.
  Herding dogs of collie type have long been widespread in Britain, and these can be regarded as a landrace from which a number of other landraces, types, and formal breeds have been derived, both in Britain and elsewhere. Many of them are working herding dogs, but some have been bred for conformation showing and as pets, sometimes losing their working instincts in the course of selection for appearance or for a more subdued temperament.
  Herding types tend to vary in appearance more than conformation and pet types, as they are bred primarily for their working ability, and appearance is thus of lower importance.


1. Border Collie
The most well known breed for herding sheep throughout the world. Originally developed in Scotland and Northern England. Not always suitable for herding cattle. Ears semi-erect or floppy, fur silky or fairly long, but short on face and legs; red, black, black-and-tan or merle, all usually with white over shoulders, alternatively mostly white with coloured patches on head. Coat can be either long or short.
  The Border Collie breed boasts two varieties of coat: rough and smooth. Both are double coats, with a coarser outer coat and soft undercoat. The rough variety is medium length with feathering on the legs, chest, and belly. The smooth variety is short all over, usually coarser in texture than the rough variety, and feathering is minimal. His coat is most often black with a white blaze on the face, neck, feet, legs, and tail tip, with or without tan. However, he may be any bicolor, tricolor, merle, or solid color except white.

2. Bearded Collie
  Now largely a pet and show breed, but still of collie type, and some are used as working dogs. The Beardie has a flat, harsh, strong and shaggy outer coat and a soft, furry undercoat. The coat falls naturally to either side without need of a part. Long hair on the cheeks, lower lips, and under the chin forms the beard for which he is known. All Bearded Collies are born black, blue, brown, or fawn, with or without white markings. Some carry a fading gene, and as they mature, the coat lightens, darkening again slightly after one year of age. A puppy born black may become any shade of gray from black to slate to silver. 
  The dogs that are born brown will lighten from chocolate to sandy, and the blues and fawns show shades from dark to light. Dogs without the fading gene stay the color they were when they were born. The white only occurs as a blaze on the face, on the head, on the tip of the tail, on the chest, legs, feet, and around the neck. Tan markings occasionally appear on the eyebrows, inside the ears, on the cheeks, under the root of the tail and on the legs where the white joins the main color.

3. Shetland Sheepdog
  A small show and pet breed developed in England partly from herding dogs originating in Shetland. The Shetland dogs were originally working herding dogs, not collies but of Spitz type . However, in the development of the modern breed these Spitz-type dogs were heavily mixed with the Rough Collie and toy breeds, and are now similar in appearance to a miniature Rough Collie. Very small, nearly erect ears, long silky fur on body, most commonly sable or merle, with white over shoulders.
  Shelties have a double coat. The undercoat is short and dense, causing the longer, harsher topcoat to stand out from the body. The hair on the head, ears, and feet is smooth, but the mane and frill are abundant. The legs and tail are furry as well.

4. Australian Cattle Dog
  Dog used in Australia for herding cattle, one of several Australian dogs interbred with the wild Dingo. Dogs of this type are also known as Queensland Heeler, Blue Heeler and Red Heeler. Powerful build, erect ears, short-haired, mottled grey or red with solid colour patches on head, and no white.
  The Australian Cattle Dog's coloring is blue or red speckle. Blue or blue-mottled includes black, blue, or tan markings on the head; partially tan on the forelegs, chest, and throat; and tan on the jaw and hind legs. Sometimes the undercoat is tan with a blue outer coat. Red speckle means red all over, including the undercoat, and sometimes including dark red markings on the head.

5. Old English Sheepdog
  Derived from "Shags", hairy herding dogs, themselves derived from "Beards", the ancestors of the Bearded Collie. Modern dogs larger than most collies, no tail, floppy ears, long silky hair , usually grey and white. Not to be confused with the English Shepherd.
  If you want a dog with big hair, the Old English Sheepdog is the one for you. This breed has hair galore: a profuse, shaggy coat that is neither straight nor curly. The breed has a double coat, with a textured outer coat and soft undercoat. Colors include gray, grizzle, blue or blue merle, brown, and fawn, usually mixed with white markings. 
He's certainly a large dog at 60 to 100 pounds, but his profuse coat of blue-gray and white makes him appear even larger. Known for his wonderful temperament, he's powerful, sturdy, and hardworking. Those who know and love him are familiar with his sense of humor. He can be playful and comical, although he is also the guardian and protector of his family.
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Monday, February 26, 2018

Everything about your Collie

Everything about your Collie
  The Collie, also known as the Scottish Collie or the Scotch Collie, is perhaps most famous due to the television series about “Lassie.” There are two varieties of Collie: rough-coated, which is the recognizable long-haired Collie, and smooth-coated, which is becoming increasingly popular. Famous for their loyalty, bravery and kind spirit, the Collie is one of the most glamorous and well-known of all dog breeds. Its name is thought to come from the name of the Scottish black-faced sheep called “Colleys” – the animal that this breed was assigned to watch. 
  The Collie was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1885, one year after the AKC was established. The Collie Club of America was formed in 1886 and was the second parent club to join the AKC.

Overview
   While the breed certainly has qualities that bolster that impression, it’s a disservice to any dog to load him up with baggage that he can’t possibly carry. The Collie is gentle, affectionate and sensitive, but Collie puppies don’t come fully trained and ready to rescue Timmy from the well.
  There are two types of Collies. The most common is the Rough Collie, the classic Lassie, with a long coat. The Smooth Collie sports a short, dense and flat coat that has a lot of undercoat.  In the show ring they are considered the same breed and are judged by the same standard.
  Collies love children, love playing with them, and bond closely with all family members. They are not a one-person dog and are protective of everyone in the family. Collies think of everyone as their friend. They are an excellent choice as a family dog and get along with other pets. Be aware that their herding heritage may cause them to nip at heels, which can frighten some children. The Collie will also herd your neighbor's chickens, the neighborhood kids, and other dogs and cats.

Highlights
  • The Collie is usually quiet unless she has a reason to bark. However, if she is left alone too often or if she is bored, she will bark excessively.
  • Both varieties need grooming, but the Rough Collie especially needs regular brushing to keep her coat clean and free of tangles.
  • Many Collies are sensitive to medications including ivermectin, the drug used in heartworm preventives. Be sure to talk with your veterinarian before giving your Collie a heartworm preventive or any other drug.
  • Be careful from whom you acquire a Collie. The Collie's popularity has given rise to unethical breeders acting with no regard for temperament, health, or conformation.
  • Collies are sensitive and can become depressed if spoken to harshly.
  • Collies don’t have a “doggie odor” as long as they are brushed regularly. 
Breed standards

AKC group: Herding

UKC group: Herding dog

Average lifespan: 14 - 16 years
Average size: 50 - 75 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, thick, dense
Coloration: Sable, tricolor, white and blue merle
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Large and lean, chiseled face, ears never pricked or sticking straight up and always have a folded tip.
Possible alterations: Some Collies have a smooth coat verses the common rough coat.
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, farms/rural areas
Comparable Breeds: Border Collie, Shetland Sheepdog

History of Collies
  The ancestors of today’s Collies worked as herding dogs in the Scottish highlands, driving cattle and sheep to the market. They may take their name from a Scottish breed of black-faced sheep called the Colley. Not much is known about their origins, shepherds being more interested in working ability than in keeping pedigrees or studbooks.
  The Collie might have remained a humble, little-known herding dog, but fate had a different plan. Queen Victoria, who frequently vacationed in Scotland at Balmoral Castle, fell in love with Collies in the 1860s. Royal patronage caused a demand for the breed. They went from being the helpmeets of humble shepherds to the cherished companions of the wealthy. By 1877, Collies were being exhibited at the Westminster Kennel Club show, and they again were taken up by wealthy dog lovers, including J. P. Morgan. In 1886, two years after the American Kennel Club was created, the Collie Club of America became the second parent club to join the AKC.
  The Collie has been a main character, and appeared as a perfect family dog, in such books as Albert Payson Terhune's "Lad of Sunnybank" and Eric Knight's “Lassie Come Home." The Collie’s popularity leapt to its greatest heights during the nearly two-decade run of the television show “Lassie,” which aired from 1954 to 1973. The series captured the fancy of the American public, and the Rough Collie because widely known and loved.
  Today, the Collie ranks 38th among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club.



Personality

  Just about anyone who has been around since the advent of television knows who Lassie is. She is the loyal, intelligent, fearless star of TV and movies and we've been following her adventures for the last sixty years. Lassie is an excellent ambassador for the entire Collie breed, as they are just as intelligent and loyal as the silver screen portrays. Collies are fantastic family dogs, they love to be with people and are highly patient and loving with children.



Health Problems
  The Collie has a few health concerns you should be aware of. Collies are prone to eye ailments such as Progressive Retinal Atrophy. This means it’s important to keep regular appointments with the vet for eye checkups, so that problems can be identified before they become too serious. This breed can also be affected by Neutropenia , gastric torsion, hip dysplasia , dermatomyositis  and arthritis. Like all breeds, Collies can be susceptible to disease because of trauma, infections, and abnormalities of the immune system, genetic influences or degenerative conditions.

Care
  The Collie lives comfortably in the city or the country, as long as she has enough exercise. A brisk, daily walk and yard play are sufficient. Mostly, she wants to be with her family, meaning she is not a candidate for a backyard lifestyle.
  If left alone for too long, she tends to bark excessively. While some barking is normal in this herding breed — that's how she warned the shepherd of wolves — she will bark her head off when she's bored, lonely, or otherwise frustrated. Excessive barking can be avoided by letting the Collie join in all family activities, and by keeping her mentally challenged with ongoing obedience training or dog sports.
  Training the Collie is a breeze, but — like any dog — she needs early socialization to prevent her from becoming timid. She also benefits from obedience training; a "Quiet" command should be a part of every Collie's training program.

Living Conditions
  The Collie will dog okay in an apartment as long as it is sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with at least an average-sized yard. Sensitive to the heat. Provide plenty of shade and fresh water in warm weather.

Trainability
  Collies are easy to train, though sometimes they can be stubborn. They should always be treated gently, with positive reinforcement and treats. Collies are sensitive animals, and when treated harshly they can become timid and skittish. After mastering basic obedience, Collies should be allowed to move on to more advanced training or participate in agility activities.
  Collies are highly intelligent and have been used as service dogs, guard dogs and search and rescue dogs.

Exercise Requirements
  To maintain its strong and lean physique, Collies need a lot of exercise. To keep your dog in peak physical and mental condition, be sure to play, take your dog for long walks and give it plenty of activity every day.

Grooming Needs
  Rough Collies will need to be brushed at least twice a week to maintain the proper texture and appearance of the coat. Smooth Collies, however, only need to be brushed once per week to remove loose and dead hair. They require a bath every six to eight weeks, and most owners prefer to hire a groomer to do this, as the thick hair of the Rough Collie can be challenging to handle. New owners may wish to consult a groomer or breeder for instruction on brushing and bathing.
  In addition to brushing and bathing, ear cleaning and teeth cleaning should be part of a Collie's grooming regimen. Check ears weekly for signs of infection or irritation, and use only a veterinarian-approved cleanser on the ears. Regular brushing of the teeth prevents bad breath and tartar buildup which can lead to gum disease and tooth loss.



Children And Other Pets
  The playful Collie is known for her love of children, even those she wasn't raised with. She's highly protective of the kids in her family, watching over them and keeping them safe from danger, just like Lassie did for Timmy.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Collie is also protective of and gentle with other pets in her family. She's an affectionate, tender guardian, willing to watch over baby rabbits, chicks, or goats.

Is the Collie the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Constant and Seasonal Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Easy Training: The Collie is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
  These dogs love and live for a working lifestyle. Whether it is mental or physical stimulation, the Collie needs to keep occupied. A family that has time to dedicate to proper exercise and training would be best fit for a loving Collie. Due to its complex double coat, daily grooming is a must to prevent discomfort and tangles, as well as ease the amount of constant shedding. Collies love kids and make excellent guard dogs; however, as natural-born herders, they may develop tendencies to herd younger family members and should therefore be socialized early on.

Did You Know?
  The TV show “Lassie” made the Collie - and the phrase “Timmy fell into the well!”-famous. Lassie rescued Timmy from falls into mine shafts, rivers and quicksand. However, during the show’s 19 year run, Timmy never once fell into a well.

Tommy Rettig with Lassie Junior,
 son of Pal, the first Lassie,
in the Lassie television series
Famous collies
  • Silverton Bobbie, the Wonder Dog who in 1923, traveled 2,800 miles from Indiana back home to Silverton, Oregon.
  • Blanco, pet of Lyndon Johnson
  • Reveille, a Rough Collie, official mascot of Texas A&M University
  • Lad, pet of Albert Payson Terhune. He is chronicled through several short stories, most famously in the collection Lad, A Dog.
  • Shep, Blue Peter dog
  • Lassie was a fictional Rough Collie dog character created by Eric Knight who originally was featured in a short story expanded to novel length called Lassie Come-Home. The character then went on to star in numerous MGM movies, a long running classic TV series, and various remakes/spinoffs/revivals.
  • Pal, who played Lassie.
  • Bessy, a long-running Belgian comics series which also was very successful in French, German and Swedish translations. It also featured a collie, obviously based on Lassie, but in a Wild West setting.
  • Fly and Rex, herding dogs of the movie, Babe.
  • Colleen, a female collie in Road Rovers.
  • Shadow, collie from Enid Blyton's book Shadow the Sheepdog. The collie type is not identified in the text, but the illustrations in an early edition look vaguely like a border collie.
  • Fly, the sheep dog featured in Arthur Waterhouse's "Fells" trilogy for children, Raiders of the Fells (1948), Rogues of the Fells (1951), and Fly of the Fells (1957). The collie type is not specified, but the illustrations look rather like a rough collie.
A dream day in the life:
  Helping, guarding or just hanging out makes a perfect day for the social Collie. An off-leash run in the great outdoors or on leash by your side would exert the energy this pup needs to let out on a daily basis. Collies love the challenge of learning new tricks and have the brains to handle even advanced levels of training. Easygoing and carefree, Collies are happy in just about any climate as long as they have work to do 
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Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your Belgian Tervuren

Everything about your Belgian Tervuren
  Created in Belgium in the late 19th century, the Belgian Tervuren dog breed is often considered to be the most elegant of the four Belgian sheepdogs. He’s intelligent and athletic, making him a versatile performer in any number of activities, including his original job, herding. If you can provide a dog with plenty of exercise, training, and attention, he might be a good choice for you.

Overview
  This breed combines elegance and strength. It is square-proportioned and of medium bone. It is noteworthy for its exceedingly proud carriage. Its movement is lively, graceful and seemingly tireless, exhibiting an easy, effortless gait rather than a hard-driving action. It has a natural tendency to move in a circle rather than a straight line. It combines a dense undercoat with an outer coat consisting of abundant guard hairs that are long, well-fitting, straight and of medium harshness. Its expression is intelligent and questioning.
  Alert, watchful and energetic, the Tervuren is an active and dependable companion that functions best when given daily mental and physical exercise. It enjoys playing and running outside, and can be a well-mannered companion inside as long as it is given sufficient exercise. It is smart and obedient, but independent. It is aloof with strangers and can be aggressive toward other dogs and animals. It may nip at the heels of children in an attempt to herd them.

Highlights
  • Shyness can be a problem in this breed. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one beating up his littermates or the one hiding in the corner.
  • Belgian Tervuren require at least an hour of exercise per day. If you don't provide them with exercise and mental stimulation in the form of training or play, they'll find their own entertainment, and chances are it will be expensive to repair.
  • Belgian Tervuren shed year-round and require 15 to 20 minutes of brushing weekly.
  • Tervs can get along well with other dogs and cats if they're raised with them, but they have a chase instinct and will go after animals that run from them.
  • Belgian Tervuren will chase joggers, bicyclists, and cars, so they need a securely fenced yard.
  • Tervuren are very intelligent and alert. They also have strong herding and protection instincts. Early, consistent training is critical!
  • Although they are good-size dogs, they are very people-oriented and want to be included in family activities.
  • Belgian Tervuren are play-oriented and sensitive. Keep training sessions fun, consistent, and positive.
  • Because of their intelligence, high energy, and other characteristics, Tervuren are not recommended for inexperienced dog owners.
Other Quick Facts

  • When you look at a Belgian Tervuren, your first impression is one of elegance. This is a medium-size dog with a square build, a wedge-shaped head carried proudly, dark-brown eyes that are slightly almond-shaped, prick ears, and an intelligent, questioning expression that indicates he's always ready for action.
  • The Belgian Tervuren has a double coat that is short on the head and the front of the legs. The opening of the ear is protected by tufts of hair. A collarette of longer hair surrounds the neck and is especially abundant on males. Other areas where the hair is longer are the back of the legs and the tail.
  • A Belgian Tervuren’s coat is a beautiful rich fawn-to-russet mahogany with a black overlay, meaning the tip of each fawn hair is black. A Terv’s coat typically darkens with age.
Breed standards
AKC group: Herding Dogs
UKC group: Herding Dogs
Average lifespan: 10 to 12 years
Average size: 40 to 70 pounds
Coat appearance:  dense undercoat with long, straight outercoat
Coloration: red, fawn, also grey with black overlay. Black mask on face.
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, farms/rural areas, watchdog
Temperament: Athletic, hard working, loyal, loving
Comparable Breeds: Belgian Malinois, Belgian Laekenois


History
  This herding breed from Belgium — he takes his name from the village of Tervuren — does not have a well-known history until the late 1800s. He may have been helping shepherds care for flocks for centuries, but it wasn’t until 1891, in a burst of national enthusiasm, that Belgian herding dogs were divided into types and given names. A standard for the Tervuren was written in 1893, and the Society Royale Saint-Hubert recognized the breed in 1901.
  One of the early breeders of the dogs, M. F. Corbeel, who lived in Tervuren, bred Tom and Poes, who are considered to be the breed’s foundation dogs. They produced Miss, who in turn gave birth to Milsart, the breed’s first champion in 1907.
  The American Kennel Club registered its first Tervuren in 1918, but few people took an interest in the breed. By the 1930s, Tervuren were no longer seen in the AKCstud book. In Europe, the breed survived two world wars, and in 1953 Belgian Tervuren were again imported into the United States. The AKC recognized the Terv as a distinct breed in 1959. Today the breed ranks 108th among the dogs registered by the AKC.



Personality
  The Belgian Tervuren is a breed of the Belgian Sheepdog. Loyal companions, the Tervuren can be a farm dog or a family dog. As with all Belgian Sheepdog breeds, they were bred to herd and protect livestock, so Tervurens need constant activity, whether playing with children, going on long walks, or chasing a frisbee. Always vigilant, they make excellent watchdogs, and can be trained to do just about any task put before them.

Health 
  This hardy, healthy breed has no major health concerns. Some minor concerns that have been seen are epilepsy, skin allergies, eye problems, excessive shyness, excessive aggressiveness and occasionally hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia. Do not overfeed this breed, for it has a tendency to become obese and lazy.

Care
  The Belgian Tervuren is an indoor/outdoor dog. He should live indoors with the family but needs access to a securely fenced yard that will prevent him from escaping to chase passing cyclists, joggers, and cars.
  Belgian Tervuren are sensitive and highly trainable. Be firm, calm, and consistent with them. Anger and physical force are counterproductive. Use positive training techniques, rewarding them with praise, play, or treats when they perform commands correctly or do anything you like — even if you didn't ask them to.

Living Conditions
  The Belgian Tervuren will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. This breed prefers cool climates, but adapts well to others. It can live outdoors but would much rather be with his people.

Trainability
  Though sometimes willful and stubborn, Belgians are highly trainable and thrive on advanced obedience, trick and agility training. They can read small movements and even changes in facial expression, and are famous for being so “in tune” with their trainers that they can literally stay one step ahead of the person giving commands. For this reason, Belgian Sheepdogs are often competitors  in agility and herding competitions.
  Though easily trainable, Belgians are not for the first-time dog owner. They are highly intelligent and manipulative, and can easily walk all over someone who does not know how to remain consistent with training. Positive reinforcement is the best method to train a Belgian Sheepdog, as discipline can lead to avoidance behavior and stubbornness.

Exercise Requirements
  Being that the Belgian Tervuren was bred to herd and protect livestock, this dog is athletic and needs lots of exercise. An hour or so of playing with the kids, fetching a ball or jogging through the park will keep the average Terv in tip-top condition both physically and mentally. Because of their tremendous chase instinct, this breed should only be exercised on a leash or in a securely fenced area.

Grooming
  The Belgian Tervuren’s harshdouble coat sheds dirt, but he will need a thorough brushing once or twice a week to remove dead hair. This will take about 15 to 20 minutes. Have grooming tools such as a medium-size pin brush, slicker brush, undercoat rake, and a mat comb on hand. He sheds heavily once or twice a year and will need more frequent brushing during those times to control the amount of loose hair floating around. There will be lots of it!
  He shouldn’t need a bath very often , but warm baths during shedding season can help remove dead hair. Trim his nails as needed — weekly for puppies and monthly in most cases for adults — and keep the ears clean and dry to prevent infections. Proper dental hygiene is also important. Brush the teeth frequently for overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Well-socialized Tervs are good with children, especially if they are raised with them, but because of their herding heritage they may have a tendency to nip at their heels and try to herd them when playing. You must teach your Terv that this behavior is unacceptable. An adult Tervuren who's unfamiliar with children may do best in a home with children who are mature enough to interact with him properly.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Tervs get along best with other dogs and cats when they're brought up with them from puppyhood. Sometimes they become best friends with cats and other animals and will protect them as they would members of their flock, and sometimes they all come to an agreement of mutual indifference. Tervs do have a chase instinct, however, and even if they don't chase "their" cats, they may be unable to resist chasing cats or other animals that intrude in their yards. If you want your Terv to get along with other animals you must start early and reward them for appropriate behavior. If your Terv hasn't been socialized to other animals, it's your responsibility to keep him under control in their presence.

Is the Belgian Tervuren the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. No trimming or stripping needed.
Constant Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Easy Training: The Belgian Tervuren is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Belgian Tervuren is one of four related varieties of Belgian herding breeds. In their home country they are all known as Chiens de Berger (bair-zhay) Belge (belzh). The Terv is distinguished from the other varieties by his coat length and color.

Famous Tervuren
  • In an episode of Hogan's Heroes, Belgian Shepherds were referred to as the preferred choice of police dogs.
  • For the film The Company of Wolves the wolves are primarily played by dyed Tervurens.
  • A Tervuren is featured in Agent Cody Banks 2: Destination London as a test subject for a mind-control device.
  • A Tervuren is also featured in Friday Night Dinner as neighbour Jim's dog, Wilson
  • A Belgian Malinois is featured in Inspector Lewis Season 1 Episode Sons of the Twice Born
  • A Tervuren named Mr. Cupcake can be seen on Alaskan Bush People, he's the family's dog.
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