LUV My dogs: China

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Showing posts with label China. Show all posts
Showing posts with label China. Show all posts

Thursday, December 8, 2016

Everything about your Chinese Shar-Pei

Everything about your Chinese Shar-Pei
  Though the Chinese Shar-Pei is the 134th breed recognized by the American Kennel Club, the dog breed has been around for hundreds of years. He was developed to guard, hunt, herd, and later, fight, and is known for his characteristic short, bristly coat, loose, wrinkled skin, and devotion to his family. Today, the Shar-Pei mostly enjoys life as a beloved companion.

Overview
  The Chinese Shar-Pei, also known as the Chinese Fighting Dog or simply the Shar Pei, is an ancient breed that has existed for centuries in the southern provinces of China. “Shar-Pei” literally translates as “sand skin” but more loosely means “rough, sandy coat” or “draping sandpaper-like skin.” In addition to their strange wrinkled appearance, they have a characteristic solid blue-black tongue, a feature shared only with another ancient Chinese breed, the Chow Chow. The Chinese Shar-Pei was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1988 as a non-sporting dog and fully approved in 1992.
  The average Chinese Shar-Pei stands 18 to 20 inches at the withers and weighs between 45 and 60 pounds, with females typically being smaller than males. Their extremely rough, short, wrinkled coat is unique to the breed. It should be neither shiny nor lustrous and comes in solid colors and sable. It should be brushed regularly, and the folds of skin should be cleaned and checked frequently to avoid moistness, irritation and infection. Shar-Peis are compact and sturdy, and they normally do not bark unless they are threatened or feel the need to alert their owners.

Highlights
  • The Shar-Pei was once a guard dog and pit fighter. Today he is primarily a companion, though he retains fighting toughness. He can be aggressive toward other dogs or people, so it's imperative that he be socialized and trained from an early age.
  • Due to his short nose, the Shar-Pei is prone to overheating. Keep him inside with fans or air conditioning during hot summer months. Like other short-nosed breeds, he tends to snore and wheeze, and makes a terrible jogger.
  • Like the Chow, the Shar-Pei has a dark tongue. This is considered normal, even desirable, by dog show enthusiasts.
  • Frequent bathing isn't necessary for the Shar-Pei, but when you do bathe him, dry him thoroughly. The wrinkles and skin folds are an ideal breeding ground for fungal infections.
  • Though devoted to his family, the Shar-Pei can be willful and stubborn. He must learn right away who the pack leader is or he's likely to compete for the job.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The name Shar-Pei means "sand-skin" but translated more as “sand-paper-like coat.”  No other breed shares the short, rough coat of the Shar-Pei.
  • A Shar-Pei is a poor choice for a novice dog owner.
  • A Shar-Pei housetrains earlier than most breeds because of his natural cleanliness and ease of training. 
  • The Shar-Pei enjoys and does well in obedience, agility, herding and tracking. He would rather be with people than other dogs.
  • Those famous wrinkles need to be looked after carefully to prevent skin infections. They should be wiped out with a damp cloth and dried well to prevent infection.
  • Like other flat-faced breeds, the Shar-Pei can easily overheat.
Breed standards

AKC group: Non-sporting Group
UKC group: Northern Breed Group
Average lifespan: 9 - 11 years
Average size: 45 - 60 pounds
Coat appearance: Horse or brush-coat
Coloration: Sandy with black muzzle
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Large with wrinkled skin; blue-black tongue; dark, almond-shaped eyes; rounded, triangular ears; large muzzle with dark coloration; thick tail
Possible alterations: May have lighter eyes based on coloration
Comparable Breeds: Chow Chow, Great Pyrenees

History
  The Chinese Shar-Pei originated in the southern provinces of China where he was valued as a hunter, herder, guardian, and fighter. Some historians believe the Shar-Pei is an ancient breed, though there is no definitive evidence to prove this. Statues that look a lot like the Shar-Pei have been dated to the Han Dynasty (200 B.C.), though these statues also resemble the Chow and Pug.
  Following the creation of the People's Republic of China, the dog population in the country was practically wiped out. A few Shar-Peis, however, were bred in Hong Kong and Taiwan. If not for the efforts of one man, Matgo Law, of Down-Homes Kennels in Hong Kong, the Shar-Pei might be extinct.
  Thanks to him, a small number of Shar-Peis were brought to the United States in 1973 and breed fanciers formed the Chinese Shar-Pei Club of America, Inc., in 1974. The first National Specialty show was held in 1978. The Shar-Pei was accepted in the American Kennel Club Miscellaneous Class in 1988, and recognized by the AKC in 1991 as a member of the Non-Sporting Group.



Personality
  The large head and wrinkled face of the Chinese Shar-Pei has oven been compared to the head of a hippopotamus. They are independent and willful dogs, but when exposed to confident, consistent leadership are respectful companions and clean housemates. Their ever-present scowl coupled with their alert nature, makes them an imposing looking guard dog. The Shar-Pei's tenency toward independence them good companions for single people or working families with older children. They don't require much attention or exercise to keep them happy, and can entertain themselves with lots of chew toys or sun to bathe in.

Health
  The Chinese Shar-Pei, which has an average lifespan of 8 to 10 years, suffers from minor health issues like lip and skin fold pyodermas, otitis externa, hypothyroidism, patellar luxation, allergies, and amyloidosis, and minor problems such as entropion and canine hip dysplasia (CHD). To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip, eye, knee, elbow, and thyroid tests on the dog.
  Megaesophagus is sometimes seen in this breed. The Shar-Pei is also prone to fevers, and although its cause is unknown, it often occurs with Shar-Peis suffering from swollen hocks .

Care
  The Shar-Pei lives comfortably in the city or country. He does well in a limited space, such as an apartment or condo, as long as he gets daily exercise. A backyard is not required, but he does appreciate getting out and stretching his legs. In general, the Shar-Pei is fairly happy just hanging out with his owner, wherever he may be.
  Begin training and socializing your Sharpei the day you bring him home, and commit to continuing the process all his life. He'll need the constant reinforcement since he's not naturally friendly to other dogs. He can also be stubborn and owners must be consistent and firm in order to establish leadership. He is generally eager to please, though, and responsive to training.
  The best kind of socialization exercise is to take your Shar-Pei with you everywhere — to puppy classes, outdoor events, busy parks, friends' homes — and as often as possible. This will help prevent him from becoming overly shy or overprotective. Since this breed can be aggressive toward other dogs, the Shar-Pei should be kept leashed in public.
  The Shar-Pei is classified as a short-nosed, or brachycephalic breed, similar to the Bulldog, Boxer, Pug. Their short noses make them highly sensitive to heat, which means they make lousy jogging companions. To prevent heat stroke, these dogs should be kept inside with fans or air conditioning in hot weather.

Living Conditions
  The Chinese Shar-Pei will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do okay without a yard.
  The Shar-Pei is sensitive to warm weather, partly due to the wrinkles on its head holding in the heat.
  On hot days shade should always be provided. Water should be available at all times. Provided they get enough exercise, they will be very peaceful indoors.

Training
  The proper training and socialization of a Chinese Shar-Pei from a young age is very crucial in its development. Because it can have a higher propensity to territorial aggression and can be a little worried around strangers, it should get used to the idea of other humans and should be able to realize that being around them is safe. Training will also require a good degree of patience. If you’re a first-time dog trainer, the Chinese Shar-Pei is not the ideal dog to “cut your teeth” on.

Activity Requirements
  Despite their large size, the Chinese Shar-Pei does not need a lot of vigorous exercise to maintain good health. Several walks a day will suffice, making them good city dogs. It is recommended Shar-Peis, despite their watchdog capabilities, not be raised on a farm. Their natural instinct to hunt means they can take off into the wild blue yonder after deer or other wild animals.

Grooming
  Grooming requirements depend on the individual Shar-Pei. Weekly brushing can meet the needs of both the “horse-coated”  variety and the “brush-coated” type , but some Shar-Pei of either type can be prone to skin problems. Shar-Pei with skin problems may need weekly bathing and daily brushing.
  All Shar-Pei need regular wrinkle care. The wrinkles must be wiped out with a damp cloth and then dried thoroughly to prevent infection. Do not oil the skin.
  Shar-Pei have small, tight, triangular ears that predispose them to chronic ear problems because there isn’t enough air circulating in the narrow ear canal. Although it’s not as easy to clean the ears of a Shar-Pei as it is for most breeds, regular cleaning should be done to help prevent recurrent yeast or bacterial infections.
  Bathe the Shar-Pei as you desire or only when he gets dirty. With the gentle dog shampoos available now, you can bathe a Shar-Pei weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth for overall good health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Shar-Pei is a devoted family dog who is protective of his family, including children. To best teach him to get along with kids, he should be raised with them; if he doesn't live with them, he should be exposed to children as he grows up. Because he is such an independent breed, he's best suited to families with children 10 and older who know how to treat a pet respectfully.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  In order to provide the best chances for getting along with other dogs and animals, the Shar-Pei should be raised with them from an early age. Since he tends to be aggressive with other canines, supervision is essential.

Is this breed right for you?
  A good guard dog, the Shar-Pei does not require much space, making him a great fit for apartment life. For exercise, a daily walk will suit this pet just fine. Doing well with children and cats if raised with them, this breed bonds well with any and all immediate family members. Aloof and rude to strangers, he will need to be socialized well. In need of a dominant master, the Chinese Shar-Pei requires a good leader to avoid any untoward behavior. A clean breed, he doesn't shed often and requires only brushing and regular bathing.

Did You Know?
  After teetering on the brink of extinction, the Chinese Shar-Pei made a comback: in 1983, the Neiman Marcus catalog chose the dog as its his-and-hers fantasy gift, offering a pair of Shar-Pei puppies for $2,000 each.

A dream day in the life of a Chinese Shar-Pei
  A simple breed, the Chinese Shar-Pei will be happy to wake up in the comfort of his own home, surrounded by family members. Enjoying a nice, brisk morning walk, the Shar-Pei will return ready to guard his home from any possible dangers or strangers. Partaking in a bit of play and yard-romping, the breed will end his day sleeping at the foot of his master.


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Thursday, August 4, 2016

Everything about your Chinese Crested

Everything about your Chinese Crested
  The Chinese Crested is an alert dog that enjoys human companionship. They are funny little dogs that like to please their owners, and upon finding something that amuses you, are likely to do it again to get your attention. Chinese Cresteds are said to be “cat-like” and enjoy sitting in high places, the back of a couch or arm of a chair. Their activity level is medium to high but they enjoy quiet times with their family and adjust well to apartment living.
  Chinese Cresteds learn quickly and do well in various performance activities such as   Agility, Obedience, Fly Ball, and Lure Coursing.
  The Hairless will require a little attention to make sure it is not sun-burned or exposed to the cold. The Powderpuff can be kept in full coat with a little brushing every day or clipped for an easy care companion. Both varieties are loyal and entertaining.

Overview
  With a past as unique and questionable as its looks, the Chinese Crested was bred for one main purpose: companionship. Its history also shows this breed worked as a vermin dog, chasing rats and the like, but where this breed has found its calling lies in the friendship department. Lapdogs in every sense of the word, Chinese Cresteds want nothing more than to snuggle up with their loving owners. After all, it can be a cold world when you lack fur.

Highlights
  • Chinese Cresteds are a small breed suitable for many kinds of dwellings, including apartments.
  • A genetic link exists between dominant hairlessness and missing teeth. It is not a sign of "bad breeding" but simply goes along with the breed.
  • A Chinese Crested should not be left out in the yard alone or be left off-leash on walks. Tiny as he is, large dogs could view him as prey. He can easily escape through fences, and he can jump even high ones.
  • Although Chinese Cresteds do well with children, the age and personality of the children should be taken under consideration before getting a one of these dogs. They can be hurt easily because of their tiny size.
  • The fact that he's an exotic-looking dog might draw you to a Chinese Crested, but understand that they can be as temperamental as the next dog — and more so than some breeds.
  • They have a stubborn streak.
  • Chinese Cresteds will bark and behave like miniature guard dogs. If you want a quieter breed, look elsewhere.
  • Chinese Cresteds are companion dogs and prefer to be with their owners and families. They cannot be left outside alone and will climb and dig to escape confinement if separated from their owners. They can also suffer from separation anxiety, which may make them destructive when they're left alone for too long.
  • Proper socialization is necessary for the Chinese Crested since they can become timid and fearful of people.
  • Chinese Cresteds are relatively clean and are low- to nonshedders.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The hairless variety of the Chinese Crested has hair on his head — called a crest — from which he takes his name. He also has hair on his tail, giving it a plumed look, and on his feet, from the toes to the hock. The hair on the feet makes it look as if he’s wearing socks.
  • The Chinese Crested can be any color or combination of colors.
  • The hairless Crested needs protection from temperature extremes. If you’re cold and need a sweater or coat, your Crested does too. On sunny days, he needs a coating of sunscreen so he doesn’t get sunburned.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy Group
UKC group: Companion Dog
Average lifespan: 13 - 15 years
Coat appearance: Hairless, thin, silky
Coloration: Varies
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Slender-bodied; fine bone structure; smooth or spotted skin; large erect ears
Possible alterations: Non-hairless types are referred to as "Powderpuff" and come from the same litter
Comparable Breeds: Chihuahua, Pug

History
  Chinese Crested dogs don't really come from China. They evolved from African or Mexican hairless dogs who were reduced in size by the Chinese.
  The Crested is believed to have accompanied Chinese sailors on the high seas as early as 1530, hunting vermin during and between times of plague. By the middle of the 19th century, Cresteds began to appear in numerous European paintings and prints.
  Earlier names of the Crested include Chinese Hairless, the Chinese Edible Dog, the Chinese Ship Dog, and the Chinese Royal Hairless.
The Chinese bred the dog for its excellent ratting abilities aboard their ships, and sailors traded them at different ports. Documentation by Europeans of a hairless dog who closely resembled the Chinese Crested appears as early as the 1700s, when European travelers visited Chinese seaports and boarded Chinese trading vessels.
The Chinese apparently viewed the Chinese Crested as having magical healing powers; they also used them as living heating pads. They were kept by Chinese emperors as well as by sailors.
  It's unclear when the breed officially arrived in North America, but the first breed club here was founded in 1974. In China, the breed has become rare.

Personality
  Chinese Cresteds are expressive dogs who can smile and even hug. Always happy and energetic, this breed loves people and can become quite attached to their primary caregiver. Often called “velcro” dogs, they will physically attach themselves to their favorite person, and will use their paws to hug that person around the neck. This toy breed loves to climb like a cat, and never tires of playing with children, adults, or other animals. Their size, desire to please, and low activity requirements make them a good choice for first time dog owners, and an even better choice for retirees who have lot time to devote to their dog. The Chinese Crested loves to be the center of attention, soaks up affection and does not like to be left alone for long periods of time.

Health
  The Crested Dog, which has an average lifespan of 13 to 15 years, is prone to minor problems like deafness, patellar luxation, and seizures and major health issues like progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), lens luxation, and glaucoma. Occasionally Legg-Perthes is noticed in the breed. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend eye, hearing and knee exams for the dog.
  The Hairless Variety is prone to sunburn, wool allergy, blackheads, and tooth loss. It also has thinner enamel and irregular dentition.

Care
  As it is a small dog, its exercise requirements can be easily met by vigorous indoor games. Even though the Crested hates cold weather, it enjoys a romp outdoors. The Hairless variety requires a sweater for outings in cold weather. This breed is not suited for outdoor living. The Chinese Crested is a talented jumper and some can climb.
  Coat care for the Powderpuff involves brushing every day or on alternate days. In Puffs, the muzzle requires shaving once every two weeks. Stray hair on the Hairless type should be removed. The Hairless requires regular skin care like applying sunblock, moisturizer, or bathing to prevent blackheads.

Living Conditions
  Good for apartment life. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard. They should wear a sweater in cold weather.

Trainability
  Like all toy breeds, the Chinese Crested has a willful streak, but is generally a breed who loves to please people. Training requires lots of positive reinforcement and treats – harsh treatment will cause them to develop avoidance behaviors. Many Cresteds can be taught tricks and enjoy the attention that comes with being a showman.

Exercise
  This tiny breed can live easily in apartments or condominiums, and require one or two walks per day and the opportunity to run once in a while. Chinese Cresteds have a lot of energy, and even though they are typically not destructive, keeping them calm requires daily exercise. Toy breeds are prone to obesity, as people tend to overfeed and under exercise them. Make no mistake, these dogs are not cats and do require a commitment to daily walking to keep them healthy. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display a wide array of behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off-lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard. Don't think that just because he is small he should be confined to a small space.

Grooming
  The hair on the Chinese Crested is soft and silky. The hairless variety has soft, smooth skin, with hair on the ears and face, the top of the head and down the neck, the feet and the tail. The Powderpuff is born with hair. He has a short, silky undercoat topped with long, thin guard hairs.
  Just because the Crested is hairless doesn’t mean there’s no grooming involved. Both the hairless and the Powderpuff have special grooming needs. Just as you wash your face and body daily, you must also clean the Crested with a mild cleanser and moisturize his skin with a gentle lotion or coat oil to keep it from drying out.
  The hairless Crested can experience problems with his skin, from dry skin to sunburn to acne. Apply sunscreen to his skin before he goes outdoors. Use a dog-safe brand recommended by your veterinarian in case he tries to lick it off.
  The silky Powderpuff coat should be brushed or combed daily. Give him a bath every few of weeks using a mild shampoo made for dogs.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Sweet, gentle children are adored by Chinese Crested. Children need to be old enough to understand that they must be careful with these small dogs.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Cresteds love other pets and are playful with them.

Is this breed right for you?
  If you're looking for a best buddy that's always by your side, this is the breed for you. Recommended for all environments, this breed requires little exercise and does well with apartment living. Due to their affectionate nature, Chinese Cresteds excel with a wide range of owners from young pet lovers to seniors looking for companionship. If the Hairless variety proves to be too risqué for your liking, the Powderpuff variety provides the same loving disposition and is an equally dander-free option for allergy sufferers. Owners of the Hairless Chinese Crested must be willing to dedicate proper care to this breed's delicate skin, as exposure to the elements can make them prone to sunburn as well as skin allergies.

Did You Know?
  Both varieties of the Chinese Crested can be born in the same litter.

In popular culture
  One famous Chinese crested dog was the hairless purebred named Sam. He was the winner of the World's Ugliest Dog Contest from 2003 to 2005; he died before he could compete in 2006. Other Chinese cresteds, either purebreds or mixes, have finished high in the event as well.Some Chinese crested dog have also appeared as a characters in movies and TV shows such as,
  • Peek from Cats & Dogs and Cats & Dogs: The Revenge of Kitty Galore
  • Fluffy from 102 Dalmatians
  • Romeo from Hotel for Dogs
  • Giuseppe from Marmaduke
  • Halston from Ugly Betty
  • Reinaldo from New York Minute
  • Krull the Warrior King from How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days
  • Lackey from Good Boy!
  • Bobby from The Young and the Restless
A dream day in the life of a Chinese Crested
A cozy day spent curled up in blankets is what this breed's dreams are made of. For fun in the sun, the Chinese Crested will enjoy and appreciate a thick layer of sunscreen to protect its sensitive coat and on cool winter days, he'll gladly wear any sweater you've picked out for him. It doesn't take much to make this pup happy: just a warm lap, a comfortable household and lots of love will keep this breed smiling.

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Everything about your Japanese Chin

Everything about your Japanese Chin
  The Japanese Chin dog breed hails from Asia, where he has been prized as a companion for more than a thousand years. He was a popular member of Chinese and Japanese imperial courts, and it was in Japan that his distinctive look was developed. This breed is elegant and dainty, mild-mannered and playful.
  The Japanese Chin is a sensitive and intelligent breed whose only purpose is to serve man as a companion. Agile and playful, they can be taught to perform tricks and like to show off to an audience of friends. They are extremely cat-like in nature, smart when they want to be and coy when it suits them. Very loyal and loving, treat them right and you have a best friend for life; treat them wrong and you have lost your best friend forever!

Overview
  Despite his name, the Japanese Chin originates from China. Bred for the sole purpose of becoming a companion dog, the breed was originally referred to as the Japanese Spaniel. Eventually moving to Japan and other parts of Europe, the dog was given as a royal and meaningful gift. Playful and intelligent, the Japanese Chin is a good fit for any person or family.

Highlights
  • The Japanese Chin is catlike in many ways. The breed is commonly seen grooming itself by licking its paws and wiping its head. Also, they enjoy being up high and will perch on the back of couches and on tables.
  • Considered to be an average shedder, the Japanese Chin requires a few minutes of brushing each day to remove loose hair and to keep the coat from tangling.
  • Japanese Chin do not handle heat very well and need to be monitored on hot days to ensure that they don't overexert themselves.
  • Due to the breed's flat face, Japanese Chin will often snort, sniffle, or reverse sneeze. Generally, a Japanese Chin is still able to breathe through this, but if the attack becomes severe, you can try gently stroke his neck.
  • Japanese Chin do well in apartments.
  • Although Japanese Chin are intelligent and eager to please, they require interesting, fun-filled training sessions. Otherwise, they get bored and will turn their attention to something more entertaining.
  • Japanese Chin do very well with older children but are not recommended for homes with smaller children due to their small size. They can be seriously injured with minimal force.
  • Japanese Chin are companion dogs who thrive when they are with the people they love. They should not live outside or in a kennel away from their family.
  • Japanese Chin require a lower amount of exercise compared to other breeds but they do enjoy a daily walk or play in the yard.
  • Japanese Chin don't like being parted from their people, and separation anxiety is a common problem in the breed.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • In Japan, the Chin is considered a higher being than other dogs.
  • Chin love to go for walks, but they’re not fond of inclement weather. It’s a good idea to papertrain a Chin if you live in an area with a lot of rain or snow.
  • When the Chin isn’t playing, he’s perching on a high point, observing everything going on around him.
  • The Chin’s happy, cheerful nature, adaptability and range of sizes make him suited to almost any home. Chin who weigh eight or nine pounds are best for families with children, but they must still be handled carefully.
  • The Chin’s abundant silky coat comes in black and white, red and white, or black and white with tan points (tricolor).
  • Because of his acrobatic nature, climbing ability, and tendency to clean himself, the Chin has been described as a cat in a dog suit.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion/Spaniel
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 4 - 7 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky, straight and luxurious
Coloration: White with black patches, ruby and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Body is same length as height; wide-set, large eyes; small V-shaped ears covered with hair; typical black nose with like-colored markings; straight legs; tail set high with feathering
Possible alterations: Patches of color may be red, brindle, orange and other similar colors; markings will match the coloration of the nose
Comparable Breeds: Pekingese, Shih Tzu, Pug

History
  The Japanese Chin is an ancient breed that probably originated in the Chinese imperial court. Highly prized, he was often given as a gift to emissaries from other lands, and it was probably as a gift to the emperor of Japan that he made his way to that island nation which gave him his name. In Japan, the Chin was regarded not as a dog (inu) but as a separate being (chin). There, he was probably crossed with small spaniel-type dogs and eventually achieved the look he has today.
  The Japanese Chin remained unknown to the outside world until 1853 when Commodore Matthew Perry sailed into Uraga Harbor near Edo — now modern-day Tokyo — and introduced Japan to international trade. The Japanese Chin became a popular commodity and many were imported into Britain and the United States.
  Among the first American owners of the breed were President Franklin Pierce, then-Secretary-of-War Jefferson Davis, and Perry's daughter, Caroline Perry Belmont. They became popular with people of wealth and nobility. In the United States, the Japanese Chin was known as the Japanese Spaniel and he kept that name until 1977.

Temperament
  This breed is considered one of the most cat-like of the dog breeds in attitude: it is alert, intelligent, and independent, and it uses its paws to wash and wipe its face. Other cat-like traits include their preference for resting on high surfaces, their good sense of balance, and their tendency to hide in unexpected places. Japanese Chin are loyal to their owners and are typically a friendly breed. While Japanese Chin prefer familiar surroundings, they also do well in new situations. This, alongside their friendly demeanor, makes them good therapy dogs. Early socialization of Japanese Chin puppies leads to a more emotionally well-balanced Chin that is more accepting of different situations and people.
  Japanese Chin are defensive animals and thus although they are usually quiet, they will bark to alert the arrival of a visitor or to draw attention to something out of the ordinary.
  Japanese Chin were also bred for the purpose of entertaining their owners. While typically calm, they are well known for performing many tricks such as the "Chin Spin", in which they turn around in rapid circles; dancing on their hind legs while pawing their front feet, clasped together, in the air; and some even "sing", a noise that can range from a low trill to a higher, almost operatic noise.

Health
  The Japanese Chin, with an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is prone to minor ailments like patellar luxation, cataract, heart murmur, Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS), and entropion. Achondroplasia, portacaval shunt, and epilepsy are sometimes seen in this breed. The Japanese Chin is also susceptible to corneal abrasions and cannot tolerate anesthesia or heat. Knee and eye tests are recommended for this breed.

Care
  Japanese Chin require very little exercise. They are happy with a daily walk or a nice play session but they tend to require little else. Training can be slightly difficult since they have a mind of their own and become bored with repetitious training. When they like you, however, they'll work hard to please you. When they do wrong, a firm tone of voice is all you need to set them straight. Stronger corrections will only backfire and cause your Chin to stubbornly stand his ground.
  They can be difficult to housetrain but with patience and consistency, you can generally expect them to be housetrained by 4 months of age.
  Japanese Chin are companion dogs and should not live outdoors or in kennels. They become very attached to their people, and many suffer from separation anxiety. With their low exercise needs, Japanese Chin make wonderful apartment residents.
  The neck of the Japanese Chin is very delicate and it is strongly suggested that you use a harness instead of a collar when walking him.

Living Conditions
  The Japanese Chin is a good dog for apartment life. They are moderately active indoors and will do okay without a yard. This breed is somewhat sensitive to temperature extremes.

Trainability
  Japanese Chins have spaniel roots, making them easier to train than other small breeds. Training should be done with nothing but positive reinforcement, as harsh treatment will bruise their sensitive egos and they will simply stop listening. The daily training routine should be mixed up to keep the Chin interested, as he is easily bored with repetitive activities. Once basic obedience is mastered, teaching your Chin do to parlor tricks is a breeze, and he'll love the attention that gets lavished upon him when guests see him perform.

Exercise
  Chins do not require a great deal of exercise, however they do need to be taken on a daily walk. They will enjoy the opportunity to play in an open yard.

Grooming
  The Chin might look like he needs a lot of grooming, but he’s a wash-and-go dog. His silky, abundant coat is easy to care for and rarely mats, with the occasional exception of the ear fringes. Brush him weekly with a pin brush to keep the hair from flying around the house (yes, the Chin sheds), and bathe him once a month to keep him smelling nice. After a bath, towel him off until he’s almost dry, brush the coat upward and outward with the pin brush, then smooth it down. You’re done!
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Toy breeds are especially prone to periodontal disease, so brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Although the Japanese Chin is a gentle dog, he is not recommended for homes where there are young children. He can be easily hurt by an overexuberant child. The breed does well with older children who understand how to properly handle a dog.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Japanese Chin get along well with other dogs and cats, but they must be protected from larger dogs who could accidentally injure them in play. A cat's claws can injure their large eyes, so it's important to make sure everyone plays nicely together.

Is this breed right for you?
  Very friendly, the Japanese Chin fits in well with any family. Due to his delicate nature, it is best that children are taught how to handle the small breed. Good with other animals, he's an indoor dog that can live well in an apartment. Needing only moderate exercise, he'll be content with short walks around the neighborhood. The Japanese Chin is easily trained, enjoys playtime and is best kept out of the heat for a prolonged period of time. His luxurious coat will need to be groomed twice a week and it's best to socialize and train him to know that you are master to avoid any potential behavioral problems.

Did You Know?
  A Japanese Chin makes a cameo appearance in the 1984 Woody Allen film "Broadway Danny Rose."


A dream day in the life of a Japanese Chin
The Japanese Chin will ideally wake up in the bed of his master. Following the family wherever they may go, he may stop for a trick or two while awaiting his meal. After a bit of TV time with his master, the dog will enjoy a quick stroll around the neighborhood. Upon returning home, he'll be happy to hang out with the little ones of the house until bedtime, where he'll contentedly snuggle up to his humans.

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Thursday, March 5, 2015

Everything about your Pekingese

Everything about your Pekingese
  Pekingese were dogs bred for centuries to be the cherished companions of the imperial family of China. Today they are still cherished family companions and show dogs who greet everyone they meet with dignity and grace.
  Alert, calm, and intelligent dogs. Need regular activity, however require less exercise than other breeds. Stubborn tendencies may be lessened by using reward-based training involving small treats and favorite toys. They tend to bark. They can be wary around strangers and may require careful socialization to prevent or reduce defensive aggressive tendencies. May be intimidated by other dogs, causing defensive barking leading to confrontations.
  Choosing to add a furry friend to your growing household is a long-term commitment, and picking a breed that fits your lifestyle presents the key to a happy home. With over 160 American Kennel Club-recognized breeds, that decision can seem overwhelming. We're here to help you meet the breed that's right for you. If you're looking for a compact companion to add to your pack, find out everything you need to know about the Pekingese.


Overview
  The Pekingese is a compact dog with a pear-shaped body, heavy forequarters and lighter hindquarters. It is slightly longer than it is tall, with a stocky, heavy build. Its image is lionlike. It should imply courage, boldness and self-esteem rather than prettiness, daintiness or delicacy. Its gait is dignified and unhurried, with a slight roll resulting from its wider, heavier forequarters. It has a thick undercoat, and its outer coat is long, coarse and straight, and stands off. It forms a mane around the shoulders. The Pekingese must suggest its Chinese origins in its lionlike appearance, bold and direct character, and distinctive expression. 

   The Pekingese is decidedly not a sissy lap dog. It is a courageous character that will not start a fight but will not back down from one either. It tends to be aloof around strangers. It is extremely devoted to its family, but it is independent and not overly demonstrative. Its stubbornness is legendary. Although playful around family members, it may not be athletic or playful enough to satisfy many children.

Highlights
  • Due to their short noses, Pekes snore, some quite loudly.
  • The round bulging eye of the Pekingese can be damaged or "popped out" during excessively rough play; this is rare but can occur.
  • Pekes have an excessive amount of wrinkling on face; this can cause problems with skin fold dermatitis, skin irritations, and infections. The folds should be kept clean and dry.
  • Pekes have a tendency to gain weight if overfed.
  • A Peke may go on a hunger strike just to prove a point over his owner.
  • Pekingese tend to bark a lot.
  • The breed can be difficult to housebreak.
  • Pekingese tend to be one-person dogs.
  • Because of their profuse coat and short noses, they do not tolerate heat well.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Quick Facts

  • The Peke’s glamorous coat can come in all coat colors and markings, including parti-color (a color, plus white).
  • The Pekingese is meant to suggest lionlike courage, boldness, and self-esteem.
  • The Pekingese may look small, but he is solidly built and surprisingly heavy when lifted.
  • This breed takes its name from Peking, as the capital of China used to be called.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC Group: Companion Dog
Average lifespan: 14 - 18 years
Average size: 7 - 14 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, straight, coarse
Coloration: Varies
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Small, compact body frame, "lion-like" appearance
Possible alterations: None
Comparable Breeds: Pug, Tibetan Spaniel

History
  The breed originated in China in antiquity. Recent DNA analysis confirms that the Pekingese breed is one of the oldest breeds of dog, one of the least genetically diverged from the wolf. For centuries, they could only be owned by members of the Chinese Imperial Palace.
  During the Second Opium War, in 1860, the Old Summer Palace in Beijing was occupied by a contingent of British and French troops. The Emperor Xianfeng had fled with all of his court to Chengde. However, an elderly aunt of the emperor remained. When the British and French troops entered, she committed suicide. She was found with her five Pekingese mourning her death. They were removed by the Allies before the Summer Palace was burnt to the ground.
  Lord John Hay took a pair, later called Schloff and Hytien, and gave them to his sister, the Duchess of Wellington, wife of Henry Wellesley, 3rd Duke of Wellington. Sir George Fitzroy took another pair, and gave them to his cousins, the Duke and Duchess of Richmond and Gordon. Lieutenant Dunne presented the fifth Pekingese to Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom, who named it Looty.
  The Empress Dowager Cixi presented Pekingese to several Americans, including John Pierpont Morgan and Alice Lee Roosevelt Longworth, daughter of Theodore Roosevelt, who named it Manchu.
  The first Pekingese in Ireland was introduced by Dr. Heuston. He established smallpox vaccination clinics in China. The effect was dramatic. In gratitude, the Chinese minister, Li Hongzhang presented him with a pair of Pekingese. They were named Chang and Lady Li. Dr. Heuston founded the Greystones kennel.
  Around the turn of the century, Pekingese dogs became popular in Western countries. They were owned by such arbiters of fashion as Queen Alexandra of the United Kingdom, and Elsie de Wolfe, popular American interior decorator.

Sleeve Pekingese
  According to the 1948 publication Dogs In Britain, A Description of All Native Breeds and Most Foreign Breeds in Britain by Clifford LB Hubbard, the Sleeve Pekingese is a true miniature of the standard-sized dog, and was also known as the Miniature Pekingese. The name Sleeve Pekingese came from the custom of carrying these small dogs in the capacious sleeves of the robes worn by members of the Chinese Imperial Household.   Hubbard indicated that this tradition appeared to be early Italian rather than Chinese, but its adoption by the Chinese Imperial Household led to dogs being bred as small as possible and to practices aimed at stunting their growth: giving puppies rice wine, holding new-borns tightly for hours at a time or putting the puppies into tight-fitting wire mesh waistcoats. These practices were apparently forbidden by the late Dowager Empress Tzu Hsi.
  In Hubbard's time, the term Sleeve was applied in Britain to a miniature Pekingese no more than 6–7 pounds in weight, often appearing to be only about 3–4 pounds. Mrs Flander's Mai Mai weighed only a little over 4 pounds and many other breeders had bred true miniatures of a similar size. He noted that miniatures may appear in a litter bred from full-sized Pekingese and were exhibited in classes for dogs less than 7 pounds at the major dog shows in Britain. In 1946, the Sleeve Pekingese had a strong following with the most popular colours being cream and white, with white being considered particularly attractive. He illustrated the description with a white Sleeve Pekingese bred by Mrs Aileen Adam.

Personality
  He may look foofy, but the Pekingese is a stand-up character who's tougher and braver than his appearance suggests. The Peke's regal dignity, self-importance, confidence, and stubborn streak all come together in a lively, affectionate, good-natured dog who'll respect you if you respect him. He's loyal to and protective of his people, barking in warning when strangers appear. Train him with firm, kind consistency, using positive reinforcements such as food rewards and praise. You will always succeed if you can persuade the Peke that doing something is his idea, not yours.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Pekingese need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Peke puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
  The Pekingese, which has an average lifespan of 13 to 15 years, is prone to minor health problems like elongated soft palate, patellar luxation, stenotic nares, Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS), trichiasis, corneal abrasions, disticiasis, and skin fold dermatitis. It also known to suffer from urolithiasis occasionally. This breed does not tolerate heat or anesthesia well. Additionally, Pekingese pups are often delivered by cesarean section.

Care
  Keeping the Pekingese coat healthy and presentable requires daily brushing, and a trip to the groomer every 8–12 weeks. One important thing for new owners to remember is that dogs intended as a house pet may be kept in a puppy cut which is much more low maintenance than a show cut. It is also important to remove dirt from the eyes daily, and from the creases on the face to prevent sores (hot spots). It is also necessary to keep and maintain the fur in the buttocks of the Pekingese clean and well groomed as the area is prone to soiling.
  Due to their abundance of fur, it is important to keep the Pekingese cool. The breed is prone to having heatstroke when exposed to high temperature.

Peke legends
  There are two origin stories for the Pekingese. The first is the most common, The Lion and the Marmoset:
  A lion and a marmoset fell in love. But the lion was too large. The lion went to the Buddha and told him of his woes. The Buddha allowed the lion to shrink down to the size of the marmoset. And the Pekingese was the result.
  The second, less-common, originating story is The Butterfly Lions:
A lion fell in love with a butterfly. But the butterfly and lion knew the difference in size was too much to overcome. Together they went to see the Buddha, who allowed their size to meet in the middle. From this, the Pekingese came.
  Another legend says that the breed resulted from the mating of a lion and a monkey, getting its nobleness and coat from the former and its ungainly walk from the latter.
  Because the Pekingese was believed to have originated from the Buddha, he was a temple dog. As such, he was not a mere toy. He was made small so that he could go after and destroy little demons that might infest the palace or temple. But his heart was big so that he could destroy even the largest and fiercest. 

Exercise
  Pekingese need a daily walk, where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as instinct tells a dog the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard. Get your Peke accustomed to the leash when it is still a puppy. Some owners have told me their Pekes will walk up to 4 miles on a nightly walk.

Grooming
  The Pekingese has a long, beautiful double coat with a thick mane on the neck and shoulders and profuse fringing or feathering on the ears, tail, legs and toes. Grooming this glamourous dog is not as difficult as it might appear, though. Regular care will keep the coat healthy and prevent the formation of mats or tangles, which are often the primary reason people think longhaired dogs are hard to care for. Your dog’s breeder is the best source for advice on caring for the coat, especially if you plan to show him, but the following tips will get you started.
  The Pekingese coat may need to be brushed daily, every other day, or just a couple of times a week, depending on the individual dog. Mist the coat with water or a special coat conditioner and brush through it with a pin brush or natural bristle brush. Start at the front and work your way back, brushing small sections of hair at a time. Be sure you brush all the way down to the skin, and keep misting the coat to protect the hair from breaking.
  When your Pekingese sheds, and he definitely will, even if only a little, use a slicker brush to remove the dead hair. Brushing and removal of loose hair encourages new coat growth.
If your Pekingese lives life as a beloved companion, there’s nothing wrong with trimming his coat to make it easier to care for. Ask a groomer to trim the feathering on the feet and legs so they don’t collect so much dust and dirt. You can even have your Peke given a lion trim in which the body is shaved smooth, leaving a mane around the head and a pom pom on the tip of the tail. If grooming costs are getting you down, learn to do it yourself. With practice, many people give their dogs trims that look perfectly nice and professional.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Check the ears to make sure they are clean. Leave them alone if they are; use a cleaner recommended by your veterinarian if they look dirty or have excessive amounts of wax. Toy breeds such as the Pekingese are prone to periodontal disease because they have so many teeth crammed into their little mouth. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Living Conditions
  Pekingese are good for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Is this breed right for you?
  This friendly, loving and tiny breed makes a perfect fit for an apartment lifestyle. Pekingese require only moderate exercise and are perfectly happy playing indoor games. Due to their strong personalities, some Pekes may not do well with small children, as they thoroughly enjoy being the center of attention. This breed also does not do well in warm climates and shouldn't be outdoors for extended periods of time. Potential owners should also be warned: Pekingese are known to snore. If you're going for the best-in-show look, be ready to spend a lot of time and money on grooming. Pekes' long locks need to be brushed on a regular basis to prevent matting, particularly the long and coarse top coat.

Children and other pets
  A Pekingese is not a good choice for families with toddlers who may treat him roughly without meaning to. The Peke won't tolerate being grabbed or poked and won't hesitate to defend himself.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
   Pekes prefer the company of other Pekingese, but with early socialization they can learn to get along with other dogs (and cats) and may even rule over dogs that are 20 times their size.

Did You Know?
A Pekingese named Winnie lived in the Playboy mansion - she belonged to “Girls Next Door” star Bridget Marquardt. Winnie’s proper name is Wednesday, after the daughter from the “Addams Family” series. She shared space in the mansion with Marquardt’s cat, Gizmo.


A dream day in the life of a Pekingese
  Getting groomed and pampered like the kings and queens they are, Pekes love nothing more than being the center of attention. They excel in social settings and their compact size make them the perfect breed to tote around. Treat this adorable pup like royalty with plenty of toys and treats and you'll have a happy companion by your side.

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