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Showing posts with label American. Show all posts
Showing posts with label American. Show all posts

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Everything about your American Water Spaniel

Everything about your American Water Spaniel
  The American Water Spaniel was bred to be an all-around hunting dog. Specializing in waterfowl, he’s a skilled swimmer who will retrieve from small boats and has a water-resistant double coat. The dog breed has the high energy of a dog born to chase and retrieve game, but given enough exercise, he can also make an great family companion.

Overview
  Known as the "little brown dog,” the curly-coated American Water Spaniel is the classic “big dog in a small package.” With a weight range of 25 to 45 pounds, he looks small and cute, but he’s a tough hunting dog who’s known for having a stubborn streak. Although he’s called a spaniel, the AWS is primarily a water retriever and has a fine reputation as a hunting dog among those in the know. His claim to fame is that he is the state dog of Wisconsin, where he was developed in the mid-19th century in the Wolf and Fox River Valley region.
  Like any retriever, he’s tireless and needs daily exercise. A long walk will do, but you can also channel his energy into dog sports such as agility and flyball. He’ll love anything that involves getting wet and is an excellent choice for boaters, including canoers and kayakers, seeing as how he was developed to hunt from a boat.

Highlights
  • American Water Spaniels are active dogs and require daily exercise. Give him one to two hours a day of walks, runs, or games of fetch. You can break up exercise periods throughout the day — an hour here, a half hour there. Without it they may express their pent-up energy with recreational barking and excessive chewing.
  • The American Water Spaniel is a highly versatile hunting dog on land and in water. His job is to hunt, flush and retrieve all kinds of game.
  • The American Water Spaniel stands out for his solid liver or dark chocolate-colored coat.
  • American Water Spaniels can be stubborn and manipulative. You must show them that you mean what you say by establishing rules and being consistent in enforcing them.
  • American Water Spaniels like to roam and may leave your yard or your side to go hunting on their own if they're not confined by a fence or restrained by a leash.
  • Some American Water Spaniels are territorial and aggressive with strange dogs, although they get along with other family dogs and pets.
  • They have a natural tendency for chewing, digging, and jumping, but you can overcome these behaviors with training.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 10–15 years
Average size: 25 to 45 pounds
Coat appearance: Double coated, curly exterior layer
Coloration: Shades of brown
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, hunters, rural/farm areas
Temperament: Energetic, sensitive, willing to please, alert
Comparable Breeds: Curly-Coated Retriever, Irish Water Spaniel

History
  The history of the American Water Spaniel is somewhat of a mystery. The breed supposedly was “created” sometime in the late 1860s, when it accompanied settlers to remote but developing areas of the Midwestern United States.
American Water Spaniels, pictured in 1913
  They were bred as hunting dogs that would be capable of flushing and retrieving game in all conditions and terrain, including water. The early American Water Spaniel was primarily a duck and waterfowl retriever, but it actually became a unique combination between the true hunting spaniels and the hunting retrievers. The breed works equally well in water and on land. He has an excellent nose and is a sound swimmer. According to an American Kennel Club publication: “As a retriever the American Water Spaniel leaves little to be desired. He will watch the huntsman drop perhaps four or five birds, then work swiftly and merrily until every one is brought in. Rabbits, chickens, grouse, quail, pheasant, ducks – he handles all with unfailing dispatch and tender care. He swims like a seal, hence few wounded waterfowl escape him; his tail serves as a rudder to aid him, especially in turbulent water.” While the actual ancestors of the American Water Spaniel are unknown, it is suggested that they descend from crosses of the Irish Water Spaniel, the Old English Water Spaniel, the Curly-Coated Retriever, the Field Spaniel and the Poodle. The breed was well-established by the end of the 19th century and was particularly popular among sportsmen in Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota. The American Water Spaniel Club was founded in 1937. The breed was formally recognized by the American Kennel Club Registry in 1940, as a member of the Sporting Group.

  The American Water Spaniel’s small size still endears him to hunters, especially those using canoes or other small boats to hunt waterfowl on inland lakes. Despite its rarity, this truly American breed also thrives as a family companion and makes an especially good watch dog.


Temperament 
  Friendly and eager to please, the American Water Spaniel is a good-natured dog that will keep your children entertained. It can play all day long, and at the end of the day, curl up on your lap for extra cuddles. It will partake in all kinds of activities, on land or in water. This breed loves to be around people and will want to follow you around no matter where you go.
  The AWS is not a dog for people who spend a lot of time away from their home. This breed develops separation anxiety if let alone for alone periods of time, and will bark or howl. This dog needs plenty of companionship, exercise and play time to combat boredom.
  A vocal breed, it’s an understatement to say that the American Water Spaniel likes to bark. When they are happy, need attention or left alone, the breed will bark… just to hear the sound of its own voice. Start training to avoid this behavior when your dog is a puppy.

Health
  The lifespan of an AWS is between 10 and 15 years, and they do have a higher risk for developing some health conditions than do other dogs in their size range. Breed health concerns include diabetes; epilepsy; eye problems; heart problems; hip dysplasia; and hypothyroidism. They have a medium length curly coat which requires regular grooming.   They do well in both cold and in warm climates. Other breed health concerns include pattern baldness, cataracts, focal retinal dysplasia and adult-onset growth-hormone responsive dermatosis.

Care
  If he gets lots of exercise and playtime, the American Water Spaniel can do well in smaller living situations such as an apartment or condominium, but he's a country dog at heart, and is happiest when he's got plenty of open space to run off his natural energy.
  Smart and trainable, the AWS responds best to short, motivational training sessions. Avoid heavy-handed techniques that use punishments for getting it wrong instead of rewards for getting it right — they could make him sulky or withdrawn. And train him yourself rather than sending him off to be tutored by a stranger. He'll work much better for someone he knows and loves.
  He may chew when his people aren't home, so crate training is a must to keep your possessions safe and your AWS out of the doghouse.

Living Conditions
  American Water Spaniels will do okay in an apartment as long as they get enough exercise. They are moderately active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. Like to roam in search of quarry.

Trainability
  Intelligent and eager to please, the American Water Spaniel is easy to train. Harsh discipline can cause them to distrust people, so a confident, but gentle positive-reinforcement strategy works best.
  There is no need to train the American Water Spaniel to fetch. They are born with the innate desire to chase, hunt, and retrieve, and can spend hours engaged in this activity. Once basic obedience training is completed, this breed should be enrolled in advanced training, or agility training to keep them challenged and mentally stimulated.
  Unlike other breeds of spaniels, the American Water Spaniel is wary of strangers. They will bark to alert a stranger's arrival, but can can grow to be distrusting of strangers, if not properly socialized. The earlier this breed is exposed to new people and new situations, the more easy-going they will be in adulthood.

Exercise Requirements
  Because this is a hunting breed, the American Water Spaniel needs plenty of exercise. Running, hunting, swimming, hiking and bike rides – these are just a few of the ways you can tire your dog out. The AWS needs room to run, so you’ll need to have a fenced in yard. If you have a swimming pool, even better! And even though this is a smaller breed, the American Water Spaniel doesn’t do well in apartments. Because of the lack of space to run around, this dog may become destructive.
  Great with children, the American Water Spaniels are patient and will put up with boisterous kids. However, the AWS will snap if startled, so children need to be taught to never sneak up on a sleeping dog or approach from the rear.

Grooming
  Expect to comb and brush this breed’s curly double coat two or three times a week.  Comb it first to prevent or remove mats and tangles. Do this every time your dog has been outside and picked up burrs or other debris. Use a slicker brush to remove dead hair. You may need to trim the coat every once in a while to give it a neat appearance. The AWS rarely needs a bath, but be sure to give him a thorough freshwater rinse after he has been in saltwater or a lake or pond with algae.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every couple of weeks. Clean the foot pads, and keep the ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections. More tips on grooming are available from the American Water Spaniel Club.

Children And Other Pets
  The American Water Spaniel is gentle with children. Nonetheless, as with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Some American Water Spaniels are territorial and aggressive with strange dogs, but they generally get along well with family dogs and cats.

Is the American Water Spaniel the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The American Water Spaniel is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
 The American Water Spaniel is the state dog of Wisconsin, where he was developed in the mid-19th century in the Wolf and Fox River Valley region.


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Friday, July 7, 2017

Everything about your American Pit Bull Terrier

Everything about your American Pit Bull Terrier
  The American Pit Bull Terrier has been known by many names, including the Pit Bull and the American Bull Terrier. It is often confused with the American Staffordshire Terrier, however, the United Kennel Club recognizes the American Pit Bull Terrier as its own distinct breed. Affectionately known as "Pitties," the Pit Bull is known for being a loyal, protective, and athletic canine breed.

Overview
  The American Pitbull Terrier often gets a bad rap for being an aggressive breed. This is due to the fact that these dogs are often used for dog fighting. The reality of the situation is, however, that Pitties, as they are often referred to, are not aggressive by nature – any dog will become aggressive out of pain or fear if he is mistreated by his owners. When treated properly, the American Pitbull Terrier is one of the friendliest, most gentle-hearted breeds out there. If you are looking for an energetic and fun-loving family pet, the American Pitbull Terrier may be a great option.
  The American Pitbull Terrier is one of the friendliest, most gentle-hearted breeds out there.

Highlights
  • American Pit Bull Terriers are not a good choice for people who can give them little or no attention.
  • They must be trained and socialized when young to overcome the breed's tendencies toward stubbornness and bossiness, which combined with his strength can make him hard to handle if he hasn't learned you are in charge.
  • Your American Pit Bull Terrier must be kept on leash in public to prevent aggression toward other dogs. It's not a good idea to let these dogs run loose in dog parks. While they might not start a fight, they'll never back down from one, and they fight to the finish. American Pit Bulls who aren't properly socialized as puppies can become aggressive toward other dogs.
  • Breed-specific legislation almost always includes this breed. Be aware of rules in your area as well as neighboring regions if you travel with your dog.
  • American Pit Bull Terriers have a great need to chew, and powerful jaws make quick work of cheap or flimsy toys. Give yours only tough, durable toys that can't be chewed up and swallowed.
  • American Pit Bull Terriers are best suited to owners who can offer firm, fair training, and gentle consistent discipline.
Quick Facts
  • The term “Pit Bull” is often applied indiscriminately to APBTs, American Staffordshire Terriers and sometimes Staffordshire Bull Terriers, a British breed. The term may also be used to label any dog who resembles those breeds, even if he is a Lab mix with little or no “Pit Bull” in his background.
  • An APBT comes in any color, pattern or combination of colors, except merle.
  • Celebrities who count Pitties as their best friends include actresses Jessica Alba, Jessica Biel and Alicia Silverstone; cooking guru Rachael Ray; and political satirist Jon Stewart.
  • Comparable Breeds: Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Bull Terrier
History
  The Pit Bull Terrier was created by breeding Old English Terriers and Old English Bulldogs together to produce a dog that combined the gameness of the terrier with the strength and athleticism of the bulldog.These dogs (Bull and Terriers) were bred in England, and arrived in the United States where they became the direct ancestors of the American Pitbull Terrier.
World War I poster featuring a pit bull
as representation of the U.S.
In the United Kingdom, Bull-and-terriers were used in bloodsports such as bull baiting, bear baiting. These bloodsports were officially eliminated in 1835 as Britain began to introduce animal welfare laws. Since dogfights were cheaper to organise and far easier to conceal from the law than bull or bear baits, bloodsport proponents turned to pitting their dogs against each other instead. Dog fighting was used as both a bloodsport (often involving gambling) and a way to continue to test the quality of their stock. For decades afterwards, dog fighting clandestinely took place in small areas of Britain and America. In the early 20th century, pitbulls were used as catch dogs in America for semi-wild cattle and hogs, to hunt, and drive livestock, and as family companions. Some have been selectively bred for their fighting prowess.

  Pit Bull Terriers successfully fill the role of companion dogs, and police dogs,and therapy dog. Pit Bull Terriers also constitute the majority of dogs used for illegal dog fighting in America. In addition, law enforcement organisations report these dogs are used for other nefarious purposes, such as guarding illegal narcotics operations, use against police, and as attack dogs.
  In an effort to counter the fighting reputation of pit bull-type dogs, in 1996 the San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals renamed pit bull terriers to "St. Francis Terriers", so that people might be more likely to adopt them. 60 temperament-screened dogs were adopted until the program was halted, after several of the newly adopted pit bulls killed cats. The New York City Center for Animal Care and Control tried a similar approach in 2004, relabeling their pit bulls as "New Yorkies", but dropped the idea in the face of overwhelming public opposition.


Personality
  Pit Bull Terriers come with a huge stigma – they are famous for being viscous fighting dogs, and evening news programs often highlight stories of Pit Bull attacks. Shelters are overrun with Pit Bulls, entire cities have banned the breed, and saying the name “Pit Bull” can strike fear into the hearts of some people. But a well bred Pit Bull who lives in a loving, caring home is the opposite of the “killer” splashed around on television. Pit Bulls are loving, loyal, clown dogs who make excellent companions or those with active lifestyles. They love being with people and want to be included in all family activities whether it's a ride in the car, a neighborhood stroll or a romp in the park. While it's true that in the wrong hands, Pit Bulls can be viscous, in the right hands, Pit Bulls can be sweethearts, which many owners describe as babies in a dog's body.

Health
  The average life span of the American Pit Bull Terrier ranges from 10 to 12 years. Health concerns associated with this breed include actinic keratosis (solar keratosis), allergies, bloat (gastric dilatation and volvulus), cancer, cataractsM,congenital heart disease (particularly subaortic stenosis), cranial crutiate ligament rupture, cutaneous hemangioma, cutaneous histiocytoma, hip dysplasia, hypothyroidism and von Willebrand’s disease.

Care
  Expect to spend about an hour a day walking, playing with or otherwise exercising this dog. While they love people, American Pit Bull Terriers are strong for their size and can be stubborn if left to their own devices. Begin obedience training early and continue it throughout the dog's life. Training is the foundation for a strong relationship with your American Pit Bull Terrier.
  American Pit Bull Terriers should not be left outside for long because they can't tolerate the cold well. Even regardless the climate, these dogs do best as housedogs. They form strong attachments to their families and will suffer if left alone for long periods.

Living Conditions
  Pits will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are very active indoors and will do alright without a yard provided they get enough exercise. Prefers warm climates.

Trainability
  Training should be started early and always done in calm-assertive manner, as they won't respond to discipline or harsh tones. Training is best done in short sessions due to Pit Bull Terriers' short attention span and they will quickly become uninterested, even if treats are used as a reward. Lots of patience is necessary when working with a Pit Bull Terrier, as training can be a long process.
  Even after a Bull Terrier is fully trained, they may decide to test their boundaries as they get older and project dominance. These situations should be handled with calm assertion; like a teenager, they just want to see what they can get away with.
  Families with children should socialize puppies early on to accept outside children as welcome guests. While Pit Bull Terriers will bond nicely with kids in their own family, they can sometimes be aggressive to to other children and should be taught early on that all kids are to be welcomed with open arms. 

Exercise Requirements
  The American Pitbull Terrier is a fairly active breed, known for its enthusiasm and eager-to-please attitude. These dogs require a long daily walk or jog to use up their excess energy. They also enjoy active play sessions and time spent in a fenced yard.

Grooming
  The grooming needs of the Pit Bull are modest. Brush his coat a couple of times a week to help manage shedding.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually twice a month. Brush the teeth frequently — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian.

Children And Other Pets
  American Pit Bull Terriers love children, and we don't mean for breakfast. Sturdy, energetic, and tolerant, they are ideal playmates. That said, no dog of any size or breed should ever be left unsupervised with children.
  When no adult can be there to oversee what's going on, dogs should be crated or kenneled, especially after they reach sexual maturity, when they may begin to test the possibility of becoming "pack" leader.
  Don't allow children to pull on a dog's ears or tail. Teach them never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away.
  Because of their dog-fighting heritage, some American Pit Bull Terriers retain a tendency to be aggressive with other dogs, but if they are socialized early and trained to know what behavior is expected of them, that aggression can be minimized or overcome, and many are dog- and cat-friendly. Just to be safe, they should always be supervised in the presence of other pets.

Is the American Pit Bull Terrier the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Easy Training: The American Pit Bull Terrier is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Pit Bulls descend from crosses between Bulldogs and Terriers. The goal was to create a dog with the strength and tenacity of the Bulldog and the speed and agility of the Terrier.

Law
  Australia, Ecuador, Malaysia, New Zealand, the territory of Puerto Rico,Singapore, Venezuela,Denmark, Israel, France, Germany, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain and Switzerland have enacted some form of breed-specific legislation on pit bull-type dogs, including American Pit Bull Terriers, ranging from outright bans to restrictions on import and conditions on ownership.The state of New South Wales in Australia places restrictions on the breed, including mandatory sterilization.
  Certain counties and cities in the United States have banned ownership of the American Pit Bull Terrier, as well as the province of Ontario in Canada. American Pit Bull Terriers are also on a list of four breeds that are banned in the UK.
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Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Everything about your American English Coonhound

Everything about your American English Coonhound
  A true Southern U.S. dog, the American English Coonhound loves to hunt. Loud-voiced and hard-working, the American English Coonhound is one of six official Coonhound breeds. Renowned for its speed, endurance, intelligence, and athleticism, this dog loves to be on the move. 
  Good with children and friendly with strangers, you’ll find this dog to be fairly easy to train, making it a great family pet for novice owners. It will alert you  of strangers entering your property, but will make fast friends with anyone who gives it attention. This makes the American Coonhound a good watchdog, but not the best guard dog.

Overview
  Evolved as a descendant of the English Foxhound, the American English Coonhound is a natural-born hunter. Loving barking and hunting rocky and natural terrain, this breed is a loud athlete. A pleasant and nice pup, he's sociable to both humans and animals.
  Alert, confident and friendly to people and dogs, the American English Coonhound fits in well with a variety of households. Active owners will find that it makes a wonderful companion, especially if you like to spend time outdoors with a high-energy pet. Although not suited to apartment living, this breed loves to be with its people and will thrive in a loving household. If this is the first time you’ve heard of the American English Coonhound, read on – this dog may just be the perfect fit for your family.

Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Scenthound
Average lifespan: 11 - 12 years
Average size: 40 - 75 pounds
Coat appearance: Rough, hard, short- to medium-length
Coloration: Red, black, blue, yellow and tricolored with ticking
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Strong build; graceful and fast-running athlete; muscular chest, back, hips, thighs and neck; Straight and strong hind legs with sloping shoulders; overall square shape; deep padded paws and medium-length, high tail; large, open nostrils; deep brown eyes and scissor-bite teeth
Possible alterations: Long, soft ears can be stretched to nose; may be post-legged
Comparable Breeds: Redbone Coonhound, English Foxhound

History
  The breed traces its ancestry from Foxhounds brought to the United States by European settlers during the 17th and 18th centuries. It shares a common ancestry with all other coonhounds with the exception of the Plott Hound. The breed developed from the "Virginia Hounds", which were developed over time from dogs imported to the United States by Robert Brooke, Thomas Walker and first President of the United States, George Washington. The dogs had to adapt to more rigorous terrain, with the breed being specifically bred over time to suit these new conditions. They were used to hunt raccoons by night and the American red fox by day. It was recognized by the United Kennel Club (UKC) in 1905 as the English Fox and Coonhound.
  The Treeing Walker Coonhound was recognized separately by the UKC in 1945, splitting it off from the English Fox and Coonhound breed. The following year the Bluetick Coonhound was also split.
  The breed was accepted into the American Kennel Club's Foundation Stock Service as the American English Coonhound in 1995. It was moved up to the Miscellaneous Class on 1 January 2010. Following the recognition of the breed by the AKC in the hound group on 30 June 2011 as the 171st breed,the American English Coonhound became eligible to compete in the National Dog Show in 2011 and both the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show and the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship for the first time in 2012.

Temperament
  English Coonhounds are energetic, intelligent and active. Loving and eager to please their owners, their great senses make them excellent hunters. This breed is an extremely fast, hot-trailing competitive type coonhound. Very devoted to its family, it makes a good companion dog. It does well living indoors and plays a fine guardian to his family and home.
  They are usually best with older considerate children, but can also do well with younger ones. Without proper human to canine leadership and communication some can be a bit dog-aggressive and/or develop behavior issues. They need owners who are firm, confident and consistent with an air of authority. Socialize this breed well, preferably while still young to prevent them from being reserved with strangers. Do not let this breed off the leash in an unsafe area, as they may take off after an interesting scent. They have a strong instinct to tree animals. Without enough mental and physical exercise they will become high-strung.

Health
  Due to its size, the American English Coonhound’s most common health issue is hip dysplasia. Other health problems that may occur include ear infections, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and polyradiculoneuritis.

Living Conditions
 These dogs are not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and do best with acreage.

Trainability
  The American English Coonhound needs a kind but firm hand for successful training. In order to make headway, owners should maintain calm, confident, consistent authority as leader of the pack. This breed may require more time, repetition and patience than other Coonhounds to reach the owner’s training goals, because it tends to be more easily distracted than its Coonhound cousins and likes to learn at its own pace. Some American English Coonhounds find it difficult to focus on anything but hunting and treeing other animals. Those dogs need extra motivation to learn their manners and basic obedience skills. Without steady, consistent, gentle guidance, this breed can develop undesirable traits such as dominance or excessive shyness. Socialization and training should start at an early age and continue for life.

Exercise Requirements
  No surprise here – the American English Coonhound has lots of energy to burn. This is high-energy breed needs plenty of daily exercise. If you’re an active owner, make your American English Coonhound a jogging or biking partner. As a family, you can enjoy playing games such as fetch and hide-and-seek with your dog, along with long brisk walks. Another idea to consider is to get active in competitive outdoor canine sports, including field trials, tracking, agility and obedience. There are organizations that put on events such as night hunts, water races, field trials and benched conformation shows. Hunters will find faithful companions in the American English Coonhound – this dog is an energetic hunting and will happily carry out all the hunting duties it was bred for.
  Of course, if your American English Coonhound doesn’t get enough exercise, it can become bored, depressed, frustrated, anxious or hyperactive. On top of all of that, these dogs can become destructive. To ensure that the American English Coonhound is happy, you’ll need to provide plenty of mental and physical stimulation. If you don’t have enough time to exercise and socialize this dog, you should consider a different breed. The American English Coonhound needs room to run around in, so they do not do well in apartments, condominiums or houses without fenced yards. The American English Coonhound needs a fenced-in yard, where there is room to run.

Grooming
  The American English Coonhound's short, close-fitting coat is easy to care for. This certainly is not a breed that requires religious grooming or meticulous trimming. However, they do shed quite a bit throughout the year and should be brushed regularly to keep household hair build-up at bay. A thorough brushing once a week with a clean, firm-bristled brush should suffice. Coonhounds don’t need to be bathed very often. 
 Usually, they only require a good shampooing after they have romped in mud puddles or otherwise had a particularly eventful frolic in the out-of-doors. Of course, a bath is an excellent idea after a Coonhound is sprayed by a skunk or rolls in any of the wild animal or livestock feces that they find so appealing. It’s a good idea to brush them before their bath, to minimize the mess caused by excess dirt and hair. Owners can discuss a dental care regimen with their veterinarian. They should clip their Coonhounds’ nails monthly, or as often as necessary to keep them fairly short and tidy.

Is this breed right for you?
  Perfect for an athlete, this dog will keep you company on long runs. Loving other people, he would be a good fit in a family or an active single person's best friend to tag along on car rides. Best for people who live on lots of land, this dog might disturb neighbors with his loud howling and barking.
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Easy Training: The American English Coonhound is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

A dream day in the life of an American English Coonhound
  A real-life alarm system, this breed will wake you up in the morning. After sharing breakfast, he's ready to go on a daily run with his owner. Stopping to sniff out possible raccoons, he may even chat with anyone you meet as you run your usual route. Coming home for a nap, he'll engage in after-school play as soon as the kiddos arrive. Tuckered out at the end of a busy day of exercise and play, he'll lounge around and drool while listening for possible visitors to greet with a bark.



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Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Everything about your American Foxhound

Everything about your American Foxhound
  Easygoing, sweet, kind, and loyal, the American Foxhound dog breed belongs to a way of life that has continued for more than two centuries, but he has the potential to be a modern-day companion as well. His stamina and love of running make him a great jogging partner for athletic owners, and his mild nature makes him an excellent family dog, so long as he gets the exercise he craves.

Overview
  The American Foxhound, also known simply as the Foxhound, is one of the few breeds that truly originated in the United States, and is also one of the most rare. It resembles a taller, somewhat lankier version of its ancestor, the English Foxhound. The American Foxhound is known for its keen scent-tracking ability, its affable personality and its song-like voice. This breed typically is too friendly to make a good watchdog, being more likely to welcome strangers into the home rather than sounding an alarm or providing meaningful protection. The American Foxhound was admitted into the American Kennel Club in 1886, as a member of the Hound Group.

Highlights
  • The Foxhound is famed for his musical voice and his bays and howls can carry for miles; city living is not recommended for this breed.
  • Foxhounds are easily distracted by various scents. Once he has decided to follow one, you'll have a difficult time calling him off.
  • Foxhounds aren't homebodies and will roam if given the chance.
  • Foxhounds are extremely active and need one to two hours a day of exercise. Take them on long, meandering walks with lots of sniffing time or take them on a run with you.
  • Foxhounds aren't suited to living in cramped quarters; they need a large yard or, better yet, an acre or two.
  • Foxhounds love to eat and easily gain weight if their food intake isn't strictly controlled.
  • Foxhounds can be stubborn and independent, making training a challenge. Obedience training is important, however, to develop a better relationship with your dog and establish your position as leader of the pack.
  • Foxhounds are gentle and tolerant and love children. They enjoy the company of other dogs and can learn to get along with cats if introduced to them at an early age.
Other Quick Facts
  • American Foxhounds are taller and more streamlined than English Foxhounds.
  • The American Foxhound’s tail has a very slight brush, meaning that it’s heavy with hair.
  • An American Foxhound can be any color.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Scenthound
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Coat appearance: Short, smooth
Coloration: Any
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Taller than other breeds, with a stronger sense of smell; long, lean legs; large, dome-like head; wide-set eyes with a genuine and kind expression; ears frame face and are against head; tail curved upward.
Possible alterations: Eyes may be hazel or brown in color.
Comparable Breeds: Basset Hound, Beagle

History
  In 1650, Robert Brooke sailed from England to Crown Colony in North America with his pack of hunting dogs, which were the root of several strains of American Hounds. These dogs remained in the Brooke family for nearly 300 years. George Washington received French Foxhounds, Grand Bleu de Gascogne,  as a gift from the Marquis de Lafayette.
American Foxhound circa 1915.
Many of the dogs Washington kept were descended from Brooke's, and when crossed with the French hounds, helped to create the present day American Foxhound. 
 The American Foxhound is known to originate from the states of Maryland and Virginia, and is the state dog of Virginia. Though there has long been a rumor that the new breed was originally used for hunting Indigenous peoples of the Americas, this is not true. The breed was developed by landed gentry purely for the sport of hunting foxes. With the importation  of the red fox, Irish Foxhounds were added to the lines, to increase speed and stamina in the dog, qualities still prevalent in today's dogs. 
  One quality that the American Foxhound is famous for is its musical howl that can be heard for miles. This is actually one reason that this breed does not do well in city settings. The breed was first recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1886. Today, there are many different strains of American Foxhound, including Walker, Calhoun, Goodman, Trigg, July and Penn-Marydel. Though each strain looks quite different, they are all recognized as members of the same breed. Most show hounds are Walkers, many of the pack hounds  are Penn-Marydel and hunters use a variety of strains to suit their hunting style and quarry.

Personality
  While they're mainly sweet and easygoing, American Foxhounds have the independent and stubborn nature that's common to hounds. They've been bred to hunt with very little direction from their human companions, and they don't necessarily see why they should have to do things your way.
  Foxhounds who've been raised in the company of other dogs, rather than with a human family, can be challenging because they've bonded more with their pack than with people.   They'll need more time, attention, and training to help them get used to life as a family dog.
  Like every dog, Foxhounds need early socialization — exposure to many different people, dogs, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps a Foxhound puppy grow up to be a friendly, well-rounded dog.

Health
  All purebred dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit a particular disease. Run, don’t walk, from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee on puppies, who tells you that the breed is 100 percent healthy and has no known problems, or who tells you that her puppies are isolated from the main part of the household for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur in her lines.
  That said, American Foxhounds are a pretty healthy breed. Hip dysplasia and ear infections are seen occasionally, but not frequently enough to be considered a concern. Other conditions include a platelet disorder called thrombocytopathy, and a white blood cell disorder called Pelger-Huet anomaly.

Care
  Bred to be a fast hunter who can run for miles, the American Foxhound needs a substantial amount of exercise. If he's not going to be a hunting companion, he'll need daily runs or some other form of exercise to help him burn off his natural energy. He's best suited to a home with a yard — or better yet, an acre or two; he's probably too loud for condo or apartment living.
  Often raised in outdoor kennels with a pack of dogs, the American Foxhound is used to roughing it, and can live outdoors if he's got a good shelter and another social dog to keep him company. If he's an only dog, however, he should live indoors with his human pack so he won't get lonely.
  Obedience training is highly recommended to help the independent Foxhound view you as leader of the pack. He won't respond well to punishment-based training, so use treats and praise to reward him for doing as you ask. And "ask" is the operative word. Hounds will flat-out ignore you if you try to boss them around. Keep an old Southern adage in mind when training an American Foxhound: you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.

Living Conditions
  American Foxhounds are not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and do best with acreage.

Trainability
  Foxhounds are moderately easy to train, as are most hound breeds, but the trainability of individual Foxhounds varies. Some are easier to train whereas others are downright difficult. In general, they don't have the longest attention spans, so training should be conducted in short spurts and should not be overly repetitive. Patience is the key ingredient needed when training any type of hound, and calm-assertiveness is also important. Treating a Foxhound harshly will only lead to avoidance behaviors and flat out stubbornness.
  Once leadership is established and basic obedience is mastered, Foxhounds can be graduated to advance obedience, tracking, or agility activities.

Exercise
  This dog is extremely energetic and tireless. It is very important that it gets daily vigorous exercise to prevent extreme indoor restlessness. This breed should not be taken on as a family pet unless the family can guarantee plenty of vigorous exercise. They need to be taken on a daily, brisk, long walk, jog or run alongside you when you bicycle. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as instinct tells a dog the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Teach them to enter and exit door and gateways after the humans.

Grooming Needs
  Grooming the American Foxhound is a breeze. They shed lightly year round, but weekly brushing with a hound mitt is enough to keep loose hair under control. Only bathe as needed, when the dog is dirty or begins to smell. Individual dogs will determine how often bathing is necessary.
  Check the ears on a regular basis for signs of wax buildup, irritation or infection. Clean the ears with a cotton ball and a veterinarian-approved cleanser. Trim nails once per month, if the dog does not wear down the toenails naturally outdoors. Brush teeth weekly  to prevent tartar buildup, promote gum health, and keep bad breath at bay.

Children And Other Pets
  American Foxhounds are patient and loving with children, and it's not unusual to hear of a child learning to walk by holding onto the family Foxhound. That said, as with any breed, you should never leave a dog and a young child alone together. They should always be supervised to prevent any ear biting or tail pulling, by either party.
  Bred for living in large packs, American Foxhounds are always happy to have the company of other dogs. A bored hound will find ways to entertain himself — destructive ways that you won't like — so if no one's home during the day, it's best if he has at least one canine buddy.
  American Foxhounds can get along well with cats, rabbits, and other pets if they're raised with them in the home. Even so, don't leave them unsupervised with other pets until you're sure they all get along.

Is this breed right for you?
  Not meant for apartment living, American Foxhounds need a home with a lot of land to roam. A loyal dog for families, this breed will need to be exercised regularly with walks, runs or hunts. Best for hunters or people with active lifestyles, this breed can be very protective of his human kind. Meant to work in packs, American Foxhounds pair easily with other pups but not any other animal.

Did You Know?
  American Foxhounds do four different types of work. Some Foxhounds run in field trials. Slow-trailing hounds with good voices are used by hunters with guns. Drag hounds follow an artificial scent. Packs kept by hunt clubs follow the fox as an exercise in houndsmanship and horsemanship.

A dream day in the life of an American Foxhound
  Starting his day off with an early morning hunt, the American Foxhound loves to stay busy. With little downtime in the home, he would love to accompany his owner for a day on the farm or on the trails. Stopping for little rest, this pup wants to hunt, run and listen to all of the commands that his pack leader — you — throw at him.

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