LUV My dogs: Greyhound

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label Greyhound. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Greyhound. Show all posts

Friday, December 22, 2017

Everything about your Spanish Greyhound

Everything about your Spanish Greyhound
  The Spanish Greyhound, is a sighthound created to course rabbit and hare, but these days he is primarily a companion dog who is rarely seen outside of Spain.

Overview
  The Spanish greyhound, or galgo, is one of the most persecuted dog breeds. Galgos are used to hunt hares in the Spanish countryside. They spend their lives in damp, tiny, dirty holes or windowless shacks deprived of daylight, exercise and affection. They are typically fed only water and stale bread. At the end of the hunting season, countless are disposed of or abandoned.
  Sadly, the galgo's native land still views it as a second-class animal and few Spaniards will own them as pets. They are bred carelessly and used for hunting by galgueros. At the end of the hunting season in Spain, the galgos deemed worthless or too costly to maintain are destroyed in a variety of inhumane ways — including being hanged, dumped into abandoned wells, shot, and even burned to death.
  The lucky ones are rescued by a handful of shelters in Spain, operated by dedicated individuals. Almost all of the resources to help the dogs come from outside of Spain, namely the US, UK, Belgium, Denmark, France, Holland and Germany.
  There are a handful of Spanish shelters dedicated to saving the galgos and other unwanted animals of Spain. Although more and more galgueros are willing to give their unwanted dogs to the shelters, the abuse and torture of galgos continues. Organizations like GRIN are dedicated to the welfare of the Spanish galgo and sighthounds worldwide, and assist the Spanish shelters with adoption, veterinary care, and fundraising.

Other Quick Facts
  • The speedy Galgo Español was bred to course rabbit and hare.
  • The Galgo’s smooth or wiry coat can be any color, but is usually seen in brindle, fawn, red or black, with or without white markings.
  • Unlike the Greyhound, which is more of a sprinter, the Galgo is built to run long distances over rugged terrain. His hare feet are suited to taking him safely over uneven ground.
  • The Galgo Espanol is a generally healthy breed. Sighthounds in general have a tendency toward osteosarcoma (bone cancer).
  • The Galgo is a rare breed in the United States, and puppies are not readily available.
Breed standards

UKC group: Sighthound & Pariah
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 50 to 65 pounds
Coat appearance: smooth and rough
Coloration: Black, Cinnamon, Red, White, Yellow
Hypoallergenic: No

History
  Sighthounds - dogs that hunt by sight - have existed since ancient times. Different types of sighthounds have developed in different countries depending on the terrain and quarry. The Galgo is a Spanish sighthound created to course hare and rabbit. His name comes from the Latin “canis gallicus,” meaning Celtic dog. The Galgo probably descends from Greyhound-type dogs that were influenced by Salukis during the Moorish conquest of Spain.
  The Galgo is rare in the United States and is not recognized by the American Kennel Club or the United Kennel Club. The dogs may participate in lure coursing events through the American Sighthound Field Association.

Temperament
  Galgos have a very similar nature to Greyhounds. They are calm, quiet, gentle and laid back; happy to sleep their day away on their backs on a sofa. More than 90% of Galgos can be considered cat-friendly and are therefore an ideal choice for the hound lover who also owns cats. Almost all Galgos are also friendly towards other dogs and small dogs. Galgos are also very good with children, being calm in the house so there is less risk of a child being knocked over or jumped on than with a more excitable breed. 
 They are very gentle and tolerate the often over-enthusiastic attentions of children with little risk of retaliation from the dog. Galgos have a very reserved personality and they have a tendency towards shyness, so it is very important that they be socialized early in life so that they grow up to be comfortable around strange people, dogs and locations.

Health
  Like many other sighthounds, Galgos are a fairly healthy breed although they are sensitive to anaesthesia. As such, proper care should be taken by the owner to ensure that the attending veterinarian is aware of this issue. Although Galgos are big dogs, their history of selection as a working sighthound, their light weight, and their anatomy keep them safe from hip dysplasia. These dogs must run regularly to keep in perfect health, combined with their characteristic tendency to sleep all the rest of the day.

Care
  Galgos Españoles have a life expectancy of about 10 years, but it greatly varies between individuals; companion dogs can easily live for longer, but hunting dogs suffer notable wear and tear. They can live in apartments if they get lots of exercise, but in general they are recommended for homes with gardens.
  Their coat does not require much care: it will be enough to brush them regularly to get rid of dead hair and to bathe them if they get dirty.

Living Conditions
  The Spanish Greyhound will do okay in an apartment if it gets enough exercise. It is relatively inactive indoors and a small yard will do. Greyhounds are sensitive to the cold but do well in cold climates as long as they wear a coat outside. Do not let this dog off the leash unless in a safe area. They have a strong chase instinct and if they spot an animal such as a rabbit they just might take off. They are so fast you will not be able to catch them.

Trainability
  Although Spanish Greyhound do not usually take the spotlight in dog training, their gentleness makes them easy to train. With positive reinforcement, your Galgo will be perfectly able to learn the basic dog commands and more.

Exercise Needs
  This breed needs to be taken on a daily long walk or jog, where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as instinct tells a dog the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human.

Grooming
  The Galgo is easy to maintain. Weekly brushing of his smooth, shorthaired coat with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush is all he needs to stay clean and in good condition. Give him the occasional bath with a dog shampoo if he rolls in something stinky. The wirehaired Galgo is also easy to groom, although his beard, mustache, and eyebrows may need some additional combing.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Like most sighthounds, Galgos are sensitive about having their feet handled, so practice this early on with a puppy and be sure you never hurt him when you are touching his feet. He’ll never forget it. Keep the ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections from taking hold. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approvet pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Is the Spanish Greyhound the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The Spanish Greyhound is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  You might think that sighthounds are hyperactive because of their speed, but just the opposite is true. Give your Galgo a long walk or a good run every day, and he will be content to spend the rest of the time relaxing on your sofa or bed.


Read More

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Everything about your Cirneco dell'Etna

Everything about your Cirneco dell'Etna
  The Cirneco dell’Etna is a small and slender dog, similar in appearance to the Greyhound but with larger ears and a chestnut/tan coat. These dogs are an ancient breed native to the island of Sicily where they were valued for their intelligence and for their natural hunting ability. If you are looking for a small, active breed – especially one that takes well to dog sports – the Cirneco dell’Etna may be the right breed for you.

Overview
  The outgoing Cirneco (the plural is Cirnechi) weighs between 18 and 27 pounds, making him suitable for just about any home. Thanks to his innate athleticism, he’s a natural at agility and lure coursing, and he also does well in obedience, rally, and tracking. The Cirneco has a reputation for being easier to train than some other sighthounds — as long as you keep the training sessions short.
  Like most dogs, the Cirneco can become bored, noisy, and destructive if he doesn’t have other dogs to keep him company or if he doesn’t receive enough attention from his people. Despite his chase instinct, if a Cirneco is raised with other pets from an early age, he can live amicably with cats and small dogs.

Other Quick Facts
  • The Cirneco dell’Etna is a rare breed not readily found outside Italy — there are only 200 or so Cirnechi in the United States.
  • Although they are mainly companion dogs today, Cirnechi are known for their silent method of hunting, which allows them to catch animals off guard.
  • Since the breed is so uncommon, little is known about the health history of the Cirneco.
  • Like most sighthounds, Cirnechi aren’t too keen on having their feet touched.

Breed standards
AKC group: Hound Group
UKC group: Sighthound & Pariah
Average lifespan: 12 to 14 years
Average size: 18 to 27 pounds
Coat appearance: Close-Fitting, Long, Sleek, Smooth, Stiff, and Straight
Coloration:  tan- to chestnut-colored coat
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards
Temperament: Gentle, alert, independent, playful
Comparable Breeds: Pharaoh Hound, Ibizan Hound

History
  The Cirneco dell’Etna, also known as the Sicilian Greyhound, may resemble a small Pharaoh Hound, but he’s a distinct breed of Italian origin, with his own color markings, tail shape, and triangle-shaped ears. He gets his name from Mount Etna, on the Italian island of Sicily, where his ancestors hunted rabbit and hare. He stalks silently — so much so that he can even sneak up on birds. Today, this rare breed is predominantly a family companion.
  The Cirneco was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 2006. The breed is also part of the American Kennel Club’s Foundation Stock Service, the first step toward AKC recognition. In 2012, the Cirneco dell’Etna will be admitted to the AKC’s Miscellaneous Class.

Personality
  The Cirneco dell'Etna has a strong, inquisitive, independent temperament, which is important in keen hunting dogs. It is also outgoing, friendly, affectionate and smart. Cirnechi are loyal and loving with their owners and friends. They are willing and eager to please and love to receive pets and praise. They usually make great family pets, although they can be reserved around strangers. 
  The Cirneco is an extremely adaptable breed that can thrive in a wide variety of environments. However, these are house dogs that definitely need to live indoors due to their short coats, thin skin and absence of body fat. They like to nestle on warm soft furniture, blankets and bedding, almost as much as they like to snuggle with their favorite people. 
  Cirnechi typically are tolerant of children, although this is not a bomb-proof breed and probably isn’t the best choice for families with very young kids. Cirnechi are social animals that tend to get along well with other dogs. They rarely cause problems in multiple-pet homes and, unlike most sighthounds, get along remarkably well with familiar cats. Of course, the earlier any dog is exposed to other household pets and small children, the more likely it is to get along with them as they age.

Health
  Since there are so few of these dogs, little is known about the health of Cirnechi. In general, they appear to be a hardy breed, but they can get muscle and toe injuries while running. A reputable breeder will discuss potential health problems with you, including any conditions that she has noticed in her own lines.
  As an ancient breed that has been largely unmanipulated by man, the Cirneco dell’Etna is hardy and healthy. The main health concerns to which this breed is prone include injuries that can occur while running. Responsible breeding practices and genetic testing can help to reduce the risk for inherited conditions in this and other breeds.
  Careful breeders screen their dogs for genetic disease, and only breed the best-looking specimens, but sometimes Mother Nature has other ideas and a puppy can develop a genetic condition. In most cases, he can still live a good life, thanks to advances in veterinary medicine. And remember that you have the power to protect your Cirneco from one of the most common health problems: obesity. Keeping him at an appropriate weight is a simple way to extend your Cirneco’s life.


Trainability
  The Cirneco dell’Etna is an intelligent breed so they typically respond well to training. For the best results, start training early while your puppy is still young – that is when they will soak up the most training. Socialization is also important for this breed to help introduce them to new things and situations. Positive reinforcement training methods are recommended and you should be prepared to maintain a level of firm consistency with your dog to prevent him from becoming too strong-willed or independent. These dogs do very well when trained for hunting, lure coursing, agility, or other dog sports.

Exercise Requirements
  Cirnechi are high-energy animals that need quite a bit of regular exercise to keep them physically and mentally fit. They love taking long daily walks and having a chance to stretch their legs in safely-enclosed areas. It is important for Cirneco owners to have well-fenced yards, so that their dogs can run freely and burn off excess energy, which usually happens in short bursts. While they can be gregarious and playful, Cirnechi usually are calm and quiet, both indoors and out, as long as their exercise needs are met. They are great fans of toys of all sorts. A Cirneco can play with a single toy for hours, keeping it out of mischief. Cirnechi are active contestants in lure coursing and agility competitions. Participation in these and other canine sporting events provides a great opportunity to showcase the Cirneco’s athleticism, while at the same time giving him a chance to get physical exercise and canine socialization.
  Because the Cirneco dell’Etna was bred for hunting it is a fairly active breed with fairly high exercise requirements. This breed requires at least 30 minutes of moderate exercise each day in the form of a walk or jog – active play time is also appreciated. Training your dog for hunting, lure coursing, or other dog sports can help to meet its daily exercise requirements while also providing plenty of mental stimulation.


Grooming
  The Cirneco dell'Etna is a low-maintenance breed. Its short coat only needs an occasional brushing to keep it tidy and clean. A rubber curry brush or hound glove, or even a warm damp cloth, work well to keep its coat looking shiny and lustrous. Frequent bathing is not necessary and really should only be done when the dog is obviously smelly or dirty. Other routine maintenance is the same as for most breeds, including dental care to keep teeth clean, reduce plaque build-up and prevent bad breath. Regular nail clipping is also important. 
  Many sighthounds, including many Cirnechi, are sensitive to having their feet handled. Nail care should start at a very young age, so that it does not become a struggle. Owners should do their best to avoid cutting into the quick of the nail, which is quite painful for the animal. For those who are not comfortable clipping nails, a quick trip to a professional groomer can be a godsend for both owner and dog.

Did You Know?
  It’s believed that the Cirneco dell’Etna descended from dogs who were left behind by the Phoenicians along Sicily’s coast. The breed was depicted on Sicilian coins minted as early as the 3rd century B.C.


Is the Cirneco dell'Etna the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Cirneco dell'Etna is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Read More

Friday, September 15, 2017

Top 10 Dog Breeds For Seniors

Top 10 Dog Breeds For Seniors
  One of the best things a person can do at any age is to adopt a dog.  Dogs can provide a tremendous amount of love and joy, and are a great way to overcome loneliness or boredom, which sometimes can affect seniors in their retirement. There are so many different breeds that sometimes it can be difficult to decide which dog is best for you. Seniors need to think about how much exercise certain types of dogs need, and whether they can provide it. 
  Owning a pet has it's pros and cons, and you have to really think what type of pet, whether a cat or dog, and what type of breed is right for you.  For example, you have to factor in if you will have the time and energy for a larger dog, or whether a small lap dog is more your speed. There are an almost infinite amount of sizes and temperaments when it comes to dogs.  If you do choose to adopt a furry friend, they quickly become a loving and wonderful addition to any family.

1. Pug
  The short-faced pug is both gentle and quiet. But don’t let their laid-back nature fool you. These compact dogs have a lot of personality! They don’t need tons of exercise, but they love being social and definitely need to be a part of the group.
  Pugs are known as adaptable, charming, and eager to please — affectionate and playful without requiring a lot of exercise to maintain their health. They are small, so they generally meet the size requirements of assisted living communities. They can be a bit mischievous, and they tend to shed quite a bit, especially in warmer climates.

2. Bichon Frise

  Independent spirit, intelligent, affectionate, bold and lively. They are bright little dogs that are easy to train and love everyone. They need people to be happy and always love to tag along. They are competitive and obedient.

  The fluffy little Bichon Frise is a joyful and affectionate dog that makes an excellent companion. With an average weight of about 7-12 pounds, this small breed is extremely easy to handle for most people. Bichons are also relatively simple to train. The Bichon will need to be groomed periodically but is otherwise fairly low-maintenance. Many Bichon owners choose to take their dogs to a professional groomer every month or two. Moderate daily exercise is usually enough to keep the Bichon healthy and happy as long as he has your companionship.

3. Miniature Schnauzer

  Schnauzers come in various sizes, including miniature, so they offer a lot of choice to a senior trying to meet a community’s pet size requirements. They are energetic, playful, trainable, and good with children, although they can have strong guarding instincts. They can be quite active; the AKC notes that they have a medium energy level, so playtime with your schnauzer can help keep you active as well.

  Miniature Schnauzers are the smallest of the Schnauzers and they are intelligent, fun-loving dogs that are a great choice for a more active lifestyle. They are the perfect choice for an older individual looking to maintain a relatively active lifestyle, as they enjoy exercise but not so much as a larger breed. 


4. Beagle

  Beagles are moderately active dogs that can do well with a daily walk. They are social dogs that enjoy spending time with their people and make an excellent choice for someone older looking for a companion. 

  Beagles are cute (think Snoopy), funny, loyal, and friendly, enjoying the company of other dogs and humans. They love to play and are excellent family dogs. They can also be independent, which may make training a challenge, and they do need plenty of exercise – which is great for fitness-minded seniors. They shed a lot, but their coat is relatively easy to care for with regular brushing.

5. Chihuahua
  If you live in a small assisted living apartment, why not consider one of the smallest dogs there is?Chihuahuas make a great choice for seniors because they are relatively low maintenance and small enough to be easily handled. They require minimal exercise and are perfectly happy being lapdogs. 
 Chihuahuas have a ton of personality for their size, and love being showered with affection; on the flip side, they are so loyal and protective that they might need a bit of training before dealing with children, and some Chihuahuas bark a lot. They can be active, but being small, they can often get sufficient exercise by playing indoors.

6. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

  Another dog bred for companionship, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a great option if you want a dog that is as happy to snuggle in your lap as they are to be out exploring with you. They’re also great family dogs, and love nothing more than to be the center of attention.

  The Cavalier is a beloved puppy-like dog that is affectionate and adaptable. This is a small dog that is often happiest when snuggled up beside her owner. This breed typically weighs about 11 to 18 pounds and is easy to handle and train. The Cavalier has some grooming needs, such as regular hair brushing, ear cleaning, and possibly the occasional trip to a groomer. Overall, Cavaliers are favored among those who love small, snuggle companions.

7. Pembroke Welsh Corgi

  If you want a small to medium dog that makes a great companion, the Corgi might be for you. Weight 24 to 30 pounds, this breed is still small enough for most people to handle. Corgis are smart and fairly easy to train. They are also quite adorable with those short little legs! A herding dog by nature, your Corgi will need routine exercise, but daily walks will often be enough. The Corgi has minimal grooming needs, which can be very convenient. 

  The spunky corgi is the perfect companion for an active senior. Compact in size, this herding breed has the energy of larger dogs, but in a more manageable package. They’re the favored companions of Queen Elizabeth and are a loving—albeit stubborn!—breed.

8. Boston Terrier

  The Boston Terrier is a loving, gentle and clownish breed with an endearing personality. They make a great choice for seniors because of their outstanding temperaments and easy keeping. 
  Boston Terriers often make the list of top dogs for seniors because of their manageable size, friendliness, ease of grooming, and love of spending time with their owners. 

  Known as the American Gentleman, the Boston Terrier is lively, smart, and affectionate with a gentle, even temperament. They can, however, be stubborn, so persistence and consistency are definite musts when training.

9. Poodle

  Poodles are great companions. They’re easy to train, devoted to their families, and a low-shedding breed (though they still need to be groomed). 

  Coming in different sizes from large to tiny, there’s a poodle out there for everyone, even if you live in a small apartment. Smart, proud, and active according to the AKC, it’s no surprise that poodles are the 7th most popular breed overall. They’re easily trained and enjoy a variety of activities, which makes them very adaptable to different-sized living situations. Their coats require regular grooming, but they are also hypo-allergenic.

10. Greyhound

  The biggest dog on our list best dog breeds for seniors is also the laziest. Retired racing greyhounds are a great option for seniors because they are huge couch potatoes. If you adopt a greyhound from the track, you’re also getting a furry friend who has seen a lot and is well socialized.

  How can a racing dog be good for older adults? You may be surprised to learn that Greyhounds are not the high-energy dogs many think they are. Although Greyhounds will enjoy daily walks and the occasional chance to run, most tend to be "couch potatoes" that enjoy loafing around with their owners. They are usually very responsive to training and therefore easy to handle, even though most weight about 60 to 80 pounds. If you like larger dogs but worry about being able to handle one, the Greyhound is a breed to consider.
Read More

Thursday, December 8, 2016

Everything about your Whippet

Everything about your Whippet
  The Whippet is one of the most popular of the hunting dogs. A member of the sighthound class of hunting dogs, it is bred to hunt by sight. The Whippet's keen wide range of vision gives it the ability to zero in on its prey, whereupon it breaks into a fast run to apprehend it.   What makes this breed truly outstanding is its particular affection for humans. Athletic and enthusiastic while at exercise or play, the Whippet is docile and tranquil at home, and especially patient with children and friendly with guests.

Overview
  A cousin to the Greyhound, the Whippet gets his name from the phrase "to whip it" due to his fast pace. Running at speeds of up to 37 mph, the Whippet is a born hunter and racer. Referred to as "the poor man's racehorse" in early England, this breed is not only fast, but intelligent and loyal.
  While the Whippet is often described as gentle, this word doesn’t apply to a Whippet in pursuit of cats or other small, furry creatures. If you have bunnies or hamsters, you may want to think twice about bringing a Whippet into your home. Whippet puppies raised with other pets can coexist peacefully, but instinct is a powerful thing, so it’s essential to keep them separated when you’re not around to supervise.
  Like most dogs, Whippets can become bored and destructive when left to their own devices, especially if they don’t have other dogs to keep them company or if they don’t receive enough attention from family members. To counteract this, aim to walk your Whippet several times a day. You can consider taking him to a dog park at least twice a week, so he can really run. But be aware that small dogs may resemble prey to him.

Highlights
  • Whippets are suitable for apartment living if you have access to a safely fenced area where they can run. Whippets have low energy levels indoors, but will become overactive and destructive if their exercise needs are not met.
  • When Whippets are not socialized properly they can become timid and stressed by changes in their environment. A properly socialized Whippet is a polite and undemanding dog who's wonderful with strangers and other dogs alike.
  • Whippets aren't very good watchdogs as they rarely bark and are friendly toward everyone they meet.
  • Whippets need daily exercise and will enjoy romping and running in a fenced yard or on leash.
  • A Whippet should never be allowed to run off leash during walks.
  • Whippets have a strong prey drive and will pursue other animals for several miles.
  • Underground electronic fencing is not recommended for Whippets. They will ignore the shock if they see something to chase. A 5- or 6-foot fence should be enough to confine your Whippet.
  • Whippets don't shed excessively, and weekly brushing will help keep loose hair off your clothes and furniture.
  • A Whippet's thin skin is vulnerable to scrapes, tears, and nicks.
  • Without daily exercise, a Whippet can become destructive. When their exercise needs are met, Whippets are generally quiet and calm dogs.
  • Whippets are not outdoor dogs and should live in the house with their people. Whippets can suffer from separation anxiety and can become destructive when they do. It's important to spend time with your Whippet and allow him the freedom to follow you from room to room or just snuggle at your feet, or more likely on the couch with you.
  • Although Whippets do very well in multi-dog households, there have been cases of Whippets attacking and killing cats. There have been some Whippets who live happily with cats and other small furry pets, but these dogs were socialized to the animal at a very young age. If you have any other small pet besides another dog, please be aware that the Whippet might chase the other pet — or worse injure it  — if he's not properly socialized or trained.
  • Whippets are great companions for kids. Nonetheless, it's important to teach your child how to properly interact with dogs and to never leave a young child alone with any breed of dog.
  • Whippets get cold easily. Buy a sweater or coat for your Whippet to wear when it's cold, wet, or snowy outside.
  • To get a healthy pet, never buy a puppy from a backyard breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Find a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs for genetic health conditions and good temperaments.
Other Quick Facts


  • Whippets used to be known as snap dogs — for the way they snapped up rabbits and rats.
  • Whippet puppies are cunning little creatures, so you’ll benefit from signing up your pup for obedience classes at an early age; 10 to 12 weeks is highly recommended.
  • The breed is revered for its graceful, athletic build, which allows the Whippet to clock speeds of up to 35 m.p.h. Read: This is not a dog that should be allowed to run off-leash in open spaces.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Sighthound
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size: 20 - 40 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, smooth and fine
Coloration: Brindle, black, red, white, blue
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: A medium-sized thin and long body similar to the Greyhound, long slender head shape, with a long muzzle and tapered black or blue nose, darks eyes in an oval shape, short ears folded back, long and lean straight legs, and long tail that curves upward.
Possible alterations: Color may be mixed variations of Brindle, black, red, white, and blue
Comparable Breeds: Greyhound, Italian Greyhound

History
Charles Compton,
 7th Earl of Northampton by Batoni
  The Whippet is a fairly modern breed, not much more than a couple of hundred years old. He was developed in Northern England, specifically Lancashire and Yorkshire, probably during the late 1700s, by crossing Greyhounds with fast, long-legged terriers. The result was a small, swift dog frequently used by poachers to hunt rabbits and other small game on local estates.
  The Whippet became popular with working men in Northern England, who spent their off hours seeing whose Whippets could kill the most rabbits or rats or whose was the fastest. Whippet races usually took place on a straight track that spread down roads and across fields. The Whippets would chase a rag or piece of cloth, and the contests became known as rag races.
  While the working class bred and perfected the racing and hunting spirit in the breed, it's said that the upper class perfected the look of the breed as it is today by adding in some Italian Greyhound for refinement. England's Kennel Club recognized the Whippet as a breed in 1891. The first Whippet to be registered with the American Kennel Club was a dog named Jack Dempsey, in 1888.
  Today the Whippet continues to inspire admiration for his stylish look, versatility, and devoted companionship. He's ranked 60th among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.

Personality
  Amiable, friendly, quiet, and gentle at home, the Whippet is intense in the chase. He requires a leash or a fenced yard to prevent him from taking off after any moving object, be it a bunny or a radio-controlled car. He doesn't bark much, but he's alert and makes an excellent watchdog. Guard dog? Not so much. He'll happily show the burglar to the silver.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Whippets need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Whippet puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
  Whippets generally have a life-span of about 12 to 15 years. Like many sighthounds, they are sensitive, and prone to barbiturate anesthesia and lacerations. Some of the problems that can occasionally be seen in this breed are eye defects and deafness. Eye problems are a major health concern for this breed. Hence, eye tests should be part of their regular health screenings

Care
  Whippets do not require a great deal of maintenance. However, as an athletic breed, they do need to be taken out for exercise regularly, with a combination of running and walking.   Because they are natural sprinters, they cannot run for prolonged distances, but they thrive when they are able to run with some freedom and space to get to their top speeds. These dogs love to play in the snow but cannot stand cold weather for a long time and cannot be kept as outdoor pets owing to their short coats and lack of heat retaining body fats. The main part of their time should be in a warm environment, with an access to a soft bed inside the house. Regular grooming should be part of overall care, though Whippets do not tend have the typical body odor that is associated with dogs, again owing to their short, fine coat.

Living Conditions
  This breed is sensitive to the cold. Wearing a coat is advised in the winter. These dogs will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. Whippets are calm indoors and a small yard will do.

Training
  Whippets are actually known as sensitive breeds, which mean they should not be over trained. Special care should be taken to avoid negative reinforcement. Instead, positive reinforcement will help develop a natural and healthy self-esteem, as it is easy to “cross over the line” with Whippets and confuse them as to why you’re angry or impatient. A good trainer will be able to handle a Whippet with relative ease.

Activity Requirements
  Though they love to run and are prone to unprompted laps around the house or yard, you don't need to be a runner yourself to raise this breed. Whippets should be allowed to run several times a week, but they are not built for endurance activities. A few sprints around the yard or track and a Whippet is done for the day, happily retiring to his bed for some rest and relaxation. They are fine city dwellers, as long as they are allowed to get to a park for regular sprints. Other than that, regular walking will keep the Whippet happy and healthy.  Their size and quiet natures makes them suitable for some apartments, but there should be enough room to accommodate random fits of running.
  Taking your Whippet to the lure course where he can run at top speed is an excellent way to keep him in shape and meet his exercise requirements.

Grooming Needs
  The Whippet's coat only needs to be brushed with a hound mitt once per week to remove loose hair and keep the coat healthy. They only require bathing as needed. The thin coat of the Whippet does not protect well against cuts and scrapes, so he may be more prone to minor skin injuries than other breeds. Be sure to clean all wounds, even minor wounds, to prevent infection.
  Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease. Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear the toenails down naturally.

Children And Other Pets
  Whippets enjoy playing with kids. They're not so large that they knock them over easily, and they're not so small or delicate that they're easily injured by them. That said, a few ground rules will keep everyone safe.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Whippets like the company of other dogs, and the presence of another dog or two can help keep them from being lonely if you're gone during the day. They have a high prey drive, however, and aren't really suited to living in homes with cats. It's their nature to chase small furry creatures, after all. Some Whippets can learn to live peacefully with cats, especially if they're brought up with them from puppyhood, but you should always supervise them when they're together and separate them when you're not home.

Is this breed right for you?
  Great with children that do not play rough, the Whippet is a devoted and quiet family dog. Docile and easy to maintain, these pets are awesome to travel with and take care of. Best suited for warmer climates, the Whippet will need a coat if taken out in a cold climate.   Sensitive, they're on the easier side to housebreak and are OK for apartment living if taken out for regular exercise. Trained and prone to hunting, these dogs only do well with cats if raised with them. They do best living in a home with a small yard and as an inside pup.

Did You Know?
  Whippets were introduced to America by English mill workers who settled in Massachusetts and eventually turned the state into a mecca for Whippet racing.

A dream day in the life of a Whippet
  Waking up ready for affection from his owner, the Whippet will loyally watch the house once you leave for the day. Going out occasionally for a run around the yard and a sniff for any animal intruders, he'll spend most of the day tucked away indoors. A loving pat from the kids and a reserved glance at the neighbors and he'll keep himself entertained. After his best friend arrives home, he'll be ready and waiting for his daily run. Once home, he'll loyally sleep at your feet until you both hit the hay.








Read More

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Everything about your Scottish Deerhound

Everything about your Scottish Deerhound
  With impeccable manners and a good attitude, Scottish Deerhounds are welcoming, warm and easygoing. While they are active and sporty  outside, they are perfectly content to curl up on the couch after a long walk and snore the afternoon away. They crave attention and togetherness. When ignored or bothered, they sometimes let out a peculiar whining sound.

Overview
  Just like the name suggests, the Scottish Deerhound originated from Scotland and was bred to hunt deer. A descendant of the Greyhound and kept only by high-class individuals in the 16th century, the breed nearly became extinct due to excessive hoarding. In the 1800s it was revived in England and shown in its first dog show. It almost became extinct again during World War I but managed to survive the era. And although there are still not many Scottish Deerhounds around today, the dog is said to stay true to its class and breed.
  The Scottish Deerhound, also at times known as the Fleethound, Rough Highland Greyhound, Irish Wolf Dog, Scottish Wolfhound, Scotch Greyhound, Rough Coated Greyhound, Rough Greyhound, Scotch Deerhound, Highland Greyhound, Highland Deerhound, Wolfdog and Staghound, is a very ancient breed that was originally bred to hunt wolves, rather than deer. This breed has a strong prey drive for smaller, furry animals. It is a wonderful, calm and gentle family dog, with quiet yet courageous devotion to its family members. The Scottish Deerhound normally does not make a good watch or guard dog, because he is too polite and kind-hearted.

Highlights
  • Scottish Deerhounds need a securely fenced yard to keep them from chasing prey. Underground electronic fencing will not prevent them from giving chase.
  • The Scottish Deerhound is not recommended in homes with smaller animals and pets that could be considered as "prey." If they are not properly socialized, and for some Scottish Deerhounds even socialization does not curb it, they will give chase whenever they see the other animal. This could result in the smaller animal being killed or injured.
  • Scottish Deerhounds are not recommended for apartment living. Although they have relatively low activity levels indoors, they are a large dog and require lots of room to run. They require daily exercise and do best in a home with a large yard or acreage.
  • Scottish Deerhounds should be walked on leash to prevent them from chasing a moving animal, but be aware that they can and will lift you off your feet if they do decide to take off and you're hanging on to the leash.
  • The Scottish Deerhound is a very affectionate breed and will generally befriend everyone he meets. He gets along well with other dogs if they are large and don't trigger his prey drive. He doesn't make the best alert or guard dog because of his loving nature.
  • Housetraining can take a bit longer with the Scottish Deerhound than with other breeds. Be patient and consistent.
  • Scottish Deerhounds are relatively inactive inside but still need a lot of daily exercise to maintain their huge bodies. They make great jogging companions and enjoy long, long walks. Many people are surprised when their active Scottish Deerhound puppy turns into a couch potato adult.
  • Scottish Deerhounds do very well with older children, but take into account their size and energy level when they're outdoors. Don't let a child walk a Scottish Deerhound; he won't be able to hang onto him if he decides to run after something. Regardless of breed, no dog should ever be left alone with a young child.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • Other names by which the Deerhound has been called include Highland Deerhound, Rough Greyhound, and Scotch Greyhound. He is also known as the Royal Dog of Scotland.
  • When you look at a Deerhound, you see a dog whose long head is broadest at the ears, with the muzzle tapering to the black nose, and adorned with a mustache of silky hair and a fair beard. The soft, glossy, dark ears fold back, raised up only in excitement. Dark brown or hazel eyes hold a keen, far away expression that softens when the dog is relaxed. The long, tapering tail is carried down or curved.
  • The Scottish Deerhound is the second-tallest of all dog breeds, after the Irish Wolfhound. He weighs between 70 and 130 pounds, with females typically being smaller than males.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Sighthound
Average lifespan: 9-11 years
Average size: 75-110 pounds
Coat appearance: Wiry and harsh on the body, soft and smooth on the belly
Coloration: Brindle and black, blue, blue gray, gray
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Typical body of a Greyhound, smaller face with longer nose; high-set and folded ears; dark, brown or hazel eyes; long legs and low swooping tail
Comparable Breeds: Borzoi, Irish Wolfhound

History
  The origins of the Scottish Deerhound are lost in the Highland mists. Over the centuries, they've been known as Irish wolfdogs, Scottish greyhounds, rough greyhounds, and Highland deerhounds. Whether they were originally used to hunt wolves and then repurposed to hunt the great stags of the Highlands is unknown, but we do know that they were used as far back as the 16th century to hunt and bring down deer. The deerhounds were highly regarded for their courage and gentle dignity. A nobleman condemned to death could purchase his life with a gift of deerhounds. And only a nobleman could do so; no one beneath the rank of earl could lay claim to a deerhound, which was commonly known as the Royal Dog of Scotland.
Scottish Deerhound circa 1910
  The breed suffered under its restricted ownership, however, and there were many times it came close to extinction, most nearly when the clan system of Scotland collapsed in 1745 after the fateful battle of Culloden during the Jacobite rebellion against English rule. By 1769 the breed was in dire straits. Efforts were made to restore the breed to its original glory in the 1820s by Archibald and Duncan McNeill. The breed made its way to America as well. The first Scottish Deerhound registered by the American Kennel Club was Bonnie Robin in 1886.
  During World War I, the breed suffered another decline in numbers when many large estates in Scotland and England were broken up. The Scottish Deerhound became a rare breed again, enjoyed only by a select few.
  Today the Scottish Deerhound is still a fairly uncommon breed, appreciated by those who love sighthounds or have an interest because of their Scottish heritage, but more are coming to learn that this is a versatile breed and an all-around exceptional dog. Today the Scottish Deerhound ranks 135th among the 155 breeds and varieties registered by the American Kennel Club.

Personality
  The Scottish Deerhound can best be described as chivalrous. He's gentle yet strong, sensitive yet brave. Loyal, devoted, quiet, dignified, and alert are all terms that apply to this dog. He is courageous in the face of danger but never aggressive.
  Of course, those characteristics don't just appear. Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Scottish Deerhounds need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Deerhound puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
  The Scottish Deerhound breed, which has an average lifespan of 7 to 9 years, is susceptible to major health issues such as cardiomyopathy, gastric torsion, and osteosarcoma. Hypothyroidism, neck pain, atopy, and cystinuria may also plague this dog. To identify some of the issues early, a veterinarian may recommend regular cystinuria and cardiac exams for this breed of dog.

Care
  The Scottish Deerhound breed loves to spend time inside the home with its human family. Nevertheless, the dog can adapt to living outdoors in warm or cool climate. Routine exercise is essential for the breed, ideally in the form of a long walk or running in an enclosed area.
  The hair should be clipped on occasion to prevent it from tangling; combing, meanwhile, will help remove any dead hair. Additionally, the hair around the dog's face and ears should be stripped.

Living conditions
  Scottish Deerhounds can do okay in an in apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors. If they are taken for walks they can live without a yard, but they do best with a large, fenced yard.

Trainability
  Deerhounds are moderately easy to train. They pick up new behavior quickly, especially when praise and food are the motivation, but some can be quite stubborn and simply choose to ignore the rules. The good news is that they are not particularly destructive or ill behaved, so a Deerhound who doesn't listen is easier to live with than some other breeds. Practice makes perfect, so patience is necessary, but even the most stubborn Deerhound comes around in time. When your Deerhound isn't listening, you should never treat him harshly. They are sensitive dogs who will respond to harsh treatment by completely shutting down. Polite praise and encouragement will help motivate him to repeat good behavior and abandon bad.
  Housebreaking can be a long process with Deerhounds. They don't respond well to crating, so as puppies, they require a lot of attention. Some owners prefer the breeder housebreak their dog before bringing him home.

Activity Requirements
  Deerhounds are athletes. They were designed to hunt deer twice their size, so they are built for stamina and endurance. They need several long walks every day and should be allowed to run whenever possible. Joggers enjoy Scottish Deerhounds because they can keep pace on long runs. Though they are well behaved indoors, Deerhounds do not make the best apartment dwellers because they require a bit of room to move around.

Grooming
  The Deerhound’s harsh coat is usually easy to care for, but some Deerhounds have a silkier, longer coat that can become quite tangled. Usually, though, all he needs is a good brushing with a pin brush or slicker brush two or three times a week. Give the coat a going over with a stainless steel Greyhound comb to make sure you didn’t miss any tangles and to comb out the hair on the face  and you’re done. Only a few baths a year, when the dog is dirty, are necessary.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually once every week or two, and keep his ears clean and dry. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian.
  Good dental hygiene is also important. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Introduce your Deerhound to grooming early in life so that he learns to accept it willingly and patiently.

Children And Other Pets
  Deerhounds can get along with children, but they're not really a playmate kind of dog, being more into body slams than playing fetch. They're best suited to homes with older children who understand how to interact with dogs. Deerhounds aren't best pleased by the poking, prodding, and pulling of toddlers and will generally stalk off rather than put up with it. Their size also makes them unsuited to life with small children; they can easily knock them over without meaning to.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  While your Deerhound may learn to live peaceably with small dogs or cats indoors, if he sees them running around outdoors it can be a different story.

Is this breed right for you?
  A very friendly and pleasing breed, the Scottish Deerhound is a wonderful family dog and companion. Docile and best kept as an inside dog with its own bed, it does well inside of an apartment but will need some space to stretch out and daily exercise. A sensitive dog, it can be shy with strangers but does well with other pets in the home. A natural born hunter, it may chase after animals unknown to it. Requiring weekly grooming, the Scottish Deerhound is prone to calluses.

Did You Know?
  Scottish Deerhound GCH Foxcliffe Hickory Wind made history in 2011 by becoming the first of her breed to win Best in Show at Westminster.

Notable Deerhounds
  • A Scottish Deerhound named Foxcliffe Hickory Wind won Best In Show at the 2011 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show February 14–15, 2011.
  • Maida was a cross-bred Deerhound belonging to Sir Walter Scott.
  • A Scottish Deerhound named Cleod played the role of Padfoot, Sirius Black's canine Animagus form, in two films, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2005) and Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2007).
A dream day in the life
Waking up to a run around the neighborhood, the Scottish Deerhound will then enjoy a nice breakfast with its family. A watchdog, it will keep a good eye on the home while you are away, although it would prefer to stay in your company. After an afternoon nap, it'll run about the yard and chase after any four-legged visitors. In the evening, it'll snuggle up at the foot of your bed on its very own pillow.
Read More