Everything about your Giant Schnauzer - LUV My dogs

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Friday, September 16, 2016

Everything about your Giant Schnauzer

  The Giant Schnauzer, also for a time known as the Russian Bear Schnauzer, the Munich Schnauzer the Munchener, the Munchen Dog and the Riesenschnauzer , is a large, intelligent, loyal and sometimes headstrong breed developed in Germany hundreds of years ago. The first Giant Schnauzer was shown in Munich in 1909 under the breed name of the Russian Bear Schnauzer. The Giant Schnauzer was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1930, as a member of the Working Group.

Overview
  The Giant is the largest of the three Schnauzer breeds. He was created by German land owners who wanted a tough dog to drive their cattle. It’s thought that they started with the large and shaggy “Bear Schnauzer” and mixed in some herding and working dogs such as the Bouvier des Flandres, the black Great Dane, and the Standard Schnauzer. Today’s Giant Schnauzer has many good qualities, but he is demanding.
  The Giant Schnauzer is smart, but like any dog with a working background, he is an independent thinker. You must begin early teaching him to think of you as his leader. The Giant Schnauzer is not an appropriate choice for a first-time dog owner.
  It’s important to give him a job to do, from his daily training exercises to participating in a dog sport such as agility, obedience, rally, or tracking. Giant Schnauzers are energetic and athletic, and they enjoy long walks, jogging, and hiking on leash. Plan to take yours for at least a 20-minute walk twice a day, at a good pace, plus training practice for 20 minutes to an hour.
  Be aware that a Giant Schnauzer can be messy to keep. His beard will drip water after he drinks and will need to be cleaned after meals. You may also need to wipe walls or furniture if he shakes his head before you can get to a towel. His coat picks up all kinds of dirt and debris which may be deposited throughout your home.
  The Giant Schnauzer is best suited to a home with a large yard surrounded by a solid fence that is at least five or six feet high. Do not rely on an underground electronic fence to keep him contained. The shock it provides is nothing to this tough dog, and he won’t let it deter him from leaving the yard if that’s what he wants to do.
  Giant Schnauzers are a good choice for families with older children. They can be too active in the presence of toddlers and may accidentally knock them over.
  The Giant Schnauzer’s coat must be brushed or combed at least a couple of times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles. To maintain the Giant Schnauzer’s distinctive look, you’ll need to trim his head and body regularly. You can take him to a professional groomer or learn to do it yourself. Other grooming requirements include cleaning the ears and trimming the nails as needed, brushing his teeth, and bathing him when he’s dirty.
  While you might think of him as an outdoor dog, nothing could be farther from the truth.   Chaining a Giant Schnauzer out in the yard and giving him little or no attention is not only cruel, it can also lead to aggression and destructive behavior. Giant Schnauzers are guardian dogs, devoted to their people. A Giant Schnauzer should have access to a securely fenced yard, but when the family is home, he should be in the house.

Highlights
  • Giant Schnauzers are energetic breed and require at least two long walks per day or 30 to 60 minutes of vigorous exercise in the backyard.
  • Without proper exercise and mental stimulation, Giant Schnauzers can become very destructive and difficult to handle.
  • Giant Schnauzers are not recommended for first-time or timid owners. They need a strong leader who can provide clear and consistent rules without resorting to physical force.
  • Although they are a very affectionate breed, the Giant Schnauzer is not recommended for homes with young children because of their size and forceful behavior.
  • Giant Schnauzers will make excellent guard dogs.
  • Apartments are not suitable dwellings for Giant Schnauzers. They need a large fenced yard where they can play and run safely.
  • Socialization is a must with this breed. They can be aggressive toward people, dogs, and other animals they don't know. They are naturally suspicious of strangers and need to become accustomed to experiencing new people and situations.
  • Giant Schnauzers are companion dogs and should live indoors. They thrive when they are with the people they love.
  • Giant Schnauzers require brushing one to three times a week. Their coats must also be stripped or clippered to remain neat looking.
  • Giant Schnauzers are intelligent dogs who learn quickly and excel at a variety of jobs. Be firm and consistent, and use positive reinforcement techniques such as praise, play, and food rewards. Giant Schnauzers will see and take advantage of any inconsistencies in your behavior.
  • Never buy a Giant Schnauzer from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts

  • The Schnauzer hallmark is a harsh beard and eyebrows.
  • Its large body is nearly square, while the head has a strong rectangular appearance.
  • There are three Schnauzer breeds, classified by size.
  • The breed is named for a show dog named Schnauzer, who won a dog show in Hanover in 1879.
Breed standards
AKC: Working
UKC Guardian Dog
Life span: 10-12 years
Coat Dense, wiry
Color: Black or "pepper and salt"

History
  The first Giant Schnauzers emerged from Swabia in the German state of Bavaria, and Württemberg in the 17th century.These original Giant Schnauzers were considered a rough-coated version of the German pinscher breeds, and their hair was thought to help them withstand the harsh German winters and bites from vermin. The origins of the breed are unclear, but sources speculate it originated through some combination of black Great Danes, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, Dobermans, Boxers,Bouvier des Flandres, Thuringian Shepherds, and the Standard Schnauzer.
  The Giant Schnauzer was originally bred as a multipurpose farm dog for guarding property and driving animals to market. By the turn of the 20th century the Giant Schnauzer was being used as a watchdog at factories, breweries, butcheries, and stockyards throughout Bavaria.It was unknown outside Bavaria until it was used as a military dog in World War I and World War II. The first Giant Schnauzers were imported to America in the 1930s, but they remained rare until the 1960s,when the breed became popular. In 1962, there were 23 new Giant Schnauzers registered with the American Kennel Club; in 1974 this number was 386; in 1984 it was over 800 and in 1987 it was around 1000 animals. In 2012, there were 94 new dogs registered, down from 95 in 2011.
  In modern times, the Giant Schnauzer is used as a police dog; is trained for obedience, dog agility, herding, search and rescue, and schutzhund; and is shown in conformation shows. They are also used for carting. In Europe, the breed is considered to be more of a working dog than a show dog. The focus in many European Schnauzer clubs is not so much on conformation shows, but on the working ability of the breed. In several countries, including Germany, dogs must achieve a Schutzhund Champion title before they can qualify to be a conformation champion.

Personality
  The Giant Schnauzer has the calm, loving temperament of a companion dog and the assertiveness, boldness and energy required of a guard and working dog.
He takes his responsibilities seriously and is protective of home and family, willing to defend them with a fierceness that can be intimidating. This is a territorial dog who's distrustful of strangers, but when he's not needed as a guardian, he's a playful and affectionate companion.
  His intelligence can pose a challenge to the inexperienced trainer, however. Giant Schnauzers require consistent and firm guidance. Without it, they're quite capable of thinking for themselves and running the household the way they think it ought to be run.
  As with every dog, Giant Schnauzers need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Giant Schnauzer puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
Health
  The Giant Schnauzer, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 12 years, suffers from minor health issues such as Osteochondrosis Dissecans (OCD), hypothyroidism, and gastric torsion. This breed is also prone to canine hip dysplasia (CHD), a serious health concern. To identify some of these issues early, a veterinarian may recommend regular hip and thyroid exams for the dog.

Care
  Giant Schnauzers are not recommended for apartments or condos. They have high energy levels indoors and out, and are best suited to a home with a fenced yard where they can safely run off some of that energy. When they're not playing outdoors, Giant Schnauzers should be inside with their people, whom they will happily follow around the house.
  Giant Schnauzers require at least an hour of daily exercise. Plan on a couple of half-hour walks at a good clip or vigorous play. He can be a digger or chewer, so always give him something constructive to do instead.
  This is a breed that needs a job. Train him to do tricks or help you around the house if you want to forestall destructive behavior. He doesn't like to be bored, so avoid frequent repetition and turn training into a challenging game to get the best out of him.
Train him with firmness and consistency. He can be stubborn and you must be more stubborn. You must be able to provide leadership without resorting to physical force or harsh words.
  It's best if you work with a trainer who's familiar with and understands the breed. Your Giant Schnauzer will respond with enthusiasm to training techniques that are positive and keep him on his toes.

Living Conditions
  The Giant Schnauzer is not suited for apartment life. It is fairly active indoors and will do best with acreage.

Training
  Giant Schnauzers require good training to grow up properly socialized. They are outdoor dogs that need a lot of exercise, so exercise should be included in their training. These dogs need to be raised to understand that other dogs are not a threat and that strangers are not, either. Displaying your status as a pack leader in your dog’s perceived tribe is very important with these dogs, as they can quickly believe that they are the pack leaders without the presence of someone with more discipline than them.
  If a Giant Schnauzer has been properly trained, it can have a very endearing personality and can even be known as a very playful breed.

Activity Requirements
  For people who aren't prepared to walk or run several miles a day, the Giant Schnauzer is not the right choice. For active people, he makes an excellent companion, as his daily activity requirements are high. Walking, jogging, hiking and biking are good ways to keep Schnauzers physically fit, and enrolling them in agility training can keep their minds sharp.   Couch potatoes or city dwellers may not be the right choice for this breed, as they need lots of space, both indoors and out. Proper exercise not only keeps Giant Schnauzers physically fit, but it also helps maintain a steady temperament. High-strung Schnauzers are probably not getting enough exercise.

Grooming
  The Giant Schnauzer’s distinctive look — eyebrows, thick beard, clipped body — doesn’t come naturally. Regular grooming is essential, including brushing, bathing, haircut, nail trim, and ear cleaning. Expect to groom  your dog every six to eight weeks, especially if you wish to keep the coat trimmed short and those eyebrows distinct. Regular brushing every week between stylings will keep the breed’s double coat.
  Shop around before choosing a groomer. Grooming a Giant Schnauzer properly requires good clippering and scissoring skills. Make sure the groomer has experience with the breed, both in terms of styling and handling.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Because of their size, energy level, and commanding nature, Giant Schnauzers are not recommended for homes with young children. The suggested age range is 12 and older who have the maturity to interact appropriately with a large-breed dog.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Giant Schnauzers don't tend to be buddy-buddy with other dogs, especially those of the same sex, and they probably shouldn't be trusted alone with cats, no matter how well they seem to get along.

Did You Know?
  The Giant Schnauzer was probably developed in southern Bavaria and for a long time was known as the Munchener, after the city of Munich.

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