Everything about your Transylvanian Hound - LUV My dogs

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Thursday, September 15, 2016

Everything about your Transylvanian Hound

  When it comes to the Transylvanian Hound, there is much to love. It has a gentle, adaptable personality that comes from centuries of working with people in the wide-ranging climate of Hungary. Gentle and good-natured, it grows very close to family members. This is the type of dog that will romp through the wilderness and cuddle on the living room floor.

Overview
  The Transylvanian Hound  is an ancient dog breed of Hungary, historically primarily used for hunting. It is a strong, medium-sized scent hound, characterized by a black body, with tan and sometimes white markings on the muzzle, chest and extremities, and distinctive tan eyebrow spots. It has a high-pitched bark for a dog of its size. The breed was rescued from extinction by focused breeding efforts in the late 20th century. There were formerly two varieties, the long-legged and short-legged, developed for different kinds of hunting in the Middle Ages. Only the long-legged strain survives.

What makes the Transylvanian Hound Unique?
  Historically, Transylvanian Hound are know primarily for hunting. These dogs re characterized by a black body, and sometimes white markings on the muzzle and they are medium-sized dogs. they are sweet, energetic, loyal and fearless.

Breed standards
FCI: Group 6, Section 1 #241
AKC: FSS- The AKC Foundation Stock Service (FSS) is an optional recording service for purebred dogs that are not yet eligible for AKC registration.
UKC : Scenthound
Life Span: 10 – 12 Years
Colour: Black, Tan
Litter Size: up to 8 puppies
Size: Males –18 to 21 inches; Females – 18 to 21 inches
Weight: Males – 66 to 77 pounds; Females –66 to 77 pounds
Origin: Hungary
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards, hunters
Temperament: Friendly, hardy, courageous, intelligent
Hypoallergenic: No
Comparable Breeds: Black and Tan Coonhound, Rottweiler

History
  The ancestors of the Transylvanian Hound came with the invading Magyar tribes in the ninth century, who brought in hounds and crossed them with local varieties and with Polish hounds.
  The dog was the favourite of the Hungarian aristocracy during the breed's peak in the Middle Ages, for hunting various game animals.Two height varieties developed to hunt different game in different types of terrain, and both varieties were kept together. The long-legged variety was used for hunting woodland and grassland big game, such as European bison, bear, boar, and lynx. The short-legged variety was used for hunting fox, hare, and chamois is overgrown or rocky terrain.
  The breed declined, and was marginalised to the Carpathian woodlands, shrinking with the growth of agriculture and forestry. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the breed was nearly extinct, and not recognised and standardised by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) until 1963. In 1968, efforts began to save it.Today, a substantial number of the long-legged variety of the dogs may be found in both Hungary and neighboring Romania. However, only the long-legged variety remains.
  The Transylvanian Hound is, naturally, recognised by the national dog breeding and fancier group, the Hungarian Kennel Club (using the FCI breed standard). The breed was recognised with a breed standard by one US-based group, the United Kennel Club (UKC), in 2006.The more prominent American Kennel Club publishes no standard for it, though the organisation at least provisionally recognises its existence, announcing its acceptance in 2015 into the AKC Foundation Stock Service Program, for breeders hoping to establishing it in the United States.


Temperament
  Even though the Transylvanian Hound was originally developed as a hunting dog it also makes a wonderful family pet. These dogs are friendly and amiable by nature and they can be quite loyal and loving with their families. This breed is curious and they have a tendency to follow scents, so you should always keep your dog on a leash when you take him outside.   The Transylvanian Hound can be somewhat independent at times due to their hunting instincts, but they love to spend time with family and they generally get along well with children and other dogs. This breed requires adequate daily mental and physical stimulation to prevent the development of problem behaviors.
  This breed is known for its protective ways and is a good addition as a family dog. The Transylvanian Hound is not only loyal, but also intelligent and easy to train. Bred for hunting purposes, the Transylvanian Hound is energetic, requiring daily exercise.

Health Problems
  The Transylvanian Hound is a very hardy and healthy breed for the most part, not prone to many serious health problems. Like all breeds, however, this dog can develop minor health issues. The diseases most commonly affecting this breed include hip dysplasia and elbow dysplasia.
  This dog breed lives an average of 10 to 12 years.

Care
  The Transylvanian Hound requires little coat maintenance, shedding an average amount. An occasional brushing with a firm bristle brush is sufficient, and bathing should be kept to a minimum to maintain the natural coat.

Training
  The Transylvanian Hound was originally bred for hunting so it is an intelligent breed that learns quickly – it also has the ability to hunt independently. This being the case, the Transylvanian Hound can be a little bit strong-willed at times though they generally aim to please their owners. These dogs can be trained for tracking, pointing and driving game – they may also excel at various dog sports. Positive reinforcement training methods are best for this breed and a firm but consistent hand in training is recommended. As is true for all breeds, you should start training and socialization as early as possible with Transylvanian Hound puppies.

Exercise Requirements
  As a hunting breed, the Transylvanian Hound is fairly active. This being the case, he needs a good bit of daily exercise to remain in good health. This dog will appreciate a long daily walk or jog and he will also enjoy training for hunting or other dog sports. Make sure to give this breed plenty of mental and physical stimulation to prevent the development of problem behaviors.

Coat
  The Transylvanian Hound has a short, smooth coat that is fairly dense with a shiny appearance. It is primarily black with tan markings on the muzzle and legs as well as a tan point above each eyebrow. Because the breed has a double coat, regular brushing is recommended to control shedding.

Grooming
  The Transylvanian Hound requires little coat maintenance, shedding an average amount. An occasional brushing with a firm bristle brush is sufficient, and bathing should be kept to a minimum to maintain the natural coat.

Is the Transylvanian Hound Right For You?
  They are known for being protective and is a good addition as a family dog. The Transylvanian Hound is not only loyal, but also intelligent and easy to train. Bred for hunting purposes, the Transylvanian Hound is energetic, requiring daily exercise.

What They Are Like to Live With...
  Intelligent, curious and protective, the Transylvanian Hound also serves as an admirable watchdog. It has very keen instincts, however, and knows the difference between real danger and a letter carrier, for example. Once a friend or stranger is welcomed into the house, the Transylvanian Hound relaxes and becomes more social.

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