LUV My dogs: Border Terrier

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Showing posts with label Border Terrier. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Border Terrier. Show all posts

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in UK

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in UK
  There are an estimated 9 million dog owners in the UK. This figure is rising year on year as new generations become dog parents and our canine companions become our surrogate children.
  Over the years, the list of most popular dog breeds has fluctuated, with new breeds emerging and taking pole position. However there are some breeds that have maintained their ranking and remain amongst the most popular breeds owned in the UK.
Here’s a list of the top 10 most popular dog breeds based on The Kennel Club registration in 2016.

10. Border Terrier
  In 10th place is the Border Terrier , part of the KC’s Terrier Group. Boasting a rustic, working appearance, the breed is easily identifiable and held in high esteem. First developed in the early 18th century in the Cheviot Hills, the Border Terrier was primarily bred for the purpose of flushing out and killing foxes that were attacking the farmer's livestock. Highly valued for its willingness and stamina, the Border Terrier rose to tremendous popularity in the century, also hunting otters, badgers and vermin.
  The Border’s wiry double coat is commonly coloured wheaten, blue, tan, grizzle, red and white, which may have aided the breed's camouflage in the outland terrains of the border.   The Border Terrier is an affectionate, loyal and mannered breed, displaying a relaxed temperament that makes for an ideal companion. Compatible with children and other house pets as well as being a practical size, it is unsurprising that this breed appears on the popularity list.

9. Miniature Schnauzer
In ninth place is the Miniature Schnauzer. The miniature schnauzer is a robust, sturdily built terrier of nearly square proportion. It was developed as a ratter and is quick and tough. Its gait displays good reach and drive. Its coat is double, with a close undercoat, and hard, wiry, outer coat which is longer on the legs, muzzle and eyebrows. Its facial furnishings add to its keen expression. 
  The miniature schnauzer deserves its place as one of the most popular terrier pets. It is playful, inquisitive, alert, spunky and companionable. It is a well-mannered house dog that also enjoys being in the middle of activities. It is less domineering than the larger schnauzers and less dog-aggressive than most terriers. It is also better with other animals than most terriers, although it will gladly give chase. It is clever and can be stubborn, but it is generally biddable. It enjoys children. Some may bark a lot. 

8. Golden Retriever 
  In eighth place is the Golden Retriever.Lower in the list than some might have assumed, the Golden Retriever is widely considered one of the most popular breeds, not only as a companionable house dog but in obedience, service and therapy. Believed to have been developed by Lord Tweedmouth in the late 1800s, the Golden Retriever has its roots in the Scottish Highlands where it was selectively bred for the purposes of hunting, tracking and retrieving upland game, as its name would suggest.
  Easily identifiable for its wavy golden coat, the Retriever is medium-sized with a straight muzzle, large brown eyes, feathering on ears, back of legs, underside of tail and front of neck. Highly trainable, the breed is the ideal choice for the modern family, being devoted to children and demonstrating love, loyalty and affection. Like the Labrador Retriever, the breed’s natural love of people is showcased at every opportunity.

7. German Shepherd Dog
   In seventh place is the German Shepherd Dog, a member of the Herding Group.
Despite falling fourth on the list, the German Shepherd – otherwise known as the Alsatian – is arguably the most popular breed worldwide. Founded in 1899, the Shepherd was primarily bred as a versatile working dog, developed to be fearless and agile for the purposes of military and police work. The German Shepherd retained its concrete reputation across Europe and the United States following its wide usage during World War I.
  Athletically built to change direction at full speed, the appearance of the German Shepherd reflects its versatile working capabilities. Contrary to popular belief, a socialised and consistently trained German Shepherd will not display undue aggression. Instead, a Shepherd will demonstrate a calm and gentle manner - having an enormous capacity for love, loyalty and affection. Inherently able-minded and intelligent, the Shepherd can be trained to a very good degree and is known for being incredibly devoted to children.

6. Bulldog
  In sixth place is the Bulldog, which is included in the Utility Group. Less of a lap dog, more of a fully-fledged canine side-kick, the Bulldog is just behind its smaller counterpart on the list of popular breeds. Commonly entitled the National Dog of Great Britain, the breed features in various patriotic pictorials – for this reason alone, the Bulldog simply had to appear on the list! Once the so-called sport of bull and badger baiting was finally dispensed with in 1850, the Bulldog grew in popularity as a fearless yet increasingly placid companion dog, hence its positioning on the list.
  Bearing in mind its early sporting heritage, the appearance of the Bulldog is somewhat intimidating, however such is not a fair reflection of its nature. The breed possesses an easy and affectionate temperament, is protective of children and its home, and is a great lover of people. The appearance of the Bulldog is distinctive and clearly desirable. Anyone wanting a dog with an outwardly fierce appearance but a mellow interior should seriously consider buying a Bulldog.

5. English Springer Spaniel 
  In fifth place is the English Springer Spaniel, part of the KC ’s Gundog Group.Larger than its cousin the Cocker Spaniel, the English Springer is a strong competitor in the popularity contest. Deriving its name from its early usage as a game flusher, 'springing' furred and feathered game from the bush in order for the hunter to shoot it, the breed is revered for its ability to work tirelessly in a variety of working fulfillments. Having retained its popularity as a companion dog since its early prevalence in the Renaissance, the English Springer Spaniel is often described as the ideal family dog.
  The coat of the English Springer Spaniel is typically wavy and feathered, common in colours of white and liver, usually with black, liver or tan markings. The breed possesses an amiable and relaxed temperament, displaying affection and loyalty towards its family and engaging well with children. Owners have described the Springer Spaniel as being ‘full of life and character,’ and making a great addition to active family life.

4. Pug
  In fourth place is the Pug, a member of the Toy Group. This entry might come as a surprise to some. Much conjecture surrounds the ancestry and origin of the Pug, although it was made popular during the Victorian period when it was commonly observed atop private carriages. As a breed, it has boasted many notable admirers throughout history, including Napoleon's wife – Josephine, Queen Victoria, and the Duke and Duchess of Windsor.
  The breed boasts several distinctive features, including a broad, flat and pronounced muzzle, prominent eyes, low-set, triangular ears and a short tail, arching over the back. The Pug is a suitable and delightful breed choice for families or a dedicated sole owner wanting a lap dog, due to its calm and amiable temperament and its compact proportions. Animated and spirited, a Pug is guaranteed to liven up any home setting – perhaps accounting for its popularity!

3. French Bulldog
  In third place is the French bulldog, which is included in the Utility Group. Another close contender, the French Bulldog is the eighth most popular breed choice in the UK – up four places from last year. Contrary to popular belief, the French Bulldog hails from Nottingham, England, where it was the breed choice of lace makers and craftsmen in the city. Popular amongst the artistic and eccentric of Parisian city dwellers also, the French Bulldog grew in favour, retaining its name on its return to England, as well as its concrete reputation.
  A compact dog of reduced proportions, the French Bulldog possesses a steady and easy temperament, despite its bullish appearance. A popular lap dog and ladies’ companion, the Bulldog is well suited to the home setting, being compatible with both children and other house pets. Time has proven the popularity of this breed, which is unlikely to ever go out of favour.

2.  Cocker Spaniel
  In second place is the Cocker Spaniel, a member of the Gun Dog Group. Taking second position is this versatile hunting gun-dog. The Cocker Spaniel was prominent during the Tudor reign of Henry VIII and proved a favourite in the royal courts of the 16th and 17th centuries. Until 1990, the breed was considered the most popular as registered by the American Kennel Club, however it now ranks 25th.
  Characterised by an arched head, low-set ears, ovular eyes and a soft, wavy coat in colour deviations of solid black, red or liver, the Cocker Spaniel is a highly attractive breed and is considered the original family companion, proceeding the Labrador and Golden Retriever as the dog most compatible with children, other pets and domestic living. The breed experienced a resurgence in popularity following the acquisition of a black Cocker Spaniel, named Lupo, by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge before Christmas of last year.

1.  Labrador Retriever
  In first place is the Labrador retriever, a friendly and active member of the Gundog Group. The KC (UK) recognized the breed in 1903. The Labrador retriever, the most popular dog breed in the United Kingdom, comes in three colors: yellow, black, and chocolate.   Labrador Retrievers are among the most popular dog breeds out there today. 
  The fact the Labrador Retriever takes pole position is probably not surprising. Described as 'the best all-round dog' by the Kennel Club, the Labrador Retriever has enjoyed great popularity throughout its existence, both as a domestic pet and service dog. This traditional working animal was originally utilised off the coast of Labrador and neighbouring Newfoundland in Canada, helping Portuguese fishermen to trawl, retrieve fish and retract the nets. The modern Labrador was developed in 19th century England and was officially recognised by the Kennel Club in 1903.
  Typically a proportioned and sprightly-looking breed, the Labrador Retriever boasts strong legs, a broad head, medium-sized pendant ears, and wide-set eyes. Today, the Labrador is observed in hunting, tracking, retrieving, military and police work, search and rescue, competitive obedience, agility and as a guide dog to the blind. Highly valued for being inherently gentle, affectionate and obedient, the Labrador is well suited to the home setting and is neither unduly shy nor aggressive. The Labrador is a great lover of people, perhaps why people are a great lover of it!
Read More

Everything about your Border Terrier

Everything about your Border Terrier
  Although he’s not as flashy in appearance as some of his terrier relatives, the Border Terrier is still pure terrier, living life with great gusto, whether out and about with people or digging a hole in a flowerbed. Frankly, it’s a bit surprising that he isn’t more popular, given that he’s one of the healthier purebred dogs, is less driven to hunt than most other terriers, and is fairly flexible about exercise. He’s robust, sturdy, and great with children, making him one of the top terrier contenders for a family pet.

Overview
  The Border Terrier is one of the oldest and smallest of the working terrier breeds that originated in Great Britain. Earlier names for this breed include the Reedwater Terrier, Ullswater Terrier and Coquetdale Terrier. They are well-known for their scruffy face and beard and their friendly, welcoming disposition. They are active, agile and sturdy little dogs, said to be “hard as nails” and “as game as they come.” This breed thrives on human companionship and does well around children. However, they should not be in homes with other small animals such as birds, hamsters or mice, and they always will be inclined to chase cats. Border Terriers are friendly to everyone, including strangers, but will sound an alarm when something new or unfamiliar appears in their home territory.

Highlights
  • The Border Terrier is characterized by his rough coat, “otter”-shaped head, and an “at the alert” attitude.
  • As a breed, the Border Terrier has changed little over the years, aside from becoming more consistent in appearance.
  • Border Terriers have thick, loose skin, which protects them from adversary bites.Border Terriers become overweight easily, so be sure to measure your Border's food and give him at least a half hour of vigorous exercise each day.
  • Border Terriers thrive when they're with their people and aren't meant to live outdoors with little human interaction. When left to their own devices, they can be noisy and destructive.
  • These escape artists will find the way out of a fenced yard if given the time and opportunity. They've been known to climb over and dig under fences, and once they get out they have little street sense to keep them from dashing out in front of cars.
  • Border Terriers have a high threshold for pain. If your dog's sick, the only sign may be a behavioral change, such as the dog becoming withdrawn or quiet.
  • Border Terriers have a natural instinct to dig. Rather than fighting it, give your Border Terrier a place of his own to dig or put his digging drive to work with fun games.
  • Border Terriers are active and bouncy. They love jumping up on people to greet them.
  • Border Terriers aren't yappy, but they'll bark to alert you of anything unusual, and they can become nuisance barkers if they get bored.
  • Border Terriers have a high prey drive and will chase, attack, and even kill neighborhood cats, squirrels or other small animals. They'll also go after small pets such as rabbits, mice, or gerbils. Because of their tendency to chase, make sure your yard is securely fenced, and don't let your Border off leash in an unfenced area.
  • Border Terriers do well with other dogs and with family cats if the cat is raised with the Border Terrier or lived in the home before the Border Terrier.
  • Border Terriers can make excellent companions for kids, but they can be rambunctious, especially when young, and can unintentionally hurt small children.
Breed standards
AKC group: Terriers

UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 11.5 to 15.5 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense, Harsh and Rough, Thick, and Wire
Coloration: Red, wheaten, grizzle and tan, or blue and tan.
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Calm, friendly, curious, independent
Comparable Breeds: Irish Terrier, Kerry Blue Terrier

History
  The Border Terrier was developed in Great Britain, where it originally was bred to hunt and kill the powerful hill foxes that threatened the stock of farmers along the borders of Scotland and England. They had to be active, stout and tireless to perform this task. Their legs had to be long enough to keep up with horses and the accompanying foxhounds, while at the same time they needed to be low enough to the ground so that they could follow and corner foxes, even flushing them from their dens. It is thought that the Border Terrier, Bedlington Terrier and Dandie Dinmont share common ancestors. 
  The breed’s popularity surged after it was officially recognized by the English Kennel Club as a distinct breed, and following formation of the British Border Terrier Club, in 1920. True terrier fanciers feared that recognition of Border Terriers as show dogs might “prettify” and soften the breed, but that has not proven true. The breed was well-established long before it became a show dog in the 1920s and retains is rough-and-tumbled looks and sound working character to this day. Border Terriers were first registered with the American Kennel Club in 1930 and are part of its Terrier Group. The Border Terrier Club of America was founded in 1949.



Temperament
  Though sometimes stubborn and strong willed, border terriers are, on the whole sound dogs, and are friendly and rarely aggressive. They are very good with children, but may chase cats and any other small pets.
  Borders do well in task-oriented activities and have a surprising ability to jump high and run fast given the size of their legs. The breed has excelled in agility training, but they are quicker to learn jumps and see-saws than weaving poles. They take training for tasks very well, and are extremely trainable, and capable of learning tricks quickly and competently.   The border in recent years has been bred to harbor a more subtle character so are more adaptable to apartment living if properly exercised.
  They are intelligent and eager to please, but they retain the capacity for independent thinking and initiative that were bred into them for working rats and fox underground. Their love of people and even temperament make them fine therapy dogs, especially for children and the elderly, and they are occasionally used to aid the blind or deaf. From a young age they should be trained on command.
  Borders can adapt to different environments and situations well, and are able to deal with temporary change well. They will get along well with cats that they have been raised with, but may chase other cats and small animals such as mice, birds, rabbits, squirrels, rats, and guinea pigs.
  Borders are very independent and loyal. Some borders are known to be territorial and will protect their homes. They have a strong sense of smell and can tell when danger is near.
  Borders love to sit and watch what is going on. Walks with Borders will often involve them sitting and lying in the grass to observe the environment around them.

Health
  The Border Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, is prone to canine hip dysplasia (CHD) and heart defects. The breed may also suffer from minor health issues such as patellar luxation. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may conduct hip and cardiac exams on this breed of dog.

Care
  Even though it can live outside in cool climates, this terrier is better when it has access to the yard and the house. The harsh coat demands weekly brushing and dead hair should be stripped four times a year so that it looks tidy.
  As the Border Terrier enjoys activity, it should be provided with an adequate exercise routine such as a vigorous game, an off-leash expedition in a secure place, or a daily on-leash walk.

Living Conditions
  The Border Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are moderately inactive indoors and a small yard is sufficient.

Training
  You’ll find that it is fairly easy to train the smart and able Border Terrier.  An important note to remember is not to inadvertently teach this dog an unacceptable behavior, as Border Terriers have long memories. Once it is taught something is okay to do, it’s challenging to try to reverse the behavior. But on the positive side, if a Border Terrier is given love and attention for performing a command correctly, it will do it again and again.
  One of these reasons you see a lot of Border Terriers on TV and in the movies is because of its willingness to learn. This breed seems to really take to obedience training. This also means that the Border Terrier can be trained to work with disabled people.
  The Border Terrier likes to chew, reducing even the toughest of toys to piles of fluff with no effort. When training, set boundaries as to what is acceptable for chewing and what is not. It is a good idea to invest in chew toys that are geared toward safe, heavy duty chewing.
  Thanks to the irresistible combination of lovable, affectionate, and easygoing, the Border Terrier fits into just about any family or living environment. With the right training, you’ll be able to mold a perfect, well-behaved dog.

Activity Requirements
  Border Terriers can live happily in just about any environment be it an apartment, a house with lots of children, or a farm. They don't need an excessive amount of exercise, but should be allowed to walk several times a day and be allowed to run in a yard or park a few times a week. Yards should be fenced because Border Terriers will chase birds, squirrels and cats. Farmers like Border Terriers because they are very reliable ratters and keep foxes at bay.
  They enjoy challenges and new tasks, so they need lots of mental activity as well. Challenging toys or hide-and-seek games are right up the Border Terrier's alley.

Grooming
  The Border Terrier has a double coat composed of a short and dense undercoat and a wiry topcoat. His coat fits closely to the body, like a jacket, and comes in a few colors, including red, grizzle and tan, blue and tan, and wheaten. To keep his coat healthy, simply brush or comb him weekly. Even in the show ring, he only needs a little tidying of his head, neck, and feet, although most breeders “strip” the coat — pluck out dead hair by hand — for a less scruffy look. The Border Terrier Club of America offers advice on grooming through its website. The rest is routine care: Trim his nails every few weeks, and brush his teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Border Terriers love kids and can match their energy levels all day long, but they're a little rambunctious for households with children under the age of 6 years.
  As with any dog, always teach children how to approach and touch your Border Terrier, and supervise all interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear pulling from either party.
  Border Terriers usually get along well with other dogs and cats, especially if they're introduced to them in puppyhood. They do best with dogs of the opposite sex. They're likely to chase outdoor cats as well as squirrels and other wildlife, and they shouldn't be trusted alone with pet birds or small, furry pets such as rabbits, hamsters, and gerbils.

Is the Border Terrier the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Border Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Chomp in 102 Dalmatians
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
 Border Terriers hold more American Kennel Club Earthdog titles than any other breed.

Famous Border Terriers
  • Baxter in Anchorman
  • Brillo in Misfits episode "Four" as a street puppy eaten by new zombie Curtis
  • Hubble in Good Boy!
  • Lady Eccles in Coronation Street as Blanche Hunt's inheritance gift from her friend; belongs to her son-in-law Ken Barlow after her death in 2010
  • Monty and Rommel in Monarch of the Glen
  • Nancy in Unfabulous as Addie's pet dog
  • Oscar as Scotty the Dog in Ruby Sparks 2012 
  • Pard in High Sierra 
  • Pepper as Pinkybones in Another Happy Day
  • Puffy in There's Something About Mary
  • Seymour in Futurama episode Jurassic Bark
  • Shep Proudfoot, Greg Laswell's pet dog
  • Sickan in My Life as a Dog
  • Sorry in Seeking a Friend for the End of the World; Dodge's dog
  • Tansy as Toto from Return To Oz 1985 
  • Toots in Lassie




Read More