November 2016 - LUV My dogs

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Everything about your Bloodhound

Everything about your Bloodhound
  The Bloodhound is a large scent hound originally bred for the purpose of tracking and trailing human beings. Often recognized for its long ears and wrinkled face, the Bloodhound has a keen sense of smell and an extraordinary ability to follow a scent - even scents that are days old. This makes the dog an excellent aid and an important part of a search and rescue team.
  Choosing to add a furry friend to your growing household is a long-term commitment, and picking a breed that fits your lifestyle presents the key to a happy home. With over 160 American Kennel Club-recognized breeds, that decision can seem overwhelming. We're here to help you meet the breed that's right for you. If you want a loyal pet that's good with the family and other pets, find out everything you need to know about the Bloodhound.

Overview
  A scent hound originally bred to track deer and boar, this breed has evolved to trailing humans. These dogs are called Bloodhounds not because of their abilities but due to early breeders working intensely to keep their bloodline clean. An active animal in law enforcement, the Bloodhound's scenting ability is so trusted that it can be used as sufficient evidence in the courtroom.

Highlights
  • This is a very active breed, not the lazy dog you may have seen portrayed on The Beverly Hillbillies. Bloodhounds are working dogs and need long daily walks or runs.
  • Bloodhounds are not suited for apartment living. They do best in a home with a large fenced yard.
  • Bloodhounds are pack dogs and will enjoy the company of other dogs. A cat will do in a pinch.
  • Bloodhounds slobber and shed. Keep baby wipes or hand towels on hand throughout the house, and brush them weekly or more often if needed.
  • Bloodhounds love and are extremely tolerant with them. Teach children how to treat a Bloodhound properly and supervise play between them. Bloodhounds may be too large for toddlers; they can knock them down with a single swipe of the tail.
  • Bloodhounds need a fenced yard. This is not an option but a necessity. If they come across an interesting scent, they will follow it, head down, nose to the ground, eyes covered by their wonderful ears, oblivious to traffic and other dangers.
  • For the same reason you need a fenced yard, you need to walk a Bloodhound on leash.
  • Known for their stubbornness, Bloodhounds need an owner who is firm, loving, and consistent. A Bloodhound who is mistreated or feels he is mistreated will pout and hide. Bloodhounds do well with positive reinforcement training.
  • Bloodhounds are prone to recurring ear infections. Routinely check their ears and clean them on a regular basis.
  • Bloodhounds will chew and swallow the most unimaginable items, from rocks and plants to batteries and TV remotes.
  • When they're not following a trail, Bloodhounds prefer to live indoors with the family.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • Bloodhounds descend from the St. Hubert hound, developed more than a thousand years ago in France.
  • Bloodhounds are not lazy. They are bred to follow a trail for hours on end and nothing pleases them more. When they get bored, they are hugely destructive.
  • Comparable Breeds: Basset Hound, Bullmastiff

History
  Dogs like the Bloodhound have been in existence for centuries, used by noblemen to track
Bloodhounds circa 1915
game in the ritual of the hunt. The dogs take their name from the care taken in recording their ancestry, or bloodlines, so they were “blooded” hounds. Today’s Bloodhound descends from the St. Hubert hound, created in eighth century France to follow difficult trails in search of treacherous game such as wild boar. William the Conqueror brought St. Hubert hounds with him when he conquered England in 1066, and it was there that the Bloodhound eventually blossomed, some 800 years later.
  The Victorians were famous for creating dog breeds as we know them today — previously there had been no breed standards and rarely any record keeping of bloodlines. The rise of dog shows and a widespread interest in the keeping of fine or rare animals helped to save many breeds from extinction. The Bloodhound was one of them. His ability as a mantrailer, and the patronage of Queen Victoria, herself a noted dog lover, saved him from fading into oblivion. Mantrailing with Bloodhounds became a popular leisure activity, and it didn’t take long before the police recognized the Bloodhound’s usefulness in tracking down criminals.
  These days, the Bloodhound is still a favored member of many law enforcement teams. His testimony is even accepted in court.

Personality
  The dignified Bloodhound is a study in contradictions. He's docile yet stubborn, determined but not quarrelsome, affectionate but somewhat shy with people he doesn't know. When it comes to training, he's sensitive to kindness or correction, but he still wants to do things his way.
  He can sniff out the slightest hint of a trail, but as a watchdog or guard dog, he's poor, given his love of people. Some Bloodhounds can be vocal, barking up a storm when they're excited. Others are nice and quiet.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.
  Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Bloodhounds need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Bloodhound puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
  The lifespan of the Bloodhound is 7 to 10 years. Some major health problems the breed is susceptible to include skin-fold dermatitis, ectropion, entropion, otitis externa, gastric torsion, canine hip dysplasia (CHD), and elbow dysplasia. The Bloodhound also suffers occasionally from hypothyroidism.

Exercise 
  Bloodhounds can use regular exercise like any animal, but it’s also important to let them work with you in open areas so that it can sniff out scents. Letting an animal exercise in the way it was born and bred to exercise is a great, natural way to get it to live out its most instinctual behaviors in a healthy, energetic way.

Training
  The most spectacular element of the Bloodhound’s behavior is its ability to track. So let your Bloodhound use that skill in the wild – it’s important for every dog to feel that it has its own unique role in your pack. Bloodhounds are popular because of its loyalty and its relatively high rate of obedience. Bloodhounds aren’t very independent dogs who like to go roaming without you.

Care
  Bred to trail under any condition, the Bloodhound does not stop once it’s on a trail. Therefore, being that it needs regular exercise, it should be kept in an enclosed area when outside so that it does not go too far. The Bloodhound's grooming needs are little more than the occasional wiping or brushing of its coat , and the cleaning and removal of drool or dirt around its facial wrinkles. This breed can function as an indoor or outdoor dog, provided it has shelter and comfortable, warm bedding.

Grooming
  Bloodhounds have short, easy-care coats in black and tan, liver and tan, or red and need only a weekly brushing or wipe down. That’s where the easy part stops. The wrinkles must be cleaned regularly and kept dry to prevent infection.Be prepared to wash your Bloodhound’s face thoroughly after every meal and wipe his mouth after he drinks water — and before he shakes his head and slings water and drool everywhere.
  Use a rubber hound glove to brush the Bloodhound’s short coat, remove dead hair and distribute skin oils. You can brush the dog daily or weekly, depending on your tolerance for finding dog hair around the house.
  Bloodhounds shed seasonally, in the spring and fall. A tool called a shedding blade can come in handy during that time to help remove the excess hair.
Bloodhounds typically don’t need baths very often if they are brushed regularly. They have a distinctive odor that most people either love or loathe. If you’re a loather, don’t think you can bathe the smell away. It’s an inherent part of the dog and is something you must live with if you want a Bloodhound.
  Cleaning the facial wrinkles is part of grooming a Bloodhound. Depending on the individual dog, wrinkles may need to be cleaned a couple of times a week or every day. Wipe out the crud from the wrinkles with a soft, damp cloth or a baby wipe, then dry them thoroughly. If moisture is left behind, wrinkles become the perfect petri dish for bacterial growth.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks, and brush the teeth for overall good health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Bloodhounds love children. That said, they are large, active dogs and can accidentally knock a toddler down with a swipe of the tail. They're best suited to homes with older children.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  In general, Bloodhounds are quite friendly with other dogs, although a few have issues with small dogs. They usually get along fine with cats, although your cat may not appreciate being slobbered on.

Is this breed right for you?
  Sometimes shy, this affectionate breed will love his master for life. Because of their outstanding leadership qualities, these dogs like to be in a home where they can feel like they're the king of the roost. They're very protective of their home, but are friendly to other animals and people, making them good family pets. Due to loud howling, daily grooming needs and demanding an active lifestyle, these dogs are fit for average-sized yards or in an apartment only if given proper exercise.

Did You Know?
  The name “Bloodhound” does not come from this dog’s ability to track game and people, but from a long history of carefully recorded blood lines. In other words, he is a “blooded” hound - a kind of dog aristocracy, if you will.

A dream day in the life of a Bloodhound
  Waking up on the trail to breakfast, this pup will want a little bit of loving when he first sees you in the morning. After a good sniff of his owner, he'll be ready to sniff the outdoors. After a walk and a new trail to sniff, he'll be ready for the great indoors. A few smell-downs to make sure everything in the house is in order and he'll be ready for a run in the backyard. After dinner and loving from his master, he'll enjoy his daily coat-brushing. Once he's been groomed, he'll loyally sleep in the corner of your room.

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Everything about your Borzoi

Everything about your Borzoi
  Borzoi dog breed was developed in Russia as coursing and hunting dogs. These hounds were hunted in teams of three to go after rabbit, fox, and wolves. They later became popular as a companion for royalty across continental Europe.
  The undisputed glamour queens and kings of the sighthound world, these cousins of the Greyhound are tall, curvy and elegant. Their distinctive heads and flowing coats are featured in art and fashion photography, and they've been the favored pets of the aristocracy and royalty for even longer.

Overview
  With his tall, lean body, long, narrow head, and silky coat, the Borzoi is the picture of refinement and elegance. Borzois carry themselves proudly, and it's easy to envision them lounging in the palaces of Russian Tsars or swiftly running down a wolf in the Russian countryside. But before you bring a Borzoi to your palace, you need to decide if a Borzoi is right for you.
  Despite his relaxed attitude and regal appearance, the Borzoi is not simply a beautiful showpiece for your home. This giant breed, whose height ranges from 28 to 32 inches, has a mind of his own and a desire for human companionship. He's not the best choice for people who are away from home for long hours every day. His luxurious double coat, which kept him warm during brutal Russian winters, sheds heavily. His size is also a consideration for people with small children. The Borzoi is gentle, but puppies are enthusiastic and may accidentally knock over a toddler in play.
  No longer a royal hunting companion, today the Borzoi's most important job is that of family friend. With his sweet, gentle demeanor, it's a job at which he excels.

Highlights
  • Borzoi are sighthounds and will chase anything that moves. They should never be allowed to run loose unless in a secure area.
  • Borzoi can be sensitive to drugs, especially anesthetics, due to their lack of body fat. Make sure your vet is aware of this. The drug Ropum (Xylazine) should never be used for a Borzoi. Also, avoid exercising them on lawns that have been recently treated with fertilizer, insecticides, herbicides, or other chemicals.
  • Borzoi can be fussy eaters.
  • Borzoi can be prone to bloat. Feed frequent small meals and prevent heavy exercise after eating.
  • Borzoi can be nervous around children and should be introduced to them at a young age if they will be in frequent contact with them.
  • Borzoi bark infrequently and do not have strong guarding instincts. They make poor watchdogs as they cannot be relied upon to raise the alarm when an intruder is sighted.
  • They can live successfully with cats and small animals if introduced to them at an early age. Some Borzoi only follow the "no chase" rule indoors and cannot resist the instinct to chase a running cat if outdoors.
  • The Borzoi is not a common breed, so it may take some searching to find a breeder who has puppies. Be patient.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Borzoi is a sighthound, bred to chase running prey.
  • The graceful, elegant Borzoi was a favorite subject of artists during the Art Deco era.
  • The Borzoi’s long, silky coat can be any color or combination of colors.
  • The Borzoi is a giant breed.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Sighthound
Average lifespan: 7 - 10 years
Average size: 60 - 105 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, silky, flat
Coloration: Golden, black, white, red, brindle, cream
Hypoallergenic: No
Possible alterations: Long, narrow head; slightly slanted, dark eyes; small ears close to the head; large, black nose; arched back, straight legs and long, curved tail
Possible alterations: Coat can be slightly wavy with many color variations, including black markings
Comparable Breeds: Afghan Hound, Greyhound



History
  The Borzoi originated centuries ago in Czarist Russia, where they were bred by aristocrats as coursing sighthounds. The Borzoi’s predecessors are thought to have come from Egypt and include the long-coated, smooth-faced Russian Bearhound, the coursing hounds of the Tatars, the Owtchar, a tall Russian sheepdog and other ancient sighthound breeds. Whatever the mix, by 1260 the sport of hare coursing was documented in connection with the Court of the Grand Duke of Novgorod. The first Borzoi standard was written in 1650 and apparently did not differ much from the standard today. According to the American Kennel Club, “from the time of Ivan the Terrible in the mid-1500s to the abolition of serfdom in 1861, hunting with Borzoi was the national sport of the aristocracy.”
Sarah Bernhardt, depicted with borzoi,
by Georges Clairin, French painter
  During this period, great rural estates with hundreds of serfs and thousands of acres were devoted to breeding, training and hunting with the Borzoi. The breed was pampered and promoted by Russian royalty on a grand scale unparalleled in the development of any other breed. Guests, horses, dogs, tents, kitchens and carriages came by special trains to attend ceremonial “hunts.” More than a hundred Borzoi in matched pairs or trios, with additional foxhound packs and riders on horseback, made up the primary hunting party, with “beaters” on foot to flush out the game - usually a wolf. The Borzoi would pursue the wolf, and the horsemen would pursue the Borzoi, until the dogs captured, pinned and held their quarry. Typically, the huntsmen would leap off their horses, grab, gag and bind the wolf, and then either kill it or set it free. These extravagant affairs involved elaborate attire, feasting and festivity.
  Several Borzoi were sent as gifts to Princess Alexandra of Britain in 1842, and the breed was exhibited at the first Crufts World Dog Show in 1891. In 1863, the Imperial Association was formed to protect and promote the old-style Borzoi. Many present-day American bloodlines are traceable to the dogs of breeders who were members of this club. Most notable among these were the Grand Duke Nicholas, uncle to the Czar and field marshal of the Russian armies, and Artem Boldareff, a wealthy Russian aristocrat. The first Borzoi to come to America was allegedly brought from England in 1889 by a fancier of the breed living in Pennsylvania. The first American to travel to Russia and directly import Borzois was C. Steadman Hanks, the Massachusetts founder of the Seacroft Kennels in the 1890s. In 1903, Joseph B. Thomas of Valley Farm Kennels made several trips to Russia to obtain specimens of the breed that played a key role in the development of American Borzoi pedigrees, including dogs from the Perchino Kennels owned by the Grand Duke Nicholas and from the Woronzova Kennels owned by Artem Boldareff.
Wolf hunting with borzois (1904), Efim A. Tikhmenev.
  The Borzoi Club of America was formed in November of 1903, then called the “Russian Wolfhound Club of America.” The breed standard was approved at a meeting held during the Westminster Kennel Club dog show in February of 1904, and the breed club was elected to membership in the American Kennel Club in May of that year. The official breed standard was formally adopted in 1905 and is essentially the same today, with minor revisions made in 1940 and 1972. The breed’s name was changed from Russian Wolfhound to Borzoi in 1936, and the parent club’s name was changed to the Borzoi Club of America that same year.
  Today, this breed is largely unchanged from its Russian ancestors in both appearance and ability. Borzois are still used by farmers in the Western United States to ward off coyotes. They excel in AKC lure coursing competitions and in the conformation ring. Above all, Borzois are graceful, glamorous, gentle and devoted companions.

Personality
  The gentle-spirited Borzoi personality ranges from serious and stately to clownish. As a companion, the Borzoi is quiet, sensible, and intelligent. He prefers not to be left alone for long periods. His reaction to strangers ranges from aloof to friendly. In general, he's trusting of people and not shy. The Borzoi's easygoing nature doesn't necessarily mean he's easy to train, however. He's an independent thinker and can be stubborn. Last but not least, it's important to the Borzoi to know that he's loved, cared for, and will never be put in harm's way.
  Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, Borzoi need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Borzoi puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
  With an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, the Borzoi dog breed is prone to major health concerns such as gastric torsion, and minor problems like cardiomyopathy and hypothyroidism. The Borzoi reacts adversely barbiturate anesthesia. To identify some of these issues, your veterinarian may run thyroid and cardiac tests on this breed of dog.

Exercise
  To maintain their fitness these dogs need plenty of exercise, including a long daily walk and regular opportunities to run off the leash, however in some countries it is forbidden to allow all the dogs in this fleet-footed hunting category off the leash. The Borzoi make excellent jogging companions and usually enjoy running alongside a bicycle but beware, a Borzoi is quite likely to shoot off after any prey it catches sight of. If this happens you will need to react very quickly.

Care
  Functioning best as house dogs, with easy access to a yard, Borzoi can reside outdoors in cold weather, provided a warm shelter and soft bedding are offered. The male Borzoi has a fuller coat than the female, and requires combing or brushing two or three times a week. There are times when the dog sheds a great deal. This breed of dog does well when given a chance to exercise every day with a long walk and a sprint in an enclosed area.

Grooming Needs
  Borzoi should be brushed weekly to keep the coat healthy, manageable and mat-free. Groomers recommend using a pin brush on this breed, as wire slicker brushes can damage the coat. They shed lightly throughout the year and heavy during the change of seasons, so more brushing may be required in the Spring and Fall months. Borzoi are clean dogs whose coats naturally deflect dirt and only require baths on an as-needed basis.
  Regular ear and teeth cleanings will keep harmful bacteria from building up in the ear canal and mouth leading to infections or bad breath. Nails need to be trimmed once or twice a month.

Is this breed right for you?
  Best for homes with larger yards, this breed is a loyal member of the family. Affectionate to both familiar people and strangers, the Borzoi would make a great pet for someone who has a lot of company. Good with children but not prone to roughhousing, this pet is best suited for families with teens or without children. Likely to hunt and chase smaller animals, this is not a good breed to pair with a cat. Quiet but large, he would do OK with apartment life if exercised regularly.

Children And Other Pets
  The Borzoi can be too large for a household with small children, especially toddlers. They're giant dogs and can easily knock over a child by accident. Nor are they especially tolerant of toddlers poking and prodding them. They're best suited to homes with older children who understand how to interact with dogs.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Generally, Borzoi aren't aggressive toward other dogs, although in an uncontrolled situation their sighthound heritage may take over, especially if small dogs are running around. Some can be aggressive toward dogs of the same sex. With training, young Borzoi can learn not to chase or snap at smaller household pets, including cats. That training may only hold indoors, however. Cats outdoors — even your own cat — may be viewed as fair game.

Did You Know?
  The Borzoi was bred in Russia to course wolves and other game across open fields and, if necessary, to capture and hold it until the arrival of the huntsman. Leo Tolstoy’s novel “War and Peace” has a scene describing such a hunt.

A dream day in the life of a Borzoi
  Waking up slowly, the Borzoi will quietly sneak downstairs for his daily feeding. After checking out the home, he'll go outside for a run and trail any possible animals in the yard. Once he knows the coast is clear, he'll be ready for a nap in the sun. When his owner gets home, the Borzoi will be patiently waiting for his daily run. After dinner, he'll snooze next to his master.

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Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Top 10 Quietest Dog Breeds

Top 10 Quietest Dog Breeds
  We all love dogs, but constant barking is a sure-fire way to upset your neighborhood and get yourself in trouble. And let’s face, incessant barking drives us insane too! So if you’re looking for a dog but don’t think you’ll be able to curb a barker’s noise, or perhaps just don’t want to deal with the possibility at all, we’e compiled a list of some of the most silent dog breeds.
  Whether your desire for a dog who doesn't bark stems from the fact that you share a thin wall with your neighbor or you just like a fairly quiet place to call home, we've got you covered. 

10.Collie


 The Collie isn’t exactly a silent breed — if he were, Lassie would never have been able to tell us that Timmy had fallen down the well! Still, this gentle and affectionate dog generally only speaks when he really has something to say. Given the appropriate amount of exercise, he shouldn’t be a nuisance barker.
  In addition to being one of the most intelligent dog breeds out there, the Collie is also one of the quietest. This breed does not tend to bark except when he really needs to. Because this breed is so smart, training is easy so, if barking does become an issue, you can just teach your dog a “hush” command.

9. Shiba Inu
  The Shiba Inu looks almost like a fox in appearance and does equally well as a jogging partner as an indoor companion.  He is clean, easy to groom, and loves his people. 
While he is quiet, he has a very strong prey drive which means he should never be off leash. 
  They are intelligent and independent, making them very attractive to people who want a small dog, who is quiet, but not necessarily one that is “in their face.”

8.Irish Setter

  Unlike many of the other dogs on this list, the Irish Setter is a rowdy and rollicking dog with more energy than he knows what to do with. Happily, though, that energy is rarely channeled into nuisance barking, and as long as he’s given plenty of exercise, he can be a great choice for families.
  This medium-sized breed does have a good bit of energy but, with proper exercise and mental stimulation, barking is rarely a problem. Irish Setters don’t tend to expend their extra energy by barking – they would much rather play a game or run around the house with your kids. That makes him an excellent family pet and a good listener! 

7.Bullmastiff
  Large and loveable, most of the noises that come out of the Bullmastiff are snorts and snuffles. Sure, he may not get along with cats , but this large breed is loyal with his family, fairly low-maintenance and saves his barking for special occasions.
  Strong-willed and incredibly loyal, the Bullmastiff isn’t a big barker, but he is not always good with other dogs  or cats .

6.Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

  This small breed is playful and friendly – he tends to form strong bonds with family and does not like to be alone. As long as you give the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel enough attention, he will remain calm and placid at home, not prone to barking. One thing to be wary of with this breed is that he can be a little stubborn at times. 
  Sweet and docile, these dogs get along well with everyone.  They are one of the larger of the toy breeds, weighing in at between 13 and 18 pounds. But they are still considered a quiet small breed dog.
  Fiercely loyal, they will follow you everywhere. 
  Some think of them as lazy, lounging around in your most-comfortable chair, but they are also playful and enjoy walks and activities as long as it involves their owners. 

5.Saint Bernard

  St. Bernards are very social, affectionate dogs, although they may bark at strangers. However, as long as they are properly socialized as young puppies, Saints will typically grow to love everyone they meet and have little need to bark.
  The Saint Bernard is a member of the Mastiff family. He can be sweet, shy and stubborn, but with proper training and socialization, this quiet breed can be fantastic for families or for use as a therapy dog.
  This giant breed is the definition of “gentle giant” – despite his size, he is sweet and friendly. The Saint Bernard can be a little aloof around strangers and he may have a bit of a stubborn streak, but barking generally isn’t a problem. These dogs are particularly well suited to families with children and they make great therapy dogs. 

4.Italian Greyhound

  Tiny, intelligent and a bit fragile, the Italian Greyhound can be rather defiant, but barking is rarely an issue. Housetraining, however, may be another story.
  The Italian Greyhound (IG for short) may need a few reminders from time to time that he is a small dog and not the same as his bigger cousin the Greyhound. 
  Energetic and playful, he will keep you going and happily amused for years to come.  His grooming needs are minimal, but extra effort might be needed when training.  You will need to convince him that what you want him to do is what he wanted to do all along.

3. Great Pyrenees
  Another large breed, the Great Pyrenees is known for its long white coat. This breed was developed for livestock guarding so he is protective and independent by nature, but with proper training he isn’t much of a barker.
  Like the first two breeds on this list, the Great Pyrenees is a large dog with an equally big heart. When properly trained, he’s calm, gentle and protective, but you’ll have to do your homework in order to get this strong-willed dog to that point.

2. Great Dane

  The breed named quietest of them all is also one of the biggest: the Great Dane. He’s a gentle giant with a calm nature, and while he doesn’t bark often, when he does, his voice will be louder and deeper than just about any other breed.
  He’s a gentle giant with a calm nature, and while he doesn’t bark often, when he does, his voice will be louder and deeper than just about any other breed.

1.Basenji

  Basenjis are actually known for their inability to bark! But that doesn’t mean they don’t make noise. Bred as hunting dogs in Africa, they make a yodeling sound instead of barking. However, they typically only do this when they feel there is a reason, and are not known to make noise often.
  Patience and a sense of humor are essential to living with a Basenji. He will chew up or eat whatever's left in his reach, and he's quite capable of putting together a plan to achieve whatever it is he wants, whether that's to get up on the kitchen counter or break into the pantry where the dog biscuits are stored. 

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Everything about your Redbone Coonhound

Everything about your Redbone Coonhound
  As you can tell from its name, the Redbone Coonhound is a breed made famous by hunting raccoon and a few other animals. In fact, this is what it was originally bred for, having first been an “unofficial” breed in the American south for a number of years. This was before people serious about hunting wanted not only a superior Redbone Coonhound in terms of athleticism, but in coat color and overall breed quality. The result is the modern-day Redbone Coonhound, an excellent companion for families and a dog with keen hunting instincts that have also been measured against bears and cougars.
  What’s interesting about the Redbone Coonhound is just how well-suited it is for a number of households and family types. A good dog to have around children and sturdy enough to enjoy farm life and the outdoors, the Redbone Coonhound can make a highly versatile breed that brings a lot of joy to a family in so many ways.

Overview
  The Redbone Coonhound, also known as the Redbone, the Redbone Hound and the Red Coon Dog, is truly an all-American breed. This is an easy-going, friendly, good-natured hound dog that is immediately recognizable by its beautiful, deep red coat. Redbones were bred to perpetuate their instinctive desire and talent for hunting and treeing raccoons and other large game, including bobcat, cougar and even bear. Redbone Coonhounds are surefooted and swift.   They also are fantastic family dogs; they adore children and get along famously with other companion animals. Today, this is the only solid-colored purebred coonhound. The American Kennel Club accepted the Redbone Coonhound for full registration as a member of its Hound Group in 2009.

Other Quick Facts
  • Colonial settlers, especially those from Scotland and Ireland, brought red hounds with them to the United States, and those dogs are the ancestors of the Redbone.
  • The Redbone is a cold-nosed dog, meaning he’s good at following an old, or “cold,” trail.
  • Redbones occasionally have a small amount of white on their chest or feet, said to be a result of their Irish hound background.
  • The Redbone’s main quarry is raccoons, but he can also track bigger game.
  • The Redbone has a pleading expression with dark brown or hazel eyes and a sweet voice that carries over long distances.
Breed standards
AKC group: Hound

UKC group: Scenthound

Average lifespan: 11-12 years
Average size: 35-65 pounds
Coat appearance: Flat, shiny, and smooth
Coloration: Rich red
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Strong, vigorous, and striking all around, clean, well-proportioned head, black nose, strong chest, brown eyes, long, floppy ears that are close to the nose, upright tail, and small paws with thickened pads.
Possible alterations: Some may have white markings on chest and feet.
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, American Foxhound

History
  In the late 18th century, many European-type hunting dogs were imported to America, most of them of Scottish, French, English, and Irish ancestry: the English Foxhound, the Harrier, the Grand Bleu de Gascogne, the Welsh Hound, the Beagle, and the Bloodhound were among these. Most often, these dogs were imported so that wealthy planters of the Tidewater could engage in foxhunting. Over time, Southern hunters selectively bred dogs that would not back down, had great stamina, and would "hound" their prey until they treed or cornered their exhausted quarry, leading to modern coonhounds.
  In the late 18th century Scottish immigrants brought red-colored foxhounds to Georgia, which would be the foundation stock of the Redbone. Later, approximately 1840, Irish-bred Foxhound and Bloodhound lines were added. The name came from an early breeder, Peter Redbone of Tennessee, though other breeders of note are Redbone's contemporary,   George F.L. Birdsong of Georgia, and Dr. Thomas Henry in the 19th century.Over time, breeders followed a selective program that led to a coonhound that is specialized for prey which climbs trees, was unafraid of taking on large animals, was agile enough to carry on over mountain or in meadow, and liked to swim if necessary. They were ideal for pack hunting of both small and larger prey. Originally, the Redbone had a black saddleback, but by the beginning of the 20th century, it was an uninterrupted red tone.
  Like many American hunting dogs, especially those from the South, they were widely known by hunters and farmers, but not well known in the show ring. The Redbone has found recognition by the two major American kennel clubs. Because of of its main use as a hunting dog rather than a show dog Redbones are extremely rare dogs outside of the United States. There are very few breeders outside of North America and it is virtually unknown in Europe or Australia.
  The Redbone Coonhound was recognized by the United Kennel Club in 1902, becoming the second coonhound breed to gain recognition.
  The Redbone Coonhound was popularized after the novel Where the Red Fern Grows, written by Wilson Rawls, was published in 1961. It told the story of Billy Colman and his Redbones.
  The Redbone Coonhound was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2010. It was shown at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show for the first time in 2011.

Personality
  Redbone Coonhounds are determined, energetic, tenacious, tireless and fearless, especially while on the hunt. These personality traits are part of what make Redbones such fantastic scenthounds. In addition, Redbone Coonhounds are affectionate, friendly, kind-hearted, sensitive and extremely good with children and other animals. This is not a high-strung, fussy or clingy breed. Redbones adapt effortlessly to a wide variety of new situations. They are not suspicious or wary around strangers, nor are they overly boisterous or pushy. These are solid, stable hound dogs that can work in the field all day, and then comfortably relax with the family for a nice evening at home.

Health Problems
  Problems with hip dysplasia affect this dog, but that is not uncommon and they have few other health problems, making them generally pleasant around veterinarians.

Care
  Traditionally used as an outdoor dog, the Redbone has become more adaptable to indoor living with a family. It should be taken out on routine jogs, walks, or be allowed to swim nearby. However, these activities should only be done in safe and secure locations, as the dog can quickly roam off if it picks up a curious scent. While trailing or when excited, it has a loud and melodious voice.
  To maintain its coat, the Redbone should be brushed weekly. Many Redbone Coonhounds also have a tendency to drool.

Living Conditions
  The Redbone Coonhound will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. These dogs are relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. Their all-weather coat allows them to live and sleep outdoors and work in all kinds of terrain.

Training
  Redbone Coonhounds take well to training, and are so versatile and athletic that they can accomplish a high variety of tasks. Giving them tasks to fulfill – from swimming to hunting – can help it not only feel fulfilled, but help it feel like it plays a role in your pack. Every dog should certainly feel this way about humans, but should be trained with the discipline to realize that its role is subservient to every human in the house.

Exercise Requirements
  Capable of a lot of exercise – and indeed, they were bred that way – this is a great outdoor dog and a good companion for someone who wants to get plenty of vigorous exercise. If you’re looking for a low-maintenance dog that likes to lay around the house, this is not your breed.

Training
  Redbone Coonhounds take well to training, and are so versatile and athletic that they can accomplish a high variety of tasks. Giving them tasks to fulfill – from swimming to hunting – can help it not only feel fulfilled, but help it feel like it plays a role in your pack. Every dog should certainly feel this way about humans, but should be trained with the discipline to realize that its role is subservient to every human in the house.

Grooming
  The Redbone has a flashy, dark-red coat that’s short and smooth. Weekly brushing with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush will keep it clean and shiny, as well as remove dead hair so it doesn’t land on your floor, furniture or clothing.
  Bathe your Coonhound as needed. He may have a bit of a “houndy” odor, which some people love and others hate. Bathing can help reduce the smell if you don’t like it, but it won’t take it away completely or permanently.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every week or two, and keep the ears clean and dry. Brush the teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Great with children, the Redbone Coonhound will adapt to family life with ease. Loving and loyal, this dog loves his owner with passion. A great hunter, he can adapt well to the working life or be happy as a playmate. In need of a fenced-in yard, he has the natural instinct to sniff out his prey, including cats. Trained easily if done so at a young age, this breed is a great addition to add to a household.
Did You Know?
  The man who did the most to develop the breed was named George E. L. Birdsong, a well-known fox hunter and dog breeder who lived in Georgia.

A dream day in the life of a Redbone Coonhound
  Waking up ready to play, he'll greet you with a lick. Once you pet him and show him love, he's ready for his meal. After breakfast, he'll enjoy a fun walk and sniff around the block. Engaging in any activity the kiddos present him, he'll follow them around with ease. Happy to nap inside or outside, he'll need a lot of time in the backyard. After dinner, he'll enjoy a good rubdown, a swim in the pond and a lot of attention before he takes a snooze with his master.




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