Everything about your Pomsky - LUV My dogs

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Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Everything about your Pomsky

  Cute, silly, and suited for apartment life, the Pomsky is a dog that likes to be the center of attention, and with their adorable looks and playful antics, they often get the adoration they crave. Their unfortunate start as a designer breed mixed between Siberian Husky and Pomeranian parents hasn’t stopped them from earning popularity with dog lovers. Unfortunately, those who rush to buy Pomsky puppies from breeders are often overwhelmed and unprepared for their needs, and dogs of this breed sometimes find themselves left at shelters or with rescue groups. 

Overview
  The Pomsky is a mixed breed the result of crossing the Siberian Husky with a Pomeranian. She is a medium sized dog with a life span of 13 to 15 years. She is bred using artificial insemination as natural breeding would be dangerous due to the size difference between the parents. She is a fun and watchful dog who is great for families with older kids, couples or singles or seniors as long as she can be given the exercise she needs.
  The Pomsky is a dog best suited for a household that does not have children or other pets unless she is going to be raised with them. Early socialization and training are important for her. If you love the look of the Husky but do not have the room or the energy for a purebred the Pomsky is a great though expensive substitute.

Highlights
  • Pomsky are very trainable, but may inherit some stubbornness from the Siberian Husky, so they are best suited for experienced dog owners.
  • The Pomsky's thick coat makes it more tolerant of cold weather than most other kinds of lap dogs.
  • Pomskies are vocal dogs that tend to be yappy if they aren't properly trained.
  • The coat of the breed comes in a variety of colors, just like its parent breeds.
  • Socialization with other dogs and people is important, especially at an early age.
  • Pomsky are highly adaptable, don't have large space requirements, and only have moderate exercise needs, making them good apartment dogs.
Other Quick Facts

  • A Pomsky typically has a soft, fluffy, silky coat, prick ears and a furry tail that swishes over the back.
  • The Pomsky is usually bred from a Siberian Husky female and a Pomeranian male. Breedings are usually done through artificial insemination because of the size difference in the two breeds.
  • The size of a Pomsky can vary dramatically, from toy size to medium size. Like their parent breeds, the dogs can come in many different patterns and colors, such as grey/white, brown red, blue merle, blonde and more.
Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Mixed Breed Dogs
Average lifespan: 12 to 15 years
Average size: 20-30 lb
Coat appearance: Fluffy, soft, wavy, double
Coloration: black-and-white coloration,this breed can exhibit a wide range of colors including black, grey, brown, red, blue, blonde, and more
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, singles and seniors, apartments and houses with/without yards
Temperament: Loving, friendly, energetic, playful
Comparable Breeds: Pomeranian, Siberian Husky

History
  Pomsky breeders have formed the Pomsky Club of America, with the goal of achieving a recognized purebred dog. This can take years, however, and will not be accomplished any time soon.
  But crossing two breeds over and over does not a breed make. To achieve consistency in appearance, size and temperament, breeders must select the puppies with the traits they want and breed them over several generations for the traits to become set.
Crossbreeds such as Pomskies have become popular over the past 10 or 20 years as people seek out dogs that are different from the everyday Yorkie or Poodle. It’s also often claimed that crossbreeds are hypoallergenic or have fewer health problems or will carry the best traits of each breed, but this just isn’t true.
  Whatever his breed, cross or mix, love your dog for what he is: a unique and loving companion.

Personality
  The Pomsky is a bit of a comedian and tends to know that its cute antics will be met with plenty of adoration from human onlookers. They are highly adaptable to change, and their moderate exercise needs make them fairly suited to apartment living, so long as they get at least one long walk per day. That said, they tend to inherit their Husky parents' chatty howling and whining tendencies along with their Pomeranian parents' penchant for yapping.   This makes them very vocal dogs that may get on the neighbors' nerves. Also, they shed a ton, so be prepared to find hair everywhere and have some lint rollers and a vacuum cleaner at the ready. Pomskies tend to latch on to one favorite family member, though they may get along with all humans in the household. Socialization is very important and should begin at an early age. Pomskies can be nervous around strangers if they haven't been properly socialized.

Health
Since the breed is so new, not much is known about any common Pomsky health conditions. Keep in mind, though, that as is common with most mixed breeds, any hereditary health conditions that show up in either the Pomerian  or the Husky  may show up in your Pomsky, as well.

Care
As with any other breed, Pomskies need to be groomed on a regular basis to make sure their coats and skin are kept in top condition. They also need to be given regular daily exercise to ensure they remain fit and healthy. On top of this, dogs need to be fed good quality food that meets all their nutritional needs throughout their lives.

Living Conditions
The Pomsky’s generally small size makes this breed the perfect companion for someone living in an apartment all the way up to a larger home.

Training
Pomskies are highly intelligent and respond well to reward based training methods. However, they can sometimes inherit the Pomeranian’s stubbornness and the willfulness of the Siberian Husky and should therefore be handled with calm and assertive leadership. Failure to do so can result in “small dog syndrome” and other behavioral problems. For instance, Pomskies can be prone to resource guarding like the Pomeranians, and catching early signs of this behavioral problem will help you eliminate before it becomes a serious issue.
  For most new dog owners, it’s important to start with the basics such as potty training and learning to walk on a leash. Depending on the breeder you’ve got your Pomsky from and the puppy’s age, they might already know a trick or two, but it’s also highly likely you’ll need to be the one that that housetrains them. Training a puppy is not an easy feat, but it’s important to teach your Pomsky fur baby manners while they’re still young. If they sniff out you’re not an alpha, they’ll shamelessly exploit your weak side to their advantage- as any smart pupper would do!

Exercise
  Pomskies are high energy, intelligent dogs, much like both parent breeds. As such they must be given the right amount of daily exercise and as much mental stimulation as possible for them to be truly happy, well-rounded dogs. They need to be given a minimum of 30 to 40 minutes exercise a day, but more would be better so that boredom does not set in which could lead to a Pomsky developing some unwanted behavioural issues around the home.
  A shorter walk in the morning would be fine, but a longer more interesting one in the afternoon is a must. These dogs also like to be able to roam around a back garden as often as possible so they can really let off steam. However, the fencing must be extremely secure to keep these energetic dogs in because if they find a weakness in the fence, they will soon escape out and get into all sorts of trouble.

Grooming
  A Pomsky has a double coat that is usually soft, fluffy and silky. Brush or comb the Pomsky coat with a bristle brush at least weekly to distribute skin oils and prevent or remove mats and tangles.
  Bathe a Pomsky as needed. That might be weekly , monthly or somewhere in between.
Twice a year he “blows coat” as it’s called, losing a great deal of hair so new hair can grow in. This period can last up to three months during each shedding season — typically spring and fall. Brushing him daily at this time will help to ensure that loose fur comes out when you want it to and helps to keep it off your clothing and furniture.
  Other grooming needs include trimming his nails every few weeks, keeping his ears clean and dry and brushing his teeth regularly — daily if you can — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste. Small dogs can be especially prone to periodontal disease.

Children And Other Pets
  Pomskies are often wary of small children who may not be properly trained on how to handle animals, and they can nip if they feel uncomfortable or threatened. They can get along with other dogs if they are socialized, especially if they have been raised with them, though the high prey drive they inherit from the Husky means they might like to give chase to smaller animals like cats. It is best to socialize them early, especially if you plan to have them in a household with children or other pets.

Fun Facts About the Pomsky
  • The Pomsky is usually made by crossing a female Siberian Husky with a male Pomeranian to avoid complications caused by the smaller Pomeranian bearing a litter of larger puppies.
  • There is no way to predict which characteristics the Pomsky will inherit from each parent breed, but many Pomskies become protective of their owners and are skittish around children – they may not be the best family pet.
  • Though the black-and-white Husky-like coloration is the most popular for Pomskies, these dogs can range in coat type and length as well as color, including shades of brown, red, and even blonde.
  • Is the Pomsky a vulnerable breed? No, they have become one of the more popular cross breeds thanks to their kind natures and charming looks
  • A Pomsky’s sire is a Pomeranian and their dam is a Siberian Husky to avoid birthing complications
  • They come in lots of sizes, but prospective owners should be careful when considering buying an extra small Pomsky because of the health issues associated with their size
Did You Know?
Pomskies can be smart and learn quickly, especially when motivated by praise and food rewards.
  

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