LUV My dogs: Guardian Dogs

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Showing posts with label Guardian Dogs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Guardian Dogs. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Everything about your Anatolian Shepherd

Everything about your Anatolian Shepherd
  The Anatolian Shepherd breed are a Mastiff dog bred originally in Turkey.
This dog was originally used as a guard dog for nomadic farmers and used to extremes of temperatures.
  In both Turkey and Australia, it has been found these dogs work in very well with goats and sheep. Farmers hold them in high regards. Although tough and hardy, they get on well with other dogs, not always good domestic pets, as their independent natures and devotion to their duties as a herder is such that they have been known to attack their owners if the dog thought one of the herd was to be hurt.

Overview
  The Anatolian Shepherd Dog is a hard worker. Amazing guard dogs, you’ll find that this breed is very loyal to its owner. Easygoing and calm, the Anatolian loves kids and will happily spend hours playing with them. It’s been known under many names: Anatolian Karabash Dog, the Kangal Dog, the Turkish Guard Dog, the Turkish Sheepdog and the Karabash Dog. Even though the Anatolian is highly intelligent and obedient when trained, it is not a dog for everyone. Since this breed is powerful and has great endurance, it needs plenty of daily exercise.
  The Anatolian Shepherd Dog needs a large home with lots of space, and loves to be outside. A wonderful companion, this dog has many qualities that make it a great pet. Read on to learn more about this fascinating breed.

Highlights
  • It is critical that the Anatolian Shepherd receive proper socialization and training so that he can learn what is normal and what is a threat. Untrained and unsocialized Anatolian Shepherds can become overprotective, aggressive, and uncontrollable.
  • Anatolian Shepherds are independent and less eager to please than other breeds. They won't not necessarily wait for instructions but will act if they think their "flock" is threatened.
  • As guardians of their territory, some can be barkers, especially at night.
  • Some Anatolians can be dog-aggressive.
  • Expect a challenge for leadership at some point with the Anatolian Shepherd. Owners must be willing to exercise pack authority consistently and kindly.
  • Because they are so large, expect high costs for boarding, medications, and food purchases; you'll also need a large vehicle for them.
Other Quick Facts

  • Once you’ve earned an Anatolian’s loyalty, he will guard you and whatever you have on your property with his life.  
  • In Namibia, Anatolians guard livestock from cheetahs, protecting the livestock from predation and the cheetahs from being shot by angry farmers.
  • The Anatolian’s double coat sheds heavily. Some people have given up the dogs to rescue groups because of it.
  • All color patterns and markings are acceptable, including white, fawn, brindle, or fawn with a black mask. Often, his coloration or markings echo that of the livestock he is guarding to help him blend in.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working dog
UKC group: Guardian Dog
Average lifespan: 13-15 years
Average size:80 to 150 pounds
Coat appearance: short, rough
Coloration: Red, Brown, White, Cream
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, farmers, rural/farm areas, guard duty
Temperament: Easygoing, protective, loyal, devoted
Comparable Breeds: Great Pyrenees, Kuvasz

History
  The Anatolian Shepherd Dog is named for his homeland of Anatolia in the central part of Turkey, where he is still a point of pride .
  It's thought that the working ancestors of the breed date back 6,000 years. Wandering tribes from central Asia probably brought the first mastiff-type dogs into the area that is now Turkey, and sight hound breeds from southern regions contributed to the Anatolian's agility, long legs, and aloof character.
  Due to the climate and terrain of the area, the local population developed a nomadic way of life, dependent on flocks of sheep and goats. The protection of those flocks, and of the shepherds themselves, was the job of the large dogs who traveled with them.
The dogs became known as coban kopegi, Turkish for "shepherd dog." The dogs stayed with the animals night and day, and they had to be swift enough to move quickly from one end of a widely scattered flock to the other. They also had to be large and strong enough to stand up to predators.
  Severe culling and breeding of only the best workers resulted in a dog with a uniform type, stable temperament, and excellent working ability. Dogs were often not fed once they were past puppyhood. They lived by killing gophers and other small animals, though never injuring their flock. They were fitted with iron collars with long spikes to protect their throats from assailants. You can still find working dogs wearing these collars in Turkey today.
Anatolian Shepherds got their most enthusiastic introduction in the U.S. in the 1970s, although prior to that the Turkish government had given Anatolians to the U.S. Department of Agriculture as a gift, for experimental work as guardians of flocks.
  In 1970, the Anatolian Shepherd Dog Club of America was formed at the urging of Robert Ballard, a U.S. naval officer who had become fascinated by the dogs while in Turkey, and who began to breed them once back in California. The breed entered the American Kennel Club Miscellaneous Class in 1996. It moved to the Working Group in August 1998.

Personality
  The Anatolian Shepherd dog was developed to be independent and forceful, responsible for guarding its master's flocks without human assistance or direction. These traits make it challenging as a pet; owners of dogs of this breed must socialize the dogs to turn them into appropriate companions. They are intelligent and can learn quickly but might choose not to obey.
  According to Turkish shepherds, three Anatolian Shepherd Dogs are capable of overcoming a pack of wolves and injuring one or two of them. These dogs like to roam, as they were bred to travel with their herd and to leave the herd to go hunt for predators before the predators could attack the flock. Therefore, it is recommended to microchip and tag pets.
  The Anatolian Shepherd is not recommended for life in small quarters. They do well with other animals, including cats if they are introduced while still a puppy and have their own space. They mature between 18–30 months. Due to their history, both puppies and adults seem to have little interest in fetching. Rather, they prefer to run and sometimes swim.
Presence of some Anatolian shepherd genes in Alaskan huskies positively correlates with husky work ethic.

Health
The average life span of the Anatolian Shepherd Dog is 10 to 13 years. Breed health concerns may include cancer, ear infections, entropion, hip dysplasia and hypothyroidism. Otherwise, they appear to be healthy, hearty dogs.

Care
  The Anatolian Shepherd requires minimal coat care, comprising of just once a week brushing session to clear the dear hair. A brisk run or long walk is all it requires for a daily exercise regimen. It is also fond of socializing with its family, but can live outdoors in cool and temperate climates.

Living Conditions
Anatolian Shepherds are not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. This breed is very suspicious of strangers, and it is therefore necessary to provide a secure, fenced yard.

Training
  Not for the first-time owner, Anatolian Shepherds need a confident leader. This breed is stubborn and dominant, and once this dog knows who is in charge, training should go smoothly. Trainers need a strong and consistent hand to establish leadership. If not, don’t be surprised if your Anatolian takes over your household.
  When it comes to a dog’s instincts, you can’t train it out of them. This holds true for the Anatolian Shepherd Dog’s innate sense to protect its family, which includes people and other animals in the household. You can train your dog to limit these behaviors, but don’t expect these habits to desist. Instead, you can use these protective instincts to protect your household and everyone in the family. Anatolians will be wary of strangers, so ensure that visitors to your home are introduced to the dog properly.

Activity Requirements
  This large breed should not live in an apartment. Though Anatolian Shepherds need less exercise than other breeds of comparable size, they still need plenty of walks and daily time to run. Organized games of catch or fetch don't interest this breed. If they don't have livestock to work with, their desire to work can be satisfied by pulling a sled or cart, or engaging in tracking activities.
  Farms are the ideal living space, as they have an inborn desire to work and protect flocks, and benefit from the open space to run. Families with small children should think twice about adopting an Anatolian. While they will bond well with members of their own family, they often don't react well to children they do not know.

Grooming
  This is a double-coated breed that sheds heavily. Grooming the Anatolian requires at least weekly brushing -- daily during the twice yearly shedding season -- and dogs with a thick, plush coat may need to be brushed more frequently. That comes as an unpleasant surprise to some people. It’s even one of the reasons owners give up Anatolians to rescue. On the plus side, baths are rarely necessary. Brushing usually keeps the coat clean, and the dog has little odor.
  Anatolians have drop ears, so they can be prone to ear infections. Keep the ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections from taking hold.
The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Anatolian Shepherd is loving with his family, including the children, with whom he's calm and protective. But because of his large size, he's probably better suited to families with older children. He's unlikely to respect young children as leaders, so all interactions between the Anatolian and children should be supervised by responsible adults.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The best chance of the Anatolian Shepherd accepting other dogs and pets is to raise him with them from puppyhood. As he grows, he'll naturally accept them as part of his "flock."

Did You Know?
While his protective nature is attractive, the Anatolian Shepherd is not an appropriate choice for a novice dog owner. He needs someone who can guide him with kind, firm, consistent training, never force or cruelty. He is an independent thinker but responds well to routine.

Famous Anatolian Shepherd Dogs
Butch, from Cats & Dogs 
  • Duke- animal ambassador at the San Diego Zoo.
  • Bart, from Kate and Leopold
  • Butch, from Cats & Dogs and Cats & Dogs: The Revenge of Kitty Galore
  • Corky, from Road Trip
  • Marlowe, from Simon & Simon
  • Sam, from Shooter
  • Haatchi, a three-legged Anatolian Shepherd who has formed a special bond with Owen, a 7-year-old boy suffering from Schwartz-Jampel syndrome. Haatchi and Owen were the winners in the "Friends for Life" category at Crufts in 2013. Haatchi was also awarded The Braveheart Honour in the ceremony of The British Animal Honours in April 2013 (Haatchi the dog), and an Endal Medal.
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Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your Black Russian Terrier

Everything about your Black Russian Terrier
  These majestic black beauties are highly intelligent, confident guard dogs who aren’t actually true terriers. Relatively new and still a rare dog breed, Black Russian Terriers are working dogs who can protect a home or business, play with the family’s children, and excel in agility and obedience competition. Known as the “Black Pearls of Russia,” Blackies are people-oriented and want to be close to the action at all times. They tend to be a bit aloof around strangers, including dogs they don’t know, but they’re devoted to their families — and they don’t bark or shed much. They have large bones and well-developed muscles, creating a vibrant, flowing impression.

Overview
  Also known as Stalin’s dog or Sobaka Stalina, the Black Russian Terrier is a low-maintenance and hard working dog. Developed by the post World War II Soviet Union, the Black Russian Terrier or BRT, is not a true terrier, and is instead categorized as a working dog.
  The BRT is a fairly large dog and has a powerfully built body. Both its forelegs and hindquarters are well-boned and muscular, and end in large, padded feet. The BRT’s head is fairly large and block shaped and is equipped with a powerful set of teeth that meet in a scissor bite. The BRT’s body is covered in a thick double coat. The outer-coat is coarse and wiry while the thick undercoat is soft to the touch. The BRTs coat is black and sometimes has a few stray grey hairs. 
  Brown or white markings are considered to be a fault.
  BRTs are extremely intelligent and self-assured dogs. Bred primarily as guard dogs, they have extremely strong protective instincts and are devoted to their owners. Their strong personalities do however require owners with a thorough understanding of dog psychology and leadership.

Highlights
  • Blackies need a job. They were bred for it and will be unhappy without one. Their job as your companion could be competing in agility, obedience, Schutzhund, or various canine sports.
  • Black Russian Terriers need at least 30 minutes of exercise a day. They are intelligent and powerful, and exercise provides a needed outlet. A Black Russian can manage in an apartment with sufficient outdoor exercise. A fenced yard is best for the Blackie living in a house.
  • Blackies enjoy the company of their families and prefer to stick close to their human pack. They don't do well stuck in the backyard by themselves.
  • The sometimes stubborn Blackie needs firm training as soon as you get him home so that he won't try to establish himself as the leader of the pack.
  • Blackies are by nature aloof with people they don't know, and unless they have regular exposure to lots of different people — ideally beginning in puppyhood — they can become overly protective of you around strangers. This may lead to biting out of fear and aggression. Give your Blackie lots of contact with friends, family, neighbors, and even strangers to help him polish his social skills.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Black Russian Terrier’s coat is slightly to moderately wavy. The hair on the head falls over the eyes and on the face forms a mustache and beard. The coat is trimmed to achieve the dog’s distinctive look.
  • Basic black is this breed’s fashion statement. His double coat - which can be one and a half to six inches long - comes only in black or black with a few gray hairs scattered throughout.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Guardian Dog
Average lifespan: 10-14 years
Average size: 80–130 pounds
Coat appearance: Rough and thick, slightly waved
Coloration: black coats, but a sprinkling of gray hair
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active single, houses with yards, farms and rural areas
Temperament: Energetic, confident, brave, hardy
Comparable Breeds: Bouvier des Flandres, Giant Schnauzer

History 
  This dog is a Cold War creation, developed in Moscow after World War II for military and police work. His breeders started with a Giant Schnauzer and crossed him with other breeds that included the Airedale, Rottweiler, and the Moscow Retriever. The result was a large black dog with a protective temperament and a healthy dose of suspicion toward strangers.
  Less than two decades ago, the BRT was seen only in small numbers at European and Scandinavian dog shows, but in 2004 he was recognized by the American Kennel Club as its 151st breed. Today the Black Russian Terrier ranks 135th among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Personality
  Black Russian Terriers are truly man's best friend. They thrive on human interaction and have such a strong desire to be with their family that they will follow their people from room to room, and when left alone, will wait longingly by doors or windows until they are happily reunited with the ones they love. This breed adores children – especially female Black Russians. They are patient with small children who want to climb on them and are big enough to keep up with bigger kids' outdoor games. They have bee known to sleep in kids' rooms or outside their bedroom doors as a guardian and protector.

Health
  The Black Russian Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 14 years, is prone to minor health issues such as elbow dysplasia and major problems like canine hip dysplasia (CHD). The breed may also suffer from progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and dwarfism. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend hip, elbow, and eye exams for the dog

Care
  The Black Russian Terrier, because of its breeding as a working dog, has a very strong "work ethic", and needs a job to do in order to be happy. Early training is a must and they are very responsive to firm, consistent training, excelling at Obedience competitions. They also perform well in other dog sports, such as Agility, and Schutzhund training. They have a low-shedding coat, and need grooming several times a week. Dogs who compete in conformation need to be groomed a minimum of every three weeks to keep the coat in show condition. The Black Russian Terrier needs lots of exercise, and may become hyperactive and destructive if it does not have a chance to burn off its energy..

Living Conditions
  The Black Russian Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and no matter how big your yard is they will be sitting at your front door waiting to come in. They love to live very close to their owner. They will follow you from one room to the other. Kept in a garden they will follow you from window to window and wait for you at the door. They need very close human contact. This breed does not do well living in a kennel; they must have close human contact to be happy.

Training
  Black Russian Terriers are extremely intelligent and eager to please and are fairly easy to train. They do however have strong personalities and should be handled with a loving but firm hand from an early age. BRT puppies are inquisitive and playful and some adults too display this extreme curiosity. Black Russian Terriers often excel at various obedience competitions and dog sports such as agility and Schutzhund training.

Activity Requirements
  Black Russian Terriers, despite their larger size, can do well living in an apartment. They don't need an excessive amount of vigorous running time per day, but do need several walks. If left alone in a yard, Black Russian will quickly get bored and want to come inside. Outside activities should always involve interaction with kids or people in order to keep this breed interested.

Grooming
  Regular grooming is essential for the Black Russian Terrier’s handsome good looks. Expect to bathe your dog every two to three months. The wiry coat should be brushed twice a week to prevent tangles.
The rest is basic care. Nails should be trimmed once a month and ears checked every week. Regular tooth brushing with a soft toothbrush and doggie toothpaste keeps the teeth and gums healthy.
  Because the Black Russian Terrier is not a common breed, it is likely some professional groomers will not know exactly how to groom him, especially when it comes to hand stripping. An experienced breeder is probably the best resource for learning how to groom the breed.
  It is important to begin grooming the Black Russian Terrier when he is very young. An early introduction teaches this independent dog that grooming is a normal part of his life and to patiently accept the grooming process. 

Children And Other Pets
  Despite their impressive size, Blackies are great with children and will protect them. Females seem more willing to play with children than the males, but both sexes treat children with whom they are raised with gentleness and respect. Don't forget, however, that Blackies are large and active companions, and extremely young children may be accidentally knocked over or injured by a playful and energetic dog of this size. Use caution with very young children.
  Blackies who have not been exposed to children from puppyhood may not be as tolerant-something to consider if you're looking to add an older or rescue dog to your household.
  Either way, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Make sure your Blackie is well socialized as a puppy and adult so that he doesn't become overprotective of his family and property.
  Male Black Russians don't do well with other dominant dogs. Many of them aren't suited to dog parks for this reason. At home, they do best with other canine companions who were already established in the house. They will be fine with nondominant or small dogs, as well as cats, horses, rabbits, and other pets.

Is the Black Russian Terrier the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Black Russian Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
Despite the word Terrier in his name, the Black Russian Terrier is a member of the American Kennel Club’s Working Group.
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Everything about your Entlebucher Mountain Dog

Everything about your Entlebucher Mountain Dog
  The athletic and physical Entle makes an excellent family dog; he is known for his extreme devotion to his family. He is a great watchdog, as he is aloof with strangers and has a big bark for his size. Self-assured and determined, he is intelligent and thrives on being with his people.

Overview
  The Entlebucher, or Entle for short, is a Swiss herding breed related to the Appenzeller, the Bernese Mountain Dog, and the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog; of the four, he's the smallest.
  He's known for his intelligence, personable attitutude, agility, and loyalty. He's independent and self-confident, yet he bonds strongly to his person and is happiest spending the day at his family's side. He's got energy to burn, and needs an owner who can give him about an hour of vigorous exercise a day — if not herding flocks, then competing in dog sports like tracking, frisbee, or agility. Like other smart working dogs, he loves having jobs to do, so begin training this smart cookie early, teaching him to gather up dirty laundry, bring in the newspaper, fetch your slippers, or other useful tasks.
  The Entlebucher can be territorial and will bark to announce the presence of strangers or arrival of guests. He's aloof with people he doesn't know, and like any dog, he needs early socialization to learn how to behave around strangers and other dogs. He loves his kids but, because he also loves roughousing, he must learn to be gentle with little ones. He may try to "herd" his kids by nipping at their heels.

Other Quick Facts
  • There are two common pronunciations for Entlebucher: Ent’-lee-boo-ker or Entel-boo-ker. He is also known as the Entlebucher Sennenhund (which means dog of the Alpine herdsman) and Entlebucher Cattle Dog.
  • The Entlebucher is a medium-size dog with a compact but muscular body. Dark-brown eyes have an alert, attentive, friendly expression. Triangular ears, rounded at the tips, hang down, raising up slightly when the dog is alert. The tricolor coat is black with symmetrical white markings on the face, chest and feet and rich fawn to mahogany markings on the eyebrows and between the black and white markings.
Breed standards

AKC group: Herding
UKC group: Guardian Dog
Average lifespan: 11-15 years
Average size: 55-66 pounds
Coat appearance: double coat that consists of short, tight, harsh and glossy outer coat and a dense undercoat
Coloration:  black with symmetrical tan and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards and farms/rural areas
Temperament: Devoted, loyal, intelligent, independent
Comparable Breeds: Appenzeller Sennenhunde, Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

History 
  All of the Swiss mountain dogs, including the Entlebucher, descend from mastiff-type dogs brought by the Romans more than 2,000 years ago. The dogs that became the Entlebucher was used to herd cattle to and from mountain pastures.
  The dogs were first called Entlebucherhund in 1889. They were little known and generally considered the same breed as the Appenzell Cattle dog until 1913. That year, four of the dogs were exhibited at a Swiss dog show. Based on the judges’ reports, they were classified in the Swiss Canine Stud Book as a fourth Mountain and Cattle Dog breed. Even so, it wasn’t until 1927 that a standard was written for them, after the founding of the Swiss Club of Entlebuch Cattle Dogs in 1926. 
  The breed developed slowly but was eventually recognized for his lively, tireless nature and excellent qualities as both a working and family dog. The American Kennel Club recognized the Entlebucher in 2011

Temperament
  Entlebucher Mountain Dogs are intelligent and very quick to learn new things. They are agile, active dogs by nature which means they enjoy being given things to do. In their native Switzerland, the Entlebucher is still used as a herding dog and are highly prized because they are so reliable and biddable by nature.
  They form extremely strong bonds with their owners whether in a working or home environment and are known to become totally devoted to their families and children. They are very people-oriented by nature and enjoy nothing more than being included in a household although they form the strongest bond with the person who usually feeds and takes care of them.
  Being so smart and so active, the Entlebucher thrives in a country environment and with people who live active, outdoor lives. They are a very good choice as a family pet in homes where one person is usually around when everyone else is out of the house. They are highly trainable and love nothing more than to learn new things. Entlebuchers excel at all sorts of canine sports which includes activities like agility and flyball.
  They are not the best choice for first time owners, because the Entlebucher needs to be trained and handled by someone who is familiar with the breed or similar type of active, intelligent working dog. Without the right amount of daily exercise and mental stimulation, an Entlebucher would quickly become bored and find new ways to amuse themselves which could result in them becoming wilful and unruly making them a lot harder to handle.
  If left to their own devices for long periods of time, the Entlebucher can also suffer from separation anxiety which could lead to a dog becoming destructive around the house. These hard working dogs are never happier than when they are being given something to do that occupies their minds. 

Health Problems
  Because the foundation stock of Entlebuchers was so small, these dogs are known to suffer from several hereditary ailments such as hip dysplasia, hemolytic anemia and progressive retinal atrophy.

Care
  As with any other breed, Entlebuchers need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, dogs need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs throughout their lives.

Living Conditions
  The Entlebucher Mountain Dog is not recommended for apartment life.

Trainability
  The Entlebucher Mountain Dog is highly intelligent and therefore in the right hands and environment they are easy to train. They revel in learning new things and are very quick to pick up on things. However, this means they quickly learn both the good and the bad, which is why their socialisation and training has to start early. It also has to be consistent throughout their lives because these active dogs like nothing more than knowing their place in the pack and who they can look to for direction and guidance.
  They excel at many canine sports which includes activities like flyball and agility because they adore the one-to-one attention they are given during a training session and remain highly focused when they take part in any competitions. Entlebuchers are always keen and alert, but they do not answer well to any sort of harsh correction or heavy handed training methods which would not achieve any sort of good results with these highly intelligent and voice sensitive dogs. An Entlebucher needs to know what is expected of them to be truly well rounded dogs.



Exercise Requirements
  Bred to herd cattle across the Swiss Alps for days on end, Entlebuchers have a virtually inexhaustible amount of energy. Therefore it is important that they be provided with at least an hour of vigorous exercise each day. It is also beneficial for these dogs to have a meaningful task to which they can devote themselves to.

Grooming
  The Entlebucher has a short, thick, double coat. The coat is easy to care for, but it sheds. Brush the dog weekly with a rubber curry brush to remove dead hair. The Entle sheds a little more heavily in spring, so you may need to brush a little more often for a few weeks until he has lost all of his winter coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once a month. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian.

Children and Other Pets
  Entlebuchers are known to be friendly, devoted dogs by nature and they love nothing more than to be part of a family. As such they are generally very good around children although they can play a little rough at times which means any interaction between younger children should always be well supervised by an adult to make sure things don't get too boisterous.
  If they have grown up with a family cat in a household, they usually get on well with them although they will think nothing of chasing off a neighbour's cat whenever they can. If well socialised from a young enough age, the Entlebucher generally gets on well with other dogs and smaller pets as long as they were introduced when a dog was younger. Care always has to be taken when they are around any small animals they don't already know just in case.

Is the Entlebucher Mountain Dog the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. Little to no trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Difficult Training: The Entlebucher Mountain Dog isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Entlebucher is one of four farm dogs native to Switzerland. He takes his name from the Entlebuch valley where he originated.
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Thursday, September 22, 2016

Everything about your Kuvasz

Everything about your Kuvasz
   Bold, courageous and fearless, the Kuvasz is an unparalleled livestock guard, able to act at just the right moment without instruction and cover rough terrain for long periods of time. One of the larger working breeds, he is well-muscled and agile. His double coat features a coarse guard hair that protects a soft, fine undercoat. The hair ranges from straight to quite wavy, but must always be white.

Overview
  The kuvasz is a large dog, slightly longer than tall, and medium-boned. It is not bulky, but instead light-footed, with a free, easy gait. The breed's combination of power and agility stems from its versatile roots as a guardian, hunter and herder. Its double coat is medium-coarse, ranging from wavy to straight. 
  Despite its sweet looks, the kuvasz is a tough protector, fearlessly defending its family or home. It is gentle with and protective of children in its own family, but it may misinterpret a child's rough-and-tumble games with other children as attacks on its child. It is reserved with strangers and may be aggressive toward strange dogs; however, it tends to be very gentle with other pets and livestock. It is devoted and loyal but not very demonstrative. Some can be domineering.

Highlights
  • Kuvaszok require a confident, experienced owner, one who gains their respect and understands their independent nature.
  • Kuvaszok shed profusely, especially in the spring and fall. Brushing them at least once a week, and preferably every two to three days, is recommended.
  • Like many large dogs, the Kuvasz may develop joint problems if exercised too much while he's still growing. Don't push your Kuvasz to over-exercise, jump excessively, or go up and down stairs too often until he's passed his second birthday.
  • Kuvaszok are suspicious of strangers and can be overly protective. Obedience training is imperative when you own a large guarding dog such as a Kuvasz.
  • Although he's pretty self-sufficient, a Kuvasz doesn't like to be kept apart from his family. Like all dogs, he does best spending at least part of his time with you in the house rather than being left alone in the backyard. There really is no such thing as a "good backyard dog."
  • Your Kuvasz can become aggressive and frustrated if kenneled, tethered, or chained. This is a breed that needs to run. He needs a large, fenced yard as well as a long daily walk or run once he's physically mature.
  • Kuvaszok are intelligent and like many guarding dogs, they think for themselves. Training can be difficult and requires a lot of patience, time, and consistency.
  • Although they're very gentle with children if they were raised with them, Kuvaszok puppies can be rambunctious and may accidentally knock over a small child.
  • Your Kuvasz may consider any children other than the kids in your family to be threats. Opt to be safe rather than sorry, and when other kids come over to play, watch your Kuvasz carefully or put him in a secure area.
  • Never allow anyone to reprimand your Kuvasz. If he feels that the person who's reprimanding him isn't "worthy" to do so, he will resent it.
Other Quick Facts
  • The muscular and agile Kuvasz is large and sturdy with a white double coat, dark-brown almond-shaped eyes, drop ears that fall into a V-shape, and a long, furry tail.
Breed standards
AKC: Working
UKC : Guardian Dogs
Life Span: 10 to 12 years
Weight: 70 to 115 pounds
Height: 26 to 30 inches at the shoulder
Coat : Ranges from straight to wavy
Color: White
Hypoallergenic Breed: No
Comparable Breeds: Komondor, Great Pyrenees

History
  Around 2000 BC, the Magyar tribes moved along the recently established trade routes of the steppes, gradually leading them to the Carpathian Basin in Hungary which they conquered in 896 A.D. With them came Kuvasz-type dogs, which primarily served as livestock guardians. In 1978, the fossilized skeleton of a 9th Century Kuvasz-type dog was discovered in Fen├ękpuszta near Keszthely, a discovery which was remarkable in that the morphology of the skeleton was almost identical to a modern Kuvasz. If accurate, such a discovery would mark the Kuvasz as among the oldest identifiable dog breeds as only a few breeds can be dated beyond the 9th Century.
  After the Magyar settlement of the Carpathian Basin, the tribes converted to a more agrarian lifestyle and began to devote more resources towards animal husbandry. Whereas the Komondor was used in the lower elevations with drier climates, the Kuvasz was used in the wet pastures of the higher mountains and both were an integral part of the economy. Later, during the 15th Century, the Kuvasz became a highly prized animal and could be found in the royal court of King Matthias Corvinus. Kuvasz puppies were given to visiting dignitaries as a royal gift, and the King was said to have trusted his dogs more than his own councilors. After the king's death, the popularity of the breed among the nobles waned but it was still frequently found in its traditional role of protecting livestock.
  By the end of World War II, nearly all the Kuvasz dogs in Hungary had been killed. The dogs had such a reputation for protecting their families that they were actively sought and killed by German and Soviet soldiers, while at the same time some German officers used to take Kuvasz dogs home with them. After the Soviet invasion and the end of the war, the breed was nearly extinct in Hungary. After the war, it was revealed that fewer than thirty Kuvasz were left in Hungary and some sources indicate the number may have been as few as twelve. Since then, due to many dedicated breeders, Kuvasz breed have repopulated Hungary. However, as a result of this near extinction, the genetic pool available to breeders was severely restricted and there is conjecture that some may have used other breeds, such as the Great Pyrenees, to continue their programs. The issue is further clouded by the need to use an open stud book system at the time to rebuild the breed.

Possible origins of the breed name
  The word most likely comes from the Turkic word kavas meaning guard or soldier or kuwasz meaning protector. A related theory posits that the word may have originated from the ancient farmers of Russia, the Chuvash, who nurtured the breed for generations and contributed many words to the Hungarian language.

Personality
  The Kuvasz is one of the oldest Hungarian dog breeds, with roots tracing back to the 15th century, where they were a favorite guard dog for the noble classes. The modern Kuvasz takes his watchdog role seriously, quietly sizing up newcomers before making a decision about whether they are friend or foe. They are fiercely protective of their property, family, and even other household pets. They have a high tolerance for pain, which means Kuvasz are patient with children who want to climb on them and romp around.

Health
  Although generally a healthy and robust breed which can be expected to live approximately 12–14 years, the Kuvasz are prone to developmental bone problems. Accordingly, owners should take care to provide proper nutrition to their Kuvasz puppy and avoid subjecting the puppy to rough play. As with many large breeds, hip dysplasia, a painful and potentially debilitating condition, is not uncommon. Good genetics and proper nutrition as a puppy are key to avoiding these complications.
  The belief that a large breed puppies including Kuvasz puppy should not be fed a diet high in calories or protein has largely been dispelled by studies. Bone and joint disorders are thought to be genetic. However, weight can be an influencing factor. Puppies should be fed a balanced diet. The Kuvasz has a very efficient metabolism and is predisposed to rapid growth—vitamin supplements are not necessary and, in fact, should be avoided. Cooked bones should never be given to a Kuvasz or any other dog because the cooking process renders the bone brittle and prone to splintering, which can cause serious injury to the dog's mouth and digestive tract.

Care
  Coat care consists of weekly brushing; however, daily brushing is required when the dog undergoes its seasonal shedding. The dog needs daily exercise in the form of a good run in an enclosed area and a long walk.
  It is fond of cold weather and can survive outside in cool and temperate climates. Despite this, Kuvasz experts recommend allowing the dog to spend time both in the yard and indoors.

Living Conditions
  The Kuvasz is not recommended for apartment life. It is fairly active indoors and does best with at least a large yard. Do not leave this dog alone in the backyard for long stretches of time, as he may become destructive. Vigorous exercise should help with this. The Kuvasz should never be left outside all tied up, for this could lead to viciousness. It will do best in a large enclosed yard. It especially enjoys cold weather and can live outdoors in temperate to cold climates as long as it has a doghouse and fresh water, but will do best if allowed access to both the house and yard. The Kuvasz's thick coat makes him very uncomfortable in warm weather or humid conditions; it should always have plenty of shade and fresh water.

Trainability
  Training a Kuvasz can be a challenge. This is a dominant breed with a huge physical presence, and they like to be in charge at all times. They were developed to make independent decisions in the field, and that independent air has not left the modern Kuvasz. You must teach him early who the true leaders are in the house, or he will naturally assume the role.
  Consistency is the key to raising an obedient Kuvasz. They are vigilant, and will be on the lookout for the first sign you have bent the rules, and promptly take over. Training should be firm, but never harsh as this can lead to avoidance behaviors. Positive reinforcement, lots of treats and always meaning what you say are the best recipe for success.
  Protectiveness is in the Kuvasz DNA, so socialization should be conducted early and often. These dogs need to understand how welcome guests behave, so that their wariness of strangers does not get out of hand.

Exercise
  The Kuvasz needs vigorous daily exercise. If it is not actively working as a flock guardian it needs to be taken on a daily, long brisk walk or jog. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Exercising should help with chewing or digging problems—in hopes that it will tire the dog out.

Grooming
  The Kuvasz has a beautiful white double coat that sheds dirt but also sheds hair. Brush him weekly with a pin brush to remove dead hair and keep the skin and coat healthy. Trim the fur between his toes to keep his feet in good condition. His coat repels water and sheds dirt easily with brushing, so a bath is rarely necessary.
  When summer comes along, don’t think that your Kuvasz has suddenly developed a disease that causes hair loss. It’s normal for the Kuvasz to lose most of his long coat during hot weather.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets

  Kuvaszok are fond of children, and can be gentle and protective with them. If your kids are playing with friends, though, it's essential to supervise if a Kuvasz is nearby. He may mistake other children's play for aggression and will move to protect "his" kids. Kuvaszok puppies can be too rambunctious for young children.
  As with any dog, always teach children how to safely approach and touch your Kuvasz, and supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent biting or tail-pulling from either party.

Is the Kuvasz the Right Dog for You?
  Kuvaszok are protective dogs who need socialization and training. They are great with children and other pets, but they should not be left alone with children they do not know.   They are wary of strangers and will be picky when choosing whom to trust. They should not be left alone for very long.
  Daily exercise is a must. These dogs also need regular grooming and can shed heavily a couple of times per year.
  Keeping regular veterinary visits and feeding a quality dog food will give your Kuvasz the best chance at a healthy life. The double coat makes them ideal for colder climates, but they can live in warmer climates and will shed the outer coat.
  If you are looking for a protective family dog and can commit to socializing and training a dog, consider the Kuvasz for your next pet.

Did You Know?
  The name Kuvasz is thought to derive either from a corruption of the Turkish word Kawasz, meaning “armed guard of the nobility,” or the Arabic word kawwasz, meaning “archer.”



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