Everything about your English Toy Spaniel - LUV My dogs

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Thursday, December 8, 2016

Everything about your English Toy Spaniel

  A true lapdog, the English Toy Spaniel is dedicated to becoming the world’s best couch potato. This breed does like to play too but he prefers doing so on the living room carpet as opposed to outside in the dirt and grass. After all, the dirt and grass could make his beautiful, silky coat dirty! English Toy Spaniels love being spoiled and absolutely enjoy living in the lap of luxury. To them, luxury doesn’t have to be an English estate. It could very well be a small and cozy apartment providing the dog is with the people he loves.

Overview
  Originally bred as a woodcock hunter, the English Toy Spaniel was loved by royalty as a constant companion and foot and lap warmer. Very similar to the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, the two are often confused with each other and bred together as well. A preferred lap dog, he's a good companion that gets along well with school-aged children and other animals. Not prone to barking, he does need regular grooming and a push for regular exercise.
  English Toy Spaniels (nicknamed Charlies or ETs) are not as well known as their Cavalier King Charles Spaniel cousins, and that’s too bad. People who know them appreciate their small size and calm, devoted nature. Even though his ancestors lived in palaces, the ET is the perfect roommate for an apartment dweller. If you're allowed to bring a dog to work, he’s a good cubicle pal, too. And if you like to travel? Well, he fits perfectly in a carrier beneath your seat.

Highlights
  • Socialization is important with this breed because they can be timid when they are exposed to new people or situations.
  • Considered to be an average shedder, the English Toy Spaniel should be brushed every week to remove loose hair and to keep the coat from tangling.
  • For the dog's own safety, the English Toy Spaniel should be kept on leash whenever they are walked and they should also have a fully fenced yard.
  • English Toy Spaniels do well in apartments.
  • English Toy Spaniels do not handle heat very well and need to be monitored on hot days to ensure that they do not overexert themselves. It is recommended that the dogs reside in an air-conditioned dwelling.
  • English Toy Spaniels have low energy levels and low exercise requirements. They are happy spending their days sitting on your knee, and a leisurely walk around the neighborhood will meet their exercise needs. They make excellent companions for older owners.
  • English Toy Spaniels are loving dogs that usually do well with children, but they are not the ideal breed for a home with busy children since they can become overwhelmed by the noise and excitement children make.
  • English Toy Spaniels are companion dogs and thrive when they are with the people they love. They should not live outside or in a kennel away from their family.
  • Separation anxiety is a common problem in the English Toy Spaniel and they can become destructive when they are separated from their owners for a period of time.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store.
Other Quick Facts

  • The most recognizable feature of the English Toy Spaniel is his head, with its domed skull, large eyes, black nose, and soft, intelligent expression.
  • The English Toy Spaniel comes in four colors or patterns: Blenheim (red and white), Ruby (solid red), Prince Charles (tricolor), and King Charles (black and tan). In dog shows, the Blenheim and the Prince Charles compete in one class and the King Charles and the Ruby in another.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
Average size: 8 - 14 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky, medium-length
Coloration: Tricolored (beige, white and black), black and tan, red and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Dark eyes and dark-eyed rims; well-proportioned body; scissor-bite teeth; long ears with feathering and medium-to long-length wavy coat; soft expression
Possible alterations: Coat may be straight
Comparable Breeds: Japanese Chin, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

History
  Little spaniels probably descend from dogs that were popular in Chinese and Japanese imperial courts. They may share an ancient ancestor with the Pekingese and the Japanese
Portrait of Queen Mary I and King Philip of England
 by Hans Eworth (1558)
Chin. At some point, they made their way to Europe and became prized as companion dogs. Johannes Caius mentioned toy spaniels in his book, Of English Dogges, which was published in 1574. Mary, Queen of Scots had at least one toy spaniel, and it’s said that her son, King James I, received a litter in 1613 as a gift from the Emperor of Japan.
  In England, this breed is known as the King Charles Spaniel, because both Charles I and Charles II were very fond of the little dog. Because they were popular with royalty, they were also popular with everyone else, and it wasn’t unusual to see one pictured with the family in a portrait painted by Gainsborough, Rubens, Rembrandt, or Van Dyck. After the death of Charles II and the ouster of his brother, James II, Charles’ niece Mary and her husband William ascended to England’s throne. They brought their own favorite dogs with them: Pugs. Some people bred the toy spaniels and the Pugs together, eventually changing the look of the breed. The body became wider, the face flatter, and the skull more domed.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the English Toy Spaniel as a member of the Toy Group in 1886. Today, the ET ranks 126th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Personality
  The sweet and lovable English Toy Spaniel is a true companion dog. He has an aristocratic bearing, but he's not a snob at all; picture instead a happy, devoted, quiet dog. He enjoys spending time with the people he loves and will fit himself into their lives. The ET requires little exercise and is happiest perched on his owner's knee. He does well with other dogs and cats if socialized to them and is gentle and loving to children although he's not best suited to living with them. He can become overwhelmed by excitement and can be shy and timid when he meets new people or is exposed to new situations.

Health
  The English Toy Spaniel, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, is susceptible to major health conditions like patellar luxation, and minor issues like early tooth loss, and "lazy tongue," a condition which causes the tongue to protrude from the mouth. A veterinarian may recommend regular knee tests for the dog.
  Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), hydrocephalus, and fused toes are also seen in some English Toy Spaniels, as well as a soft spot in the dog's skull due to an incomplete fontanel closure. Some English Toy Spaniels react adversely to anesthesia.

Care
  Even though the English Toy Spaniel is not very active, it enjoys a fun indoor or outdoor game or a good on-leash walk. Hot weather does not suit it and, by nature, it cannot live outdoors, away from the comfort of its family. It has a long coat that requires combing twice a week.

Living Conditions
  They are good for apartment life, relatively inactive indoors, and will do okay without a yard if they are sufficiently exercised. English Toy Spaniels do not do well in temperature extremes.

Training
  English Toy Spaniels are pretty bright dogs. They have a strong desire to please their owners however; they have a short attention span. To keep this breed interested during training sessions, delectable treats are necessary. Charlies love tasty treats so this will keep him focused and be his reward for working hard during the session.
  This breed makes a wonderful therapy dog. Their small size and love for riding in the car make traveling to hospitals and nursing home facilities easy. Patients enjoy allowing this cute little dog to sit on their laps while stroking their soft coats. Everybody feels better with an English Toy Spaniel around!

Exercise Requirements
  English Toy Spaniels are not fans of exercise. They would much rather chill on the couch than to chase a ball in the yard. Although this breed does not require a lot of activity, he does need some exercise to stay healthy and fit. Regular walks are important, but the occasional brisk trot will be beneficial to the Charlie. He might not like it; but it is needed.
  This breed is easily enticed with tasty treats. Puzzle toys which hide a treat within tend to keep the English Toy Spaniel intrigued and active inside of the house. Those that have a fenced yard for the dog to play in will find that the Charlie’s playfulness will have him chasing balls and other toys around the yard. Though not the most energetic breed of dog, the English Toy Spaniel will happily spend time playing with kids. That is, until he becomes bored and needs a nap.

Grooming
  The English Toy Spaniel has a long, silky coat that is usually straight but can be slightly wavy. Despite his long coat, this is a wash-and-go dog. Comb him out weekly to prevent mats and tangles, especially those that form behind the ears, elbows, and back legs. A bath every two to four weeks will keep him smelling good, and it doesn’t hurt to wash his face daily — mainly to prevent him from doing it himself by rubbing it on your furniture.
  Otherwise, simply clean the ears, trim the toenails, and brush the teeth frequently. The latter is especially important with toy breeds, which are often prone to dental disease. Charlies often have fused toes, which are a normal characteristic of the breed and not something to be concerned about.

Children And Other Pets
  English Toy Spaniels can be loving toward children, but they can become overwhelmed by the noise and stimulation young children create. This can lead to biting if they are handled roughly. English Toy Spaniels do very well with other pets, especially if they are raised with them.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although the English Toy Spaniel enjoys engaging in play and walks, it is necessary that he lives indoors with his family. Good with school-aged children, the breed is completely content sitting on his owner's lap all day. In need of regular companionship, he will need to be with a family that is home and available to him constantly.

Did You Know?
  English Toy Spaniels used to have their tails docked, and some still do, but this practice is becoming less common. Tail docking is done at an early age, so if you want a puppy with a natural tail, let the breeder know before the pups are born.

Urban myth
Portrait of a King Charles Spaniel,
 by Jean-Baptiste Huet 1778
  An urban legend claims that Charles II issued a special decree granting King Charles Spaniels permission to enter any establishment in the UK,overriding "no dog except guide dogs" rules. A variant of this myth relates specifically to the Houses of Parliament. This myth is sometimes instead applied to the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.
  The UK Parliament website states: "Contrary to popular rumour, there is no Act of Parliament referring to King Charles spaniels being allowed anywhere in the Palace of Westminster. We are often asked this question and have thoroughly researched it." Similarly, there is no proof of any such law covering the wider UK. A spokesman for the Kennel Club said: "This law has been quoted from time to time. It is alleged in books that King Charles made this decree but our research hasn't tracked it down."

A dream day in the life of the English Toy Spaniel
  The English Toy Spaniel will be in no rush to wake up in the morning. Perfectly happy staying in bed with his family members, he will follow you to breakfast once you finally move from your comfort zone. Fill up his bowl to allow him to leisurely eat for the remainder of the day. Engage in a bit of play with his favorite toys, take him for a short walk and end the day with your English Toy Spaniel on your lap.

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