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Showing posts with label Germany. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Germany. Show all posts

Thursday, November 9, 2017

Everything about your Toy Poodle

Everything about your Toy Poodle
  Size differentiates the Standard, Miniature, and Toy Poodles, who are otherwise similar. These elegant dogs have Einstein-like smarts and they make excellent family dogs. Most of them don’t have the runway styling of a show dog, but they do need professional grooming unless you are prepared to learn to use clippers.

Overview
  The Poodle, also known as the Caniche and the Pudle, is a breed of dog that comes in three sizes. The Standard and Miniature Poodles are in the Non Sporting Group, and the Toy Poodles are in the Toy Group. This is one of the most popular house pet breeds known, and poodles are famous for their companionable temperaments and extremely high degree of intelligence. The Poodle was recognized by the AKC in 1887 and AKC approved in 1984.
  When groomed to show dog standards the body is meant to give off a square appearance. It is approximately the same length as the height at the withers. The skull is moderately rounded with a slight but definite stop. It has a long, straight muzzle. The dark, oval-shaped eyes are set somewhat far apart and are black or brown. The ears hang close to the head and are long and flat. Both the front and back legs are in proportion with the size of the dog.   The topline is level. The tail is set and carried high. It is sometimes docked to half its length or less to make the dog look more balanced. Dewclaws may be removed. The oval-shaped feet are rather small and the toes are arched. The coat is either curly or corded. It comes in all solid colors including black, blue, silver, gray, cream, apricot, red, white, brown or café-au-lait. While it does not make the written show standard, some breeders are breeding parti-colored Poodles. 

Other Quick Facts
  • Poodles are canine scholars. Their intelligence combined with their desire to please makes it easy to train them.
  • The original purpose of the Standard Poodle was to retrieve waterfowl for hunters, and he is still capable of performing that task today.
  • Poodles need regular mental stimulation and physical exercise.
  • Poodles are not prissy and are just as likely as other dogs to enjoy wet or muddy fun.
  • A Poodle’s grooming needs are considerable. Clipping must be done regularly, typically about every 6 to 8 weeks, or that fine curly coat will mat into gnarly knots.
  • Poodles can be one of the best family dogs possible. For the tiny dog’s safety, though, most breeders won’t place Toy Poodles in homes with children younger than 10 years.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion Dogs
Average lifespan: 14 to 18 years
Average size: 5 to 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Corded, Dense, and Harsh and Rough
Coloration: It comes in all solid colors including black, blue, silver, gray, cream, apricot, red, white, brown or café-au-lait
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Intelligent, easy to train, obedient, playful

History 

  Poodles are thought to have originated in Germany, where they were called Pudel, meaning "splash in the water,”  a reference to their work as water retrievers. The exaggerated show cut seen today began as a practical way to keep the dog’s joints and torso warm in cold water.
  The Standard is the oldest of the three Poodle varieties. The Miniature and the Toy were created by selecting for smaller size. They, too, were working dogs. Miniatures are said to have sniffed out truffles, a type of edible mushroom that grows underground, and Toys and Miniatures were popular circus dogs because of their intelligence, love of performing and ability to learn tricks.
  The curly-coated dogs became popular in England and Spain, but in France they were adored. King Louis XVI was besotted with Toy Poodles and the breed became thought of as France’s national dog. It was in France that the breed achieved status as companions, and Poodles still enjoy that status today. They are beloved around the world and are consistently ranked among the most popular breeds. Today the Miniature is the most popular of the three sizes, and the three varieties together are ranked ninth in popularity among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club.

Personality
  Poodles have a reputation for being “sissies.” They way their hair is cut for shows probably doesn't help that image, but Poodles are by no means fragile, shrinking violets.   They are outgoing, friendly dogs who love to run and romp, and interestingly, they were originally used to assist hunters of water fowl. They are true family dogs who can play hard with children all afternoon, then curl up in the living room for an evening of relaxation. Toy Poodles make excellent watchdogs, they are alert and curious and will sound the alarm that a person or animal is approaching. They make an excellent choice for families of all sizes and ages, and are great for first time dog owners.

Health
  This dog has a lifespan of 12 to 14 years and may suffer from minor diseases like trichiasis, entropion, cataract and lacrimal duct atresia, and major aliments like progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, patellar luxation, and epilepsy. Urolithiasis and intervertebral disk degeneration are sometimes noticed in the breed. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip, knee, and eye exams on the dog.

Care
  The Toy Poodle is not meant for outdoor living, but it enjoys moving to and from the yard. Its coat requires it to be brushed on alternate days. When hair sheds, it does not fall off easily, but gets tangled, thus causing matting. Clipping is recommended four times annually, while the feet and face require monthly clipping. Most Poodles need professional groomers, but owners of the dogs can also learn the grooming procedure. Poodles require plenty of physical and mental exercise - indoor games, short walks, etc. -as well as lots of interaction with humans.

Living Conditions
  Toy Poodles are good for city life as well as country living. Given enough exercise, they are not active indoors. They will lie right next to you and are more sedate when indoors, although they love to play outdoors and are a highly intelligent breed, so they do like lots of thoughtful activities to stimulate their mentality. They will do okay without a yard.

Trainability
  Poodles are highly trainable dogs. They catch on very quickly to patterns and don't require much motivation beyond praise and a couple of treats. Poodles should never be treated harshly as they will simply stop listening to you. They are natural learners, however, so they shouldn't test your patience too far during training sessions.
  Once basic obedience has been mastered, Poodles should graduate on to advanced obedience, trick training, or the agility course. They are thinking dogs and will appreciate the opportunity to learn new things.

Activity Requirements
  Toy Poodles can live as happily in and apartment as they can in a large home with a yard. Wherever they dwell, they do need daily walks and several chances to run every week. Poodles who aren't exercised enough can become high strung and bark excessively.
  They are a smart breed who need to use their minds as much as their bodies, so it is important to give your Poodle lots of interesting activities to do during the day.

Grooming
  Grooming is a significant consideration in Poodles. The fine, curly coat that works well in the water needs to be clipped regularly, typically about every six to eight weeks, depending on your preferences. It mats easily, and requires regular brushing at home, even with professional grooming care. Left untrimmed, the coat will naturally curl into cords. Some people want the coat to cord because they prefer the look.
  Dental care is an issue, particularly for the Toy and Miniature Poodle. Those small mouths full of teeth can cause problems. Keep on top of it by brushing the teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste and having regular dental checks when you go to the veterinarian.
  Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Don’t let them get so long that you can hear them clicking on the floor.

Is the Toy Poodle the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Difficult Training: The Toy Poodle isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Slightly Active: Not much exercise is required to keep this dog in shape. Owners who are frequently away or busy might find this breed suitable for their lifestyle.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Toy Poodles have been popular pets for centuries, including in the court of Louis XVI. Poodles didn’t originate in France, but they are often referred to as French Poodles because they were so popular in that country.



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Friday, June 30, 2017

Everything about your Biewer Terrier

Everything about your Biewer Terrier
  The Biewer Terrier, also known as the Biewer Yorkshire Terrier a la Pom Pon, the Biewer Yorkie or just the Biewer, is a fairly new toy terrier breed. It has not yet been recognized by the American Kennel Club, but is recognized by the American Rare Breed Association (ARBA) and of course by their own American breed club, the Biewer Terrier Club of America (BTCA).

Overview
  At first glance, the Biewer Terrier looks like a colorful tricolored Yorkie or a hybrid mix between a Maltese and Yorkie . 
  Biewer Terrier is a modern breed in the making right before our very eyes.
Pronounced “Bee-Vair,” the breed was first discovered and developed in Germany by a couple, Werner and Gertrude Biewer, Yorkshire terrier breeders.  They mated two of their dogs together in 1984 and produced a blue, gold, and white dog named Schneeflocken von Friedheck.  The explanation for this unusual “Yorkie” was a rare recessive piebald gene mutation. 
  From there it was introduced into the United States in 2003 and continues to gain in popularity as people learn about this incredibly sweet, happy, even-tempered terrier that is a fiercely loyal companion to all those humans he determines are his family.
  As you known, in USA, most Yorkies have docked tails, but the Biewer keeps his full tail as part of the  standard began in Germany.  As in many European countries, the practice of docking tails and cropping ears is banned and the breed’s founders in the U.S. determined that it was in the best interest to maintain this look. 

Breed standards
Other Names Used: Biewer a la Pom Pon, Biewer Yorkshire Terrier, Biewer Yorkshire, or Biewer Yorkie
Affiliation:  AKC FFS (May 2014); ARBA (American Rare Breed Association)
Group: Toy Dog, Companion Dog
Size: Height: 8 12 inches, Weight:  4-7 pounds
Coat Type: Long and Silky; No undercoat
Colors: Black/Blue with Tan/Gold and White
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Country of Origin:  Hunsruck, Germany
Activity Level:  Moderate
Life Expectancy:  12 to 15 years
Good with Children:  Yes (Older children)
Good with other pets:  Yes
Comparable Breeds: Yorkshire Terrier, Silky Terrier

History
  The Biewer Terrier came to be its own breed as a result of a Yorkshire Terrier puppy born in Germany in January of 1984 that had an extreme amount of white patterning throughout his coat. This unusual puppy, named Scheefloeckchen von Friedheck, caused his breeders, Werner and Gertrud Biewer, to wonder whether their Yorkies carried a recessive piebald gene, which apparently they did. Over the next several years, the Biewers bred for the piebald gene and produced blue, white and gold Yorkshire Terriers that bred true to their color. Mr. Biewer showed two of his unique dogs as “black and white Yorkies” in 1988, and the breed took off from there. Biewer Terriers were first officially recognized by the Allgemeiner Club der Hundefreunde Deutschland e. V., one of Germany’s dog clubs. The Biewers signed off on the Biewer breed standard in the late 1980s. Mr. Biewer died in 1997; thereafter, his widow stopped breeding dogs. The Biewer Terrier Club of America was established in 2007. Today, this is still considered to be a rare breed.


Temperament
Having a friendly and affectionate nature, the Biewer Terrier is quite comfortable enough to mingle.
They also possess a highly loyal and dedicated nature, loving to spend quality time with their masters and other family members.
The Biewer Terriers are at times childlike and whimsical in their behavior, loving to do a lot of amusing things like carrying a toy in his mouth.
In spite of their pleasing nature, they may sometimes be strong willed and yappy just like the Yorkshire Terrier, trying to have the upper hand over their masters.
They are wary and suspicious on seeing an unfamiliar face at the beginning, even going to the extent of warning the owner about the same. However, they gradually get along well with the stranger once they realize that he is not a threat to their household. Inappropriate socialization might make these small breeds little aggressive towards strangers.
These dogs are said to have a greater personality than their size, thus making them a little difficult while dealing with other dogs particularly the bigger ones or even cats.
Besides being perfect companions to all, especially the elderly group, this breed is ideal for homes with older children who can deal with them in a responsible way rather than the little ones who can be restless enough with them.

Health 
  Given the fact that Biewer Terrier was bred from the Yorkshire Terrier, they share the same sort of health problems. Some of the most common genetic disorders seen in this breed include patellar luxation, Legg-Calve-Perthes syndrome, portosystemic shunt, bladder stones, and tracheal collapse. Other conditions these dogs may develop include distichiasis and hypoglycemia.

Care
  As with any other breed, Biewers need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in tip-top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, they need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs throughout their lives.

Living Conditions
  The Biewer Terrier can live in an apartment if it gets enough exercise. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Training
  The Biewer Terrier is a smart little dog that generally responds well to a firm and consistent hand in training. Like many toy breeds, the Biewer Terrier is prone to developing small dog syndrome if not properly trained. Biewer Terriers can be somewhat difficult to housebreak and they can be a little overprotective at times. As long as you start training early and remain consistent, you shouldn’t have any trouble training your Biewer Terrier.

Exercise Requirements
  Toy breeds don't need a whole lot of room to run, but even apartment Biewers should be walked regularly, to avoid becoming overweight. In a fenced-in yard they will run and play with children, but should never be left off leash, as they will chase after just about anything that catches their eye – even cars.
  Though Biewers can get along swimingly with larger dogs, they should be socialized as early as possible to learn to accept new people and situations. They can be wary of strangers and once a fearless little Biewer postures, it's difficult to talk them down.
 The Biewer Terrier is a naturally active breed that requires regular daily exercise to work off his excess energy. If a daily walk is not possible, some active playtime will usually fulfill this dog’s needs for exercise. Without enough exercise of some form, however, this breed is likely to develop behavioral problems such as digging and chewing.

Grooming Needs
  The long, silky coat may appear to be intimidating to groom, but it is easy to care for. Daily brushing is required to keep the coat free from dirt and tangles. Biewers should not be brushed when they are completely dry, as it will damage the hair. A spray bottle with water or a mix of water and dog conditioner will do the trick. Weekly baths are necessary to keep the coat in good condition, and some keep bath wipes on hand to clean the underside of the dog on a daily basis. While some owners elect to trim the dog all over, the only trimming that is absolutely necessary is around the ears (so they don't get weighed down), the rectum (for hygienic reasons) and under the pads of the feet.
  Regular tooth brushing and ear cleaning sessions should also be part of the grooming routine, as these practices promote good health and keep harmful bacteria from growing in the mouth or ear.

Children and Other Pets
  Biewer Terriers are not the best choice for people with toddlers and young children because these little dogs can be a little snappy if they feel threatened in any way. They are a good choice in households where the children are older and therefore know how to behave around dogs and more especially when they are interacting with such small dogs.
  They are known to be a little aggressive around other animals and this includes cats which is why they need to be well socialised from a young age although it would be a mistake to trust a Biewer around other smaller pets because of their "terrier" traits. They can be aggressive towards other dogs too, bearing in mind that Biewers have no idea of how small they really are. As such care has to be taken when out on a walk in a public place where other dogs are commonly being walked too.

Is the Biewer the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The Biewer is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.


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Friday, December 9, 2016

Everything about your Miniature Pinscher

Everything about your Miniature Pinscher
  The Miniature Pinscher is not a scaled-down Doberman, although he is fearless and makes a terrific watchdog. Known as the “King of the Toys,” this little fireball is best suited to an experienced owner who can manage his willful nature. On the plus side, his antics are pure entertainment, and he is simple to groom.

Overview
  Originating in Germany, the Miniature Pinscher was bred as a way to control the rodent population in stables. Developed from the Italian Greyhound and Dachshund, the Miniature Pinscher is small but fast. Often referred to as the "king of toys," the breed enjoys living a very active life that is stimulating both physically and mentally.
  The diminutive Min Pin is a bundle of energy, full of vigor. He's highly curious and tends to investigate — and possibly eat — everything. He must be watched closely so he doesn't get into something he shouldn't. He's a skilled escape artist and should never be outside off-leash — in fact, you'll have to make sure he doesn't dart out whenever you answer the front door.
  For these reasons, the Min Pin is not the dog for everyone, especially first-time dog owners. His energy and intelligence can catch his owner off guard. Without proper training and supervision, he can quickly become a tyrant in the household.

Highlights
  • Miniature Pinschers are hardy little dogs, but they can be easily injured by roughhousing. Because of this, they're better suited as pets for older children who have learned how to care for a dog properly.
  • The Min Pin is sensitive to cold. Be sure to put a sweater or coat on him when you take him outside in really cold weather.
  • Because they were originally bred to hunt vermin, Min Pins may attack small objects , which can be a choking hazard. He may also take off after small pets that he perceives as prey.
  • Min Pins have a lot of energy — probably more than you have. They're also very curious. You must supervise your Min Pin constantly, and if you can't, put him in a crate.
  • You must be willing to take the position of "alpha" in your household. If you don't, the Min Pin will gladly assume the role.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Min Pin is strong-willed and not for novices. He can be possessive of toys and food.
  • The Min Pin can have either cropped or uncropped ears and a docked tail. Coat colors include red, stag red (red with black hairs), black with rust markings, or chocolate with tan.
  • The Min Pin likes to play both indoors and out. He doesn’t need a lot of exercise, but a daily walk is important to give him the mental stimulation he needs.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 14 - 15 years
Average size: 8 - 12 pounds
Coat appearance: Smooth, short-haired
Coloration: Black and rust, red, stag red, chocolate and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Compact, small, squarish body, with head proportional to the body; dark black eyes; scissor-bite teeth; strong, straight legs, cat-like feet, and cropped tail
Possible alterations: Tail may not be cropped and dewclaws may be removed.
Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Chihuahua


History
  The Miniature Pinscher is thought to be an old breed, but documentation can only trace it reliably back several hundred years. It was developed in Germany to kill rats in homes and stables.
Drawing of a pinscher and a miniature pinscher
by Jean Bungartz
   There it was first called the Reh Pinscher because of its supposed similarity to the reh, or small deer, that used to inhabit Germany's forests. Many people think that the Miniature Pinscher was developed as a mini Doberman, but though he looks similar, he's a distinct and much older breed.
  Development of the Miniature Pinscher took off in 1895 when German breeders formed the Pinscher Klub, later renamed the Pinscher-Schnauzer Klub. It was then that the first breed standard was written. Miniature Pinschers were first shown at the Stuttgart Dog Show in Germany in 1900, at which time they were virtually unknown outside of their homeland.
  From 1905 until World War I, the Miniature Pinscher rapidly grew in popularity in Germany. After World War I, breeders in Germany and also in the Scandinavian countries worked to improve the line. Around 1919, the first Miniature Pinschers were imported in the United States. Only a few were shown in American Kennel Club dog shows at first. But by 1929, the Miniature Pinscher Club of America, Inc., was formed.
  Also in 1929, the AKC recognized the breed. At that time Min Pins were shown in the Terrier group. In 1930, they were reclassified as Toys and called Pinscher (Miniature). They were renamed Miniature Pinscher in 1972.

Personality
  Contrary to popular belief, the Miniature Pinscher was not developed by breeding Doberman Pinschers down to size. In fact, Min Pins are actually a much olde breed than the Doberman. Nicknamed the “King of the Toys,” your Min Pin will also rule as King or Queen of your house. Breeders and owners agree, these little dogs believe they are the center of the universe and expect everyone to cater to their whims. They have a unique high-step manner of walking which has been likened to a prance, and they ooze confidence wherever they may go. Min Pins are cuddle bugs who will find their way to your lap the instant you sit on the couch. They do love to run, however, and will sometimes tear through the house for no apparent reason. Min Pins make excellent watchdogs, sizing up everyone who approaches his kingdom, and requiring all guests earn his trust.

Health
  The Miniature Pischer, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, may be prone to some minor problems like Legg-Perthes Disease, patellar luxation, hypothyroidism, Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) VI, and heart defects. Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) may also be seen in some Min Pins. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend knee, eye, and hip tests for the dog, as well as DNA to confirm MPS.

Care
  Grooming is easy, as the smooth, short-haired coat requires little attention, needing only occasional brushing and shampooing. Care must be taken in cold weather. Sweaters or baby blankets for a Miniature Pinscher keep it from getting too cold. Miniature Pinschers are an active breed and need access to a fenced yard, or be given a daily walk.
  The Min Pin requires plenty of activity, but as it is small, its exercise requirements can be fulfilled either indoors or outdoors. It needs many good game sessions daily to keep it active. Even though it loves outdoor romps in a secure place, it is not fond of the cold.

Living Conditions
  The Miniature Pinscher is good for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard. The Miniature Pinscher should be protected from the cold.

Training
  The Miniature Pinscher should not really be treated like a toy dog – it’s not a great socializer and will have a high tolerance for work and exercise. Consequently, if you want to make sure that your dog is properly raised according to the breed’s characteristics, it’s a good idea to make sure that your Miniature Pinscher has plenty of outdoor exercise on a regular basis. Miniature Pinschers aren’t ideal for large families and are generally regarded as a dog for one or two people.

Activity Requirements
  Min Pins are tiny, which makes them excellent for apartment and condo life, but they should be taken for daily walks and allowed to run once or twice per week. Min Pins are often high-strung to begin with, so allowing them to burn off as much energy as possible can keep their temperaments in check.
  A good activity to engage in with a Min Pin is agility. Once leadership is established, Min Pins are highly trainable, and take well to the agility course. He will enjoy the exercise, appreciate the opportunity to use his mental prowess, and more importantly, he will eat up the time spent with his favorite person.

Grooming
  Min Pins are really easy to groom — there’s almost nothing to it because of their short, smooth coat. Just use a bristle brush once or twice a week. They shed an average amount, but their small size means that there is less fur shed than from a larger dog with the same kind of short coat.
  Bathe the Min Pin as you desire or only when he gets dirty. With the gentle dog shampoos available now, you can bathe a Min Pin weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  As with all Toy breeds, dental issues are common. Brush your Min Pin’s teeth daily with a vet-approved pet toothpaste and have your veterinarian check them regularly. Nails should be clipped about every two weeks; you should not be able to hear the toenails click when the dog walks.

Children And Other Pets
  If a Miniature Pinscher is raised with children who treat him carefully and kindly, he will adore them and be a trustworthy companion. However, if children are allowed to grab or treat him roughly, even accidentally, he may develop a bad attitude toward kids, or at least want to avoid them as much as possible. The Min Pin is best suited for children age 10 and older.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Many owners have more than one Min Pin; properly socialized and trained, these dogs get along with other dogs just fine . As far as other pets are concerned, the Min Pin's instinct is to chase, so he isn't well suited to homes with small mammals.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although suited for apartment life due to his small size, the Miniature Pinscher requires a lot of activity to satisfy him. He enjoys running, playing and needs a daily walk to fulfill his physical needs. The Miniature Pinscher will partake of regular romps in the yard, but will require a large fence to avoid attempting an escape. In need of proper training, the dog can easily develop behavioral problems if allowed to form small-dog syndrome. OK with older children, it's advised that they are taught how to behave around dogs, as he may nip or bite. In addition, he doesn't care too much for strangers and may bark or attack them unless taught otherwise.

Did You Know?
  It’s thought that the Min Pin was created by crossing breeds as diverse as the Dachshund, the old German Pinscher, the Manchester Terrier, and the Italian Greyhound.

A dream day in the life of a Miniature Pinscher
  It's likely that your Miniature Pinscher will wake at the crack of dawn, before his owners. Ensuring the home is safe, he'll make his way outside to sniff out any vermin and engage in games by himself. Once he hears the family awaken, he'll greet you in the kitchen, patiently awaiting his meal. After a quick walk, he may have a quick nap, but will then spend the day guarding his home and playing with his toys. Not keen on too much affection, he'll end the day with a quick pat on the head for his excellent behavior.


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Monday, September 8, 2014

Everything about your Lowchen

Everything about your Lowchen
  The Lowchen’s German name means “little lion.” He is a cute, charismatic little dog who loves to clown around and be the center of attention. When he encounters other dogs he sometimes thinks he’s as big as a lion and must be prevented from taking them on. His long, dense coat is soft and comes in any color or combination.
  The Lowchen is a toy dog breed that was developed as a companion dog and still finds itself in this role today. Active and smart, they do very well in dog competitions such as obedience and agility, and surpass the expectations that many have for a family companion.

Overview
  With a name that translates to "lion dog," you might expect the Lowchen to have a fierce demeanor, but with people he's lionlike only in his looks. Playful and gentle, the Lowchen is a great companion for children and adults alike.
  He is surprisingly robust and loves to roughhouse with his people. The Lowchen generally gets along well with everyone, but he can be shy of strangers. With proper socialization, this trait can be overcome, however. Generally, Lowchen will fit into any household whether there are dogs before they arrive or not. They also get along well with other pets.
  The Lowchen is affectionate and loving. They thrive when they are with their people and can fit wherever that person is living, be it an apartment or a large estate. They should not be left outside or in a kennel, and doing so will not only lead to ill health for the dog but also to many temperamental problems. 
  Lowchens are not known for their high activity levels, but they enjoy their role as watch dog and will bark an alert whenever they see something they think merits a response. Some can also be partial to digging, and this habit can be difficult to break.
   The name "lion dog" comes from the traditional Lowchen clip, with close-cut hindquarters and a full, natural mane, but the nickname applies to the little dog's big personality as well. Lowchen have the "small dog...big personality" down pat, and that can be a joy and a frustration.
  They are lively and energetic, sweet and affectionate, and they will challenge any dog or rule if they decide to. They will take over the homes and lives of the people they love, and with their fierce determination and wonderful even temperament they will take over their owners' hearts as well.

Highlights
  • The Lowchen was not developed to be an outdoor or kennel dog. They are companion dogs and are happiest when they are in the company of the people they love.
  • Barking is a much-enjoyed pastime for the Lowchen. They make excellent watchdogs with their alarm barking but they may become a nuisance to neighbors.
  • Lowchen make wonderful apartment residents as long as their exercise requirements are met. Expect to spend at least 20 minutes per day exercising him. He makes an excellent walking companion and will go for long walks with his people.
  • Although the Lowchen doesn't shed much, he still requires regular brushing and grooming to prevent tangles and mats and keep him in good health.
  • Although not all Lowchen exhibit this trait, many enjoy digging and the habit may be difficult to discourage.
  • Lowchen can be shy of new people, and it is important to socialize them at a young age to discourage any fearfulness or timid behaviors.
  • Lowchens are companion dogs and may suffer from separation anxiety whenever their companions leave for the day. They are not the best breed for people who work long hours.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Except to achieve the distinctive “lion” look, the Lowchen’s coat should not be trimmed. It comes in all colors and combinations of colors.
  • The Lowchen can vary in size. European dogs may stand only 10 to 13 inches, while American dogs can range from 12 to 14 inches.
  • The lion cut probably originated as a sanitary measure, but a more romantic story is that court ladies would warm their feet on the dogs’ warm, exposed skin.

Breed standards
  • AKC group: Non-sporting
  • UKC group: Companion
  • Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
  • Average size: 9 - 17 pounds
  • Coat appearance: Wavy and long
  • Coloration: Black, white, lemon and speckled
  • Hypoallergenic: Yes
  • Other identifiers: Small and compact body with proud head held high; short skull and muzzle with dark, round eyes; high tail and feathered ears
  • Possible alterations: Clipped into a lion trim
  • Comparable Breeds: Bichon Frise, Havanese
History
  The Lowchen’s name comes from German words meaning “little lion.” Paintings and woodcuts give evidence that dogs resembling the Lowchen have existed since the 15th century. A painting by Jan van Eyck, The Birth of the Baptist, which dates to 1422, depicts one of the curious-looking little dogs and is perhaps the earliest visual proof of the breed’s age. The expressive woodcuts by German artist Albrecht Durer also provide Lowchen lovers with a glimpse of their breed’s past.
  During the Renaissance, a period rife with symbolism, the little lion dogs represented courage. Knights who were killed in battle were buried with the statue of a lion at their feet, but if they died of natural causes, the statue of a lion dog was substituted. The little lion dogs were also popular with court ladies, who kept them as lap dogs, flea catchers, and foot warmers.
  As the centuries passed, the Lowchen’s popularity waned. By World War II, the breed was   considered rare and came close to disappearing. A Belgian woman, Madame Bennert, managed to revive the breed with just two females and one male. She worked closely with German breeders to increase the Lowchen’s numbers and maintain its quality. English breeders began importing the dogs in 1968, and three Lowchen were imported by an American couple in 1971.
  The first Lowchen to achieve pop culture stardom was an untrimmed dog who starred as Freeway, the popular canine co-star of the 1980s television series Hart to Hart. The breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1999. Lowchen currently rank 147th among the breeds registered by the AKC, down from 131st a decade ago.


Personality
  The Lowchen is the personification of an even-tempered breed. He is lively and active, affectionate and gentle. He is an intelligent dog who learns quickly and easily. Lowchen are fearless watchdogs and will often alert bark if they see something or someone suspicious. They don't seem to mind that they are small and will challenge larger dogs if they feel the need.
  They take control of their home, and their people may feel as if they've become a beloved possession of their sweet little dog. There is no doubt that the Lowchen is a wonderful breed with a cheerful disposition who has many people opening their hearts and homes to not just one but to many Lowchen companions.
  The Lowchen is a wonderful breed to train. They are intelligent and take to training very quickly. Like many toy breeds, they can have issues with housetraining, but this can be overcome with patience and consistency. Socialization is a must for this breed, which can be shy around people. Lowchen that are not properly socialized can become fearful or timid. They generally get along well with other pets, but socialization with other dogs is important for all breeds.

Health
  The Löwchen, which has an average lifespan of 13 to 15 years, may suffer from minor health problems like patellar luxation or be prone to serious heart conditions. To identify some of these issues early, a veterinarian may recommend knee and cardiac exams for dogs of this breed.

Care
  Although the Löwchen is not meant for living outdoors, it loves access to a yard during the day. Short daily walks or a vigorous game is sufficient to satisfy the exercise needs of the Löwchen, but it is especially fond of mental challenges.
  Its dense coat requires combing or brushing on alternate days. Clipping, meanwhile, should be done once or twice a month, in order to preserve the lion trim, the preferred choice among pet owners.

Living Conditions
  The Löwchen is good for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Exercise
  The Löwchen needs a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of its exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.

Grooming
  The Lowchen hallmark is the lion trim he wears: basically a mane of hair extending to the last rib, poufs of hair forming “cuffs” around the ankles, a bare rear end, and a bare tail with a plume of hair left at the tip.
  The hair on the Lowchen is long, dense, and soft to the touch. Expect to spend 10 minutes a night removing tangles and mats from his single coat, and give him a more thorough brushing at least weekly. Take him to a professional groomer for his lion trim every two months. If the lion trim doesn’t appeal to you, keep him in a cute and simple puppy cut.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every week or two. Small dogs are prone to periodontal disease, so brush his teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for overall good health and fresh.

Is this breed right for you?
  An active breed that requires daily activity, the Lowchen is kind to children, family members and other furry friends. A cheerful breed, the Lowchen is very easy to train and is devoted to his family and home. A good watchdog, he does bark a lot. Although small, he believes himself to be quite the mighty pup. Without proper leadership or activity, the Lowchen will misbehave. Requiring some grooming, he's easy to maintain with daily walks and socializing.

Children and other pets
  Lowchen make excellent dogs for families with either children or other pets. They generally do well with children and enjoy playing with them. They are surprisingly robust and exceedingly gentle.
   Lowchen are also very sociable and will do well in homes with other pets and dogs. Unaware of their small size, they often have a desire to challenge larger dogs that they meet in public, so it's important to protect them from themselves.

Did You Know?
  Very popular in parts of Europe in the 1500s, the Lowchen was nearly extinct by World War II. A Belgian woman managed to revive the breed with just two females and one male.

A dream day in the life of a Lowchen
  A happy guy, the Lowchen may be your own private alarm clock. Waking you up with a bark, he's ready for breakfast and his daily walk. After sniffing out the neighborhood, this spirited breed will return home ready to socialize with his family. Playing with the kids and romping with the other animals, he'll be sure to keep watch on your home from morning to night. Barking at even the mailman, all of the neighbors are sure to know where the Lowchen lives. Going to sleep at the foot of his owner, he'll be as happy as a lamb to have spent the perfect day with those he loves the most.
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Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Everything about your Doberman Pinscher

Everything about your Doberman Pinscher
  Although the Doberman has a reputation as a sharp and even sinister dog, his devoted fans consider him the most loving and loyal of companions. Believe it or not, a good Doberman is a stable, friendly dog - unless you threaten his family.
  The Doberman Pinscher was developed in Germany during the late 19th century, primarily as a guard dog. His exact ancestry is unknown, but he's believed to be a mixture of many dog breeds, including the Rottweiler, Black and Tan Terrier, and German Pinscher. With his sleek coat, athletic build, and characteristic cropped ears and docked tail, the Doberman Pinscher looks like an aristocrat. He is a highly energetic and intelligent dog, suited for police and military work, canine sports, and as a family guardian and companion.


Overview
  Because the Doberman Pinscher came into existence at the end of the 19th century, he is, in the world of dogs, the new kid on the block. This hasn't stopped the Dobie, as he is affectionately called, from becoming one of the most popular and recognized breeds in the United States.
  His look is elegant and his style is athletic; the Dobie is also intelligent, alert, and loyal. He is a courageous guard dog as well as a beloved family companion.
  The Dobie's fierce reputation precedes him. He is feared by those who don't know him, stereotyped as highly aggressive and vicious. True, he is a formidable guardian, but he is usually a gentle, watchful, and loving dog. He does not go looking for trouble, but he is fearless and will defend his family and turf if he perceives danger.
  The Doberman Pinscher enjoys being part of a family. He likes to be close to those he loves and, when this love is present, he is a natural protector. He is trustworthy with his family's children, friends, and guests as long as he is treated kindly.
  In spite of his positive qualities, the Dobie isn't the right breed for everyone. He's large, at 60 to 80 pounds, and he's extremely active, both physically and mentally. He needs a lot of exercise.
  He also needs plenty of mental challenges to keep him from becoming bored. He needs a strong owner/pack leader who can take time to properly socialize and train him, and who will keep him busy every day. This may be too much to handle for people who lead a more laid-back lifestyle.
  The current look of the Dobie is slimmer and sleeker than that of past years. His temperament has also changed somewhat, say breed enthusiasts, softening a bit from his early days in Germany, though he is still an excellent guard dog.
  Originally, Dobies' ears were cropped to increase their ability to locate sounds, and tail docking gave the breed a more streamlined look. North American breeders usually dock the tails and crop the ears of Doberman puppies, though it's not mandatory. Docking and ear cropping is illegal in some countries.
  Those who know him say that a well-bred and properly socialized Dobie is an excellent pet and companion, suitable for families with other dogs, gentle with young children, and overall a loyal and devoted family member.

Highlights
  • The Doberman has a great deal of energy and needs a lot of exercise.
  • This breed can be protective, so don't be surprised when he assumes the role of household guardian.
  • The Dobie will assume the alpha role in your household if you're not a strong leader. Early, consistent training is critical to establish your role as pack leader.
  • The Dobie is sensitive to cold weather and needs adequate shelter in winter (he likes to be in the house next to the fireplace).
  • The Doberman Pinscher is a family dog and shouldn't be left alone. He thrives when he's included in family activities.
  • The Doberman has gained a reputation as being vicious. Even though your Doberman may have a sweet personality, neighbors and strangers may be afraid of him.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Doberman originated in Germany, created by tax collector Louis Dobermann to keep himself and the taxes he carried safe from thieves.
  • In the 1950s, long before the advent of agility and freestyle competitions, the Doberman Drill Team thrilled audiences with their amazing physical feats. Today the breed is highly competitive in obedience and agility trials as well as many other dog sports and activities.
  • The Doberman who is raised with children and other pets will love and protect them and be a good companion for kids.
  • The first Doberman to win Best in Show at Westminster was Ch. Ferry v Raufelsen of Giralda in 1939. He was followed by his grandson, Ch. Rancho Dobe's Storm, who had back to back wins in 1952 and 1953 and more recently by Ch. Royal Tudor Wild as the Wind in 1989.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Guardian Dog
Average lifespan: 10-11 years
Average size: 66-88 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, hard, thick
Coloration: Black, red, blue, and fawn
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Athletic build, muscular body, ears pricked and erect, tail short and cropped
Possible alterations: Dobermans are born with floppy ears and long tails.
Comparable Breeds: Dalmatian, Rottweiler
History
  Doberman Pinschers were first bred in the town of Apolda, in the German state of Thuringia around 1890, following the Franco-Prussian War by Karl Friedrich Louis Dobermann. Dobermann served in the dangerous role of local tax collector, and ran the Apolda dog pound. With access to dogs of many breeds, he aimed to create a breed that would be ideal for protecting him during his collections, which took him through many bandit-infested areas. He set out to breed a new type of dog that, in his opinion, would be the perfect combination of strength, speed, endurance, loyalty, intelligence, and ferocity. Later, Otto Goeller and Philip Greunig continued to develop the breed to become the dog that is seen today.
  The breed is believed to have been created from several different breeds of dogs that had the characteristics that Dobermann was looking for, including the German Pinscher, the Beauceron, the Rottweiler, the Thuringian Sylvan Dog, the Greyhound, the Great Dane, the Weimaraner, the German Shorthaired Pointer, the Manchester Terrier, the Old German Shepherd Dog, the American Pit Bull Terrier, Thuringian Shepherd Dog . The exact ratios of mixing, and even the exact breeds that were used, remain uncertain to this day, although many experts believe that the Doberman Pinscher is a combination of at least four of these breeds. The single exception is the documented crossing with the Greyhound and Manchester Terrier. It is also widely believed that the old German Shepherd gene pool was the single largest contributor to the Doberman breed. Philip Greunig'sThe Dobermann Pinscher (1939), is considered the foremost study of the development of the breed by one of its most ardent students. Greunig's study describes the breed's early development by Otto Goeller, whose hand allowed the Doberman to become the dog we recognize today. The American Kennel Club believes the breeds utilized to develop the Doberman Pinscher may have included the old shorthaired shepherd, Rottweiler, Black and Tan Terrier and the German Pinscher.
  After Dobermann's death in 1894, the Germans named the breed Dobermann-pinscher in his honor, but a half century later dropped the 'pinscher' on the grounds that this German word for terrier was no longer appropriate. The British did the same a few years later.
During World War II, the United States Marine Corps adopted the Doberman Pinscher as its official War Dog, although the Corps did not exclusively use this breed in the role.
In the post war era the breed was nearly lost. There were no new litters registered in West Germany from 1949 to 1958. Werner Jung is credited with single-handedly saving the breed. He searched the farms in Germany for typical Pinschers and used these along with 4 oversized Miniature Pinschers and a black and red bitch from East Germany. Jung risked his life to smuggle her into West Germany. Most German Pinschers today are descendants of these dogs. Some pedigrees in the 1959 PSK Standardbuch show a number of dogs with unknown parentage.
  In the United States, the American Kennel Club ranked the Doberman Pinscher as the 12th most popular pure-breed in 2012 and 2013.





Personality
  A super-intelligent and super-active dog — that's what you get when you get a Doberman Pinscher. You also get an extremely loyal, trustworthy dog who's playful and fun-loving with his family. He's a natural protector who won't hesitate to act when he thinks his family is under threat, but he is not aggressive without reason.
  The Dobie likes to be busy, physically and mentally. He learns quickly, and training him is easy. Because he learns so fast, it's challenging to keep lessons fresh and interesting. He can have his own ideas about things, though typically he's not overly stubborn or willful with an owner who provides consistent, kind leadership.
  The Dobie takes a while to grow up. He remains puppyish until he is three to four years old.
Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.
  Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, the Dobie needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Dobie puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.



Health
  The Doberman Pinscher has a lifespan of 10 to 12 years. Wobbler's syndrome, cervical vertebral instability (CVI), and cardiomyopathy are some serious health problems affecting Dobermans; some minor diseases seen in this breed of dog include canine hip dysplasia (CHD), osteosarcoma, von Willebrand's disease (vWD), demodicosis, and gastric torsion. Albinism, narcolepsy, hypothyroidism, and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) are occasionally seen in Dobermans, while the Blue Doberman is more prone to hair loss. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run cardiac, eye, hip, and DNA tests.


Living Conditions
  Will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised, but does best with at least an average-sized yard. Dobes are very cold sensitive and are not outside dogs. That is why police in areas where it gets cold are not able to use them.

Exercise
  The Doberman is very energetic, with great stamina. They need to be taken on a daily, long walk or jog, and need to be made to heel beside or behind the human holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the humans.

Care
  The Doberman requires mental and physical exertion daily or it may become destructive or frustrated. This need can be easily met with a walk on a leash, a run in an enclosed area, or a long jog. And while it can live outdoors in cool climate, the Doberman is most effective indoors as a guardian and a family companion. Its coat requires minimal care.

Grooming
  Grooming is a breeze. Brush the Doberman with a slicker brush or hound glove every week, or even just run a wet towel over him. On the days he needs a bath, use a dog shampoo, not a human product. Rinse thoroughly and let him shake dry or towel-dry him.
  The Doberman sheds moderately. Regular brushing will help keep him and your home neat.  As with any dog, brushing before a bath helps eliminate more dead hair, which leaves less hair to shed. Your vacuum cleaner will work longer if you brush your Doberman regularly.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush his teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  The Doberman Pinscher is definitely not right for everyone. This is a highly intelligent breed meant to guard and work, and its owners must have the time and dedication to provide proper upbringing to this potentially dangerous breed, especially for households with young children. Highly trainable and loyal, the Doberman Pinscher makes a wonderful addition to an experienced household. This is a tidy breed as it does not shed much and has a low-maintenance grooming routine.

Children and other pets
  The well-bred Doberman is a wonderful family dog. He is trustworthy and protective of the children in his family, as long as he's been socialized and trained appropriately. Children must be respectful and kind to the Dobie, and he will be just that in return.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  He's also friendly with other dogs and animals in his home, especially if he has been raised with them. He can be aggressive toward dogs outside his family if he considers them a threat to his loved ones.

Famous Doberman Pinschers
  • Graf Belling v. Grönland: first registered Dobermann, in 1898.
  • First Doberman registered with the American Kennel Club, 1908
  • Ch. Big Boy of White Gate (owner/breeder Howard K. Mohr) wins the 1st Best in Show for an American-bred Doberman at the Rhode Island Kennel Club show, 1928.
  • Ch. Ferry v Raufelsen of Giralda (owner/breeder Mrs. M Hartley Dodge) is the first Doberman to win Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club show, 1939
  • Kurt, A Doberman who saved the lives of 250 U.S. Marines when he alerted them to Japanese soldiers. Kurt became the first k-9 casualty, July 23, when he was mortally wounded by a Japanese grenade. He was the first to be buried in what would become the war dog cemetery and he is the dog depicted in bronze sitting quiet but alert atop the World War II War Dog Memorial. Kurt, along with 24 other Dobermans whose names are inscribed on the memorial, died fighting with the US Marine Corps against Japanese forces on Guam in 1944.
  • Ch. Rancho Dobe's Storm: back to back Westminster Best in Show (1952, 1953). While other Dobermans may have more group or best in show or even more breed wins than Ch Rancho Dobe's Storm, he remains the only Doberman that has never been defeated by another Doberman.
  • Bingo von Ellendonk: first Dobermann to score 300 points (perfect score) in Schutzhund.
  • Ch. Cambria Cactus Cash: Sired 155 AKC champions as of January 2011.
  • Ch. Borong the Warlock: won his championship title in three countries, including 230 Best of Breed, 30 Specialty Show "bests," six all-breed Best in Show, and 66 Working Groups. He was the only Doberman ever to have won the Doberman Pinscher Club of America National Specialty Show three times, and in 1961 five Doberman specialists judged him Top in the breed in an annual Top Ten competition event.
  • Am. Ch. Brunswigs Cryptonite: achieved Best In Show on 124 occasions
Did You Know?
  Doberman’s get a bad reputation as attack dogs. Alpha in the Academy Award-winning film “UP” embodies every stereotype of the Doberman Pinscher: he’s both mean and not very smart. Fortunately, he’s also fictional and nothing like a real Doberman.

A dream day in the life of a Doberman Pinscher
  The Doberman Pinscher is a dog who thrives on work. Give this workaholic a job and he'll be the happiest pup on the block. Whether it's standing guard for the household, getting involved with search and rescue or any other type of accelerated training, this no-nonsense breed is up for the challenge.
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