LUV My dogs: Dachshund

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Showing posts with label Dachshund. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Dachshund. Show all posts

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Everything about your Basschshund

Everything about your Basschshund
  The Basschshund, often misspelled as Basschund, is created by cross-breeding two of the most popular purebreds in the world – a Basset Hound and a Dachshund. The medium-sized dog, with its lively nature and noble appearance, is regarded as a great family companion. The confident little Basschshund, like its parent breeds, has a long muscular body, an elongated head with its eyes having an intelligent look, drooping ears, and short legs.

Overview
  The Basschshund is not a purebred dog. It is a cross between the Basset Hound and the Dachshund. The best way to determine the temperament of a mixed breed is to look up all breeds in the cross and know you can get any combination of any of the characteristics found in either breed. Not all of these designer hybrid dogs being bred are 50% purebred to 50% purebred. It is very common for breeders to breed multi-generation crosses.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 12-15 years
Average size: 25-45 lbs 
Coat appearance: Short, smooth, shiny
Coloration:  Light Brown/Golden, Brown and White, Black and Brown
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles , couples, apartments, houses with/without yards, seniors
Temperament: Gentle, loving, stubborn, watchful
Comparable Breeds: Dachshund, Basset Hound

History 
  The Basschshund is a modern breed, so the documentation of their history is minimal. However, the Basset Hound originated in France and was primarily bred to hunt rabbits. Because of their keen sense of smell, they were also used to hunt squirrels, pheasants, foxes and deer. Their name is derived from the French word "bas" meaning low-set. It is believed that they are descendants of the Bloodhound. Therefore, they are a scent hound and are excellent trackers. 
  The Basset Hound started being imported into the United States in 1883. The Westminster Kennel Club recognized the Basset Hound in 1884 and the American Kennel Club first recognized the Basset Hound in 1885. The Basset Hound has been on different television shows such as Columbo, Dukes of Hazzard and Coach. A Bassett Hound named Sherlock dressed in white tie and tails appeared with Elvis on The Steve Allen Show. Elvis sang the song “Hound Dog” to Sherlock. This breed is a wonderful performer, companion and hunter. It is believed that the Dachshund originated in Germany in the early 1600s.
  The breed was developed so that it could go inside of an animal’s underground den. The Dachshund would bravely fight underground and force the badger or fox out of his den. Dachshunds first came to the United States in 1870. They were imported into the U.S for rabbit hunting. The American Kennel Club (AKC) registered its first Dachshund in 1885. 

Temperament 
  The Basschshund dogs are known to be fearless, intelligent, and full of energy but may act too hastily at times. When faced with certain tasks, they like to do them in their own ways without being instructed. Because of their independent, playful, and entertaining nature, they are often regarded as mischief-makers. Like most hounds, the Basschshund may show stubbornness with an instinct to chase small animals and toys.
  They remain close to their family and love to be cuddled. If introduced to the kids and other household animals early, these dogs get along well with them. Since they have an inherent suspicious nature, they can be aggressive towards strangers. These brave and alert pets warn their owners of intruders, which makes them a great watchdog.

Health 
  There are certain issues she is more prone to, some that can be inheritied from her parents and some particular to the type of dog she is. With her back it is important to make sure she is not allowed to jump from moderate or more heights, even jumping from the couch to the floor could cause injury. Her ears means she is prone to ear infections and her love of food means she is prone to obesity. Other issues include Bloat, Von Willebrand's, Panosteitis, Eye problems, Patellar Luxation, Thrombopathia, IDD, IVDD, Cushings, Diabetes, Deafness, Allergies and Hip Dysplasia.

Care
  The Basschshund does shed, so he needs to be brushed weekly with a slicker brush or a grooming mitt. The Basset Hound can develop a musky smell. Because of this, the Basschshund should be bathed monthly with a gentle dog shampoo. It is important to try to prevent water from getting inside those floppy ears as breeds with this type of ear are susceptible to yeast and bacteria developing into an infection. Afterwards, your dog will need to be dried off with a towel or carefully with a hair dryer on low heat. 
  The Basschshund’s nails should be trimmed every 10 to 14 days, to reduce stress on their tiny feet. The teeth should be brushed on a regular basis to prevent tartar build-up. The Basschshund’s ears will need to be cleaned once a week. Floppy ears do not allow for good air circulation and can be prone to trouble. 

Training
  The Basschshunds are quick learners, but they need proper motivation. Use their favorite toys or treats to catch their attention. Do not extend the training sessions by using the same instructions repeatedly. They might quickly become bored, so training should be made more fun and interesting. Housetraining these dogs can be a challenging task, so be patient and persistent in your approach. As the puppies are typically rambunctious, early socialization, obedience, and crate training will help them learn basic etiquettes of living with a family.

Exercise
  The activity level of Basschshunds depends on which parent it leans towards. It can be slightly active, requiring just 30 minutes of walk per day. But it can also be very energetic and will want to go to the park for play sessions and socialize with other pets and kids. It is necessary to leash it because it loves to chase. This dog is suitable for apartment life because of its small size and moderate exercise needs.

Grooming
  A gentle rubdown with a hound glove or brush will keep your Basschshund’s coat in top condition. Since it does not shed too much, a weekly brushing is sufficient to remove loose or dead hairs. It needs an occasional bath unless it has an unpleasant smell. Ear infections could be an issue with this breed as its long hanging ears prevent proper circulation of air in its inner ear. Therefore, clean your pet’s ears every week with a vet-recommended ear cleansing solution. Keep your dog’s nails neatly trimmed and brush its teeth 3-4 times a week.

Children and other Pets
  This is a great family dog and is very good with children, being playful and affectionate with them. She can get on well with other pets too though she does chase smaller animals. Some Basschshunds can get on well with other dogs but some need more help. Early socialization is key on helping her be at her best with other people, animals and dogs.
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Thursday, August 4, 2016

Which Small Dog Breed Is Right For Me?

Which Small Dog Breed Is Right For Me?
  Toy dogs, lapdogs and other tiny canines are incredibly popular as pets, as they can be comfortably housed in smaller apartments and homes and are of course, undeniably cute!
   If you’re thinking of getting a small dog because they’re cute, cuddly and quiet, you probably should think again; what they lack in stature, they often make up for in arrogance. Sure, small dogs are cute, and some of them look cuddly, but not all small dog breeds have meek personalities. Like people, small dog breeds come with different personalities, so before you pick up your small-framed dog, it’s a good idea to know exactly what you’re getting.
  Small dogs have been known to bite, in some cases more than larger dogs. Yet small dogs do have a certain advantage. For starters, they can go with you virtually anywhere. There are so many purse and bags out now in pet stores that you can literally take your dog with you everywhere you go.
  For the many city dwellers who still really want to share their lives with a canine companion, a small dog is the way to go.


1. Chihuahua
  • The Chihuahua comes in two varieties: long and smooth coat.
  • A graceful, alert, swift-moving compact little dog with saucy expression, and with terrier-like qualities of temperament.
  • Legend and history are rich in tales of the ancestors of the present Chihuahua. He is described as a popular pet, as well as a religious necessity.
  • Chihuahuas are tiny dogs that come in many different colors and markings, and can have either long or short coats, but they all have large, alert ears, big moist eyes, and huge personalities. Inside each little Chihuahua is a miniature king or queen ready to rule their realms, so they need to be taught what is acceptable in human kingdoms. They are intelligent and enthusiastic, so they usually don’t need extensive training.
  • More : Everything about your Chihuahua.

2. Yorkshire Terrier
  • The Yorkie became a fashionable pet in the late Victorian era.
  • That of a long-haired toy terrier whose blue and tan coat is parted on the face and from the base of the skull to the end of the tail and hangs evenly and quite straight down each side of body. The body is neat, compact and well proportioned. The dog's high head carriage and confident manner should give the appearance of vigor and self-importance.
  • The Yorkshire Terrier traces to the Waterside Terrier, a small longish-coated dog, bluish-gray in color, weighing between 6 and 20 pounds.
  • The Waterside Terrier was a breed formed by the crossing of the old rough-coated Black-and-Tan English Terrier  and the Paisley and Clydesdale Terriers. It was brought to Yorkshire by weavers who migrated from Scotland to England in the mid-19th century.They do not realize how small they are. Yorkies are easily adaptable to all surroundings, travel well and make suitable pets for many homes. Due to their small size, they require limited exercise, but need daily interaction with their people. Without strong leadership they tend to become bossy, especially if their owners allow them to get away with naughty behaviors - like yapping and pulling - that would never be acceptable in a larger dog.
  • More: Everything about your Yorkshire Terrier.

3. Papillon
  • The name Papillon means "Butterfly" in french.
  • The Papillon is a small, friendly, elegant toy dog of fine-boned structure, light, dainty and of lively action; distinguished from other breeds by its beautiful butterfly-like ears.
  • The dwarf spaniel of the 16th century, depicted in many paintings by the Masters of that era, is the dog that became known as the Papillon.
  • Although the Papillon owes its name and much of its breed development to the French, it was Spain and Italy that gave rise to its popularity.
  • Papillons are more robust than they look. They thrive in warm or cool climates, in the country or city, and are eager to join family fun. Papillons are athletic, fast, and versatile. They’re especially good in competitive agility trials, and are regular winners at the sport’s highest levels. For less ambitious owners, Papillons can be trained to do all kinds of tricks. Not particularly yappy for a small dog, requiring just routine grooming, and drop-dead adorable, Papillons are little dogs for all seasons and reasons.
  • More:  Everything about your Papillon.

4. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
  • The Cavalier was featured on the hit HBO series, "Sex and the City", as Charlotte York's dog.
  • The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is an active, graceful, well-balanced toy spaniel, very gay and free in action; fearless and sporting in character, yet at the same time gentle and affectionate. It is this typical gay temperament, combined with true elegance and royal appearance which are of paramount importance in the breed. Natural appearance with no trimming, sculpting or artificial alteration is essential to breed type.
  • Dogs of the small spaniel-type have existed for centuries and the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel has documented its place among them.
  • The breed is adaptable in their need for exercise, happy with either sleeping on the couch or taking long walks. The Cavalier does not demand more than a loving home…and a fenced yard. Cavaliers are not reliable to obey commands if they are too busy chasing butterflies or birds, so a good fence is a must. Well-behaved children are happy companions, but parent must be careful that the kids are not too rough on their small charges.
  • More : Everything about your Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.

5. Dachshund
  • The Dachshund was developed in Germany more than 300 years ago to hund badgers.
  • Low to ground, long in body and short of leg, with robust muscular development; the skin is elastic and pliable without excessive wrinkling. Appearing neither crippled, awkward, nor cramped in his capacity for movement, the Dachshund is well-balanced with bold and confident head carriage and intelligent, alert facial expression. His hunting spirit, good nose, loud tongue and distinctive build make him well-suited for below-ground work and for beating the bush. His keen nose gives him an advantage over most other breeds for trailing. 
  • The Dachshund can be found in historical accounts dating back to the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, when illustrations reflected badgers being hunted with dogs with elongated bodies, short legs and hound-type ears.
  • The dogs of medieval Europe were noted to have the tracking ability of hounds and the proportions and temperament of terriers, much needed to pursue their main quarry of badgers.
  • You should always choose a dog based on what he’s like, not what he looks like, and the Dachsie’s unique physical appeal easily becomes the focal point. Luckily, he is as much fun to live with as he is to look at. But because he was an eager hunter, he can be a bit stubborn and sometimes wonders why you’re not onboard with his plans. It’s hard to stay in a bad mood with a Dachsie around—his upbeat, curious, and friendly nature is contagious.
  • More: Everything about your Dachshund.

6. Havanese
  • The Havanese is the National Dog of Cuba and the country's only native breed.
  • The Havanese is a small, sturdy dog of immense charm. The native dog of Cuba, he is beloved as a friendly, intelligent and playful companion. He is slightly longer than tall, with a long, untrimmed, double coat. The Havanese has a short upper arm with moderate shoulder layback and a straight topline that rises slightly from the withers to the croup. The plumed tail is carried arched forward up over the back. The unique springy gait is a result of the breed's structure and playful, spirited personality. These characteristics of temperament, coat, structure and gait are essential to type.
  • The Havanese, new to the AKC, is an old breed with title to a colorful history. The Havanese is the National dog of Cuba and its only native breed. The dog's journey to Cuba most likely was aboard the trade ships sailing from the island of Tenerife chronicled in ship's logs of the early sixteenth century.
  • Cuban trade was highly restricted by the Spanish, for many years allowing Tenerife to be one of the only open ports, and it would appear these little dogs who had found their way into homes of Cuban aristocracy developed without much outside influence.
  • Basic obedience training will teach skills you will use on a daily basis. The time you spend in training, especially during the first year of your pet’s life, will be repaid by giving you a well-behaved companion that is bonded to you and your family for the rest of his life. Today Havanese are seen in many areas of dog activities and competitions that are sanctioned by the AKC. Havanese excel in all levels of competition in Obedience, Rally, Agility and Tracking as well as Conformation, and owners are enjoying the challenge. The Havanese are happy little athletes and loyal family companions. As therapy dogs Havanese bring smiles to faces in hospitals, nursing homes and libraries around the country. The Havanese is trainable and intelligent and possesses a naturally affectionate temperament, which making the breed an ideal family pet. Although a toy dog, they remain energetic and require some form of daily exercise.
  • More: Everything about your Havanese.

7. Maltese
  • The greeks erected tombs to their Maltese.
  • The Maltese is a toy dog covered from head to foot with a mantle of long, silky, white hair. He is gentle-mannered and affectionate, eager and sprightly in action, and, despite his size, possessed of the vigor needed for the satisfactory companion. Size: Weight under 7 pounds, with from 4 to 6 pounds preferred. Overall quality is to be favored over size.
  • The Maltese, the ancient dog of Malta, has been known as an aristocrat of the canine world for more than 28 centuries. Their place in antiquity is well documented.
  • The Greeks erected tombs to their Maltese, and from the ceramic art dating to the 5th century innumerable paintings of the little dog are evident.
  • These living artifacts from antiquity can charm the most jaded modern sensibility. Like the little aristocrats they are, Maltese love sitting in the lap of luxury. But they’re also feisty watchdogs and game agility competitors. Maltese are low-shedding, long-lived, and happy to make new friends of all ages. Sometimes stubborn and determined, they respond well to rewards-based training. Many pet owners trim Maltese in a “puppy clip” to reduce grooming time. Happily, the dog beneath the ’do is irresistibly cute. 
  • More : Everything about your Maltese.

8. Pekingese
  • Introduction of the Pekingese into the western World occurred as a result of looting of the Imperial Palace at Peking by the British in 1860.
  • The Pekingese is a well-balanced, compact dog of Chinese origin with a heavy front and lighter hindquarters. Its temperament is one of directness, independence and individuality. Its image is lionlike, implying courage, dignity, boldness and self-esteem rather than daintiness or delicacy.
  • The legend of the lion that fell in love with a marmoset is at the foundation of Pekingese lore. In order for him to be wedded to his lady-love, the lion begged the patron saint of the animals, Ah Chu, to reduce him to the size of a pigmy, but to let him retain his great lion heart and character.
  • The offspring of this union are said to be the dog of Fu Lin, or the Lion Dog of China.
  • An untrained dog, regardless of its size or its breed, can be a problem to its owner and to society in general. However if you get a puppy from a responsible breeder, you have a greater assurance that training and socialization began from the puppy’s early stages of awareness. Training should begin as early as possible and continue as the puppy grows into adulthood. Always reward your Pekingese with praise and encouragement when it has responded to a command, remembering that good habits are built upon positive reinforcement. It is advisable to take your puppy to training class as well as to public places to get it used to noises, different people and situations. Always be patient and convey to your puppy confidence, nonchalance and good manners, and it will adapt to your attitudes and make a well mannered pet throughout its life. Pekingese possess a regal dignity, intelligence and self-importance, making them good natured, opinionated and affectionate family companions. Their small size makes them a good choice for apartment life, but they are sometimes difficult to housebreak. They are relatively inactive indoors and do not need a yard, but enjoy walks.
  • More: Everything about your Pekingese.

9. Pomeranian
  • He Pomeranian is a member of the family of dogs knows unofficially as the "Spitz Group".
  • The Pomeranian is a compact, short-backed, active toy dog of Nordic descent. The double coat consists of a short dense undercoat with a profuse harsh-textured longer outer coat. The heavily plumed tail is one of the characteristics of the breed. It is set high and lies flat on the back. He is alert in character, exhibits intelligence in expression, is buoyant in deportment, and is inquisitive by nature. The Pomeranian is cocky, commanding, and animated as he gaits. He is sound in composition and action.
  • The Pomeranian descended from the Spitz family of dogs, the sled dogs of Iceland and Lapland.
  • The breed takes its name from the historical region of Pomerania that makes up the southern coast of the Baltic sea (now present day Germany and Poland), not because it originated there, but because this was most likely where it was bred down to size.
  • Because of their outgoing temperaments, they can be very good family dogs with the right training. ​Spritely and intelligent, Pomeranians are easily trained and make for great family pets. Poms are active, but can be thoroughly exercised with indoor play and short walks, so they’re happy both in the city and the suburbs. They will do well in certain dog sports, like agility and tracking, but at the end of the day, they’ll take comfort in curling up on your lap.
  • More : Everything about your Pomeranian.

10. Pug
  • The Pug is one of the oldest breed of dog; has flourished since before 400 BC.
  • Symmetry and general appearance are decidedly square and cobby. A lean, leggy Pug and a dog with short legs and a long body are equally objectionable.
  • The truth of how the Pug came into existence is shrouded in mystery, but he has been true to his breed down through the ages since before 400 B.C. Authorities agree that he is of Oriental origin with some basic similarities to the Pekingese.
  • China is the earliest known source for the breed, where he was the pet of the Buddhist monasteries in Tibet. The breed next appeared in Japan and then in Europe, where it became the favorite for various royal courts.
  • Basic obedience training is a must for all dogs. Learning a simple “stay,” “sit,” or “come” may save your dog’s life. Many kennel clubs provide obedience classes. You and your dog will enjoy them. Many Pugs compete in AKC obedience trials, dog shows, and agility trials. The Pug’s reason for living is to be near their people and to please them, and their sturdiness makes them a family favorite. They are comfortable in small apartments because they need minimal exercise, but the breed can adapt easily to all situations.
  • More: Everything about your Pug.

11. Shih Tzu

  • The Legend of the Shih Tzu has come to us from documents, paintings, and objects d'art dating from AD 624.
  • The Shih Tzu is a sturdy, lively, alert toy dog with long flowing double coat. Befitting his noble Chinese ancestry as a highly valued, prized companion and palace pet, the Shih Tzu is proud of bearing, has a distinctively arrogant carriage with head well up and tail curved over the back. Although there has always been considerable size variation, the Shih Tzu must be compact, solid, carrying good weight and substance. Even though a toy dog, the Shih Tzu must be subject to the same requirements of soundness and structure prescribed for all breeds, and any deviation from the ideal described in the standard should be penalized to the extent of the deviation.
  • The exact date of origin of the Shih Tzu is not known, but evidence of its existence has come to us from documents, paintings and objets d'art dating from A. D. 624. During the Tang Dynasty (618 to 907 A.D.), the King of Viqur gave the Chinese court a pair of dogs said to have come from the Fu Lin (assumed to be the Byzantine Empire).
  • Another theory of their introduction to China was recorded in the mid-17th century when dogs were brought from Tibet to the Chinese court. These dogs were bred in the Forbidden City of Peking.
  • Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your pet. Their strong fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.
  • More : Everything about your Shih Tzu.

12. Poodle
  • The denominations standard, miniature, and toy are used tot describe size only. All the Poodles are one breed, governed by the same standard.
  • That of a very active, intelligent and elegant-appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly. Properly clipped in the traditional fashion and carefully groomed, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself.
  • The Poodle is supposed to have originated in Germany, where it is known as the Pudel or Canis Familiaris Aquatius.
  • However, for years it has been regarded as the national dog of France, where is was commonly used as a retriever as well as, the Caniche, which is derived from chien canard or duck dog. Doubtless the English word "poodle" comes from the German pudel or pudelin, meaning to splash in the water.
  • There’s the old stereotype of Poodles as a foofy velvet-pillow dogs looking down their long noses at us. Not true. Poodles are eager-to-please, highly trainable “real dogs.” They like to work closely with their humans and can master all kinds of tricks and dog sports. The Standard, with his greater size and strength, is the best athlete of the Poodle family, but all Poodles can be trained with great success. The Miniature can be shy around strangers; the Standard tends to be more outgoing.
  • More : Everything about your Poodle.

   Small dogs come from a variety of AKC groups, so there is a perfect breed for every lover of little dogs with regards to personality, activity level and coat type. Keep in mind, small dogs are not just lapdogs – many of them are tough as nails. Smaller dogs don’t necessarily need to work off loads of energy, so they are quite suitable for apartment life. But not all small dogs live to be lap warmers! Certain breeds like Dachshunds or small terriers would also love country life and the opportunity to run around on a farm. If your family includes very young children, ensure that your small dog has a space to get away from the kids, or reconsider your choice of breed. Many Toy breeds are too delicate to compete with a boisterous family of young children and need to live in a quieter environment.
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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

How to Stop a Dachshund Puppy From Biting

How to Stop a Dachshund Puppy From Biting
  Dachshunds were bred to track and kill pests. They had to be able to work unaided, be courageous and intelligent in order to chase down and grab hold of their prey. Today we can still glimpse these traits in Dachshunds who bark at other dogs or people, or who become aggressive. Dachshunds need to be taught at a young age to minimize problems like these associated with their breed nature. The first time you set eyes on any kind of dominance or aggression in your Dachshund puppy, especially biting, you have to act.
  When a Dachshund is a puppy they look cute and really don’t do much damage when chewing and biting. Many people think that this is OK, or even funny, but it isn’t. What they don't recognize is that these little nips are shows of dominance that may develop to direct aggression later in life. Left unaddressed your Dachshund puppy will grow up thinking that it is acceptable to chew on anything they want, causing hundreds, even thousands of dollars of damage to your expensive furniture, floors , shoes and your hands. The end conclusion is that dogs end up being taken to a shelter or, even worse, being euthanized. 
  It’s vital to learn how to stop your Dachshund biting at the puppy stage.  A lot of people think it’s okay to let a Dachshund puppy get away with biting as it seems harmless and just a bit of fun.  However this is not the case at all.  In fact your little Dachshund puppy is biting as a form of dominance because they are trying to become the leader of your pack .  Really as their owner you should be the leader – not your Dachshund.  So if you continue to let your Dachshund puppy bite, it can lead to very bad behavioural problems in the future.

Begin at a Young Age 

  Once you are searching for a Dachshund puppy ask the breeder to show you a litter. Observe the puppies playing and experimenting with behaviors and see how they learn through pointers from their litter mates. With puppy biting watch how if one puppy nips another, the one who was nipped will most likely bite back. The puppy who bit first quickly learns that when they bite, someone bites back, and the behavior soon stops. 
  When you bring your Dachshund puppy home you have to be consistent and not permit the biting restart. Begin training immediately that you spot your Dachshund puppy biting. In young puppies the biting you see is still play biting, trying out behaviors to observe which are alright and which are not. Never strike any Dachshund, in particular not a young puppy. They are still in their socialization and learning stage and will not appreciate what has happened. Dachshunds upset at an early age are more likely to develop issues with aggression when they age. 
  Consistency and even handedness are the keys when stopping Dachshund puppy biting, and in fact when training Dachshunds at all. Dachshunds react most favorably to positive training methods, particularly if they believe they are in charge! Again, consistency is vital. Be sure to give a reward  for positive/sought after behaviors and discourage unwanted behaviors. All family members have to know how to train your Dachshund so they are providing the same, constant information and rewards. Change your interactions with your Dachshund so you are not inadvertently reinforcing bad behavior. For example, with Dachshund puppy biting do not play tug of war or wrestle with them. Dachshunds were designed to be hunters and will probably notice a tug toy as prey. Don't be surprised to hear them growling and spot them biting at the toy, and you, if you play tug!

Aged One Year
  If you did not stop your Dachshund from biting as a puppy then they may still continue to bite as they reach one year of age.  If this is the case, then it’s really important you learn how to stop your Dachshund from biting at this point in their lives.
  A good place to start is to stop playing games that encourage biting such as tug of war and play fighting.

   It’s also vital that you have set rules for your Dachshund so that they realise that you are the leader of the pack, not them.  If you show your leadership position, then your Dachshund will be less likely to bite.


How to Stop a Dachshund Puppy from Biting 
  When your Dachshund puppy nips you is your first thought to spank them? If so, think again, this is not the correct action to take. The right thing to do is to demonstrate to them biting is not okay. Tell them "No" in a firm tone, or make a loud yelp . Present your Dachshund one of their own toys to play with, praising them when they start to chew it.

  When you are consistent using this system you will become aware of your Dachshund puppy quickly learns that biting you is not acceptable, but chewing their toys is. This method will work with Dachshunds of all ages, although it may be harder on adults who have not been trained or taught to not bite. 

Older Dachshund’s and Biting
  If you were unable to stop your Dachshund from biting at the puppy stage or as they reached one year of age then they have probably continued biting as they got older.  This is most likely because your Dachshund thinks they are the leader of your pack.

  At this stage of your Dachshund’s life it will be much harder to stop them from biting.  But it’s really important you still do take the steps and learn how to stop your Dachshund from biting for the safety of those around you.  The best thing to do at this point is to seek the help of a professional dog trainer.  They are the experts in situations like this and will be help you get your Dachshund’s biting under control.


  If your Dachshund is more aggressive than just giving the occasional nip or gentle bite you have to go to puppy or dog training classes or get the advice of a veterinary behaviorist. A training class will give you professional assistance in stopping your Dachshund puppy biting and will also offer an opportunity for socialization with other dogs and people, something that is very important for Dachshunds.

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Friday, May 2, 2014

Everything about your Dachshund

Everything about your Dachshund
  Dachshunds are scent hound dog breeds who were bred to hunt badgers and other tunneling animals, rabbits, and foxes. Packs of Dachshunds were even used to trail wild boar. Today their versatility makes them excellent family companions, show dogs, and small-game hunters.

Overview
  This little lap dog might look sweet and innocent, but on the inside the Dachshund is a fierce hunter. Among the few of the small breeds that love to work, Dachshunds were bred to hunt and catch burrow-dwelling animals. With webbed paws built for digging and the heart of a lion, this little pup is a force to be reckoned with. Looking for a smaller version of this already tiny pooch? You're in luck. The miniature Dachshund weighs in at 11 pounds or less of pure love.

Other Quick Facts
  • The Dachshund’s coat comes in an endless variety of colors and patterns. Solid red is probably the most popular color, but you will also see Dachshunds in cream, black, chocolate, brindle and dapple — lighter-colored areas contrasting with a darker base color.
  • Dachshunds are always alert and they have a big, deep bark. Both qualities make them superb watchdogs.
  • It’s a good idea to have ramps or steps up to furniture so the Dachshund doesn’t hurt his back jumping on or off the sofa or bed.
  • Protect the Dachshund’s back by holding him correctly: one arm tucked beneath his hind end and one supporting his front end at the chest, keeping the body in a horizontal position.
Highlights
  • Dachshunds can be stubborn and difficult to housebreak. Crate-training is recommended.
  • Dachshunds are intelligent dogs with an independent nature and playful spirit. Because of this, they can be mischievous. Be patient, firm, and consistent when training them.
  • Because they were bred for hunting, they can exhibit some behaviors that are related to that. They were designed to dig into badger burrows, and that instinct may lead them to dig up your dahlias instead. They were bred to be tenacious in the hunt, and this instinct may lead them to be relentless in pestering you for a treat. They were bred to not only hunt but kill their prey; in your household, the "prey" most likely will be your Dachshund's toys and he will effectively "kill" them one after the other.
  • Dachshunds have loud, deep barks for a dog their size - and they do like to bark!
  • If you don't watch out, your Dachshund can become fat and lazy, which will put more strain on his fragile back. Be sure to monitor your Dachshund's food intake and keep him at a healthy weight.
  • Dachshunds are prone to having slipped disks in their backs, which can lead to partial or full paralysis. Don't let them jump from high places, and when you hold them, support their backs.
  • Your Dachshund will probably be a one-person dog. By nature, he can be suspicious of strangers, so it's important to socialize him when he is a puppy.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound;
UKC group: Scenthound;
Average lifespan: 12-15 years;
Average size: 11-32 lbs;
Coat appearance: Smooth, wire or long;
Coloration: Varies;
Hypoallergenic: No;
Other identifiers: Small frame; long in body; short in height;
Possible alterations: Two size variations: standard and miniature.
Comparable Breeds: Border Terrier, Dandie Dinmont Terrier
Did You Know?
  The diminutive Dachshund comes in two sizes, three coat types and a wide variety of colors and markings, meaning there’s a Dachshund for almost everyone! Just don’t leave him alone outside - his tendency to bark could create problems with the neighbors.



History
  Badgers and other burrowing beasts are the bane of country folk everywhere and have been for centuries. To rid themselves of the hole-digging pests, foresters and huntsmen developed a long-bodied, short-legged dog with the tenacity and toughness to root out badgers from their dens. First known as the teckel in his home country of Germany, the Dachshund has been around in one form or another for at least 500 years. He was prized for his strong scenting ability, small size, determination to dig and courage in the face of a formidable foe. Breeds that probably contributed to the development of the Dachshund were the schweisshund, a type of Bloodhound; pointer-type dogs known as dachsbracke; Basset Hounds and Beagles.
  The earliest Dachshunds had smooth coats that could be any color. The longhaired Dachshund, which was popular for hunting water-loving prey such as otters, may have been created through crosses with spaniels. The wirehaired Dachshund is the youngest of the varieties, receiving official recognition in 1890. His rough coat protects him from thorny brush as he pursues his prey.
  Dachshunds first came to the United States in 1870, imported to hunt rabbits. The American Kennel Club registered its first Dachshund in 1885, and the Dachshund Club of America was formed 10 years later.
  Because of its German heritage, the breed’s popularity took a nosedive during World War I. It took a couple of decades for the breed to regain acceptance. Once it did, not even World War II, with the Germans as enemies again, could stop the Dachshund’s rise to his current place as one of America’s favorite dogs. These days, the Dachshund is ranked number eight among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Symbol of Germany
  Dachshunds have traditionally been viewed as a symbol of Germany. Political cartoonists commonly used the image of the dachshund to ridicule Germany. During World War I the dachshunds' popularity in the United States plummeted because of this association and there are even anecdotes such as a Dachshund being stoned to death on the high street of Berkhamsted, England at this time because of its association with the enemy. As a result they were often called "liberty hounds" by their owners similar to "liberty cabbage" becoming a term for sauerkraut.The stigma of the association was revived to a lesser extent during World War II, though it was comparatively short-lived. Kaiser Wilhelm II and German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel were known for keeping dachshunds.
  Due to the association of the breed with Germany, the dachshund was chosen to be the first official mascot for the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, with the name Waldi.


Is this breed right for your?
  Ideal for apartment living, this loyal and compact breed makes a great city dog. Stubborn by nature, start potty training early. Prone to barking and "guarding," enforce basic obedience from the start, or you may face some unhappy neighbors. As a professional hunter and burrower, this breed may not be the best for children as Dachshunds can be know for having a short temper and being a little snappy. Whether you have a smooth-coated, wire-coated or long-haired Dachshund, minor grooming and bathing is all it takes to keep this compact pooch fresh and clean.

Personality
  The Dachshund is described as clever, lively, and courageous to the point of rashness. He's bred for perseverance, which is another way of saying that he can be stubborn. Dachshunds have a reputation for being entertaining and fearless, but what they want most is to cuddle with their people. For many Dachshund people, this characteristic outweighs having to deal with the breed's insistence on having his own way. The Dachshund personality can also vary with coat type. Because the wirehaired Dachshunds have terrier in their background, they can be mischievous troublemakers. Longhairs are calm and quiet, and Smooths have a personality that lies somewhere in between. Some Mini Dachshunds can be nervous or shy, but this isn't correct for the breed. Avoid puppies that show these characteristics.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents-usually the mother is the one who's available-to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Dachshunds need early socialization-exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences-when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Dachshund puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Children and other pets
  Dachshunds are good with children in their own family if introduced to them early. They may not be as fond of your children's friends, so supervise playtime.
  With his long back, the Dachshund can be easily injured if he's not handled properly. Make it a rule that young children can only hold or pet the Dachshund if they're sitting on the floor. Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Dachshunds get along well with other pets, especially if they're introduced to them in puppyhood. With their bold, domineering personalities, they may well be top dog.

Health
  The breed is known to have spinal problems, especially intervertebral disk disease (IVDD), due in part to an extremely long spinal column and short rib cage. The risk of injury may be worsened by obesity, jumping, rough handling, or intense exercise, which place greater strain on the vertebrae. About 20-25% of Dachshunds will develop IVDD.
  Treatment consists of combinations of crate confinement and courses of anti-inflammatory medications (steroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like carprofen and meloxicam), or chronic pain medications, like tramadol. Serious cases may require surgery to remove the troublesome disk contents.A dog may need the aid of a cart to get around if paralysis occurs.
  A new minimally invasive procedure called "percutaneous laser disk ablation" has been developed at the Oklahoma State University Veterinary Hospital. Originally, the procedure was used in clinical trials only on dachshunds that had suffered previous back incidents. Since dachshunds are prone to back issues, the goal is to expand this treatment to dogs in a normal population.
  In addition to back problems, the breed is also prone to patellar luxation which is where the kneecap can become dislodged. Dachshunds may also be affected by Osteogenesis imperfecta . The condition seems to be mainly limited to wire-haired Dachshunds, with 17% being carriers. A genetic test is available to allow breeders to avoid breeding carriers to carriers. In such pairings, each puppy will have a 25% chance of being affected.
  In some double dapples, there are varying degrees of vision and hearing loss, including reduced or absent eyes. Not all double dapples have problems with their eyes and/or ears, which may include degrees of hearing loss, full deafness, malformed ears, congenital eye defects, reduced or absent eyes, partial or full blindness, or varying degrees of both vision and hearing problems; but heightened problems can occur due to the genetic process in which two dapple genes cross, particularly in certain breeding lines. Dapple genes, which are dominant genes, are considered "dilution" genes, meaning whatever color the dog would have originally carried is lightened, or diluted, randomly; two dominant "dilution" genes can cancel each other out, or "cross", removing all color and producing a white recessive gene, essentially a white mutation. When this happens genetically within the eyes or ears, this white mutation can be lethal to their development, causing hearing or vision problems.
  Other dachshund health problems include hereditary epilepsy,granulomatous meningoencephalitis, dental issues, Cushing's syndrome, thyroid problems, various allergies and atopies, and various eye conditions including cataracts, glaucoma, progressive retinal atrophy, corneal ulcers, nonucerative corneal disease, sudden acquired retinal degeneration, and cherry eye. Dachshunds are also 2.5 times more likely than other breeds of dogs to develop patent ductus arteriosus, a congenital heart defect. Dilute color dogs  are very susceptible to Color Dilution Alopecia, a skin disorder that can result in hair loss and extreme sensitivity to sun. Since the occurrence and severity of these health problems is largely hereditary, breeders are working to eliminate these.



Care
  Dachshunds have a lot of stamina and energy. They love to take a walk or play outdoors with other dogs, and they like to hunt and dig. They are also active inside the house and can do well in small living quarters so long as they get a moderate amount of daily exercise. Two half-mile walks a day (about 10 minutes each) is about right. Occasionally, when time is short, a game of fetch will meet their need for activity.
  They're not suited to living outdoors or in a kennel but should live in the home. Dachshunds can injure their backs jumping on and off furniture, so get a ramp or steps and teach them to use it if they want up on the sofa or bed. When you hold a Dachshund, always be careful to support his rear and his chest.
  Dachshunds can learn quickly if properly motivated. Use positive reinforcements such as food rewards or a favorite toy to hold their attention, and keep training sessions short. The Dachshund will quickly become bored if made to repeat the same exercise over and over, so make obedience practice fun and interesting.
  Housetraining can sometimes be a problem with this breed. A Dachshund may not see the need for eliminating outside. Patience and consistency are musts. Crate training helps as well.
  Beyond housetraining, crate training is a kind way to ensure that your Dachshund doesn't get into things he shouldn't. Like every dog, Dachshunds can be destructive as puppies. Crate training at a young age will also help your Dachshund accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized. Never stick your Dachshund in a crate all day long, however. It's not a jail, and he shouldn't spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he's sleeping at night. Dachshunds are people dogs, and they aren't meant to spend their lives locked up in a crate or kennel.
  The Dachshund excels as a watchdog, but he can be noisy. Minis, in particular, can be yappy. Keep this in mind if your Dachshund will be living in an apartment or condo community.

Grooming
  Dachshunds like to roll in stinky things. So while they typically don’t need baths more often than every six weeks or so, that rule goes out the window when they find something especially aromatic — to them, anyway. To you, it’s simply eau de bathtime.
  Other than that, brush smooth and longhaired Dachshunds weekly to keep them clean and, in the case of the longhair, tangle-free. They shed moderately and regular grooming will help keep loose hair from falling off the dog and onto your clothes and furniture. The wire needs a different kind of grooming. The dead hairs in his coat must be plucked out twice a year, called stripping. Your dog’s breeder can show you how to do it. You’ll also want to trim his bushy beard and eyebrows to keep them looking neat. For the longhair and the wire, trim excess hair between the paw pads.
  Keep your Dachshund’s droopy ears clean with a solution recommended by your veterinarian. Don’t use cotton swabs inside the ear; they can push gunk further down into it. Wipe out the ear with a cotton ball, never going deeper than the first knuckle of your finger.
  Trim his nails regularly, usually every couple of weeks. They should never be so long that you hear them clicking on the floor.

Sports
  Some people train and enter their dachshund to compete in dachshund races, such as the Wiener Nationals. Several races across the United States routinely draw several thousand attendees, including races in Buda, Texas; Davis, California; Phoenix, Arizona; Los Alamitos, California; Findlay, Ohio; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Kansas City, Kansas; Palo Alto, California; and Shakopee, Minnesota. There is also an annual dachshund run in Kennywood, located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, called the Wiener 100, and in Huntington, West Virginia called the Dachshund Dash.
  Despite the popularity of these events, the Dachshund Club of America opposes "wiener racing", as many greyhound tracks use the events to draw large crowds to their facilities. The DCA is also worried about potential injuries to dogs, due to their predisposition to back injuries. Another favorite sport is earthdog trials, in which dachshunds enter tunnels with dead ends and obstacles attempting to locate an artificial bait or live but caged and protected rats.

Exercise
  These are active dogs with surprising stamina; they need to be walked daily. They will also enjoy sessions of play in the park or other safe, open areas. Be careful, however, when pedestrians are about because Dachshunds are more likely to be stepped on than more visible dogs. They should be discouraged from jumping, as they are prone to spinal damage.

Popularity
Dachshunds are one of the most popular dogs in the United States, ranking 10th in the 2012 AKC registration statistics.They are popular with urban and apartment dwellers, ranking among the top ten most popular breeds in 76 of 190 major US cities surveyed by the AKC. One will find varying degrees of organized local dachshund clubs in most major American cities, including New York, New Orleans, Portland, Los Angeles, and Chicago. The breed is most popular in Europe.

Notable dogs and owners
  • John F. Kennedy bought a dachshund puppy while touring Europe in 1937 for his then girlfriend Olivia. The puppy, named Dunker, never left Germany after Kennedy started to get terrible allergies.
  • Grover Cleveland, the 22nd and 24th President, had a dachshund in the White House.
  • William Randolph Hearst was an avid lover of dachshunds. When his own dachshund Helena died, he eulogized her in his "In The News" column.
  • Fred, E.B. White's dachshund, appeared in many of his famous essays.
  • Lump, the pet of Pablo Picasso, who was thought to have inspired some of his artwork. (Pronounced: loomp; German for "Rascal") Picasso & Lump: A Dachshund's Odyssey tells the story of Picasso and Lump.
  • Jack Ruby, the killer of Lee Harvey Oswald, had a dachshund named Sheba, which he often referred to as his wife. At the time he committed his infamous murder, he had four of them—although he once had as many as ten.
  • Andy Warhol had a pair of dachshunds, Archie and Amos, whom he depicted in his paintings and mentioned frequently in his diaries.
  • Adele has a Dachshund named Louie, named after Louis Armstrong.
  • Stanley and Boodgie, immortalized on canvas by owner David Hockney, and published in the book David Hockney's Dog Days.
  • Wadl and Hexl, Kaiser Wilhelm II's famous ferocious pair. Upon arriving at Archduke Franz Ferdinand's country seat, château Konopiště, on a semi-official visit, they promptly proceeded to do away with one of the Austro-Hungarian heir presumptive's priceless golden pheasants, thereby almost causing an international incident. Another one of his beloved dachshunds, Senta, is currently buried at Huis Doorn, Wilhelm's manor in the Netherlands.
  • Queen Margrethe II of Denmark and her husband own and have owned a large array of dachshunds, both smooth and wirehaired.
  • Former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld was asked, in 2003, whether he has duct tape, plastic sheeting, and a three-day supply of bottled water at home. He replied, "I would like to say I did. I don't believe we do. But I do have a miniature dachshund named Reggie who looks out for us."
  • In Zelenogorsk, Russia, is a Dachshund monument near which passes a parade of Dachshunds on City Day, July 25.
  • Joe was the dachshund of General Claire Lee Chennault, commander of the Flying Tigers and then the China Air Task Force of the US Army Air Forces, and became the mascot of those organizations.
  • Maxie, a dachshund owned by actress Marie Prevost, tried to awaken his dead mistress, who was found with small bites on her legs. Maxie's barking eventually summoned neighbours to the scene. The incident inspired the 1977 Nick Lowe song "Marie Prevost".
  • Liliane Kaufmann, wife of Edgar J. Kaufmann who commissioned the home Fallingwater from Frank Lloyd Wright in 1935, was a well known breeder and owner of long-haired dachshunds. At the Fallingwater bookstore, visitors are able to purchase a book entitled "Moxie" which is about one of the dachshunds who lived at Fallingwater. Liliane raised long haired dachshunds and they travelled from Pittsburgh to Bear Run with her.
  • Kevin Smith (director, podcaster) has a Miniature Dachshund named "Shecky"
  • Obie is a dachshund who became infamous for his obesity, weighing as much as 77 pounds (35 kilograms), more than twice a normal-weight standard dachshund. He reached his target weight of 28 lb (13 kg) in July 2013.
  • David Hockney produced a series of portraits of his two dachshunds.
A dream day in the life of a Dachshund
  Digging up trouble is in this breed's blood. Keep your pooch happy and your household intact by taking your Dachshund on daily walks. Playtime outdoors where this pup can dig, sniff and chase will help fulfill its natural-born hunting instincts. Despite its determined personality, this breed loves to socialize, and a day at the dog park would complete a dream day.

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