Everything about your Goldendoodle - LUV My dogs

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Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Everything about your Goldendoodle

  Also known as the Groodle, the Goldendoodle ranges in size from small to large, depending on the variant of Poodle that the Golden Retriever is crossed with. Originally bred as a larger alternative to the already popular designer breed known as the Cockapoo, the Goldendoodle has proven to be an excellent family dog.
  The Goldendoodle is an affectionate and gentle dog that has gained popularity since he was first developed in 1990s. He's still a young cross compared to other designer breeds, and many of today's litters are the results of first-generation breedings between Poodles and Golden Retrievers.
  Goldendoodles are usually highly social and get along well with everyone. They don't do well in any type of guarding or watchdog role and should not be used in that capacity. They can thrive in both city and country settings, but they're not well suited to apartment living, since they do better with the space provided by a fenced yard. Goldendoodles should not live outside or in a kennel, however, since they thrive when they are in contact with the people they love.

Overview
  The Goldendoodle is a crossbreed. Opening your heart and home to a crossbreed is like opening a beautifully wrapped package on your birthday: it's exciting, but you never know what's inside. It’s often assumed that a cross breed will combine the best of two or more breeds, but genetics doesn’t always work that way. The way genes express themselves is not always subject to a breeder’s control, even less so when two different breeds are crossed. That’s something to keep in mind before you lay down lots of money for a dog that you have been assured will be hypoallergenic or healthier than a purebred.
  The Goldendoodle is a cross between a Golden Retriever and a Poodle . At their best, they are intelligent, friendly, and affectionate. They come in three sizes: miniature, medium , and standard. Because they are a cross breed, their traits are not fixed, so there is not a guarantee that the Goldendoodle puppy you purchase will fall into the desired weight range.
  Poodles have a reputation for being hypoallergenic, meaning that they can supposedly be tolerated by people who have allergies to dogs. Because they have the Poodle in their heritage, Goldendoodles are sometimes promoted as being hypoallergenic. But allergies are not caused by a particular dog coat type but by dander, the dead skin cells that are shed by all dogs . There is no scientific evidence that any breed or cross breed is more or less allergenic than any other dog. Some people with mild allergies react less severely to particular dogs, but no reputable breeder will guarantee that her dogs are hypoallergenic.

Highlights
  • Designer dogs, also called hybrids, aren't true breeds — they're crosses of two specific breeds. If you're interested in a Goldendoodle puppy, understand that his looks, size, and temperament aren't as predictable as those of purebreds, since you don't know which characteristics from each breed will show up in any given dog.
  • The Goldendoodle is considered to be a non- to light shedder, but he requires regular grooming and clipping. If the coat is kept short, it should be clipped every six to eight weeks and brushed every few weeks. If the coat is kept in its natural state, it should be brushed once every week or two.
  • The Goldendoodle is not a watch dog, and he's generally not known to be noisy. He may not bark even if someone knocks on the door.
  • Although he's got an average energy level, the Goldendoodle is not recommended for apartments. He does much better in a home with a fenced yard.
  • The Goldendoodle requires about 20 to 30 minutes of daily exercise.
  • Being a wonderful family companion, the Goldendoodle generally gets along well with children and does well with other dogs and family pets.
  • The Goldendoodle is a very social dog who should not live away from his family. He's are not suited to living in a kennel or outside; he wants to be in the house.
  • The Goldendoodle can suffer from separation anxiety if left for long periods at a time.
  • The Goldendoodle may make an excellent companion to people with allergies.

Other Quick Facts

  • Some Goldendoodles have been trained as guide dogs, a job for which their temperament and intelligence is ideally suited.
  • Goldendoodles are companion dogs. They love their people and need to live in the house, never outdoors.
  • Like their Poodle parent, Goldendoodles can come in many different colors.
Breed standards
AKC group, UKC group: Not recognized as a standardized breed by any major kennel club.
Dog Breed Group: Hybrid Dogs
Average lifespan: 10-13 years
Average size: 50 to 90 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense, Medium, Silky, Thick, and Water-Repellent
Coloration: Cream, Gold, Red, Black, Brown, White
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles and seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Intelligent, lovable, energetic, friendly
Comparable Breeds: Golden Retriever, Poodle



History
  The Goldendoodle was first bred by Monica Dickens in 1969.Popularity for the goldendoodle grew in the 1990s when breeders in North America and Australia began crossing Golden Retrievers with Standard Poodles. The original purpose of the cross was to develop guide dogs suitable for visually impaired individuals with allergies. Poodles are considered to be hypoallergenic. Their coats do not shed, which reduces dander. Dander is a protein that sheds from the skin and causes allergies in humans.
  The goldendoodle is referred to as a designer dog. The Encyclopædia Britannica traces the term "designer dog" to the late 20th century when breeders began to cross purebred    Poodles with other purebred breeds in order to obtain a dog with the poodle's non-shedding coat, along with various desirable characteristics from other breeds.In regards to goldendoodles, golden retrievers are considered a great family dog,which is why they have been used to cross breed with poodles.

Temperament
  Goldendoodles of whatever generation are usually friends of everyone and strangers to no one, which makes them an ideal choice as a family dog. Due to their affable, outgoing personalities, Goldendoodles also make excellent companions for people with disabilities. They are cheerful, trustworthy, gentle, affectionate, smart and highly trainable animals that have a keen desire to please. 
  When properly socialized, Goldendoodles get along famously with kids, strangers and other companion animals. They don’t have a particularly strong prey drive and can be quite compatible with cats and smaller dogs, when introduced in a good way. These are social dogs that thrive in the presence of people and crumble if they are not given enough time, attention and affection. 
  Like any dog, Goldendoodles can get into mischief and develop behavioral problems if they are left alone for long periods of time. Goldendoodles require a moderate amount of exercise and can live happily in urban or rural environments. This is a “breed-in-progress,” whose temperament and other traits should become more consistent and predictable as time goes on.

Health Problems
  Goldendoodles can be predisposed to all of the health issues faced by Golden Retrievers and Poodles because they are a combination of the two breeds. Some of the most common health problems are hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, Von Willebrand’s Disease, juvenile cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy, subaortic stenosis, sebaceous adenitis, patella luxation, hypothyroidism and ear infections.

Care

  The Goldendoodle can be easy to train. Intelligent, he's usually eager to please — a perfect combination for either first-time trainers or experienced trainers. He should be trained with positive reinforcement, since harsh corrections could damage his confidence.
Socialization is important for all breeds, but for a gentle dog like the Goldendoodle it can be instrumental in discouraging any shyness or timidity.
  The Goldendoodle has an average energy level and will require daily exercise through walks or a good romp in the back yard. Generally speaking, 20 to 30 minutes of daily exercise will be enough to keep a Goldendoodle from becoming bored. He's known for his love of water, so swimming provides another opportunity for appropriate exercise.
  Since the Goldendoodle may grow large, he does require room to move. He's not recommended for apartments but should have a home with some type of fenced yard. He's not an ideal pet for outdoor or kennel living, since he thrives when he's with his family, so owners should expect to keep him primarily in the house.
  The Goldendoodle can also suffer from separation anxiety, which can lead to destructive behavior, if he's left alone for long periods at a time.

Trainability

  Most Goldendoodles are smart and easy to train. They are eager, willing learners that respond best to positive reinforcement and gentleness. Harsh, loud corrections or training by punishment are not helpful when working with these  dogs. Socialization and training should start while the dog is still a puppy and continue throughout its life. A well-socialized, well-trained Goldendoodle is a happy Goldendoodle and a wonderful companion.

Exercise Requirements
  Goldendoodles require a fair amount of exercise each day. They need to be walked at least three times daily. Each walk should last for around half an hour. Time to stretch their legs and run is essential for the Goldendoodle. Living in the city is fine, provided they will have access to a dog park weekly. Those who have a fenced in yard will find that the Goldendoodle will get all the exercise he needs by playing ball with the kids in the backyard. Never let this dog exercise without being in a securely, fenced area or on a leash.

Grooming
  Goldendoodles can have different types of fur. Some look like shaggy retrievers, others resemble a Poodle with loose curls and some fall somewhere in the middle. They are not low-maintenance dogs when it comes to grooming. Plan to brush the Goldendoodle at least every other day, using a slicker brush, and have him clipped every eight to twelve weeks.
  Ear infections can be a problem in Goldendoodles. Be sure to keep the ears dry and clean, especially after the dog has had a bath or gone swimming. Report redness, bad odor, head shaking, or other potential ear issues to your veterinarian. 
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails every few weeks, and brush his teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste -daily if possible -  especially if he’s on the small side. Small dogs are especially prone to periodontal disease. Brushing the teeth contributes to overall good health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Goldendoodle makes a wonderful family pet, especially if his nature takes after the Golden Retriever parent. He's likely to be highly patient and gentle and to get along well with children of all ages.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
He does well in homes with other dogs and pets and doesn't actively show aggression toward other animals. Of course, as with all dogs, it's important to properly socialize your Goldendoodle from puppyhood.

Is the Goldendoodle the Right Breed for you?
High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The Goldendoodle is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?

  Well-bred Goldendoodles are outgoing, social dogs and often have an uncanny ability to communicate with their people. Some Goldendoodles have even been trained as guide dogs.
  Since 2005, Goldendoodles have been used as pets, agility dogs, guide dogs, therapy dogs, diabetic dogs, search dogs and rescue dogs, as they have inherited the poodle's intelligence and the golden retriever's ease of training. Goldendoodles have also become increasingly used as domestic pets due to their affection towards families, as well as their friendliness and patience with children and strangers.



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