2017 - LUV My dogs

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Thursday, December 28, 2017

Everything about your English Cocker Spaniel

Everything about your English Cocker Spaniel
  English Cockers are a medium-size dog breed with long ears and a happy disposition. The name Cocker comes from their use to hunt woodcock in England, although English Cockers have been used to hunt many other types of birds as well. They make great companion dogs for people who can give them the exercise they need.

Overview
  The English cocker must be able to find, flush and retrieve upland game birds for a full day of hunting. It must be small enough to penetrate dense cover, but of sufficient size to retrieve larger game. The broad muzzle helps when retrieving. The dog is slightly taller than long, compactly built and short coupled. This breed loves to hunt and shows it by the wagging of its tail when on the job. The English cocker has a driving, powerful gait that covers ground effortlessly. The coat is of medium length, silky in texture and either flat or slightly wavy. The feathering should not be so profuse that it becomes a hindrance in the field, but it should be long enough to protect the underside of the dog. The expression is soft and melting, yet dignified.
  The English Cocker Spaniel is merry, affectionate and even-tempered. They are easily-trained, are willing workers and excellent companions. They exhibit enthusiasm in the field, accompanied by an incessant action of the tail. Dogs exhibiting sluggish or hyper-active temperaments are to be faulted. They exhibit balance, both in motion and while standing. The head is especially characteristic of the breed, having a brainy appearance indicating high intelligence. The muzzle is also distinctive. The whole is always to be of primary consideration rather than any of the parts. Exaggeration of any of the parts is to be faulted.

Highlights
  • English Cocker Spaniels can be difficult to housetrain. Crate-training is recommended.
  • English Cockers are eager to please and like to be close to their families. But they are hunting dogs and might start chasing birds or small animals when outside. Be sure to keep your English Cocker on a leash whenever you aren't in a fenced area. Teach him to come to you when you call.
  • Cockers have a "soft" personality. Harsh training methods may make them fearful or shut down altogether. Be sure to use gentle, consistent training to get the best results.
  • If your English Cocker doesn't get enough exercise, he may become obese and destructive.
Other Quick Facts
  • What’s in a name? In Britain, what Americans call the “English” Cocker is the Cocker, and the American dog is the American Cocker.
  • The term spaniel used to be applied to any dog that hunted and flushed game birds. They were usually differentiated by size or the way they worked.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group:  Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 12 to 14 years
Average size: 26 to 34 pounds
Coat appearance: medium-long coats that are flat or slightly wavy, with a silky texture
Coloration: parti-color (white with black, liver, or shades of red); solid black, liver, or shades of red; black and tan; and liver and tan
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards
Temperament: Cheerful, energetic, loving, devoted
Comparable Breeds: Bichon FriseCavalier King Charles Spaniel


History
  The term spaniel used to be applied to any dog that hunted and flushed game birds. They were usually differentiated by size or the way they worked. For instance, there were land spaniels and water spaniels. Dogs that hunted woodcock became known as Cockers, while larger spaniels that “sprang” game from cover by flushing it became known as Springers. At one time, different types could be born in the same litter, but eventually they were separated into breeds: Cocker Spaniels and Springer Spaniels.
  In the United States and Britain, Cockers developed different looks, so much so that they began to be considered separate breeds. The English Cocker Spaniel Club of America was formed in 1935 for people who appreciated the different look and abilities of the English Cocker. The American Kennel Club recognized it as an individual breed in 1946. The American Cocker became more popular, but fanciers of the English Cocker consider their dogs a well-kept secret. Today, the English Cocker ranks 66th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Personality
  The English Cocker is described as merry and affectionate with an equable disposition. He's playful, trainable, and friendly toward people (although sometimes reserved with strangers) and other dogs. English Cockers will bark to let you know someone's approaching, so they're good watchdogs, but as typical spaniels they'll happily show the burglar where the silver is.
  Like every dog, English Cocker Spaniels need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your English Cocker puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.



Health
  The English Cocker Spaniel has an average life expectancy of 11 to 12 years. Breed health problems can include a number of cardiovascular conditions, skin disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, immune-mediated hematological / immunological disorders and infectious conditions.

Care
  The English Cocker Spaniel should be taken on long walks, preferably for hours. This will give it the necessary daily exercise. Running and playing will be good physical exercise for the breed as well. Although the English Cocker Spaniel can survive outside in temperate weather, it is best to keep the dog at home with access to a yard.
  One should check its ears regularly to remove dirt, while its coat should be combed and brushed two to three times a week. Trimming the fur at the tail and feet is necessary every two months, and head and ears are to be clipped properly at regular intervals.

Living Conditions
  The English Cocker Spaniel will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Trainability
  Cockers are easy to train, especially when the reward system involves food. This breed is incredibly sensitive and takes it personally when someone treats them harshly, which results in avoidance behaviors, or in some cases, retaliation. Positive reinforcement is always the best road to take when training a Cocker Spaniel.

Exercise Requirements
  There is no such thing as too much exercise for the English Cocker Spaniel. This breed needs daily exercise, so take it for a walk or run, or even train it for dog competitions. The English Cocker Spaniels excels at hunting, retrieving and agility competitions.

Grooming
  Brush the English Cocker’s medium-length coat two or three times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles. You may also need to trim it for neatness every couple of months. A bath every six weeks or so doesn’t go amiss. The coat sheds moderately, but regular brushing will help keep loose hair from floating onto your floor, furniture, and clothing.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every couple of weeks. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Most important, keep the ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial or yeast infections from driving your dog into a state of itchy madness.

Children And Other Pets
  English Cockers are friendly, fun-loving, and gentle family dogs who do well with children, especially if they're brought up with them. Adult English Cockers who aren't familiar with children may do best in a home with older children who understand how to interact with dogs.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  English Cockers enjoy the company of other dogs and can also get along fine with cats, especially if they're introduced at an early age.

Is the English Cocker Spaniel the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Easy Training: The English Cocker Spaniel is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  In comparison to the Cocker Spaniel, the English Cocker is taller, has a less abundant coat, and does not come in the popular buff color so often seen in the Cocker. Instead, he sports a silky, lightly feathered coat in black, liver, red, black and tan, liver and tan, or any of these colors on a white background.

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Everything about your Lhasapoo

Everything about your Lhasapoo
  The Lhasapoo is a cross or mixed breed the offspring of a Poodle  and a Lhasa Apso. She has a life span of 10 to 15 years and is talented in areas such as agility, rally and obedience. She is sometimes called Lhasadoodle and is an adaptable and playful and affectionate small dog.

Overview
  Small and cuddly, the Lhasapoo makes a wonderful companion for singles, couples, seniors and families alike. Gentle in nature and extremely playful, this dog would make a  great addition any growing family, as they do well with both children and other dogs . A mix of Poodle and Lhasa Apso, this designer breed is gaining in popularity. It is also a protective breed, most noticeably will its favorite human, and may bark at strangers – they are small, but mighty!
  If you’re not incredibly active, the Lhasapoo will forgive you. A trip to the park here, some vigorous playtime, and running around in the yard should be plenty for their daily dose of exercise. Due to its moderate activity requirements and small size, the Lhasapoo would do just fine in an apartment, so long as he goes outside everyday.

Other Quick Facts
  • Lhasapoos come in many coat colors and patterns, depending on the genes they inherit.
  • Most Lhasapoos are best suited to homes with older children who understand how to behave around dogs.
Breed standards
Breed Type: Crossbreed

Group: Companion dog, watch dog, toy dog, lap dog

Average lifespan: 10-15 years

Average size: 10 to 20 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, dense, straight, curly
Coloration: White, black, brown, cream, apricot or combinations
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Singles, couples, seniors or families living in an apartment or house
Temperament: Intelligent, sweet, active, protective
Comparable Breeds: Poodle, Lhasa Apso

History
  The Lhasapoo is a designer breed; he is growing quite popular as of late. However, there is not a great deal of information about how the hybrid breed came to be. So, in order to learn about the Lhasapoo, we must take a look at the parent breeds. The Lhasa Apso hails from Tibet. He was a dog that was owned by nobility, and he was the guard dog of the Tibetan monasteries. 
  The only way that anyone was able to own a Lhasa Apso was if the Dalai Lama gifted a Lhasa to that person. This happened sporadically; the Dalai Lama gifted Lhasas to Chinese nobility. In the 1930s, the Dalai Lama gifted a pair of Lhasas to a naturalist and renowned traveller, C. Suydam Cutting. Cutting returned to his kennels in New Jersey and began developing the Lhasa we know today. The Poodle is also a breed that has been around for centuries. Experts believe that he is a mixture of several European water dogs and the North African Barbet, a dog that is now extinct. Eventually, the breed we know as the Poodle ended up in Germany, where he was utilized for his hunting abilities. The Poodle's exact date of origin is not known; there are Poodle-like dogs depicted on Egyptian and Roman artwork. 
  The dogs portrayed are generally retrieving game or herding animals. The Standard Poodle is traditionally used for duck hunting, and smaller Poodles were used to sniff out truffles in the woods. Eventually, travelling performers learned that the Poodle is an adept show dog. Poodles were not very populous in the United States until after World War II. However, for a number of decades, the Poodle was the most popular breed in the U.S.



Temperament 
  These intelligently smart and affectionate dogs with dignity and pride tend to please their owners picking up tricks easily and taking part in games/shows, and being an alert watchdog. They are adaptable by nature and seek for attention and love from its family. If socialized from puppyhood, they would be good to other dogs, pets and children, provided the kids are also well-behaved.

Health Problems
  Before you introduce a Lhasapoo puppy into your home, remember to see a certificate of health from your reputable breeder. As a cross-bred dog, these pups can experience health issues from either Poodle of Lhasa Apso breeds. The most common are eye problems, patellar luxation, SA, kidney problems, Addison’s disease, Cushings Disease, epilepsy, Hypothyroidism, Legg-Parthes Disease, Von Willebrand’s disease, hip dysplasia as well as allergies.

Care
  The Lhasapoo is a breed with an average energy level. It will get most of the exercise it needs when it resides indoors. However, it will appreciate the opportunity to accompany its owner on a short or long walk. The Lhasapoo is an indoor breed. It will remain active while living indoors. The breed also loves being close to its family. Any color is acceptable for the coat of the Lhasapoo. While the Lhasapoo does not shed, it does require frequent trips to the groomer for haircuts every 6-8 weeks. They will become badly matted especially under wet or snowy conditions unless their fur is kept short.

Living Conditions
  The Ideal Environment for a Lhasa-Poo is being close to the family and getting a lot of attention. Since they are a small breed they can live in apartments if given enough exercise.

Training
  Early training methods are best to ensure the Lhasapoo learns as much as s/he can as early on as possible. Although they can be a little harder to train as puppies than as adults, this will make for a more socialized, obedient dog overall. They are an intelligent breed, but are known to be a bit stubborn at times. This designer breed requires a trainer who is patient, calm and keeps a positive attitude. Remember to always reward good behavior with plenty of treats and you’ll be on the right track in no time.

Activity Requirements
  The Lhasapoo is energetic, but he is not overly active. Keep in mine that his Poodle parent breed is notorious for being destructive if he becomes bored. Give your Lhasapoo plenty of chew toys, and take him on short, brisk walks to work off any nervous energy. He will also enjoy playtime with you indoors. The key is making sure he has regular activity, even for short spurts throughout the day. He will also make friends at the dog park, and he may surprise you by hopping from couch-to-couch. Observers often say it appears the Lhasapoo is "flying" when he does so.

Grooming
  Lhasapoos can have different types of fur, including soft, tight curls; big looping curls; loose waves; or straight hair. Most have a curly or wavy coat with a minority having either the typical Poodle coat or the straight Lhasa coat. Curly or straight, it’s always soft. A Lhasapoo coat looks its best with professional grooming every four to six weeks, and it requires brushing or combing every two to three days to prevent mats or tangles, as well as regular bathing between appointments with the groomer.
  Lhasapoos are among the breeds that commonly develop reddish-brown tear stains beneath their eyes. Your best bet is to wash the face daily, carefully wiping beneath the eyes, to prevent stains from setting.
  Your Lhasapoo doesn’t need a bikini wax, but you do need to trim the genital area for cleanliness or have the groomer shave the lower belly area.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails every week or two, and keep his ears clean and dry. Small dogs are especially prone to periodontal disease, so brush his teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children and other animals
  She does better with older children but with early socialization and training, and being raised with them she can also be good with younger ones as long as they are supervised in case they start tugging or pulling at her when she doesn't want it. She also does better with other animals when raised with them.

Did You Know?
  A Lhasapoo’s fur can be tightly curled, loosely curled, wavy, or straight. But whatever else it is, it’s always soft.
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Everything about your Black Russian Terrier

Everything about your Black Russian Terrier
  These majestic black beauties are highly intelligent, confident guard dogs who aren’t actually true terriers. Relatively new and still a rare dog breed, Black Russian Terriers are working dogs who can protect a home or business, play with the family’s children, and excel in agility and obedience competition. Known as the “Black Pearls of Russia,” Blackies are people-oriented and want to be close to the action at all times. They tend to be a bit aloof around strangers, including dogs they don’t know, but they’re devoted to their families — and they don’t bark or shed much. They have large bones and well-developed muscles, creating a vibrant, flowing impression.

Overview
  Also known as Stalin’s dog or Sobaka Stalina, the Black Russian Terrier is a low-maintenance and hard working dog. Developed by the post World War II Soviet Union, the Black Russian Terrier or BRT, is not a true terrier, and is instead categorized as a working dog.
  The BRT is a fairly large dog and has a powerfully built body. Both its forelegs and hindquarters are well-boned and muscular, and end in large, padded feet. The BRT’s head is fairly large and block shaped and is equipped with a powerful set of teeth that meet in a scissor bite. The BRT’s body is covered in a thick double coat. The outer-coat is coarse and wiry while the thick undercoat is soft to the touch. The BRTs coat is black and sometimes has a few stray grey hairs. 
  Brown or white markings are considered to be a fault.
  BRTs are extremely intelligent and self-assured dogs. Bred primarily as guard dogs, they have extremely strong protective instincts and are devoted to their owners. Their strong personalities do however require owners with a thorough understanding of dog psychology and leadership.

Highlights
  • Blackies need a job. They were bred for it and will be unhappy without one. Their job as your companion could be competing in agility, obedience, Schutzhund, or various canine sports.
  • Black Russian Terriers need at least 30 minutes of exercise a day. They are intelligent and powerful, and exercise provides a needed outlet. A Black Russian can manage in an apartment with sufficient outdoor exercise. A fenced yard is best for the Blackie living in a house.
  • Blackies enjoy the company of their families and prefer to stick close to their human pack. They don't do well stuck in the backyard by themselves.
  • The sometimes stubborn Blackie needs firm training as soon as you get him home so that he won't try to establish himself as the leader of the pack.
  • Blackies are by nature aloof with people they don't know, and unless they have regular exposure to lots of different people — ideally beginning in puppyhood — they can become overly protective of you around strangers. This may lead to biting out of fear and aggression. Give your Blackie lots of contact with friends, family, neighbors, and even strangers to help him polish his social skills.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Black Russian Terrier’s coat is slightly to moderately wavy. The hair on the head falls over the eyes and on the face forms a mustache and beard. The coat is trimmed to achieve the dog’s distinctive look.
  • Basic black is this breed’s fashion statement. His double coat - which can be one and a half to six inches long - comes only in black or black with a few gray hairs scattered throughout.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Guardian Dog
Average lifespan: 10-14 years
Average size: 80–130 pounds
Coat appearance: Rough and thick, slightly waved
Coloration: black coats, but a sprinkling of gray hair
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active single, houses with yards, farms and rural areas
Temperament: Energetic, confident, brave, hardy
Comparable Breeds: Bouvier des Flandres, Giant Schnauzer

History 
  This dog is a Cold War creation, developed in Moscow after World War II for military and police work. His breeders started with a Giant Schnauzer and crossed him with other breeds that included the Airedale, Rottweiler, and the Moscow Retriever. The result was a large black dog with a protective temperament and a healthy dose of suspicion toward strangers.
  Less than two decades ago, the BRT was seen only in small numbers at European and Scandinavian dog shows, but in 2004 he was recognized by the American Kennel Club as its 151st breed. Today the Black Russian Terrier ranks 135th among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Personality
  Black Russian Terriers are truly man's best friend. They thrive on human interaction and have such a strong desire to be with their family that they will follow their people from room to room, and when left alone, will wait longingly by doors or windows until they are happily reunited with the ones they love. This breed adores children – especially female Black Russians. They are patient with small children who want to climb on them and are big enough to keep up with bigger kids' outdoor games. They have bee known to sleep in kids' rooms or outside their bedroom doors as a guardian and protector.

Health
  The Black Russian Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 14 years, is prone to minor health issues such as elbow dysplasia and major problems like canine hip dysplasia (CHD). The breed may also suffer from progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) and dwarfism. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may recommend hip, elbow, and eye exams for the dog

Care
  The Black Russian Terrier, because of its breeding as a working dog, has a very strong "work ethic", and needs a job to do in order to be happy. Early training is a must and they are very responsive to firm, consistent training, excelling at Obedience competitions. They also perform well in other dog sports, such as Agility, and Schutzhund training. They have a low-shedding coat, and need grooming several times a week. Dogs who compete in conformation need to be groomed a minimum of every three weeks to keep the coat in show condition. The Black Russian Terrier needs lots of exercise, and may become hyperactive and destructive if it does not have a chance to burn off its energy..

Living Conditions
  The Black Russian Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and no matter how big your yard is they will be sitting at your front door waiting to come in. They love to live very close to their owner. They will follow you from one room to the other. Kept in a garden they will follow you from window to window and wait for you at the door. They need very close human contact. This breed does not do well living in a kennel; they must have close human contact to be happy.

Training
  Black Russian Terriers are extremely intelligent and eager to please and are fairly easy to train. They do however have strong personalities and should be handled with a loving but firm hand from an early age. BRT puppies are inquisitive and playful and some adults too display this extreme curiosity. Black Russian Terriers often excel at various obedience competitions and dog sports such as agility and Schutzhund training.

Activity Requirements
  Black Russian Terriers, despite their larger size, can do well living in an apartment. They don't need an excessive amount of vigorous running time per day, but do need several walks. If left alone in a yard, Black Russian will quickly get bored and want to come inside. Outside activities should always involve interaction with kids or people in order to keep this breed interested.

Grooming
  Regular grooming is essential for the Black Russian Terrier’s handsome good looks. Expect to bathe your dog every two to three months. The wiry coat should be brushed twice a week to prevent tangles.
The rest is basic care. Nails should be trimmed once a month and ears checked every week. Regular tooth brushing with a soft toothbrush and doggie toothpaste keeps the teeth and gums healthy.
  Because the Black Russian Terrier is not a common breed, it is likely some professional groomers will not know exactly how to groom him, especially when it comes to hand stripping. An experienced breeder is probably the best resource for learning how to groom the breed.
  It is important to begin grooming the Black Russian Terrier when he is very young. An early introduction teaches this independent dog that grooming is a normal part of his life and to patiently accept the grooming process. 

Children And Other Pets
  Despite their impressive size, Blackies are great with children and will protect them. Females seem more willing to play with children than the males, but both sexes treat children with whom they are raised with gentleness and respect. Don't forget, however, that Blackies are large and active companions, and extremely young children may be accidentally knocked over or injured by a playful and energetic dog of this size. Use caution with very young children.
  Blackies who have not been exposed to children from puppyhood may not be as tolerant-something to consider if you're looking to add an older or rescue dog to your household.
  Either way, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Make sure your Blackie is well socialized as a puppy and adult so that he doesn't become overprotective of his family and property.
  Male Black Russians don't do well with other dominant dogs. Many of them aren't suited to dog parks for this reason. At home, they do best with other canine companions who were already established in the house. They will be fine with nondominant or small dogs, as well as cats, horses, rabbits, and other pets.

Is the Black Russian Terrier the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Black Russian Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
Despite the word Terrier in his name, the Black Russian Terrier is a member of the American Kennel Club’s Working Group.
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Everything about your Belgian Tervuren

Everything about your Belgian Tervuren
  Created in Belgium in the late 19th century, the Belgian Tervuren dog breed is often considered to be the most elegant of the four Belgian sheepdogs. He’s intelligent and athletic, making him a versatile performer in any number of activities, including his original job, herding. If you can provide a dog with plenty of exercise, training, and attention, he might be a good choice for you.

Overview
  This breed combines elegance and strength. It is square-proportioned and of medium bone. It is noteworthy for its exceedingly proud carriage. Its movement is lively, graceful and seemingly tireless, exhibiting an easy, effortless gait rather than a hard-driving action. It has a natural tendency to move in a circle rather than a straight line. It combines a dense undercoat with an outer coat consisting of abundant guard hairs that are long, well-fitting, straight and of medium harshness. Its expression is intelligent and questioning.
  Alert, watchful and energetic, the Tervuren is an active and dependable companion that functions best when given daily mental and physical exercise. It enjoys playing and running outside, and can be a well-mannered companion inside as long as it is given sufficient exercise. It is smart and obedient, but independent. It is aloof with strangers and can be aggressive toward other dogs and animals. It may nip at the heels of children in an attempt to herd them.

Highlights
  • Shyness can be a problem in this breed. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one beating up his littermates or the one hiding in the corner.
  • Belgian Tervuren require at least an hour of exercise per day. If you don't provide them with exercise and mental stimulation in the form of training or play, they'll find their own entertainment, and chances are it will be expensive to repair.
  • Belgian Tervuren shed year-round and require 15 to 20 minutes of brushing weekly.
  • Tervs can get along well with other dogs and cats if they're raised with them, but they have a chase instinct and will go after animals that run from them.
  • Belgian Tervuren will chase joggers, bicyclists, and cars, so they need a securely fenced yard.
  • Tervuren are very intelligent and alert. They also have strong herding and protection instincts. Early, consistent training is critical!
  • Although they are good-size dogs, they are very people-oriented and want to be included in family activities.
  • Belgian Tervuren are play-oriented and sensitive. Keep training sessions fun, consistent, and positive.
  • Because of their intelligence, high energy, and other characteristics, Tervuren are not recommended for inexperienced dog owners.
Other Quick Facts

  • When you look at a Belgian Tervuren, your first impression is one of elegance. This is a medium-size dog with a square build, a wedge-shaped head carried proudly, dark-brown eyes that are slightly almond-shaped, prick ears, and an intelligent, questioning expression that indicates he's always ready for action.
  • The Belgian Tervuren has a double coat that is short on the head and the front of the legs. The opening of the ear is protected by tufts of hair. A collarette of longer hair surrounds the neck and is especially abundant on males. Other areas where the hair is longer are the back of the legs and the tail.
  • A Belgian Tervuren’s coat is a beautiful rich fawn-to-russet mahogany with a black overlay, meaning the tip of each fawn hair is black. A Terv’s coat typically darkens with age.
Breed standards
AKC group: Herding Dogs
UKC group: Herding Dogs
Average lifespan: 10 to 12 years
Average size: 40 to 70 pounds
Coat appearance:  dense undercoat with long, straight outercoat
Coloration: red, fawn, also grey with black overlay. Black mask on face.
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards, farms/rural areas, watchdog
Temperament: Athletic, hard working, loyal, loving
Comparable Breeds: Belgian Malinois, Belgian Laekenois


History
  This herding breed from Belgium — he takes his name from the village of Tervuren — does not have a well-known history until the late 1800s. He may have been helping shepherds care for flocks for centuries, but it wasn’t until 1891, in a burst of national enthusiasm, that Belgian herding dogs were divided into types and given names. A standard for the Tervuren was written in 1893, and the Society Royale Saint-Hubert recognized the breed in 1901.
  One of the early breeders of the dogs, M. F. Corbeel, who lived in Tervuren, bred Tom and Poes, who are considered to be the breed’s foundation dogs. They produced Miss, who in turn gave birth to Milsart, the breed’s first champion in 1907.
  The American Kennel Club registered its first Tervuren in 1918, but few people took an interest in the breed. By the 1930s, Tervuren were no longer seen in the AKCstud book. In Europe, the breed survived two world wars, and in 1953 Belgian Tervuren were again imported into the United States. The AKC recognized the Terv as a distinct breed in 1959. Today the breed ranks 108th among the dogs registered by the AKC.



Personality
  The Belgian Tervuren is a breed of the Belgian Sheepdog. Loyal companions, the Tervuren can be a farm dog or a family dog. As with all Belgian Sheepdog breeds, they were bred to herd and protect livestock, so Tervurens need constant activity, whether playing with children, going on long walks, or chasing a frisbee. Always vigilant, they make excellent watchdogs, and can be trained to do just about any task put before them.

Health 
  This hardy, healthy breed has no major health concerns. Some minor concerns that have been seen are epilepsy, skin allergies, eye problems, excessive shyness, excessive aggressiveness and occasionally hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia. Do not overfeed this breed, for it has a tendency to become obese and lazy.

Care
  The Belgian Tervuren is an indoor/outdoor dog. He should live indoors with the family but needs access to a securely fenced yard that will prevent him from escaping to chase passing cyclists, joggers, and cars.
  Belgian Tervuren are sensitive and highly trainable. Be firm, calm, and consistent with them. Anger and physical force are counterproductive. Use positive training techniques, rewarding them with praise, play, or treats when they perform commands correctly or do anything you like — even if you didn't ask them to.

Living Conditions
  The Belgian Tervuren will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is moderately active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. This breed prefers cool climates, but adapts well to others. It can live outdoors but would much rather be with his people.

Trainability
  Though sometimes willful and stubborn, Belgians are highly trainable and thrive on advanced obedience, trick and agility training. They can read small movements and even changes in facial expression, and are famous for being so “in tune” with their trainers that they can literally stay one step ahead of the person giving commands. For this reason, Belgian Sheepdogs are often competitors  in agility and herding competitions.
  Though easily trainable, Belgians are not for the first-time dog owner. They are highly intelligent and manipulative, and can easily walk all over someone who does not know how to remain consistent with training. Positive reinforcement is the best method to train a Belgian Sheepdog, as discipline can lead to avoidance behavior and stubbornness.

Exercise Requirements
  Being that the Belgian Tervuren was bred to herd and protect livestock, this dog is athletic and needs lots of exercise. An hour or so of playing with the kids, fetching a ball or jogging through the park will keep the average Terv in tip-top condition both physically and mentally. Because of their tremendous chase instinct, this breed should only be exercised on a leash or in a securely fenced area.

Grooming
  The Belgian Tervuren’s harshdouble coat sheds dirt, but he will need a thorough brushing once or twice a week to remove dead hair. This will take about 15 to 20 minutes. Have grooming tools such as a medium-size pin brush, slicker brush, undercoat rake, and a mat comb on hand. He sheds heavily once or twice a year and will need more frequent brushing during those times to control the amount of loose hair floating around. There will be lots of it!
  He shouldn’t need a bath very often , but warm baths during shedding season can help remove dead hair. Trim his nails as needed — weekly for puppies and monthly in most cases for adults — and keep the ears clean and dry to prevent infections. Proper dental hygiene is also important. Brush the teeth frequently for overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Well-socialized Tervs are good with children, especially if they are raised with them, but because of their herding heritage they may have a tendency to nip at their heels and try to herd them when playing. You must teach your Terv that this behavior is unacceptable. An adult Tervuren who's unfamiliar with children may do best in a home with children who are mature enough to interact with him properly.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Tervs get along best with other dogs and cats when they're brought up with them from puppyhood. Sometimes they become best friends with cats and other animals and will protect them as they would members of their flock, and sometimes they all come to an agreement of mutual indifference. Tervs do have a chase instinct, however, and even if they don't chase "their" cats, they may be unable to resist chasing cats or other animals that intrude in their yards. If you want your Terv to get along with other animals you must start early and reward them for appropriate behavior. If your Terv hasn't been socialized to other animals, it's your responsibility to keep him under control in their presence.

Is the Belgian Tervuren the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. No trimming or stripping needed.
Constant Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Easy Training: The Belgian Tervuren is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Belgian Tervuren is one of four related varieties of Belgian herding breeds. In their home country they are all known as Chiens de Berger (bair-zhay) Belge (belzh). The Terv is distinguished from the other varieties by his coat length and color.

Famous Tervuren
  • In an episode of Hogan's Heroes, Belgian Shepherds were referred to as the preferred choice of police dogs.
  • For the film The Company of Wolves the wolves are primarily played by dyed Tervurens.
  • A Tervuren is featured in Agent Cody Banks 2: Destination London as a test subject for a mind-control device.
  • A Tervuren is also featured in Friday Night Dinner as neighbour Jim's dog, Wilson
  • A Belgian Malinois is featured in Inspector Lewis Season 1 Episode Sons of the Twice Born
  • A Tervuren named Mr. Cupcake can be seen on Alaskan Bush People, he's the family's dog.
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Everything about your Irish Doodle

Everything about your Irish Doodle
  The Irish Doodle is a medium to large hybrid or mixed breed that crosses the Irish Setter with the Standard Poodle. She has a life span of 12 to 15 years and has talents in guarding. She is sometimes also called the Irish Doodle Setter or an Irish Setter/Poodle hybrid. She is known for being very lighthearted and is also a devoted dog.

Overview
  Also known as the Irish Doodle Setter, Irish Poo Setter, Irish Setterdoodle, and Irish Setterpoo, the Irish Doodle is a super cute, friendly, and light-hearted medium-sized crossbreed. A mix of Irish Setter and Poodle, it’s ideal for anyone seeking a dog who won’t shed a lot and who will be loyal, social, and intelligent. This dog rarely barks and will even get along great with children and pets.
  If the Irish Doodle sounds too good to be true, rest assured that it isn’t. Combing adorable looks and an equally loveable attitude, this crossbreed is becoming hugely popular. To find out if this dog would be the right fit for your family, check out some quick facts below.

Breed standards
Breed Type: Crossbreed
Breed Group: Watchdog, Sporting Dog, Guard Dog
Average lifespan: 10 to 13 years
Average size: 40-70 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, soft, wavy
Coloration: Apricot, black, white, black and tan, brown
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Singles, families with children and other pets, seniors, and those living in apartments or houses with or without yards
Temperament: Loyal, devoted, quiet, social, intelligent, friendly
Comparable Breeds: Irish Setter, Poodle

History
  The Irish Doodle is a hybrid canine, a cross between two very different breeds of hunting dog; a German retrieving dog, the Poodle, and an elegant red field hunting dog called the Irish Setter. The Poodle is often associated with France but it was actually developed in Germany, where it was known as a Pudlehund; Pudle meaning to splash around, and hund meaning dog.
  Poodles today are still sometimes employed to retrieve waterfowl, although the modern hunter is more likely to clip them short all over to prevent tangling in the brush and weeds. The Irish Setter was developed in Ireland, at some point in the 1700s as a field hunting dog and by the early 1800s, the breed was popular not just in Ireland, but also throughout the British Isles. Most experts believe that the Irish Setter is an ancestor of breeds such as the Irish Water Spaniel, the Gordon Setter, and the Irish Terrier, but written records from the time are nonexistent. The earliest Irish Setters were bred to be able to search out birds then hold their position, preventing them from entering the line of fire and they often came in either red and white or yellow and white, but in the mid-1800s their characteristic deep red color became the ideal. 
  They were imported into the United States as gun dogs and retrievers that specialized in retrieving gamebirds during the mid-1800s as well and were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1878. Although the Irish Setter could be crossed with a Miniature or Toy Poodle, the most commonly included Poodle for this hybrid is the Standard Poodle.


Temperament
  These dogs are loving and affectionate, and are characterized by loyalty and devotion. They are eager to please and have significant native intelligence inherited from their parents. It is their intelligent mind and careful disposition that have made them equally good with kids and other family pets. This makes them an excellent family dog ideal for apartment life. Not do they just love the members of their families, but they are also comfortable meeting strangers.
  These dogs, especially the puppies, love attention until they’re well along in years. Though, it is alert and attentive. If it happens to come across anything suspicious, it would immediately alert its family.

Health
  She is generally a healthy dog and whether or not you believe in the idea of hybrid vigor there is still the possibility a puppy might inherit conditions one or both its parents are at risk of. For the Irish Doodle these include Addison's Disease, Bloat, Cushing's disease, epilepsy, Hypothyroidism, Legg-Perthes, Patellar Luxation, SA , Von Willebrand's Disease, OCD, CAD, HOD, Joint dysplasia, eye problems and Panosteitis. To avoid getting a dog with health problems you can improve the odds by only buying after seeing health clearances for both parents.

Care
  Bathing need not be a frequent occurrence with these canines, usually just a few times a year, but thorough brushing and styling will generally be needed on a regular basis. They type of grooming implements that will be required for this animal can vary a bit, depending on which parent breed they most resemble, although most will need clipping or trimming of some sort on a regular basis. 
  Crossbreeds that inherit the single-layer Poodle coat are less likely to shed and in some cases, may even be low shedding enough to be considered hypoallergenic, however, the coat of the Irish Setter is decidedly not hypoallergenic, and the full composition of the coat may not reveal itself until your Irish Doodle has reached maturity. It is also quite important to check and clean this dog’s ears on a regular basis as they can be prone to internal and external infections.

Training
  The trainability of the Irish doodle is unpredictable. The standard poodle is a happy-go-lucky and easily trainable dog. But the Irish setters are not always so, but would rather get bored easily. Those Irish doodles that take after their setter parents sometimes demand commitment and patience from their trainers. But once the training process is successfully over, your Irish doodle will be the best trained dog in the neighborhood.
  Begin obedience and pack leader trainings from an early age. Train them to socialize and get accustomed to meeting new faces. Like their parents, the Irish doodles are naturally clean, and hence, are easy to be housetrained.

Exercise Requirements
  The Irish Doodle doesn’t need a lot of exercise. Instead, a moderate amount of daily activity, through games like fetch and a walk or jog, will help keep your dog happy and in great shape. If you do have an enclosed, safe yard, you can even let your pooch play freely outside when the weather permits.

Grooming 
  She does not shed much and is hypoallergenic so is good for those with allergies. She should be brushed at least twice a week still to remove mats and tangles and keep the coat looking bright and healthy. Use a solid bristle brush and you should find her coat easy to brush. She will need to have a bath as and when she gets dirty enough to need one! Check her ears once a week and wipe them clean and clip her nails if they grow too long.

Children and other animals
  When training and early socialization is completed she is very good with children and other pets. They will be happy to play and affectionate towards them. Children should be taught how to play nicely with any dog, and that things like ear or tail pulling or messing around with their food at feeding time is not acceptable.

Is the Irish Doodle the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Difficult Training: The Irish Doodle isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Slightly Active: Not much exercise is required to keep this dog in shape. Owners who are frequently away or busy might find this breed suitable for their lifestyle.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
The Irish Setter is a more energetic dog, but when combined with the Poodle, the puppies settle down a great deal. However, I recommend these pups for more active people and families with more energetic children. They will be perfect for the person wanting a devoted running companion, as well as a therapy dog
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