LUV My dogs: Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

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Showing posts with label Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. Show all posts

Friday, September 15, 2017

Top 10 Dog Breeds For Seniors

Top 10 Dog Breeds For Seniors
  One of the best things a person can do at any age is to adopt a dog.  Dogs can provide a tremendous amount of love and joy, and are a great way to overcome loneliness or boredom, which sometimes can affect seniors in their retirement. There are so many different breeds that sometimes it can be difficult to decide which dog is best for you. Seniors need to think about how much exercise certain types of dogs need, and whether they can provide it. 
  Owning a pet has it's pros and cons, and you have to really think what type of pet, whether a cat or dog, and what type of breed is right for you.  For example, you have to factor in if you will have the time and energy for a larger dog, or whether a small lap dog is more your speed. There are an almost infinite amount of sizes and temperaments when it comes to dogs.  If you do choose to adopt a furry friend, they quickly become a loving and wonderful addition to any family.

1. Pug
  The short-faced pug is both gentle and quiet. But don’t let their laid-back nature fool you. These compact dogs have a lot of personality! They don’t need tons of exercise, but they love being social and definitely need to be a part of the group.
  Pugs are known as adaptable, charming, and eager to please — affectionate and playful without requiring a lot of exercise to maintain their health. They are small, so they generally meet the size requirements of assisted living communities. They can be a bit mischievous, and they tend to shed quite a bit, especially in warmer climates.

2. Bichon Frise

  Independent spirit, intelligent, affectionate, bold and lively. They are bright little dogs that are easy to train and love everyone. They need people to be happy and always love to tag along. They are competitive and obedient.

  The fluffy little Bichon Frise is a joyful and affectionate dog that makes an excellent companion. With an average weight of about 7-12 pounds, this small breed is extremely easy to handle for most people. Bichons are also relatively simple to train. The Bichon will need to be groomed periodically but is otherwise fairly low-maintenance. Many Bichon owners choose to take their dogs to a professional groomer every month or two. Moderate daily exercise is usually enough to keep the Bichon healthy and happy as long as he has your companionship.

3. Miniature Schnauzer

  Schnauzers come in various sizes, including miniature, so they offer a lot of choice to a senior trying to meet a community’s pet size requirements. They are energetic, playful, trainable, and good with children, although they can have strong guarding instincts. They can be quite active; the AKC notes that they have a medium energy level, so playtime with your schnauzer can help keep you active as well.

  Miniature Schnauzers are the smallest of the Schnauzers and they are intelligent, fun-loving dogs that are a great choice for a more active lifestyle. They are the perfect choice for an older individual looking to maintain a relatively active lifestyle, as they enjoy exercise but not so much as a larger breed. 


4. Beagle

  Beagles are moderately active dogs that can do well with a daily walk. They are social dogs that enjoy spending time with their people and make an excellent choice for someone older looking for a companion. 

  Beagles are cute (think Snoopy), funny, loyal, and friendly, enjoying the company of other dogs and humans. They love to play and are excellent family dogs. They can also be independent, which may make training a challenge, and they do need plenty of exercise – which is great for fitness-minded seniors. They shed a lot, but their coat is relatively easy to care for with regular brushing.

5. Chihuahua
  If you live in a small assisted living apartment, why not consider one of the smallest dogs there is?Chihuahuas make a great choice for seniors because they are relatively low maintenance and small enough to be easily handled. They require minimal exercise and are perfectly happy being lapdogs. 
 Chihuahuas have a ton of personality for their size, and love being showered with affection; on the flip side, they are so loyal and protective that they might need a bit of training before dealing with children, and some Chihuahuas bark a lot. They can be active, but being small, they can often get sufficient exercise by playing indoors.

6. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

  Another dog bred for companionship, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a great option if you want a dog that is as happy to snuggle in your lap as they are to be out exploring with you. They’re also great family dogs, and love nothing more than to be the center of attention.

  The Cavalier is a beloved puppy-like dog that is affectionate and adaptable. This is a small dog that is often happiest when snuggled up beside her owner. This breed typically weighs about 11 to 18 pounds and is easy to handle and train. The Cavalier has some grooming needs, such as regular hair brushing, ear cleaning, and possibly the occasional trip to a groomer. Overall, Cavaliers are favored among those who love small, snuggle companions.

7. Pembroke Welsh Corgi

  If you want a small to medium dog that makes a great companion, the Corgi might be for you. Weight 24 to 30 pounds, this breed is still small enough for most people to handle. Corgis are smart and fairly easy to train. They are also quite adorable with those short little legs! A herding dog by nature, your Corgi will need routine exercise, but daily walks will often be enough. The Corgi has minimal grooming needs, which can be very convenient. 

  The spunky corgi is the perfect companion for an active senior. Compact in size, this herding breed has the energy of larger dogs, but in a more manageable package. They’re the favored companions of Queen Elizabeth and are a loving—albeit stubborn!—breed.

8. Boston Terrier

  The Boston Terrier is a loving, gentle and clownish breed with an endearing personality. They make a great choice for seniors because of their outstanding temperaments and easy keeping. 
  Boston Terriers often make the list of top dogs for seniors because of their manageable size, friendliness, ease of grooming, and love of spending time with their owners. 

  Known as the American Gentleman, the Boston Terrier is lively, smart, and affectionate with a gentle, even temperament. They can, however, be stubborn, so persistence and consistency are definite musts when training.

9. Poodle

  Poodles are great companions. They’re easy to train, devoted to their families, and a low-shedding breed (though they still need to be groomed). 

  Coming in different sizes from large to tiny, there’s a poodle out there for everyone, even if you live in a small apartment. Smart, proud, and active according to the AKC, it’s no surprise that poodles are the 7th most popular breed overall. They’re easily trained and enjoy a variety of activities, which makes them very adaptable to different-sized living situations. Their coats require regular grooming, but they are also hypo-allergenic.

10. Greyhound

  The biggest dog on our list best dog breeds for seniors is also the laziest. Retired racing greyhounds are a great option for seniors because they are huge couch potatoes. If you adopt a greyhound from the track, you’re also getting a furry friend who has seen a lot and is well socialized.

  How can a racing dog be good for older adults? You may be surprised to learn that Greyhounds are not the high-energy dogs many think they are. Although Greyhounds will enjoy daily walks and the occasional chance to run, most tend to be "couch potatoes" that enjoy loafing around with their owners. They are usually very responsive to training and therefore easy to handle, even though most weight about 60 to 80 pounds. If you like larger dogs but worry about being able to handle one, the Greyhound is a breed to consider.
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Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Top 10 Quietest Dog Breeds

Top 10 Quietest Dog Breeds
  We all love dogs, but constant barking is a sure-fire way to upset your neighborhood and get yourself in trouble. And let’s face, incessant barking drives us insane too! So if you’re looking for a dog but don’t think you’ll be able to curb a barker’s noise, or perhaps just don’t want to deal with the possibility at all, we’e compiled a list of some of the most silent dog breeds.
  Whether your desire for a dog who doesn't bark stems from the fact that you share a thin wall with your neighbor or you just like a fairly quiet place to call home, we've got you covered. 

10.Collie


 The Collie isn’t exactly a silent breed — if he were, Lassie would never have been able to tell us that Timmy had fallen down the well! Still, this gentle and affectionate dog generally only speaks when he really has something to say. Given the appropriate amount of exercise, he shouldn’t be a nuisance barker.
  In addition to being one of the most intelligent dog breeds out there, the Collie is also one of the quietest. This breed does not tend to bark except when he really needs to. Because this breed is so smart, training is easy so, if barking does become an issue, you can just teach your dog a “hush” command.

9. Shiba Inu
  The Shiba Inu looks almost like a fox in appearance and does equally well as a jogging partner as an indoor companion.  He is clean, easy to groom, and loves his people. 
While he is quiet, he has a very strong prey drive which means he should never be off leash. 
  They are intelligent and independent, making them very attractive to people who want a small dog, who is quiet, but not necessarily one that is “in their face.”

8.Irish Setter

  Unlike many of the other dogs on this list, the Irish Setter is a rowdy and rollicking dog with more energy than he knows what to do with. Happily, though, that energy is rarely channeled into nuisance barking, and as long as he’s given plenty of exercise, he can be a great choice for families.
  This medium-sized breed does have a good bit of energy but, with proper exercise and mental stimulation, barking is rarely a problem. Irish Setters don’t tend to expend their extra energy by barking – they would much rather play a game or run around the house with your kids. That makes him an excellent family pet and a good listener! 

7.Bullmastiff
  Large and loveable, most of the noises that come out of the Bullmastiff are snorts and snuffles. Sure, he may not get along with cats , but this large breed is loyal with his family, fairly low-maintenance and saves his barking for special occasions.
  Strong-willed and incredibly loyal, the Bullmastiff isn’t a big barker, but he is not always good with other dogs  or cats .

6.Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

  This small breed is playful and friendly – he tends to form strong bonds with family and does not like to be alone. As long as you give the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel enough attention, he will remain calm and placid at home, not prone to barking. One thing to be wary of with this breed is that he can be a little stubborn at times. 
  Sweet and docile, these dogs get along well with everyone.  They are one of the larger of the toy breeds, weighing in at between 13 and 18 pounds. But they are still considered a quiet small breed dog.
  Fiercely loyal, they will follow you everywhere. 
  Some think of them as lazy, lounging around in your most-comfortable chair, but they are also playful and enjoy walks and activities as long as it involves their owners. 

5.Saint Bernard

  St. Bernards are very social, affectionate dogs, although they may bark at strangers. However, as long as they are properly socialized as young puppies, Saints will typically grow to love everyone they meet and have little need to bark.
  The Saint Bernard is a member of the Mastiff family. He can be sweet, shy and stubborn, but with proper training and socialization, this quiet breed can be fantastic for families or for use as a therapy dog.
  This giant breed is the definition of “gentle giant” – despite his size, he is sweet and friendly. The Saint Bernard can be a little aloof around strangers and he may have a bit of a stubborn streak, but barking generally isn’t a problem. These dogs are particularly well suited to families with children and they make great therapy dogs. 

4.Italian Greyhound

  Tiny, intelligent and a bit fragile, the Italian Greyhound can be rather defiant, but barking is rarely an issue. Housetraining, however, may be another story.
  The Italian Greyhound (IG for short) may need a few reminders from time to time that he is a small dog and not the same as his bigger cousin the Greyhound. 
  Energetic and playful, he will keep you going and happily amused for years to come.  His grooming needs are minimal, but extra effort might be needed when training.  You will need to convince him that what you want him to do is what he wanted to do all along.

3. Great Pyrenees
  Another large breed, the Great Pyrenees is known for its long white coat. This breed was developed for livestock guarding so he is protective and independent by nature, but with proper training he isn’t much of a barker.
  Like the first two breeds on this list, the Great Pyrenees is a large dog with an equally big heart. When properly trained, he’s calm, gentle and protective, but you’ll have to do your homework in order to get this strong-willed dog to that point.

2. Great Dane

  The breed named quietest of them all is also one of the biggest: the Great Dane. He’s a gentle giant with a calm nature, and while he doesn’t bark often, when he does, his voice will be louder and deeper than just about any other breed.
  He’s a gentle giant with a calm nature, and while he doesn’t bark often, when he does, his voice will be louder and deeper than just about any other breed.

1.Basenji

  Basenjis are actually known for their inability to bark! But that doesn’t mean they don’t make noise. Bred as hunting dogs in Africa, they make a yodeling sound instead of barking. However, they typically only do this when they feel there is a reason, and are not known to make noise often.
  Patience and a sense of humor are essential to living with a Basenji. He will chew up or eat whatever's left in his reach, and he's quite capable of putting together a plan to achieve whatever it is he wants, whether that's to get up on the kitchen counter or break into the pantry where the dog biscuits are stored. 

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Thursday, August 4, 2016

Which Small Dog Breed Is Right For Me?

Which Small Dog Breed Is Right For Me?
  Toy dogs, lapdogs and other tiny canines are incredibly popular as pets, as they can be comfortably housed in smaller apartments and homes and are of course, undeniably cute!
   If you’re thinking of getting a small dog because they’re cute, cuddly and quiet, you probably should think again; what they lack in stature, they often make up for in arrogance. Sure, small dogs are cute, and some of them look cuddly, but not all small dog breeds have meek personalities. Like people, small dog breeds come with different personalities, so before you pick up your small-framed dog, it’s a good idea to know exactly what you’re getting.
  Small dogs have been known to bite, in some cases more than larger dogs. Yet small dogs do have a certain advantage. For starters, they can go with you virtually anywhere. There are so many purse and bags out now in pet stores that you can literally take your dog with you everywhere you go.
  For the many city dwellers who still really want to share their lives with a canine companion, a small dog is the way to go.


1. Chihuahua
  • The Chihuahua comes in two varieties: long and smooth coat.
  • A graceful, alert, swift-moving compact little dog with saucy expression, and with terrier-like qualities of temperament.
  • Legend and history are rich in tales of the ancestors of the present Chihuahua. He is described as a popular pet, as well as a religious necessity.
  • Chihuahuas are tiny dogs that come in many different colors and markings, and can have either long or short coats, but they all have large, alert ears, big moist eyes, and huge personalities. Inside each little Chihuahua is a miniature king or queen ready to rule their realms, so they need to be taught what is acceptable in human kingdoms. They are intelligent and enthusiastic, so they usually don’t need extensive training.
  • More : Everything about your Chihuahua.

2. Yorkshire Terrier
  • The Yorkie became a fashionable pet in the late Victorian era.
  • That of a long-haired toy terrier whose blue and tan coat is parted on the face and from the base of the skull to the end of the tail and hangs evenly and quite straight down each side of body. The body is neat, compact and well proportioned. The dog's high head carriage and confident manner should give the appearance of vigor and self-importance.
  • The Yorkshire Terrier traces to the Waterside Terrier, a small longish-coated dog, bluish-gray in color, weighing between 6 and 20 pounds.
  • The Waterside Terrier was a breed formed by the crossing of the old rough-coated Black-and-Tan English Terrier  and the Paisley and Clydesdale Terriers. It was brought to Yorkshire by weavers who migrated from Scotland to England in the mid-19th century.They do not realize how small they are. Yorkies are easily adaptable to all surroundings, travel well and make suitable pets for many homes. Due to their small size, they require limited exercise, but need daily interaction with their people. Without strong leadership they tend to become bossy, especially if their owners allow them to get away with naughty behaviors - like yapping and pulling - that would never be acceptable in a larger dog.
  • More: Everything about your Yorkshire Terrier.

3. Papillon
  • The name Papillon means "Butterfly" in french.
  • The Papillon is a small, friendly, elegant toy dog of fine-boned structure, light, dainty and of lively action; distinguished from other breeds by its beautiful butterfly-like ears.
  • The dwarf spaniel of the 16th century, depicted in many paintings by the Masters of that era, is the dog that became known as the Papillon.
  • Although the Papillon owes its name and much of its breed development to the French, it was Spain and Italy that gave rise to its popularity.
  • Papillons are more robust than they look. They thrive in warm or cool climates, in the country or city, and are eager to join family fun. Papillons are athletic, fast, and versatile. They’re especially good in competitive agility trials, and are regular winners at the sport’s highest levels. For less ambitious owners, Papillons can be trained to do all kinds of tricks. Not particularly yappy for a small dog, requiring just routine grooming, and drop-dead adorable, Papillons are little dogs for all seasons and reasons.
  • More:  Everything about your Papillon.

4. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
  • The Cavalier was featured on the hit HBO series, "Sex and the City", as Charlotte York's dog.
  • The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is an active, graceful, well-balanced toy spaniel, very gay and free in action; fearless and sporting in character, yet at the same time gentle and affectionate. It is this typical gay temperament, combined with true elegance and royal appearance which are of paramount importance in the breed. Natural appearance with no trimming, sculpting or artificial alteration is essential to breed type.
  • Dogs of the small spaniel-type have existed for centuries and the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel has documented its place among them.
  • The breed is adaptable in their need for exercise, happy with either sleeping on the couch or taking long walks. The Cavalier does not demand more than a loving home…and a fenced yard. Cavaliers are not reliable to obey commands if they are too busy chasing butterflies or birds, so a good fence is a must. Well-behaved children are happy companions, but parent must be careful that the kids are not too rough on their small charges.
  • More : Everything about your Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.

5. Dachshund
  • The Dachshund was developed in Germany more than 300 years ago to hund badgers.
  • Low to ground, long in body and short of leg, with robust muscular development; the skin is elastic and pliable without excessive wrinkling. Appearing neither crippled, awkward, nor cramped in his capacity for movement, the Dachshund is well-balanced with bold and confident head carriage and intelligent, alert facial expression. His hunting spirit, good nose, loud tongue and distinctive build make him well-suited for below-ground work and for beating the bush. His keen nose gives him an advantage over most other breeds for trailing. 
  • The Dachshund can be found in historical accounts dating back to the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, when illustrations reflected badgers being hunted with dogs with elongated bodies, short legs and hound-type ears.
  • The dogs of medieval Europe were noted to have the tracking ability of hounds and the proportions and temperament of terriers, much needed to pursue their main quarry of badgers.
  • You should always choose a dog based on what he’s like, not what he looks like, and the Dachsie’s unique physical appeal easily becomes the focal point. Luckily, he is as much fun to live with as he is to look at. But because he was an eager hunter, he can be a bit stubborn and sometimes wonders why you’re not onboard with his plans. It’s hard to stay in a bad mood with a Dachsie around—his upbeat, curious, and friendly nature is contagious.
  • More: Everything about your Dachshund.

6. Havanese
  • The Havanese is the National Dog of Cuba and the country's only native breed.
  • The Havanese is a small, sturdy dog of immense charm. The native dog of Cuba, he is beloved as a friendly, intelligent and playful companion. He is slightly longer than tall, with a long, untrimmed, double coat. The Havanese has a short upper arm with moderate shoulder layback and a straight topline that rises slightly from the withers to the croup. The plumed tail is carried arched forward up over the back. The unique springy gait is a result of the breed's structure and playful, spirited personality. These characteristics of temperament, coat, structure and gait are essential to type.
  • The Havanese, new to the AKC, is an old breed with title to a colorful history. The Havanese is the National dog of Cuba and its only native breed. The dog's journey to Cuba most likely was aboard the trade ships sailing from the island of Tenerife chronicled in ship's logs of the early sixteenth century.
  • Cuban trade was highly restricted by the Spanish, for many years allowing Tenerife to be one of the only open ports, and it would appear these little dogs who had found their way into homes of Cuban aristocracy developed without much outside influence.
  • Basic obedience training will teach skills you will use on a daily basis. The time you spend in training, especially during the first year of your pet’s life, will be repaid by giving you a well-behaved companion that is bonded to you and your family for the rest of his life. Today Havanese are seen in many areas of dog activities and competitions that are sanctioned by the AKC. Havanese excel in all levels of competition in Obedience, Rally, Agility and Tracking as well as Conformation, and owners are enjoying the challenge. The Havanese are happy little athletes and loyal family companions. As therapy dogs Havanese bring smiles to faces in hospitals, nursing homes and libraries around the country. The Havanese is trainable and intelligent and possesses a naturally affectionate temperament, which making the breed an ideal family pet. Although a toy dog, they remain energetic and require some form of daily exercise.
  • More: Everything about your Havanese.

7. Maltese
  • The greeks erected tombs to their Maltese.
  • The Maltese is a toy dog covered from head to foot with a mantle of long, silky, white hair. He is gentle-mannered and affectionate, eager and sprightly in action, and, despite his size, possessed of the vigor needed for the satisfactory companion. Size: Weight under 7 pounds, with from 4 to 6 pounds preferred. Overall quality is to be favored over size.
  • The Maltese, the ancient dog of Malta, has been known as an aristocrat of the canine world for more than 28 centuries. Their place in antiquity is well documented.
  • The Greeks erected tombs to their Maltese, and from the ceramic art dating to the 5th century innumerable paintings of the little dog are evident.
  • These living artifacts from antiquity can charm the most jaded modern sensibility. Like the little aristocrats they are, Maltese love sitting in the lap of luxury. But they’re also feisty watchdogs and game agility competitors. Maltese are low-shedding, long-lived, and happy to make new friends of all ages. Sometimes stubborn and determined, they respond well to rewards-based training. Many pet owners trim Maltese in a “puppy clip” to reduce grooming time. Happily, the dog beneath the ’do is irresistibly cute. 
  • More : Everything about your Maltese.

8. Pekingese
  • Introduction of the Pekingese into the western World occurred as a result of looting of the Imperial Palace at Peking by the British in 1860.
  • The Pekingese is a well-balanced, compact dog of Chinese origin with a heavy front and lighter hindquarters. Its temperament is one of directness, independence and individuality. Its image is lionlike, implying courage, dignity, boldness and self-esteem rather than daintiness or delicacy.
  • The legend of the lion that fell in love with a marmoset is at the foundation of Pekingese lore. In order for him to be wedded to his lady-love, the lion begged the patron saint of the animals, Ah Chu, to reduce him to the size of a pigmy, but to let him retain his great lion heart and character.
  • The offspring of this union are said to be the dog of Fu Lin, or the Lion Dog of China.
  • An untrained dog, regardless of its size or its breed, can be a problem to its owner and to society in general. However if you get a puppy from a responsible breeder, you have a greater assurance that training and socialization began from the puppy’s early stages of awareness. Training should begin as early as possible and continue as the puppy grows into adulthood. Always reward your Pekingese with praise and encouragement when it has responded to a command, remembering that good habits are built upon positive reinforcement. It is advisable to take your puppy to training class as well as to public places to get it used to noises, different people and situations. Always be patient and convey to your puppy confidence, nonchalance and good manners, and it will adapt to your attitudes and make a well mannered pet throughout its life. Pekingese possess a regal dignity, intelligence and self-importance, making them good natured, opinionated and affectionate family companions. Their small size makes them a good choice for apartment life, but they are sometimes difficult to housebreak. They are relatively inactive indoors and do not need a yard, but enjoy walks.
  • More: Everything about your Pekingese.

9. Pomeranian
  • He Pomeranian is a member of the family of dogs knows unofficially as the "Spitz Group".
  • The Pomeranian is a compact, short-backed, active toy dog of Nordic descent. The double coat consists of a short dense undercoat with a profuse harsh-textured longer outer coat. The heavily plumed tail is one of the characteristics of the breed. It is set high and lies flat on the back. He is alert in character, exhibits intelligence in expression, is buoyant in deportment, and is inquisitive by nature. The Pomeranian is cocky, commanding, and animated as he gaits. He is sound in composition and action.
  • The Pomeranian descended from the Spitz family of dogs, the sled dogs of Iceland and Lapland.
  • The breed takes its name from the historical region of Pomerania that makes up the southern coast of the Baltic sea (now present day Germany and Poland), not because it originated there, but because this was most likely where it was bred down to size.
  • Because of their outgoing temperaments, they can be very good family dogs with the right training. ​Spritely and intelligent, Pomeranians are easily trained and make for great family pets. Poms are active, but can be thoroughly exercised with indoor play and short walks, so they’re happy both in the city and the suburbs. They will do well in certain dog sports, like agility and tracking, but at the end of the day, they’ll take comfort in curling up on your lap.
  • More : Everything about your Pomeranian.

10. Pug
  • The Pug is one of the oldest breed of dog; has flourished since before 400 BC.
  • Symmetry and general appearance are decidedly square and cobby. A lean, leggy Pug and a dog with short legs and a long body are equally objectionable.
  • The truth of how the Pug came into existence is shrouded in mystery, but he has been true to his breed down through the ages since before 400 B.C. Authorities agree that he is of Oriental origin with some basic similarities to the Pekingese.
  • China is the earliest known source for the breed, where he was the pet of the Buddhist monasteries in Tibet. The breed next appeared in Japan and then in Europe, where it became the favorite for various royal courts.
  • Basic obedience training is a must for all dogs. Learning a simple “stay,” “sit,” or “come” may save your dog’s life. Many kennel clubs provide obedience classes. You and your dog will enjoy them. Many Pugs compete in AKC obedience trials, dog shows, and agility trials. The Pug’s reason for living is to be near their people and to please them, and their sturdiness makes them a family favorite. They are comfortable in small apartments because they need minimal exercise, but the breed can adapt easily to all situations.
  • More: Everything about your Pug.

11. Shih Tzu

  • The Legend of the Shih Tzu has come to us from documents, paintings, and objects d'art dating from AD 624.
  • The Shih Tzu is a sturdy, lively, alert toy dog with long flowing double coat. Befitting his noble Chinese ancestry as a highly valued, prized companion and palace pet, the Shih Tzu is proud of bearing, has a distinctively arrogant carriage with head well up and tail curved over the back. Although there has always been considerable size variation, the Shih Tzu must be compact, solid, carrying good weight and substance. Even though a toy dog, the Shih Tzu must be subject to the same requirements of soundness and structure prescribed for all breeds, and any deviation from the ideal described in the standard should be penalized to the extent of the deviation.
  • The exact date of origin of the Shih Tzu is not known, but evidence of its existence has come to us from documents, paintings and objets d'art dating from A. D. 624. During the Tang Dynasty (618 to 907 A.D.), the King of Viqur gave the Chinese court a pair of dogs said to have come from the Fu Lin (assumed to be the Byzantine Empire).
  • Another theory of their introduction to China was recorded in the mid-17th century when dogs were brought from Tibet to the Chinese court. These dogs were bred in the Forbidden City of Peking.
  • Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your pet. Their strong fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.
  • More : Everything about your Shih Tzu.

12. Poodle
  • The denominations standard, miniature, and toy are used tot describe size only. All the Poodles are one breed, governed by the same standard.
  • That of a very active, intelligent and elegant-appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly. Properly clipped in the traditional fashion and carefully groomed, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself.
  • The Poodle is supposed to have originated in Germany, where it is known as the Pudel or Canis Familiaris Aquatius.
  • However, for years it has been regarded as the national dog of France, where is was commonly used as a retriever as well as, the Caniche, which is derived from chien canard or duck dog. Doubtless the English word "poodle" comes from the German pudel or pudelin, meaning to splash in the water.
  • There’s the old stereotype of Poodles as a foofy velvet-pillow dogs looking down their long noses at us. Not true. Poodles are eager-to-please, highly trainable “real dogs.” They like to work closely with their humans and can master all kinds of tricks and dog sports. The Standard, with his greater size and strength, is the best athlete of the Poodle family, but all Poodles can be trained with great success. The Miniature can be shy around strangers; the Standard tends to be more outgoing.
  • More : Everything about your Poodle.

   Small dogs come from a variety of AKC groups, so there is a perfect breed for every lover of little dogs with regards to personality, activity level and coat type. Keep in mind, small dogs are not just lapdogs – many of them are tough as nails. Smaller dogs don’t necessarily need to work off loads of energy, so they are quite suitable for apartment life. But not all small dogs live to be lap warmers! Certain breeds like Dachshunds or small terriers would also love country life and the opportunity to run around on a farm. If your family includes very young children, ensure that your small dog has a space to get away from the kids, or reconsider your choice of breed. Many Toy breeds are too delicate to compete with a boisterous family of young children and need to live in a quieter environment.
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Thursday, September 4, 2014

Everything about your Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Everything about your Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
  One of the largest of the Toy breeds, Cavaliers follow their people everywhere, just waiting for a chance to jump in a lap. They are also willing and able to go for long walks and hikes, and many enjoy flushing birds, just like their bigger spaniel cousins.
  Although he's born to be a companion, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel dog breed retains the sporty nature of his spaniel ancestors. If he's not sitting on a lap or getting a belly rub, nothing makes him happier than to flush a bird and then attempt to retrieve it. One of the largest of the toy breeds, he's often as athletic as a true sporting breed and enjoys hiking, running on the beach, and dog sports such as agility, flyball and rally. Some have even shown their prowess as hunting dogs. The more restful members of the breed find success as family friends and therapy dogs.

Overview
  The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a beautiful small dog that undoubtedly is a contender for the title of "top tail-wagger." In fact, among the characteristics that Cavalier breeders strive to attain is a tail in constant motion when this breed is moving.
  If the characteristic wagging of the Cavalier's plumy tail doesn't melt your heart, surely his large, dark round eyes will. Warm and lustrous, with a sweet expression, they hold the power to extract constant petting and unlimited supplies of food from people under their spell. Not surprisingly, this breed can easily become fat, which spoils its lovely lines, so be strong and offer a walk or playtime instead of the potato chips and pizza your Cavalier is angling for.
Cavaliers pad through the house on slippered paws, always following in the footsteps of their people. With a Cavalier in residence, you'll never be alone — not even in the bathroom. Because they're so attached to their people, they do best when someone is at home during the day to keep them company. They are a housedog and will never thrive in an environment where they're relegated to the backyard or otherwise ignored.
  When it comes to training, Cavaliers are generally intelligent and willing to try whatever it is you'd like them to do. Food rewards and positive reinforcement help ensure that training goes smoothly. Cavaliers have a soft personality, so yelling at them is counterproductive and likely to send these sweeties into the sulks or into hiding. Instead, reward them every time you see them doing something you like, whether it's chewing on a toy instead of your Prada pumps or not barking in response when the dog next door barks. They'll fall all over themselves to find more things that you like.
  As with many toy breeds, Cavaliers can have issues with housetraining, but if you keep them on a consistent schedule, with plenty of opportunities to potty outdoors, they can become trustworthy in the home.

Highlights
  • Cavaliers have a dependent personality. They love to be with people and shouldn't be left alone for long periods of time.
  • Your Cavalier will shed, especially in the spring and fall. Regular combing and brushing is required.
  • Because he's a spaniel at heart, he may try to chase birds, rabbits and other small prey if he isn't kept on leash or in a fenced yard.
  • Cavaliers may bark when someone comes to your door, but because of their friendly nature, they aren't good guard dogs.
  • Cavaliers are housedogs and should not live outdoors.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Cavaliers have a silky, medium-length coat with feathering on the ears, legs, chest, feet and tail. They shed moderately.
  • The Cavalier coat comes in four colors: Blenheim (chestnut and white), tricolor (black and white with tan points over the eyes, on the cheeks, inside the ears and beneath the tail), ruby (solid red) and black and tan (black with tan points like those on the tricolor).
  • Cavaliers can get along with cats when they are raised with them, but some have a strong prey drive and will chase cats. Pet birds should also watch their tailfeathers around Cavaliers.
Breed standards
  • AKC group: Toy
  • UKC group: Terrier
  • Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
  • Average size: 8 - 14 pounds
  • Coat appearance: Silky, medium-length
  • Coloration: Tricolored (beige, white and black), ruby, red and white, black and tan
  • Hypoallergenic: No
  • Other identifiers: Dark eyes and dark-eyed rims; well-proportioned body; scissor-bite teeth; long ears with feathering and medium length coat
  • Possible alterations: Dewclaws may be removed
  • Comparable Breeds: Bichon Frise, Cocker Spaniel
History
  During the early part of the 18th century, John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, kept red and white King Charles type spaniels for hunting. The duke recorded that they were able to keep up with a trotting horse. His estate was named Blenheim in honour of his victory at the Battle of Blenheim. Because of this influence, the red and white variety of the King Charles Spaniel and thus the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel became known as the Blenheim.
Attempts were made to recreate the original King Charles Spaniel as early as the turn of the 20th century, using the now extinct Toy Trawler Spaniels. These attempts were documented by Judith Blunt-Lytton, 16th Baroness Wentworth, in the book "Toy Dogs and Their Ancestors Including the History And Management of Toy Spaniels, Pekingese, Japanese and Pomeranians" published under the name of the "Hon. Mrs Neville Lytton" in 1911.

Divergence from King Charles Spaniel
  In 1926, American Roswell Eldridge offered a dog show class prize of twenty-five pounds each as a prize for the best male and females of "Blenheim Spaniels of the old type, as shown in pictures of Charles II of England's time, long face, no stop, flat skull, not inclined to be domed, with spot in centre of skull."The breeders of the era were appalled, although several entered what they considered to be sub-par King Charles Spaniels in the competition. Eldridge died before seeing his plan come to fruition, but several breeders believed in what he said and in 1928 the first Cavalier club was formed. The first standard was created, based on a dog named "Ann's Son" owned by Mostyn Walker,and The Kennel Club recognised the breed as "King Charles Spaniels, Cavalier type".
  World War II caused a drastic setback to the breed, with the vast majority of breeding stock destroyed because of the hardship. For instance, in the Ttiweh Cavalier Kennel, the population of sixty dropped to three during the 1940s. Following the war, just six dogs would be the starting block from which all Cavaliers descend. These dogs were Ann's Son, his litter brother Wizbang Timothy, Carlo of Ttiweh, Duce of Braemore, Kobba of Kuranda and Aristide of Ttiweh.The numbers increased gradually, and in 1945 The Kennel Club first recognised the breed in its own right as the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.
  The history of the breed in America is relatively recent. The first recorded Cavalier living in the United States was brought from the United Kingdom in 1956 by W. Lyon Brown, together with Elizabeth Spalding and other enthusiasts, she founded the Cavalier King Charles Club USA which continues to the present day. In 1994, the American Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club was created by a group of breeders to apply for recognition by the American Kennel Club. The Cavalier would go on to be recognised by the American Kennel Club in 1995, and the ACKCSC became the parent club for Cavaliers.



Personality
  The gregarious Cavalier takes as his role model humorist Will Rogers, who famously said he never met a stranger. The Cavalier is eager to meet everyone who crosses his path, and if that person sits down and offers a lap (or a treat), so much the better.
  Like any dog, Cavaliers come in a range of personalities, from quiet and sedate to rowdy and rambunctious. They might or might not bark when someone comes to the door, so they're a poor choice as a watchdog — except, that is, for watching the burglar cart off the silver. There are exceptions, of course — some Cavaliers will inform you of every event in your neighborhood and bark ferociously when strangers approach — but overall you're better off buying an alarm system than counting on your Cavalier to alert you to trouble.

Health
  The Cavalier, which has an average lifespan of 9 to 14 years, may suffer from minor health problems such as patellar luxation, and entropion, or major problems like syringomelia, mitral valve disease (MVD), and canine hip dysplasia (CHD). Sometimes retinal dysplasia is seen in the breed. Many Cavaliers also have reduced platelet numbers, but this does not seem to cause any problems. Cardiac, eye, hip, and knee tests are suggested for this breed of dog.

Living Conditions
  Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are good for apartment life. They are moderately active indoors and a small yard will be sufficient. The Cavalier does not do well in very warm conditions.

Exercise
  Cavalier King Charles Spaniels need a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe open area off-lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.

Care
  The Cavalier is not suited for outdoor living. Its long coat requires brushing on alternate days. The dog requires a good amount of exercise regularly, in the form of a romp in a secure area or a moderate on-leash walk.

Grooming
  For a coated breed, the Cavalier is relatively easy to groom. The medium-length silky coat is not so heavy that it requires hours of brushing, and it sheds dirt easily. The Cavalier sheds, like all dogs, but regular brushing will remove dead hairs so they don’t float off onto your floor, furniture and clothing.
  The long, silky hair on the Cavalier’s ears, tail, belly and legs, known as feathering, should be brushed two or three times a week to prevent mats or tangles from forming. Be sure to check behind the ears and where the leg meets the body; that’s where they commonly form. Use a slicker brush or stainless steel comb to remove tangles, then bring out shine with a bristle brush. The coat does not require any trimming for the show ring; indeed, such trimming is prohibited by the breed standard.
A bath every two to four weeks will keep the Cavalier smelling sweet. The only other grooming needed is regular ear cleaning, tooth brushing and nail trimming.

Is this breed right for you?
  Perfect for families with older children, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a great companion for families and one-person households. Great for apartment living, the breed will need daily walking to avoid being bored or getting himself into trouble. Preferring company, it's best that he's not left alone for long periods of time. A social breed, it's also best that he's constantly around other people to avoid being shy or reserved.

Children and other pets
  Cavaliers can be great playmates for kids who will enjoy throwing a ball for them, teaching them tricks, participating in dog sports, or simply having them on a lap while they read or watch television. Because of their small size, however, they should be supervised when playing with small children who might injure them accidentally.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  They get along well with other dogs and can learn to play nice with cats and other pets if introduced to them at an early age. It helps if the cat is willing to stand up for herself because a Cavalier enjoys a good game of chase. They even enjoy it if the cat chases back. Some Cavaliers live peaceably with pet birds while others try to eat them — or at the very least pull their tails. Always supervise your Cavalier's interactions with birds and other small animals; they can have a strong hunting instinct.

Did You Know?
“Sex and the City’s” Charlotte York had a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel named Elizabeth Taylor. Real-life celebrities Claire Danes, Terri Hatcher, Mischa Barton, Diane Sawyer, and Jerry O’Connell are Cavalier owners.

A dream day in the life of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
  A loving breed, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel will be happy waking up in the bed of his owner. Stumbling into the kitchen for his daily feeding, the pup will enjoy having a routine in place. After his feeding, you may find him waiting at the door for his daily walk. After a short nap, he'll take a run in the backyard and finish his day snuggling on the lap of his owner while watching favorite television shows together.

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