Top 10 Quietest Dog Breeds - LUV My dogs

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Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Top 10 Quietest Dog Breeds

  We all love dogs, but constant barking is a sure-fire way to upset your neighborhood and get yourself in trouble. And let’s face, incessant barking drives us insane too! So if you’re looking for a dog but don’t think you’ll be able to curb a barker’s noise, or perhaps just don’t want to deal with the possibility at all, we’e compiled a list of some of the most silent dog breeds.
  Whether your desire for a dog who doesn't bark stems from the fact that you share a thin wall with your neighbor or you just like a fairly quiet place to call home, we've got you covered. 


 The Collie isn’t exactly a silent breed — if he were, Lassie would never have been able to tell us that Timmy had fallen down the well! Still, this gentle and affectionate dog generally only speaks when he really has something to say. Given the appropriate amount of exercise, he shouldn’t be a nuisance barker.
  In addition to being one of the most intelligent dog breeds out there, the Collie is also one of the quietest. This breed does not tend to bark except when he really needs to. Because this breed is so smart, training is easy so, if barking does become an issue, you can just teach your dog a “hush” command.

9. Shiba Inu
  The Shiba Inu looks almost like a fox in appearance and does equally well as a jogging partner as an indoor companion.  He is clean, easy to groom, and loves his people. 
While he is quiet, he has a very strong prey drive which means he should never be off leash. 
  They are intelligent and independent, making them very attractive to people who want a small dog, who is quiet, but not necessarily one that is “in their face.”

8.Irish Setter

  Unlike many of the other dogs on this list, the Irish Setter is a rowdy and rollicking dog with more energy than he knows what to do with. Happily, though, that energy is rarely channeled into nuisance barking, and as long as he’s given plenty of exercise, he can be a great choice for families.
  This medium-sized breed does have a good bit of energy but, with proper exercise and mental stimulation, barking is rarely a problem. Irish Setters don’t tend to expend their extra energy by barking – they would much rather play a game or run around the house with your kids. That makes him an excellent family pet and a good listener! 

  Large and loveable, most of the noises that come out of the Bullmastiff are snorts and snuffles. Sure, he may not get along with cats , but this large breed is loyal with his family, fairly low-maintenance and saves his barking for special occasions.
  Strong-willed and incredibly loyal, the Bullmastiff isn’t a big barker, but he is not always good with other dogs  or cats .

6.Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

  This small breed is playful and friendly – he tends to form strong bonds with family and does not like to be alone. As long as you give the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel enough attention, he will remain calm and placid at home, not prone to barking. One thing to be wary of with this breed is that he can be a little stubborn at times. 
  Sweet and docile, these dogs get along well with everyone.  They are one of the larger of the toy breeds, weighing in at between 13 and 18 pounds. But they are still considered a quiet small breed dog.
  Fiercely loyal, they will follow you everywhere. 
  Some think of them as lazy, lounging around in your most-comfortable chair, but they are also playful and enjoy walks and activities as long as it involves their owners. 

5.Saint Bernard

  St. Bernards are very social, affectionate dogs, although they may bark at strangers. However, as long as they are properly socialized as young puppies, Saints will typically grow to love everyone they meet and have little need to bark.
  The Saint Bernard is a member of the Mastiff family. He can be sweet, shy and stubborn, but with proper training and socialization, this quiet breed can be fantastic for families or for use as a therapy dog.
  This giant breed is the definition of “gentle giant” – despite his size, he is sweet and friendly. The Saint Bernard can be a little aloof around strangers and he may have a bit of a stubborn streak, but barking generally isn’t a problem. These dogs are particularly well suited to families with children and they make great therapy dogs. 

4.Italian Greyhound

  Tiny, intelligent and a bit fragile, the Italian Greyhound can be rather defiant, but barking is rarely an issue. Housetraining, however, may be another story.
  The Italian Greyhound (IG for short) may need a few reminders from time to time that he is a small dog and not the same as his bigger cousin the Greyhound. 
  Energetic and playful, he will keep you going and happily amused for years to come.  His grooming needs are minimal, but extra effort might be needed when training.  You will need to convince him that what you want him to do is what he wanted to do all along.

3. Great Pyrenees
  Another large breed, the Great Pyrenees is known for its long white coat. This breed was developed for livestock guarding so he is protective and independent by nature, but with proper training he isn’t much of a barker.
  Like the first two breeds on this list, the Great Pyrenees is a large dog with an equally big heart. When properly trained, he’s calm, gentle and protective, but you’ll have to do your homework in order to get this strong-willed dog to that point.

2. Great Dane

  The breed named quietest of them all is also one of the biggest: the Great Dane. He’s a gentle giant with a calm nature, and while he doesn’t bark often, when he does, his voice will be louder and deeper than just about any other breed.
  He’s a gentle giant with a calm nature, and while he doesn’t bark often, when he does, his voice will be louder and deeper than just about any other breed.


  Basenjis are actually known for their inability to bark! But that doesn’t mean they don’t make noise. Bred as hunting dogs in Africa, they make a yodeling sound instead of barking. However, they typically only do this when they feel there is a reason, and are not known to make noise often.
  Patience and a sense of humor are essential to living with a Basenji. He will chew up or eat whatever's left in his reach, and he's quite capable of putting together a plan to achieve whatever it is he wants, whether that's to get up on the kitchen counter or break into the pantry where the dog biscuits are stored. 

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