January 2017 - LUV My dogs

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Everything about your Appenzeller Sennenhund

Everything about your Appenzeller Sennenhund
  The Appenzeller originated as an all-around farm dog breed, who stayed busy herding the livestock, guarding the farm, and pulling carts in his native Switzerland. Today’s Appenzellers have still got the energy, smarts, and self-confidence that makes for valuable working dogs — but they’re anything but low-maintenance. Dogs of this breed need lots of exercise, training, and a job to do.

Overview
  Also known as the Appenzeller Mountain Dog and Appenzell Cattle Dog, the Appenzeller Sennenhunde is the rarest of the four ancient Swiss mountain dog breeds. The breed gets its name from the Swiss herders known as the Senn and Appenzell region of the Swiss Alps to which this breed is native.
  Like its cousins the Entlebucher, the Greater Swiss Mountain Dog and the Bernese Mountain Dog, the Appenzeller is a well-muscled and powerfully built dog. Although a medium-sized dog, it is extremely strong and is capable of pulling small carts and trolleys and working as an all-purpose farm dog. Appenzeller’s have a thick double-coat that is black, brown and white in color and its ears are high set and floppy.
  Appenzellers are an extremely hard working breed and require a great deal of physical and mental exercise to remain happy and healthy. Although an excellent herder and guarder of livestock, their high maintenance and high exercise requirements have not made them overly popular in the United States.

Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Herding Dogs
Height: 1 foot, 7 inches to 1 foot, 10 inches tall at the shoulder
Weight: 48 to 55 pounds
Life Span: 9 to 12 years
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with backyards, farms and rural areas
Temperament: Lively, self-assured, fearless, reliable
Comparable Breeds: Entlebucher Mountain Dog, Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

History 
  The Appenzeller Sennenhund is descended from the general Sennenhund type which may have existed in antiquity, or descended from "cattle dogs left there by the Romans", but the first breed club for the breed was founded and the stud book for the breed started in 1906 by Albert Heim and others, who wrote the first breed standard in 1916. An early reference to the breed's predecessors was made in an 1853 book, "Tierleben der Alpenwelt" (Animal Life in the Alps), referring to dogs in the Appenzell region. The Appenzeller Sennenhund was only recognised internationally as a separate breed in 1989.
  The Appenzeller Sennenhund was originally kept primarily as a cattle herding dog, and a flock guardian. It was also used as a draft dog, and general farm dog. The breed also was known for its affinity to both herd and guard with such devotion that they would give their life to protect their charge. Today the breed is primarily kept as a companion, and excels in agility/flyball competitions, obedience competitions and Schutzhund. They are also still used in many places as working cattle dogs even now. They are highly intelligent, and learn quickly.


Temperament
  The Appenzeller's working roots are still very obvious in today's dogs. Appenzeller Mountain Dogs are exuberant, willful, playful, intelligent and loyal. While they are wary of strangers, they are very affectionate with their families and make excellent guard dogs and family dogs.

Health Problems
  The Appenzeller is an extremely healthy breed of dog with little to no hereditary health issues. This is quite rare for a breed of this size.


Living Conditions
  The Appenzell Mountain Dog is not recommended for apartment life. They prefer to live outdoors and should have acreage where they can run free, such as a farm. Appenzells that do not have acreage need extra attention to their mental and physical exercise needs. They like to bark, so they are not suited for areas with close neighbors, however giving them the proper amount of leadership and exercise can lessen their urge to bark.

Training
  Appenzellers are an extremely intelligent breed and can learn new tasks quickly. However, they are also capable of independent thinking and require owners that can demonstrate loving but firm leadership, consistently. If an owner is meek or unsure, these dogs can quickly assume the role of the pack leader and start trying to dictate terms. This can be dangerous considering the dog’s size and strength. For this reason, Appenzellers are not recommended as a dog breed for first-time owners.
Exercise Requirements
  Appenzellers were bred to work hard throughout the day, and ensuring that they have enough physical and mental exercise is an important aspect of being a responsible Appenzeller owner. Like all working dogs, Appenzellers too require a ‘meaningful’ task that they can apply themselves to each day. When denied of such a job, they can often turn moody and neurotic and can develop various undesirable behaviors.

Grooming
  Appenzeller Sennenhunds are a generally low-maintenance breed.  They do not require professional grooming, only a regular brushing.  Other than that, only those routine maintenance procedures that every breed needs, such as nail clipping and teeth brushing, are necessary.  Appenzeller Sennenhunds do shed, and they can shed very, very heavily.   This shedding is usually worst when the seasons change and the dog changes coats.   Regular brushing will help reduce shedding, but this breed is still more than capable of covering clothes, furniture, and carpets with hair.
Is this breed right for you?
  If you love the great outdoors, enjoy physical activities like hiking, jogging and long games of fetch, and have previous experience with herding dogs, then the Appenzeller could be the perfect dog for you. These dogs are still rare in the States, so if you want your loyal companion to stand out from the crowd, bring an Appenzeller Mountain Dog home today.




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Everything about your Keeshond

Everything about your Keeshond
  The Keeshond is an old dog breed, once a companion and watchdog on the barges and boats that traveled the canals and rivers of Holland in the 17th and 18th centuries. He’s almost exclusively a companion dog today. He’s a people-lover; willing to participate in all family activities, he thrives with people who expect this of their dog. He is lively, alert, and intelligent — qualities that won him status as the most beloved dog in Holland.

Overview
  Originating from the Arctic region, the Keeshond is believed to be related to the Chow Chow, Finnish Spitz and more. Especially popular with the Dutch, the breed is known for protecting farms, riverboats and barges. Extremely friendly, the dog still makes for a great watchdog due to his bark, but will be nice to strangers. A great companion, the Keeshond makes a great family pet and is very quick to learn.
  While the Keeshond will issue a stern bark when someone approaches his property, he's such a love that he'll readily accept anyone his owner brings into the household. In truth, he isn't a very effective guard dog.
  The Keeshond is a fan of cool weather. He likes spending time outside when the weather is crisp. However, he isn't a backyard dog; he's too people-oriented for that. He needs to live inside with his family and participate in all their activities.

Highlights
  • The Keeshond is never reluctant to issue a warning bark to alert his family to strangers. His propensity to bark can be a problem if he's left alone too much and becomes bored.
  • The best way to make a Keeshond miserable is to keep him separated from his family. He was bred to be a companion, and he needs to be part of family life. If you don't want a dog joining in family barbeques, card games, or movie time, consider a more independent breed.
  • Keeping the Keeshond coat in good condition isn't terribly difficult, but the breed does shed like crazy once or twice or year. Luckily, frequent bathing isn't usually needed — the Keeshond scores low on doggie odor.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Keeshond is a member of the Spitz, or Nordic, family of dogs. He has a wedge-shaped head with a foxy expression, dark-brown eyes that are almond-shaped, and a lionlike mane around his neck.
  • Early Keeshonden were known by such names as “fox dog,” “overweight Pomeranians” and “Dutch barge dogs.”
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 13 - 15 years
Average size: 35 - 45 pounds
Coat appearance: Harsh outer coat, downy undercoat
Coloration: Gray, black and cream
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Medium-sized, sturdy body with a striking resemblance to the Samoyed; dark eyes with black markings on the face; fluffy coat and exterior, erect ears and thick tail that curls over the back
Possible alterations: None

Comparable Breeds: Samoyed, Schipperke

History 
  If you were to travel back to the Amsterdam of in the early 1800s, you'd see a familiar face on the barges passing by: the Keeshond. Paintings by Dutch artists such as Jan Steen portray a dog that is not much different than the Keeshond we see today. This handsome dog is related to other Spitz breeds such as the Chow Chow, Norwegian Elkhound, Finnish Spitz, and Pomeranian. The little Pom is one of his closest relatives.
  The Dutch barge dog rode on small vessels that traveled the Rhine River, acting as both watchdogs and companions to barge captains. Their travels made them known well beyond   The Netherlands, but they really gained a name during the political turmoil that gripped Holland in the late 18th century. The leader of the Patriot party, Kees de Gyselaer, was accompanied by one of the personable dogs, also named Kees, and he came to symbolize the Patriot movement. Unfortunately, when the Patriots were defeated the dogs’ popularity plummeted and eventually only a few remained.
  The Keeshond’s fortunes turned around in 1920 when Baroness van Hardenbroek took an interest in the breed and helped bring it back into favor. A decade later, the American Kennel Club recognized the breed.
  The Keeshond is now considered the national dog of The Netherlands. In the United States, he ranks 87 th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Personality
  The Keeshond was bred more to be a companion than a watchdog. He's not a hunter, nor does he have an innate desire for any special job. He is, first and foremost, a devoted friend.
  He's also intelligent and highly trainable. He's so smart, in fact, that he can be a little mischievous. Expect the unexpected with these fellows. Despite this, the breed easily learns proper canine manners and can do well in the obedience ring.
  A Keeshond is a lively, alert dog, full of personality. When he's excited or happy, he likes to share his joy with everyone, often spinning in circles. His outgoing personality, as well as his love of adults and children alike, endears him to all.
  As with every dog, the Keeshond needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences. Socialization helps ensure that your Keeshond puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Care
  Although the Keeshond can survive outdoors in cool or temperate climates, it is a very sociable dog that prefers to live indoors with its human family. As it is a lively breed, moderate exercise, such as a brisk on-leash walk or a vigorous game session, is sufficient for meeting its needs. The dog's double coat, meanwhile, requires brushing occasionally every week and more during the shedding seasons.

Health 
  Keeshonden are not without health issues. They are generally healthy animals however; predisposed problems can prove to be detrimental. These diseases/disorders include Addison’s disease, Hip Dysplasia, Diabetes Mellitus, Progressive Retinal Atrophy, Cataracts, Hypothyroidism, Von Willebrand’s Disease, Allergies and Epilepsy. If left untreated, some of these issues can jeopardize the life of a Keeshond. Other ailment might be problematic but with proper care, medication and treatment, a dog can live a long, fulfilling and comfortable life.

Living conditions
  Will be okay in an apartment, although they should at least have an average-sized yard. Keeshonden prefer cool climates; they cannot withstand the heat well due to their thick coats.

Training
  The Keeshond is a fast learner that seems to be able to read his owner’s mind. Although they do have an independent streak, with patience and kindness, the Keeshond can be an incredibly obedient yet still fun-loving companion. He needs an owner who is caring and gentle. Repetitive training sessions that are calm and result in the dog getting some kind of yummy reward are most successful. Harsh words and treatment will get you nowhere with a Keeshond. They require love, kindness and easy instruction during all training sessions. Positive reinforcement will have your Keeshond the picture perfect companion.
  Keeshonden can go from the home to the breed ring to the obedience in zero to sixty seconds. They also make great therapy dogs. Their adorable appearance coupled with their caring nature make them perfect for visiting ailing kids and adults in hospitals, rehabilitation facilities and nursing bills.

Exercise Requirements
  Keeshonden do not need a boatload of exercise daily. Inside of a fenced backyard, coupled with a family member who loves to play fetch will provide the average Keeshond with all the running time he needs to stay healthy, happy and out of trouble. Without appropriate exercise, Keeshonden can become unruly and rip things apart inside of the house. Nobody wants their home destroyed so at the very least, a few brisk walks daily will keep your Keeshond content.  Exercise shouldn’t be boring and repetitive. It should be spontaneous at times.

Grooming
  The Keeshond has a long, abundant double coat with a harsh texture. There’s a lot of it, and the dogs shed heavily. The adult coat comes in when the dog is 18 months to 2 years old.
  Although the Keeshond’s coat looks like it might take a lot of work to maintain, it can be kept up with brushing once or twice a week — more often when he’s shedding. You’ll spend about an hour caring for the coat each week. Grooming tools to have on hand are a soft slicker brush for the cottony puppy coat, a pin brush, a stainless steel Greyhound comb, and a good pair of shears or scissors for trimming the hair on the feet. Ask your puppy’s breeder for advice on how to groom the dog or visit this breeder’s website for detailed grooming tips.
If you do a good job of keeping the Keeshond brushed, he shouldn’t need a bath more than two or three times a year. Whatever you do, don’t shave the coat. It serves as insulation from heat and cold.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Keeshond is a great pet for families with children. He's a playful, good-natured companion for kids of all ages. And as long as he is well socialized and well trained, the Keeshond gets along well with other dogs and pets.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

Is this breed right for you?
  A family-friendly breed, the Keeshond gets along great with children and other animals of the house. Playful and adventurous, the dog loves to romp outside and will do best with a decent-sized yard that he can have access to. Not exactly a guard dog due to his friendly and outgoing nature, the Keeshond does make for a wonderful watchdog. Barking at anything he's unsure of, he does his best to protect his loved ones. With a double coat, the dog requires brushing every other week and sheds twice a year.

Did You Know?
  The Keeshond is a Dutch breed who served as a watchdog on barges and is named for an 18th century political figure — Kees de Gyselaer — who owned one of the dogs. The name is pronounced “kayz hund,” not “keesh hound,” and the plural is “Keeshonden.”

A dream day in the life of a Keeshond
  A family dog through and through, the Keeshond will be happiest when waking up surrounded by his loved ones. Running outside to check the perimeter of the house, he'll play and romp around a bit before returning inside. Affectionate, he loves getting petted and praised. Playing around with the little members of the family, he'll enjoy an evening stroll before having a bit of family time and will then doze off with the rest of the gang.

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Everything about your English Springer Spaniel

Everything about your English Springer Spaniel
  The English Springer Spaniel dog breed was developed as a gun dog to flush, or spring, game in the field, but he’s also a popular companion. Athletic and versatile, he’s been known to participate in agility, hunt tests, tracking, obedience trials and more, and he’s a great pal to have along when you go hiking or camping.

Overview
  The oldest and most-established gun dog, the English Springer Spaniel made its appearance during the Renaissance when it would accompany European hunters. Once born alongside Cocker Spaniels, English Springer Spaniels were the larger of the breeds used to chase game. The English Springer Spaniel received its name because of its springing abilities. Now a popular breed in the home, this dog is known for its intelligence, tricks, affection and obedience.

Highlights
  • English Springer Spaniels don't like to be left alone and may become nuisance barkers if they're bored or lonely.
  • In recent years, there have been reports of English Springer Spaniels who are aggressive or overly submissive. Be sure to get your Springer from a breeder who tests his or her breeding dogs for health and temperament.
  • In essence, there are two varieties of English Spring Spaniel: ones intended to work in the field, and ones intended to show. Be sure you know the difference and get the type that best suits your needs.
  • Don't expect your English Springer Spaniel to be a good guard dog. They bark at noises and when strangers come around, but quickly settle down and want to be pet.
  • English Springer Spaniels were developed to have great stamina and energy. Be sure that you can provide your dog with adequate exercise or he may become nervous and destructive.
  • Some English Springer Spaniels can demonstrate submissive urination, which means they pee in excitement or anxiety when you come home. The best way to deal with this is to make homecomings very low key by not looking at or paying attention to your dog until you've been home for a few minutes. If you do this, your puppy may grow out of this behavior.
  • Be sure to keep your English Springer Spaniel on a leash when you take him to unprotected areas. You never know when he will see a bird and be overcome by his instinct to go after it!
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Field-bred English Springer Spaniels have less coat and a more pointy muzzle.
  • Show-bred English Springer Spaniels have a heavier build, longer hair, a squarish muzzle and long ears.
  • English English Springer Spaniels are high-energy dogs and need lots of daily exercise. As long as they get plenty of exercise, they can live in any type of home, including an apartment or condo.
  • When you are choosing a English Springer puppy, consider whether you are more interested in the dog for athletic ability and endurance or for the combination of beauty and milder temperament that is the show-bred dog.

Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting Group
UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
Average size: 40 - 55 pounds
Coat appearance: Medium length, with wave and feathering on ears, legs and face
Coloration: Liver and white; black and white; black, white and liver; white with blue or black markings
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Medium-sized dog, black or liver nose, oval-shaped eyes in brown to hazel color, deep chest, medium-length pendant ears, tails are typically docked and head is proportionate to body.
Possible alterations: Blue in color, various color combinations
Comparable Breeds: Cocker Spaniel, Golden Retriever

History 
English Springer Spaniel from 1807
  Spaniel-type dogs have been popular with hunters for centuries, used to flush feathered and furred game. Spaniels came in several sizes, and it wasn’t unusual for puppies in the same litter to grow up to be different sizes. The smaller ones were used to hunt woodcock, giving rise to the name Cocker Spaniel, and the larger ones were used to “spring” game for the hunter, flushing birds from the brush so they could be shot. They became known as English Springer Spaniels. In 1902, England’s Kennel Club separated the two types into distinct breeds, one becoming the English English Springer Spaniel, the other the English Cocker Spaniel.
  In the U.S., the English Springer Spaniel Field Trial Association formed in 1924 and began the competitions known as field trials, in which the dogs were judged for not only hunting ability but also that elusive quality, style. Since then, the breed has split into two types: the smaller field-bred English Springer prized for his hunting ability and the somewhat larger, beautified show-bred English Springer, known for a milder temperament and a heavier coat. Despite their differences, both types are registered as a single breed with the American Kennel Club. They rank 29 th in popularity, down just slightly from 26 th in 2000, so their appeal holds steady.

Personality
  The typical Springer is friendly, eager to please, quick to learn, and willing to obey. He should never be aggressive or timid. In recent years there have been reports of aggression or excessive timidity in the breed, as well as excessive separation anxiety. These traits aren't desirable and could be an indication of poor breeding. As with any breed of dog, it's important to research breeders and find ones who test their breeding stock not only for genetic diseases but also temperament.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Springers need early socialization and training. Like any dog, they can become timid if they are not properly socialized — exposed to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Early socialization helps ensure that your Springer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  The English Springer Spaniel, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 14 years, is prone to major health problems like elbow dysplasia, otitis externa, and canine hip dysplasia (CHD), and minor issues such as progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), phosphofructokinase deficiency, and retinal dysplasia.
  A few of the tests that are required for them are DNA for phosphofructokinase deficiency, elbow, knee, hip, and eye. Gastric torsion, entropion, patellar luxation, seizures, and rage syndrome can occasionally be seen in them.

Care
  The English Springer Spaniel needs combing and brushing at least once or twice a week. Apart from that, trimming and clipping every two to three months is good way to maintain a lustrous coat.
  Keeping them inside the house with access to the field is best for this breed, as they love to hunt. They need to be taken on long hours of walking, as routine exercise is very important for these dogs. Proper lessons in obedience should also be given.

Living Conditions
  They will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. English Springer Spaniels adapt well to town or city life. They are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Training
  Eager to please and generally loyal, it’s important to remember that English Springer Spaniels were bred as a gun dog and have instinctual tendencies toward outdoor hunting-style activities like retrieving. This kind of exercise is good to use during training. As far as the English Springer Spaniel’s temperament for training, it can be highly responsive and eager to please, if not distracted at times. Generally an obedient breed, the English Springer Spaniel should not be a difficult dog to give commands.

Exercise Requirements
  English Springer Spaniels are an active, athletic breed and should be exercised regularly. It’s important to take advantage of their hunting instincts and allow them to roam free in open areas, making them well-suited for the country life. Taking your dog to a park if you live in the city would be advisable – if you can handle this on a regular basis, then your English Springer Spaniel should have better overall mood and weight regulation.

Grooming 
  The English Springer Spaniel should be brushed at least three times per week to prevent tangles and mats, and keep the coat shiny and healthy. Trimming around the head, neck, ears, tail and feet can help neaten the appearance, as well. Trimming is required every six to eight weeks, and most owners take their Springer to a professional groomer for a bath and a trim.
  Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. The heavy ears of the English Springer do not allow for air to circulate, making them prone to infections. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease.   Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear down the toenails naturally.

Children And Other Pets
  Springers usually do well with children if they are brought up with them from puppyhood. Older Springers who are unfamiliar with children may do best in a home with children who are mature enough to interact with them appropriately.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Springers are also generally good with other pets in the household, even small ones, but they might see pet birds as prey since those are what they are bred to hunt. Keep them separated so they don't hurt each other. A parrot's beak is a mighty weapon.

Is this breed right for you?
  The English Springer Spaniel is a true-blue lover of water. While it's OK for apartment life due to its inactivity level indoors, the breed would love to have a yard to play in and a body of water to swim in. This pup loves children, is extremely loyal and very eager to please its human companion. Although this breed is OK with other animals, the English Springer Spaniel has a natural instinct to hunt for birds. Due to a longer coat, it will need regular grooming and bathing.

Did You Know?
  English Springer Spaniels are bred either as hunting dogs or show dogs - but never as both. There hasn’t been an English Springer Spaniel that has excelled in both the show ring and hunting grounds in more than 50 years.

A dream day in the life
  The loving English Springer Spaniel will wake up at the foot of its owner's bed. Following the family downstairs, it'll go out for a quick romp around the yard and a possible dip in the pool. After checking the home turf, it'll mosey back inside to play with the kids. It'll be happy with a few games, tricks and a nice walk before ending the day with its loved ones.
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Monday, January 16, 2017

Everything about your Cardigan Welsh Corgis

Everything about your Cardigan Welsh Corgis
  Affectionately called the “yard-long dog” in his native Wales, the Cardigan Welsh Corgi is active and good-natured — and he loves to be busy. Cardigans make excellent watchdogs, but they can become nuisance barkers if they’re not properly trained.


Overview
  The Cardigan is a low-set dog, approximately 1.8 times longer than it is tall, with moderately heavy bone. It is small but powerful — capable of the agility, speed and endurance necessary to drive cattle for extended periods. Its small size allowed it to duck under the cattle's hooves should they kick at it. Its gait is free, smooth, effortless and ground-covering. Its double coat consists of a soft thick undercoat and slightly harsh outer coat of medium length. Its expression is alert, gentle and watchful, yet friendly.

  Fun-loving and high-spirited, yet easygoing, the Cardigan is a devoted and amusing companion. This is a hardy breed, capable of a day dodging kicks, so it is agile and tireless.   At home it is well-mannered but inclined to bark. It tends to be reserved with strangers and can be scrappy with other dogs.

Highlights

  • Cardigans are vocal dogs. They bark at anything and everything.
  • Cardigans are intelligent but can be stubborn. If housetraining is a problem, crate training is advised.
  • Cardigans have a strong herding instinct that may cause them to nip at the heels of your children when they are playing.
  • Cardigans like to eat and will overeat if given a chance. Be sure to monitor their food intake so they don't become obese.
  • Cardigans have a lot of energy and need daily exercise.
  • Cardigans should never be purchased from unknowledgeable breeders, puppy mills, or pet stores.

Other Quick Facts

  • Cardigans belong to the same family of dogs — the teckel group — as Dachshunds and Basset Hounds.
  • The word “Corgi” has several possible meanings: In ancient Welsh, it could translate as “dwarf dog,” or it may derive from the word “cur,” meaning to watch over — a common Corgi trait.
  • Comparable Breeds: Australian Cattle Dog, Pembroke Welsh Corgi
History
  The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is believed to be the older of the two Corgi breeds. Although no one knows for sure, his ancestors may have arrived in Wales alongside ancient Celts who migrated from central Europe. The dog that we know today hails from hilly Cardiganshire, which once teemed with farms and valleys that were perfect for raising cattle. His predecessors drove cattle to market, nipping at their heels to get the cattle to move, and pivoting out of the way if the livestock kicked back.
  Industrialization eventually put an end to the Corgi’s usefulness on the farm, and people began crossing the dogs with other herding breeds, including Collies and early Pomeranians, who were much larger than today’s standard Pom. The Collie cross may have thrown the blue merle coloration into the Cardigan’s gene pool.
  For a time, it looked as if the Cardigan would go the way of the dinosaurs because he was less popular than his cousin, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi. At one point, the two were even considered the same breed, but the Kennel Club separated them in 1934, giving the Cardigan more of a chance to survive on his own. The Cardigan Welsh Corgi Association wrote a standard for the breed, and thanks to a 1931 importation of some Corgis by Mrs. Robert Bole of Boston, Massachusetts, the dogs became known in the United States. In 1935, the American Kennel Club recognized the breed. The descendants of Mrs. Bole’s dogs did well in the show ring, including Ch. Swansea Jon, CD, who took Best of Breed at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show three years running. Today, the Cardigan is still less popular than the Pembroke — the Cardi ranks 84th among the breeds registered by the AKC — but he’s definitely in no danger of disappearing.

Personality
  The Cardigan Welsh Corgi my be small, but they pack a lot of dog into a little body. Originally used to herd cattle and hunt rodents in Cardiganshire, Wales; Corgiw were strong working dogs that took their jobs seriously. They would nip the heels of the cattle, and their small bodies enabled them to avoid being kicked. Today, the Corgi is still used on farms and ranches, but is also an energetic family companion. They are good with other pets, make reliable watchdogs, and are trustworthy around children. Corgis have a mind of their own but still have a desire to please people. They pack a large personality, which varies from clownish and attention seeking, to thoughtful and introspective.

Health
  The Cardigan Welsh Corgi, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, may suffer from degenerative myelopathy and canine hip dysplasia (CHD). This breed may also be prone to progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and urinary stones. To identify some of these conditions early, a veterinarian may recommend hip, eye, and DNA tests for the dog.

Care
  The Cardigan Welsh Corgi requires a lot of exercise for its small size. Its exercise needs are best met with a good herding session, but a vigorous play session or a moderate walk is also sufficient. It can easily live outdoors in cool or temperate weather, but it serves as an excellent house-dog and is at its best when allowed to spend time in both the yard and home. Its coat requires brushing once every week to remove dead hair.

Training
  Training for the Cardigan Welsh Corgi can be both a pleasure but also a test of your leadership. These dogs are generally obedient so long as you lay the fundamentals down – that is to say, you establish that you are the leader of your household and that your dog’s place is below that of any humans who reside in it. The dog should be able to pick up on this, and when it does, it can make a highly trainable and obedient companion.
Living Conditions
  Corgis will do fine in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. With enough exercise they can be calm indoors, but will be very active if they are lacking. Will do okay without a yard so long as they are taken for daily walks.

Exercise Requirements
  If you don’t like getting a lot of exercise, this probably isn’t the breed for you, as the Cardigan Welsh Corgi needs daily exercise that is fairly rigorous, and is capable of handling plenty of exercise on a habitual basis.

Grooming
  The Cardigan has a thick, medium-length double coat that sheds a lot, but it also repels dirt, lacks an odor, and is easy to maintain. To remove dead hair and distribute your Cardigan’s natural skin oils, groom his coat weekly using a shedding blade, slicker brush or fine pin brush. Baths are rarely needed. Cardigans also go through heavier seasonal sheds twice a year, so brush more often during that time to keep flying fur under control.
  The rest is routine care: Trim his nails every few weeks — you can also trim the hair on his feet for a neater look — and brush his teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Cardigans love children, but their herding instincts can motivate them to nip at a youngster’s feet or ankles. They can learn quickly, however, that this behavior is not permitted.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Cardigans are usually friendly toward other pets in the household, so long as they have been socialized with them. They can be aggressive toward dogs that aren’t part of their family, but they enjoy having a second or third dog in the family to play with, especially another Corgi. 

Did You Know?
  You can tell a Cardigan apart from a Pembroke Corgi if you remember that the Cardi has a long tail, like the sleeves of a cardigan sweater, while the Pembroke has a “broke” tail.




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Everything about your Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Everything about your Pembroke Welsh Corgi
  This type of Corgi was first used by farmers in South Wales to skillfully herd cattle, sheep, and ponies. A friendly and beautiful dog, it is still used today as a farm herder - nipping at heels and bending under hooves - but is more often kept as a house pet. 
   Outgoing, playful, loving, and companionable dogs, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi makes a great family pet, as it plays wonderfully with children, although it may be a bit reserved around strangers. As long as you provide your Pembroke Welsh Corgi with daily exercise, both mental and physical, you’ll get a lot out of your big-eared little companions.

Overview
  A popular competitor in dog sports, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi is an active and obedient herding breed. The Pembroke Welsh Corgi was bred in the 10th century in Pembrokeshire, Wales, as a working dog to herd cattle, horses and sheep. Having such a historical pedigree, there is a myth that the Pembroke Welsh Corgi sprang from the lairs of fairies and elves to help children around the farm. Regardless of which story you believe, the breed is a lover of children, family and wide-open spaces.

Highlights
  • Pembrokes are vocal dogs that have a tendency to bark at anything and everything.
  • While they are intelligent dogs, they also can be stubborn. If housebreaking is a problem, crate training is advised.
  • Their strong herding instinct may cause them to nip at the heels of children when they are playing.
  • Pembrokes are prone to overeating. Their food intake should be monitored closely.
  • Even though they are small dogs, Pembrokes have a lot of energy and need a healthy amount of exercise each day.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Pembroke originated in Wales some 1,000 years ago and was employed as an all-around farm dog. He herded livestock, killed rats and other vermin, and barked an alarm if strangers came by.
  • The Pembroke’s personality has been described as a cross between a cruise-line social director and a high school hall monitor. He likes being involved and being in charge.
  • Pembrokes can adapt to any home environment as long as they get plenty of daily exercise.
  • The Pembroke has a medium-length double coat that comes in red, sable, fawn, or black and tan, with or without white markings. He sheds.
  • The words “cor gi” are thought to mean “dwarf dog.”
  • The Pembroke is the smallest member of the Herding Group.
Breed standards
AKC group: Herding Group
UKC group: Herding
Average lifespan: 13 - 15 years
Average size: 24 - 30 pounds
Coat appearance: Short and thick
Coloration: Red, black and tan, fawn, sable
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Long body with short legs, black nose, eye colors in various shades of brown, oval-shaped feet, docked or short tail
Possible alterations: Often born without a tail; coat can sometimes be long or fluffy
Comparable Breeds: Australian Cattle Dog, Cardigan Welsh Corgi

History
  The Pembroke Welsh Corgi lineage has been traced back as far as 1107 AD. It is said that the Vikings and Flemish weavers brought the dogs with them as they traveled to reside in Wales. As far back as the 10th century, corgis were herding sheep, geese, ducks, horses, and cattle as one of the oldest herding breed of dogs.
  Pembroke Welsh Corgis are closely related to Schipperkes, Keeshonds, Pomeranians, Samoyeds, Chow Chows, Norwegian Elkhounds, and Finnish Spitz. Pembrokes and Cardigans first appeared together in 1925 when they were shown under the rules of The Kennel Club in Britain. The Corgi Club was founded in December 1925 in Carmarthen, Carmarthenshire. It is reported that the local members favored the Pembroke breed, so a club for Cardigan enthusiasts was founded a year or so later. Both groups have worked hard to ensure the appearance and type of breed are standardized through careful selective breeding. Pembrokes and Cardigans were officially recognized by the Kennel Club in 1928 and were initially categorized together under the single heading of Welsh Corgis, before the two breeds were recognized as separate and distinct in 1934.
  Pembroke Welsh Corgis are becoming more popular in the United States and rank 20th  in American Kennel Club registrations, as of 2015 . However, corgis are now listed as a "vulnerable" breed in the United Kingdom; the decline has been said to be due to a 2007 ban on tail-docking  in the U.K., as well as the lack of breeders in the U.K.

Personality
  The Pembroke Welsh Corgis my be small, but they pack a lot of dog into a little body. Originally used to herd cattle and hunt rodents in Pembrokeshire, Wales; Corgis were sturdy herding dogs who took their jobs seriously. They would nip the heels of the cattle to keep them in line, and their small bodies enabled them to avoid being kicked. Today, the Corgi is still used on farms and ranches, but is also an energetic family companion.
  They are good with other pets, make reliable watchdogs, and are trustworthy around children. Corgis have a mind of their own but still have a desire to please people. They pack a large personality, which varies from clownish and attention seeking, to thoughtful and introspective.

Health
  Pembrokes have an average life expectancy of 12–15 years. Pembroke Welsh Corgis are achondroplastic, meaning they are a "true dwarf" breed. As such, their stature and build can lead to certain non-inherited health conditions, but genetic issues should also be considered. Commonly, Pembrokes can suffer from monorchidism, Von Willebrand's disease, hip dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy, and inherited eye problems such as progressive retinal atrophy. Genetic testing is available for Pembroke Welsh Corgis to avoid these issues and enhance the genetic health pool. Pembrokes are also prone to obesity given a robust appetite, characteristic of herding group breeds.

Care
  As the Pembroke Welsh Corgi loves to herd, a regular herding session is an ideal form of exercise. If it is unable to herd, take it out for a moderate leash-led walk or play session.
  The Pembroke is suited to live outdoors in temperate weather, but temperamentally it prefers to share its owner's home, while having access to the yard. Coat care comprises of a weekly brushing routine to ride the dog's coat of any dead hair.

Training
  Smart and quick-witted, Pembroke Welsh Corgis learn quickly. But even though the breed is intelligent, you’ll still need to implement firm training methods and consistent training sessions to maintain good behavior and skills. As with most dog breeds, you shouldn’t use harsh or negative training methods on your Pembroke Welsh Corgi – it just won’t work and you’ll end up frustrated. Another thing to keep in mind is that Corgis don’t respond to repetitive training because it gets bored easily. Part of the training should include not to bark at strangers – socialization and obedience training can help this problem. And although the Pembroke Welsh Corgi probably will not respond to commands from strangers, it will respond commands from all family members. Once properly trained, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi makes good obedience and show dogs once they have been properly trained. This breed is natural herders, so herding trails are a good competition to get involved in.

Living Conditions
  Corgis will do fine in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. With enough exercise they can be calm indoors, but will be very active if they are lacking. Will do okay without a yard so long as they are taken for daily walks.

Exercise Requirements
  Exercise is important for the Pembroke Welsh Corgi, as it can develop back problems and needs to be kept at a healthy weight. If your dog is obese, its back problems will only get worse. As well, try to make sure your Corgi doesn’t jump. An active dog, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi loves to play and run. Regular exercise is mandatory, so a backyard is a great asset.  To wear your dog out, kids make excellent playmates – get them to play tug of war, hide and seek, and chase games. For outdoor activities to do with your Pembroke Welsh Corgi, go for a walk, jog or hike, or take your pooch to the dog park to play with other dogs.

Grooming
  The Pembroke Welsh Corgi is a wash-and-go dog. He has a medium-length double coat that should be brushed or combed at least weekly to control shedding. The coat sheds heavily twice a year, in spring and fall and will require extra brushing during that time.
  The Pembroke’s coat should never be extremely long with lots of feathering on the ears, chest, legs, feet, belly, and rear end. Dogs with that type of coat are known as “fluffies.” Some breeders may try to market fluffies as being rare or suggest that the coat can be trimmed, but don’t get sucked in by those tactics. There’s never any need to trim a Pembroke’s coat except to occasionally neaten the feet.
  Bathe the Pembroke only when he gets dirty or as often as you like. With the gentle dog shampoos available today, you can bathe a Pembroke weekly if you want without harming his coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Don’t let them get so long that you can hear them clicking on the floor. Brush the teeth with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for overall good health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Pembrokes have a remarkable affinity for children, but thanks to their herding instincts, they sometimes nip at children's feet or ankles. Pems are eager learners, though, and can be trained out of this behavior at a young age.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  They usually are good with other pets in the household, so long as they have been socialized with them.

Is this breed right for you?
  A very active breed, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi loves children and wide-open spaces. Doing OK in an apartment if sufficiently exercised, this breed would do best with a large yard to roam in. A loud barker, it needs to be trained early to avoid problems and instinctively herding its own people and other animals. Although intelligent, the Corgi can sometimes be hard to train. It is best that you give the breed a lot of attention and socialization, as when left alone too long, it may become destructive. Easy to groom, the dog does shed heavily twice a year.

Did You Know?
  Queen Elizabeth II is perhaps the world’s most famous Corgi owner; she typically has four or five at a time and is frequently photographed with them. Her first Corgi, Susan, was a gift on her 18th birthday; most of her current dogs are Susan’s descendants.

In popular culture
  • Cowboy Bebop features an extraordinarily intelligent Pembroke Welsh Corgi named Ein.
  • Lil' Lightning from 101 Dalmatians II: Patch's London Adventure is a Pembroke Welsh Corgi.
  • In RWBY, Ruby and Yang have a Pembroke Welsh Corgi named Zwei, who is sent to them by their father Taiyang and may be a reference to Ein.
  • Well-known for their association with Queen Elizabeth II, who has owned more then 30 during her reign.
A dream day in the life
  The Pembroke Welsh Corgi loves its family and loves to work. It will wake up ensuring that the home is safe and immediately run outside to herd whatever possible. Enjoying playtime, it'll be happy with a training session and a few brain-stimulating games. A few barks at the mailman and any passerby, you will always know where the dog is in the house. Once it has its daily run, the Corgi will be more than pleased to be with the family for the remainder of the day before heading off to bed.
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