October 2016 - LUV My dogs

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Top 5 Mountain Dog Breeds

Top 5 Mountain Dog Breeds
  More and more people are looking to large, mountain dog breeds to provide them with the companionship and protection that they need within their home.
  Here are the top 5 mountain dog breeds that more and more dog lovers are starting to become interested.

1.St. Bernard

  The breed that has been credited with saving more than 2,500 travelers lost in the snow was named for the Hospice du Grand St. Bernard in Switzerland, where the monks have bred these large dogs since the 17th century. The Saint needs lots of room indoors and out for regular daily exercise. This dog is great for children who won’t be bowled over by its size, and it’s an excellent watchdog.

  They’re known for copious amounts of drooling, but also for their wonderful sense of smell. They make excellent watchdogs and are quite gentle with children. Supervision should still be paid, however, as these dogs aren’t aware of just how big they are or how easily they can bowl over other people and children

2.Great Pyrenees

  Giant Pyrenees is a very gentle and elegant dog with long hairs all over their body. The nature of this dog breed is normally very calm and they are very social in nature. They have a great ability to sense the danger in advance and are great guard dogs. So because of their such beautiful qualities, they are regarded as one of the best mountain dog breeds. They have originated from France.
  They were also bred to be companion dogs, providing shepherds and livestock farmers with their friendly disposition once the work day was over. They’re a sturdy stocky dog, weighing anywhere from 100 to 125 pounds. Their double coat provides all the warmth that they need, and should be brushed at least once a week. Special attention should be paid to trimming their nails, especially if they’re not very active outside.

3.Bernese Mountain Dog

  Regarded by many as the most beautiful of the four breeds of Swiss Mountain Dogs, the Bernese is the only one with a long coat. Its ancestry traces to mastiff-type dogs of Roman times, which crossbred with local herding dogs to produce offspring smaller in stature but just as trustworthy and devoted.
  With very alert eyes and a playful smile, the Bernese mountain dog can be traced back to its Mastiff heritage during the times of the Romans. It was bred in Switzerland to be a herding dog, ensuring that the livestock never roamed too far from the rest of its herd to be taken by predators. They live for roughly 7 to 10 years, and can weigh up to 110 pounds.

4. Siberian Husky


  Believed to have descended from the Chukchi sled dogs of the Siberian Arctic, which had bred true for 3,000 years, these quick dogs were used to haul sleds and herd reindeer. They were able to travel great distances and work for long periods on little food.

  They come in a wide array of colors and live for longer than twelve years. They shed twice a year, and require extensive amounts of bathing and brushing in order to remove all of the fur. This is not a dog breed for those who are prone to pet dander allergies. Despite being a mountain dog breed, they don’t get much larger than sixty pounds, but that weight is typically all lean muscle.

5.Tibetan Mastiff

  This dog was bred in the Himalayan foothills to guard flocks, and it has remained relatively unchanged because of its isolation and the need to produce a large, strong working animal. Because of its inborn protective instincts, the Tibetan Mastiff was also used as a guardian for mansion and monastery.
  They have an extremely heavy undercoat that’s designed to keep them warm in winter, and can lead to extremely heavy shedding seasons when the weather becomes warmer. They can weigh up to 150 pounds, so they are quite stocky and sturdy dogs. They thrive best in large, open spaces and though are protective of children, can very easily knock them over.


If you’re still deciding whether a mountain dog breed is right for you, find someone you know or a breeder who would be willing to let you meet their dogs and get a feel for what being around one is like. Not a lot of people can appreciate the size of a large dog until they’ve met on in person. Taking the right steps to ensure both the safety and health of your mountain breed dog will definitely pay off in the long run, and you can both enjoy the years of fun and companionship together.
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How to Stop a Dog from Digging?

How to Stop a Dog from Digging?
  One of the biggest frustrations that comes with dog ownership is trying to establish how to stop dogs from digging. Our dogs bring lots of joy into our lives, but excessive digging problems can certainly put a strain on the owner-dog relationship.
 Dogs  dig when trying to get warm or stay cool, to entertain themselves, to bury valued items, and when hunting ground-dwelling animals.

Why Do Dogs Dig?


  • To learn how to stop dogs from digging holes it is crucial to determine the reason why your puppy or older dog is digging in the first place. That is a list of the most common reasons your dog may be digging:
  • He simply likes to dig!
  • Your dog may just seeking your attention.
  • May be bored and digs for mental and physical stimulation.
  • If your dog is digging under the fence he may be trying to get out to search for a mate.
  • Dogs are often attracted to fertilized dirt - the smell of fertilizer is irresistible to some dogs.
  • For shelter, to cool themselves down or warm themselves up.
  • Some breeds are very prone to digging, it is instinctual and bred into them.
  • May be because your dog is hunting for some little critters that live in your garden.
  • For food storage purposes. 

How To Stop Dogs From Digging?

1. Diagnose the problem. If you can figure out why your dog is digging holes, your odds of changing the behavior will dramatically improve. Some digging is random and unable to be diagnosed, but usually there are discernible reasons for the behavior.
2. Give your dog more attention. As many a dog-lover can attest, canines are not all that different from children in many ways, including a desire to get attention by whatever means necessary. Your dog may have learned that digging a hole in your nice garden gets attention from you, even if that attention is of the negative variety.
3. Reduce your dog's boredom. Dogs often dig for no other reason than simply because they are bored. Your dog may be bored if he stares at fences for a long time, whines, or engages in playful or "hyperactive" behavior, including digging holes.
4. Create safe discouragements. You have to catch the dog in the act of digging a hole if you want to effectively associate your disapproval with the activity. Since most of the digging is likely to happen while you're not watching, you need to find ways to make the act of digging while you are not around a little bit less pleasurable for the dog.
5. Try more unpleasant  discouragements if your dog continues to dig. If you've unsuccessfully tried to discourage your dog from digging the polite way, it may be time to step up your tactics. Here are some less pleasant ways of discouraging your dog from digging.
6. Seek professional assistance as needed. If you are having trouble diagnosing why your dog digs, or in stopping the digging even if you know why it happens, it may be time to call in the pros. Certified dog trainers and animal behaviorists can offer you personalized tips and techniques for addressing the causes and conditions of your dog's digging.
7. Construct a doggy-digging "sandbox." This is a designated, defined area of your yard where it is okay for the dog to dig. Encourage your dog to play in this area instead of the restricted area.
8. Create a shaded area for your dog outside. If you don't have an outside shelter to keep your dog cool in hot weather, he might be digging to find a respite from the heat. This is especially likely if the digging is near the foundations of buildings, trees, or water sources.
9. Eliminate any prey that your dog may be chasing. Some dogs are natural hunters and love the thrill of the chase. If the dog digs at the roots of trees or plants, or there's a raised path leading to the digging site, it's possible that your pet has spotted a rodent or other type of animal to hunt.
10. Keep your dog from escaping. Your dog may be trying to escape the premises to get to something, to get somewhere, or to simply to get away. This is the case especially if the digging happens near fencing. If you think this may be the case, try to figure out what your dog is running to or from, and provide incentives to stay put in the yard.
11. Remove temptations. The more temptations the dog has, the harder it is to resist digging. If you create a yard that is less tempting to dig holes in, the behavior will be much easier to keep under  control.



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