LUV My dogs: Egypt

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Showing posts with label Egypt. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Egypt. Show all posts

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Everything about your Italian Greyhound

Everything about your Italian Greyhound
  The Italian Greyhound dog breed was a favorite companion of noblewomen in the Middle Ages, especially in Italy. But this small hound was more than a lap dog, having the speed, endurance, and determination to hunt small game. These days, he's a family dog whose beauty and athleticism is admired in the show ring and in obedience, agility, and rally competitions.

Overview
  One foot lifted from the ground, ears perked, eyes fixed on the horizon -- the Italian Greyhound neither knows nor cares that he's small enough to tuck under your arm. A Greyhound in miniature, he's nonetheless a somewhat fragile toy dog who needs to be protected from larger dogs, rough children, and his own impetuous nature.
  He's a smart dog, but somehow didn't get the memo that he's very, very tiny and his legs are very slender. Broken bones seem to be a fact of life with some Italian Greyhounds, and while some dogs' bones are sturdier than others, it's something every IG owner needs to be prepared for, and prevent if possible.
  The IG can live happily in an apartment, and while he needs to be given enough exercise to keep him tired out when he's young, he'll settle into a comfortable routine once the puppy years are behind him.
  Grooming couldn't be easier: an occasional soft brushing to keep shedding from becoming a problem, along with keeping the nails trimmed and the ears clean, and you're done. Regular teeth brushing is a good idea, too.
  Training is another story. While Iggys, as they’re nicknamed, are tractable and loving people-magnets, they're also stubborn and a bit defiant – and very creative at showing their displeasure. Unlike some very small dogs nipping and barking don't tend to be big problems, but housetraining can be. Use gentle, consistent training and establish acceptable routines from the very beginning, or you might find yourself with a problem.
  Although the Italian Greyhound is extremely small and needs to be protected from rambunctious children and dogs larger than he is, he usually gets along well with other dogs and with cats.

Highlights
  • Italian Greyhounds were bred to hunt and still have the hunting instinct. They'll chase anything that moves, including cars, so when you're outside keep them on leash or in a fenced area.
  • This breed is sensitive to drugs such as anesthetics of the barbiturate class and organophosphate insecticides. Make sure your veterinarian is aware of these sensitivities, and avoid using organophosphate products to treat your home and yard for fleas.
  • Italian Greyhound puppies are fearless and believe they can fly. Broken bones are common in pups between four and 12 months old, particularly the radius and ulna.
  • Although they're clever, Italian Greyhounds have a short attention span and a "what's in it for me?" attitude toward training. Keep training sessions short and positive, using play, treats, and praise to motivate your Italian Greyhound to learn.
  • This breed can be extremely difficult to housetrain. Even if you follow a housetraining program religiously, your Italian Greyhound may never be totally trustworthy in the house. It helps to have a dog door, so your dog can come and go as he wishes. And if your dog gives you the signs that he needs to go outside, take him out that instant — they're not good at holding it.
  • Italian Greyhounds need lots of love and attention, and if they don't get it, they'll become shy or hyper.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The IG is a true hound and enjoys outdoor activity as well as the luxuries of home.
  • The Italian Greyhound can be difficult to housetrain, which means he is not always a perfect candidate for apartment living unless you can stay on top of his need to go out or teach him to use a litter box or papers.
  • The Italian Greyhound has fine, short coat that is simple to groom and comes in most colors and patterns. The coat sheds very little.
  • The IG is highly athletic and is capable of jumping onto tables and countertops.
  • Italian Greyhounds enjoy dog sports such as lure coursing, agility, rally and even weight pulling.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion Dog
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size:  6 - 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, smooth, fine
Coloration: Varies
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Slender, delicate bone structure; elegant and graceful demeanor
Possible alterations: None
Comparable Breeds: Greyhound, Whippet

History
  The name of the breed is a reference to the breed's popularity in Renaissance Italy. Mummified dogs very similar to the Italian Greyhound  have been found in Egypt, and pictorials of small Greyhounds have been found in Pompeii, and they were probably the only accepted companion-dog there. Dogs similar to Italian Greyhounds are recorded as having been seen around Emperor Nero's court in Rome in the first century AD.
  The breed is believed to have originated more than 2,000 years ago in the countries now known as Greece and Turkey. This belief is based on the depiction of miniature greyhounds in the early decorative arts of these countries and on the archaeological discovery of small greyhound skeletons. By the Middle Ages, the breed had become distributed throughout Southern Europe and was later a favorite of the Italians of the sixteenth century, among whom miniature dogs were in great demand. Sadly, though, 'designer' breeders tried, and failed, to make the breed even smaller by crossbreeding it with other breeds of dogs. This only led to mutations with deformed skulls, bulging eyes and dental problems. The original Italian Greyhound had almost disappeared when groups of breeders got together and managed to return the breed to normal. From this period onward the history of the breed can be fairly well traced as it spread through Europe, arriving in England in the seventeenth century.
  The grace of the breed has prompted several artists to include the dogs in paintings, among others Velázquez, Pisanello, and Giotto.
  The breed has been popular with royalty. Among the royal aficionados are Mary, Queen of Scots, Queen Anne, Queen Victoria, Catherine the Great, Frederick the Great and Maud, Queen of Norway.
  The breed is also represented in the film Good Boy!. Nelly is an Italian Greyhound played by "Motif" and "Imp".

Personality
  The Italian Greyhound is sensitive, alert, smart, and playful. He's affectionate with his family, and loves to snuggle with you and stick close to your side all day. Strangers may see a more shy, reserved side of his personality.

Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your IG puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.
  When treated harshly, the Italian Greyhound can become fearful or snappy. Like other hounds, he can have a "what's in it for me?" attitude toward training, so you'll do best with motivational methods that use play, treats, and praise to encourage the dog to get it right, rather than punishing him for getting it wrong.

Health
  The Italian Greyhound, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 15 years, is prone to minor health conditions such as patellar luxation, leg and tail fractures, epilepsy, and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), or major ones like periodontal disease. This breed is sensitive to barbiturate anesthesia and susceptible to portacaval shunt, Legg-Perthes, color dilution alopecia, cataract, and hypothyroidism on occasion. Regular knee and eye tests are advised for this breed of dog.

Exercise
  Italian Greyhounds are active little dogs who need a good, daily walk. In addition, they love to run free and play. Be sure to make them heel on the lead. Dogs not only have an instinct to migrate daily, but to have a leader leading the way. Humans should enter and exit all door and gateways before the dog. In order for your dog to fully respect your authority you need to be their leader rather than the other way around.

Care
  Even though the Italian Greyhound hates the cold and is not suited to outdoor living, it likes daily romps outdoors. Its exercise needs are perfectly met with a nice on-leash walk or a fun-filled indoor game. It likes a sprint and stretching out in an enclosed area. It is very important to brush this dog’s teeth regularly. Minimal coat care is required for the fine, short coat, comprising primarily of occasional brushing to get rid of dead hair.

Living Conditions
 The Italian Greyhound is good for apartment life. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard. They are sensitive to cold weather. Owners will often put a shirt on them.

Training
  This breed learns quickly. It may wish to have its own way and occasionally will be naughty, so consistency is necessary.

Grooming
  An Italian Greyhound has a short, smooth, fine coat that gleams when it has been cared for. Luckily, that is an easy task. The IG is one of the easiest breeds to groom. Brush him when he gets dusty, or once a week, whichever comes first. Bathe him when you are taking him to a dog show or on a therapy visit or whenever he has rolled in something stinky. He sheds very little.
  The rest is just basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every week or two, and brush his teeth with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Italian Greyhounds can do well with children, but because they're small and delicate, it's especially important to teach kids that the dog is living animal, not a toy, who must be treated with love and respect. Many breeders will not sell a puppy to a household with children younger than ten years old.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Italian Greyhounds usually get along well with other pets, although you may need to keep an eye on them when they're cavorting about with bigger dogs, who could accidentally hurt them while playing.

Is this breed right for you?
  Due to their small body structure and fragile bone density, it's best to keep this breed away from young children. Also, Italian Greyhounds only thrive with mounds of attention and therefore do better in a quiet environment where one-on-one time is spent cuddling and napping. Not a fan of cold weather, this breed must be provided with ample winter coats and booties if you live in a cold environment. This breed can be skittish and aloof; owners are encouraged to begin socialization and training early on.

Did You Know?
  One of the true companion breeds - dogs bred for the sole purpose of being your best friend - the Italian Greyhound excels at his work. His dark eyes, sleek lines and affectionate nature will earn him a favored place in your lap.

A dream day in the life of an Italian Greyhound
  Whether out in the country or in the city, this breed loves to be alongside a loving human counterpart. They're incredibly fast runners and a day that includes light exercise would suit this breed's activity needs. On a cold day, an Italian Greyhound would prefer a warm coat and booties to stay comfortable but would rather be indoors, quietly enjoying a nap on a loving owner's lap.


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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Everything about your Greyhound

Everything about your Greyhound
  Nicknamed the 40-mph-couch potato, Greyhounds are quiet, gentle, affectionate dogs who can fit into almost any home. They love a cushy sofa and they are satisfied with a 20-minute walk.
  Greyhounds were originally bred as hunting dogs to chase hare, foxes, and deer. Canines in this dog breed can reach speeds of 40 to 45 miles per hour, making them the Ferraris of the dog world. Not surprisingly, Greyhounds made a name for themselves as racing dogs and are still used in racing today. They also participate in many other dog sports, including lure coursing, conformation, obedience, and agility. Beyond their grace and speed, people love them for their sweet, mild nature.

Overview
 Whether or not you've seen one in the flesh, you know what a Greyhound looks like. The iconic hound with the aerodynamic build epitomizes speed with his narrow head, long legs, and muscular rear end. We've all seen images of this sprinter, if only through seeing it plastered on the side of a bus, but many of us don't truly know the breed.
  One of the most ancient of breeds, Greyhounds probably originated in Egypt and have been prized throughout history. Historic figures who were captivated by this breed include Cleopatra, Queen Elizabeth I of England, and General Custer, who raced his dogs the day before he set off on his fateful trip to Little Big Horn. The patronage of the two queens led to Greyhound racing being dubbed the "Sport of Queens."
  Aside from its royal fans, there's a lot to love about the breed. The Greyhound combines a stately appearance with a friendly attitude toward people and other dogs. Loyal and affectionate with his family, he's not aggressive toward strangers, although he will let you know — through a bark or a subtle pricking of his small, folded ears — that someone's approaching your home.
Greyhounds have a reputation for high energy levels, but in reality their favorite pastime is sleeping. Designed as sprinters, not distance runners, they'll be satisfied with a daily walk, although active people find they make good jogging or running partners. In fact, Greyhounds do fine in apartments or homes with small yards-although they need a solid fence to keep them from chasing animals they might see as prey, such as squirrels, rabbits, or trespassing cats.
  Regardless of their strong prey drive, there's no doubt that this is a wonderful breed that deserves many belly rubs. Whether you bought your Greyhound from a show breeder or adopted him from the racetrack, you'll find yourself regarding this breed with the same respect that others have given it throughout its long and glorious history.

Other Quick Facts
  • The Greyhound has a long, narrow head; small ears; dark eyes; a long, muscular neck that is slightly arched; a broad, muscular back; a deep chest; a long, fine, tapering tail; and a short, smooth coat that can be any color or pattern.
  • Greyhounds are the fastest of the dog breeds. They have been clocked at 44 miles per hour, which along with their restful attitude has earned them the nickname “40-mph couch potato.”
  • President Rutherford B. Hayes, in office from 1877 to 1881, kept several dogs in the White House, including a Greyhound named Grim.
  • Comparable Breeds: Borzoi, Saluki

 History
  Historically, these sighthounds were used primarily for hunting in the open where their keen eyesight is valuable. It is believed that they  were introduced to the area now known as the United Kingdom in the 5th and 6th century BCE from Celtic mainland Europe although the Picts and other peoples of the northern area now known as Scotland were believed to have had large hounds similar to that of the deerhound before the 6th century BCE.
 The breed's origin is romantically reputed to be connected to Ancient Egypt, where depictions of smooth-coated sighthound types have been found which are typical of Saluki (Persian greyhound) or Sloughi (tombs at Beni Hassan c. 2000 BCE). However, analyses of DNA reported in 2004 suggest that the Greyhound is not closely related to these breeds, but is a close relative to herding dogs. Historical literature on the first sighthound in Europe (Arrian), the vertragus, the probable antecedent of the Greyhound, suggests that the origin is with the ancient Celts from Eastern Europe or Eurasia. Greyhound-type dogs of small, medium, and large size, would appear to have been bred across Europe since that time. All modern, pure-bred pedigree Greyhounds are derived from the Greyhound stock recorded and registered, firstly in the private 18th century, then public 19th century studbooks, which ultimately were registered with coursing, racing, and kennel club authorities of the United Kingdom.
  The name "Greyhound" is generally believed to come from the Old English grighund. "Hund" is the antecedent of the modern "hound", but the meaning of "grig" is undetermined, other than in reference to dogs in Old English and Old Norse. Its origin does not appear to have any common root with the modern word "grey" for color, and indeed the Greyhound is seen with a wide variety of coat colors. The lighter colors, patch-like markings and white appeared in the breed that was once ordinarily grey in color. The Greyhound is the only dog mentioned by name in the Bible; many versions, including the King James version, name the Greyhound as one of the "four things stately" in the Proverbs. However, some newer biblical translations, including The New International Version, have changed this to strutting rooster, which appears to be an alternative translation of the Hebrew term mothen zarzir. But also the Douay–Rheims Bible translation from the late 4th-century Latin Vulgate into English translates "a cock".
According to Pokorny the English name "Greyhound" does not mean "grey dog/hound", but simply "fair dog". Subsequent words have been derived from the Proto-Indo-European root *g'her- "shine, twinkle": English grey, Old High German gris "grey, old", Old Icelandic griss "piglet, pig", Old Icelandic gryja "to dawn", gryjandi "morning twilight", Old Irish grian "sun", Old Church Slavonic zorja "morning twilight, brightness". The common sense of these words is "to shine; bright".
  In 1928, the very first winner of Best in Show at Crufts was Primley Sceptre, a Greyhound owned by H. Whitley.

Personality
  Greyhounds generally have a wonderful temperament, being friendly and non-aggressive, although some can be aloof toward strangers. Give them a treat, though, and they're likely to become a friend for life.
  They're intelligent and independent, even catlike in many ways. They do have a sensitive side and are quick to react to tensions in the home. They can become shy or timid with mistreatment, even if it's unintentional. Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.
  Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, the Greyhound needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Greyhound puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
   Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
 The Greyhound, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 13 years, is not prone to any major health problems. However, some of the minor ailments that can affect the breed include osteosarcoma, esophageal achalasia, and gastric torsion. Both the AKC and NGA Greyhounds cannot tolerate barbiturate anesthesia and are susceptible to tail-tip injuries and lacerations, while retired NGA Greyhounds are prone to racing injuries like muscle, toe, and hock injuries.
 The Greyhound will do okay in an apartment if it gets enough exercise. It is relatively inactive indoors and a small yard will do. Greyhounds are sensitive to the cold but do well in cold climates as long as they wear a coat outside. Do not let this dog off the leash unless in a safe area. They have a strong chase instinct and if they spot an animal such as a rabbit they just might take off. They are so fast you will not be able to catch them.


Exercise
  Greyhounds that are kept as pets should have regular opportunities to run free on open ground in a safe area, as well as daily long, brisk walks, where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead. In a dog's mind the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the human. Greyhounds love a regular routine.


Care
  Regular exercise in the form of an occasional run and a long walk on leash is good for the Greyhound. It loves to chase and run at great speeds outdoors, so it should be only let out in safe, open areas. The breed also requires warm and soft bedding and does not like living outdoors. It is easy to maintain its coat - just an occasional brushing to get rid of dead hair.

Grooming
  Greyhounds have a short, smooth coat that is simple to groom. Brush it weekly with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils that keep the coat shiny. Greyhounds shed, but regular brushing will help keep the hair off your floor, furniture, and clothing. Bathe as needed. If you do a good job of brushing your Greyhound, he probably won’t need a bath very often.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Be aware that Greyhounds are especially sensitive about having their feet handled and nails trimmed. Do your best not to cut into the quick, the vein that feeds the nail. It’s painful and your Greyhound will remember next time and put up a fight. It’s also important to brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Greyhounds - track dogs in particular - are known for developing periodontal disease, so brushing and annual veterinary cleanings can help keep dental disease at bay.

Is this breed right for you?
  A reserved and quiet breed, the Greyhound feels comfortable living in a quiet home. Not a good playmate for younger children, this dog will do better with older children or as an only pet. Known to chase anything that runs, including cats, these pups are only good with felines if trained. OK for apartment living if regularly exercised, the Greyhound does best living indoors with a small yard for playtime.


Children and other pets
  Greyhounds can be patient with children and have been known to step delicately around toddlers, but they do best in homes with older children who know how to act around dogs. They're more likely to walk away from a teasing child than to snap at him.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Although Greyhounds do very well with other dogs, they can view smaller dogs, cats, or other small pets as prey, especially if the animals run from them. Some have a much lower prey drive than others, but it's always best to supervise your Greyhound around smaller animals. Instinct can overcome training, and Greyhounds have been known to injure or even kill smaller pets.
And even if they're best friends with your indoor cat, they may view outdoor cats that come onto their property as fair game.

Did You Know?
  A description written in 1486 is a poetic notion of just how a Greyhound should look: “A Greyhound should be headed like a snake and necked like a drake, backed like a beam, sided like a bream, footed like a cat and tailed like a rat.”


A dream day in the life of a Greyhound
  Prone to bloat, the Greyhound does best with breakfast, lunch and dinner. Lazily waking up in the morning to a rubdown, he'll enjoy sticking to his routine of a morning walk before his owner leaves for work. Enjoying having the house to himself, he'll lazily keep an eye on everything while you're away. Greeting you when you come in the door, he'll be ready for a run and perhaps a bit of racing before the day is over. Just make sure to keep him on the leash in case he spots a rabbit and feels the need to chase it down.
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Saturday, July 19, 2014

Everything about your Saluki

Everything about your Saluki
  This sighthound is a living antiquity. Known as one of the first domesticated breeds, the Saluki hails from Egypt. Highly respected, they were actually mummified like the Pharaohs! Later brought to the Middle East to hunt down gazelles, these graceful-looking dogs have a lot of power built into them. Referred to as a reserved and quiet breed, the Saluki is sensitive and gentle.
  One of the oldest of dog breeds, Salukis were once considered a gift from Allah. They're fast as the wind, skinny as a supermodel, and quietly devoted to their people. A Saluki is easy to groom, challenging to train, and not to be trusted off leash.
  The Saluki is an elegant hunter with strong instincts to chase anything moving. He is a medium-size sighthound and can live happily in any environment, as long as he gets daily walks, maybe an opportunity to run a few times a week, and access to the sofa. His coat requires weekly brushing and sheds little. The Saluki is the world's oldest dog breed.

Overview
  The Saluki's origins are shrouded in the sands of time, but his history is believed to go back to antiquity. He is the very definition of grace and speed, well deserving of the name bestowed on him by his Arab breeders — The Noble. The Saluki is bred for speed, strength, and endurance, qualities that are evident in his long, narrow head and sleek yet muscular body.
  Beautiful but reserved, the Saluki is affectionate without being overly demonstrative. He's happy to prove his loyalty through quiet companionship. Not everyone is offered the gift of a Saluki's devoted friendship, but those happy few who receive it are appreciative of the honor.
Salukis are widely admired for their exotic appearance, but not everyone is well suited to live with this spirited and independent hunter. Any movement, be it a squirrel, cat, or radio-controlled car, will activate the Saluki's instinct to chase, and his speed has been clocked at 30 to 35 miles per hour.
  Unless he's protected by a strong human on the other end of the leash or a securely fenced yard, he's likely to meet his end beneath the wheels of a car. You might think that Salukis living in the country would have fewer issues, but they've been known to chase down and tangle with or kill goats, otters, foxes, raccoons, snakes, squirrels, and deer.
  To keep a Saluki safe and well exercised, provide him with 300 to 400 lateral feet of fenced area where he can run full out. If your yard isn't that large, you should have easy access to a fenced park, an enclosed sports field at a school, or a beach with no nearby road. On leash, the Saluki makes an excellent jogging companion — if you can keep up with him. He's also a good competitor in agility and lure coursing. Some Salukis participate in obedience and tracking as well.
  Indoors, the Saluki will make himself at home on your soft sofa or bed. He likes his comforts and needs cushioning for his somewhat bony body. Using his long, skinny muzzle, he'll surf your kitchen counters in search of anything edible.
  The calm and gentle Saluki can become timid and shy without early socialization and regular reinforcement through new experiences and introductions to many different people throughout his life. Generally quiet but alert, he's a good watchdog, but not a guard dog. Salukis are fearless in the hunt but otherwise unaggressive.
  Training a Saluki is possible, but don't expect the perfect obedience you might have from a Golden Retriever. Salukis think for themselves, and if something else is more interesting than what you're asking them to do, they're perfectly happy to ignore you. Use positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards and praise, never harsh verbal or physical corrections.
  Salukis can make excellent companions for older children, but they aren't recommended for homes with young children. They're tolerant, but young Salukis can be too active for children younger than 8 years of age, and their thin skin and knobby bones make them vulnerable to injury if children aren't careful.
  While Salukis aren't overly demonstrative, they do become strongly attached to their people and dislike being left alone for long periods. Consider a Saluki if you have time to give to a devoted, graceful friend who can run like the wind.

Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Sighthound
Average lifespan: 11-12 years
Average size: 35-65 pounds
Coat appearance: Smooth or feathered
Coloration: White, cream, red, golden, tan, black and tan, tricolor
Hypoallergenic: No
Comparable Breeds: Borzoi, Greyhound
Other Quick Facts
  A Saluki is built of lines and curves, the very picture of grace and strength. He has a long, narrow head; long hanging ears covered in long silky hair; bright eyes that range from dark to hazel, with a far-seeing gaze; a long, supple, well-muscled neck; a deep but moderately narrow chest; long, straight legs; a broad back; strong hindquarters to power his ability to gallop and jump; moderately long feet with long, well-arched toes adorned with feathering; and a long tail feathered with silky hair and carried curved.

  Salukis have a smooth coat with a soft, silky texture and a slight amount of feathering on the legs, the back of the thighs and sometimes on the shoulder. Some Salukis have a smooth coat with no feathering. They come in the colors of the desert: white, cream, fawn, golden, red, grizzle and tan, tricolor (white, black and tan), and black and tan.

Highlights
  • Salukis love to run and need regular daily exercise.
  • They must be kept on leash whenever they're not in a securely fenced area. They have a strong prey drive and will pursue anything furry and in motion, heedless of their owner's commands.
  • Salukis are a reserved breed although they're devoted to their people.
  • Early and ongoing socialization is important for this breed to prevent shyness and skittishness.
  • Salukis are not recommended for apartments. They require a large fenced yard where they can run safely. Underground electronic fencing is not recommended; their prey drive is so strong they'll push past it.
  • It is important to provide comfortable bedding for a Saluki since he doesn't have enough body fat to provide padding.
  • Salukis should not live outdoors. They thrive on human companionship and will become depressed if left alone for long periods.
  • Although these dogs can make gentle and calm companions for older children, they are not recommended for homes with small children.
  • Salukis are generally quiet dogs.
  • When training a Saluki, be consistent, and use only positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards and praise, since the breed is so sensitive.
  • Salukis are fastidious and like to be clean. They shed little and require only weekly brushing.
  • Salukis should not reside in homes that have small pets. Even with the best training, a Saluki will view small pets as prey and will try to hunt them.
  • Salukis prefer the companionship of other Salukis, but they can get along with other dogs that do not have dominant natures.
  • Salukis can be picky eaters.
  • Never buy a Saluki from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
History
  Once known as the Persian Greyhound or the gazelle hound, the Saluki has long been considered one of the most ancient of breeds. Recent genetic evidence confirms this to be the case.
  Scientists speculate that Salukis and other ancient breeds descend from the first dogs and made their way through the world with their nomadic owners. Depictions of dogs resembling Salukis — with a Greyhoundlike body and feathering on the ears, tail, and legs — appear on Egyptian tombs dating to 2100 B.C.E., some 4,000 years ago. Even older are carvings from the Sumerian empire (7,000-6,000 B.C.E.) that show dogs with a striking resemblance to the Saluki.
  Pharaohs hunted gazelles and hares with Salukis, which often worked in partnership with falcons. The dogs were frequently honored with mummification after death. Nomadic Muslims, who generally despised dogs as unclean animals, considered Salukis a gift from Allah and referred to the dogs by the honorific El Hor, meaning The Noble.
Salukis were the only dogs permitted to sleep inside the tents. The breed may take its name from the ancient city of Saluk, in Yemen, or perhaps from the city of Seleukia in Syria. Another theory suggests that the name is a transliteration of the Arabic word for hound.
Salukis were widespread in the Middle East and could be found in Persia (modern-day Iran), Syria, Egypt, Palestine, Anatolia, Mesopotamia, and Arabia. The first documented case of Salukis arriving in Britain was in 1840, but it wasn't until after World War I, when many British officers returned with them from the Middle East, that the breed became established in Great Britain.
  Interest in the Saluki was slower to take hold in the United States. The Saluki Club of America was founded in 1927, the same year the breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club. The first Saluki registered by the AKC was Jinniyat of Grevel in 1929. Today the Saluki is a rare treasure, ranking 116th among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.

Personality


  The Saluki is an aloof dog, but one who's devoted to his family. He's gentle and thrives on quiet companionship. He has a tendency to bond with a single person, which can lead to separation anxiety.

  With strangers, Salukis are reserved, and they can be shy if they're not socialized at an early age. Socialization should continue throughout their life. They generally get along with other dogs, but prefer other Salukis, or at least other sighthounds. They're sensitive dogs and will pick up on and become stressed by tensions in the home.
  Salukis love comfort and enjoy being pampered with soft bedding and access to furniture. Like cats, they're fastidious about personal cleanliness.
  Like every dog, Salukis need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Saluki puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  Hip dysplasia is uncommon in Salukis, with the breed ranking joint lowest in a survey by the British Veterinary Association in 2003. The breed scored an average of 5 points, with a score of 0 being low, while 106 is high. In a 2006 breed specific survey conducted by The Kennel Club and the British Small Animal Veterinary Association Scientific Committee, responses highlighted several health issues. The primary cause of death identified was that of cancer, being responsible for 35.6% of deaths, with the most common forms being that of liver cancer or lymphoma. The secondary cause of death was cardiac related, with forms such as heart failure, or unspecified heart defects. Old age is listed as the third most frequent cause of death.
  Cardiomyopathy, heart murmur and other cardiac issues were present in 17.2% of responses while dermatolic conditions such as dermatitis or alopecia were reported by 10.8% of responses. Salukis have an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years.


Living Conditions
  The Saluki is not recommended for apartment life. These dogs are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with acreage. This breed should sleep indoors. They prefer warm temperatures over cold ones.

Exercise
  The Saluki is a natural athlete that needs a lot of exercise, including a daily, long, brisk walk or run. They are happiest when running, however many are lost or killed when they are allowed to get free and they spot a small animal to chase. This very independent dog can never be off its lead except in an isolated, scouted area. These dogs hunt on sight. They will pay no attention to their handler's calls if they are chasing something. In some countries they are not permitted to be left off of their lead at all. Salukis run at top speeds of 55km/h or more with their feet barely touching the ground. These top speeds are reached in short spurts, but they also have exceptional endurance. An excellent way to exercise your Salukis is to let it trot alongside your bike.

Care
  Salukis are not suited for apartment life. They need a home with a large, securely fenced yard where they can run flat out. The ideal running area for a Saluki is 300 to 400 feet in length or width. Fences should be at least five to six feet high or a Saluki will easily jump them. Underground electronic fencing will not contain a Saluki, nor will it protect him from other animals that might enter your yard.
  Keep your Saluki on leash whenever he's not in an enclosed area. A Saluki was bred for hunting and has a strong prey drive. If he sees anything fast and furry, he'll pursuit it for as long as he can, disregarding any commands to come or stop.
  Salukis are indoor dogs and require soft, cushioned bedding to prevent calluses from forming. Place food well out of reach of the Saluki's inquiring nose. That means behind closed doors or up about seven feet.
  Salukis are intelligent and learn quickly, but they're also independent and can be stubborn, which makes training a challenge. To hold your Saluki's attention, keep training sessions short, fun, and interesting. If a Saluki becomes bored, he will choose not to learn. Use positive reinforcement, never harsh verbal or physical corrections.

Grooming
  The Saluki comes in two coat types: smooth and feathered. Brush the smooth coat weekly, but if you have the feathered variety, comb the feathering on the ears, tail, legs and feet at least a couple of times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles, and bathe him as needed. At mealtime, you’ll probably want to put his ears up in a snood to keep them from dragging in his food dish. A water bowl with sides that slope inward at the top will help prevent the ears from getting wet when he drinks.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Keep the ears clean and dry. Check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that might indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild pH-balanced cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Introduce your Saluki puppy to grooming from an early age so that he learns to accept it with little fuss.

Is this breed right for you?
  Loving and extremely loyal, the Saluki can be a family pet; however, he may only attach himself to one owner. Not prone to roughhousing, it's best that the Saluki is paired with families that have older children and someone that he can choose as his human. A great watchdog, the breed does not do well with animals that are not dogs. An athletic breed in need of large amounts of exercise, he's not suited for apartment life and will make a great companion to a runner and biker.

Children and other pets
  Salukis can make excellent companions for older children, but they aren't recommended for homes with young children. They're tolerant, but young Salukis can be too active for children younger than 8 years of age, and their thin skin and knobby bones make them vulnerable to injury if children aren't careful.
  They generally get along with other dogs, but prefer other Salukis, or at least other sighthounds. They won't chase small dogs or cats in their own household, but other animals, such as pet birds, mice, rabbits, or hamsters could prove too much of a temptation.


Did You Know?
According to the Guinness Book of World Records the Saluki is the world's oldest dog breed. They are believed to have originated in Egypt around 329 BC.

A dream day in the life of a Saluki
The Saluki will love to wake up to exercise. After a great run, he's fine with being left alone at home for the day. Guarding the home is his No. 1 priority as he strolls the house and catnaps in his dog bed. After dinner, he's ready to run alongside during a bike ride with his favorite human. He'll enjoy ending his night with a treat and a bit of cuddling with his loving family.

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