September 2016 - LUV My dogs

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Everything about your Otterhound

Everything about your Otterhound
  This is a large, shaggy scenthound who nearly disappeared after hunting otters became illegal in Britain, but fans have repurposed him as a companion. He’s entertaining to live with but can be difficult to keep clean. The Otterhound is laid-back, but that doesn’t mean he’s a couch potato. Expect to exercise him thoroughly every day.

Overview
  Thought to come from French ancestors, the Otterhound is a large breed that's close to extinction. Used in packs by fishermen to help catch and retrieve otters, the dog has a good scent trail and webbed feet to help retrieve fish. With sea otters on the endangered list, we're seeing less of this breed. Extremely affectionate and devoted to his family, this breed is a large and loving animal.

Highlights
  • Otterhounds require a great deal of exercise, and not just chasing a ball in the backyard. A vigorous daily workout of jogging or swimming for several miles is needed to keep him physically and mentally healthy. However, because of the adverse effect of strenuous exercise on growing joints and bones, you should limit exercise among puppies and adolescent Otterhounds. Swimming is the best exercise for younger dogs, because the risk of joint injury is minimal.
  • Otterhounds are enthusiastic and loud barkers. But don't expect yours to be a guard dog — he's far too friendly for that.
  • Don't allow your Otterhound off-leash in unfenced areas; you never know when he might catch an enticing scent and run off.
  • Otterhounds enjoy being outdoors, but they're best suited to living daily life inside the house with their families.
  • A fenced yard is mandatory. Otterhounds have been known to jump fences as high as five feet, so be sure the fencing is at least six feet tall.
  • The Otterhound is affectionate, but he's also independent. He won't follow you around, begging for attention. He'll probably greet you when you get home, and then — if he doesn't need exercise — he'll return to his favorite snoozing spot.
  • The Otterhound loves food and can become obese if you don't monitor his diet. Also, his incredible sense of smell enables him to locate those special goodies you've hidden in the cabinets, and his size and cleverness enable him to find a way to get at them.
  • Big dog, bigger expense. Everything for a big dog costs more, from food to grooming to veterinary care.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts:
  • Otterhounds are rare - there are fewer than 1,000 throughout the world. Approximately 350 live in the U.S. and Canada. The rest are primarily in Great Britain, the Netherlands, Scandinavia, Germany, and Switzerland.
  • The Otterhound played a role in the creation of another breed: the Airedale. He was crossed with black and tan terriers to add size and water ability.
  • Comparable Breeds: Spinone Italiano, Wirehaired Pointing Griffon


History
  Closely resembling the Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen, the Otterhound may have its roots in France. Being a very unusual member of the Hound Group, the Otterhound is a hardy scenthound, whose origin is unknown. The Otterhound may have its roots in breeds such as the Welsh Harrier, Bloodhound, Southern Hound, or a kind of water spaniel.
  Although there is not much to be said about the genetic makeup of the breed, it was a prized otter hunter in England as early as the 13th century. In 1212, King John kept the earliest documented Otterhound packs. This dog was used for searching for otters, which were exhausting the fish in local streams. The dog trailed the prey to its hideout and bayed after locating it. After the hunters arrived, they would take away the Otterhound and use small terriers to kill the otter.
  Although otter hunting was not a popular sport - as it lacked the formality of foxhunting and took place in wet weather conditions - the breed rose in popularity during the later part of the 19th century, when more than 20 packs hunted in England. However, this sport started losing its prominence after World War II.
  The first Otterhound was introduced to the United States at the turn of the 20th century; soon thereafter, the American Kennel Club would formally recognize the breed.
  Unfortunately, this ancient English breed is slowly becoming extinct. Otterhound fanciers are often not in favor of breeding the dog for dog shows and thus it has not been very popular as a pet or show dog.

Personality
  The Otterhound is an amiable fellow, with plenty of affection for every member of the family. He loves children, though he can play a little rough due to his large size. He is devoted to his family, but not overly so.
  He's likely to extend happy greetings when you come home at the end of the day, but don't expect him to follow you from room to room. He's too independent for that.
  The Otterhound's characteristic independence makes training challenging. You have to convince him that he wants to do what you're asking. This is entirely possible, as long as you are patient and skilled.
  The good-natured Otterhound is not a top candidate for a watchdog. He'll sound a loud warning bark to intruders, but that's about it.
  As with every dog, the Otterhound needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Otterhound puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health Problems
  Like most large, rapid growing breeds, Otterhounds occasionally suffer from joint problems such as hip and elbow dysplasia. They are also known to suffer from ear infections due to the long, droopy shape of their ears. Otterhounds can also sometimes suffer from epilepsy and this is considered to be a hereditary ailment.

Care
  The Otterhound is not a breed that can brag of its tidiness, as food often gets trapped in its mouth a face, or mud in its hairy feet. Therefore, the dog should be brushed and combed at least once a week.
  More over, the Otterhound requires a daily exercise regimen. It can sleep outdoors in cool and temperate climates if given proper shelter.

Living Conditions
  The Otterhound is not recommended for apartment life. They are relatively inactive indoors if they have sufficient exercise. They do best with at least a large, well-fenced yard. It can sleep outdoors in temperate or cool climates if given a good shelter.

Training
  Otterhounds were never bred to be kept as companions and are therefore not the easiest of dogs to train. Training them requires a firm hand and a great deal of patience. They are also a good-natured breed and do not respond well to harsh training methods. A firm but gentle approach always works best with this breed. It is also important that an Otterhound’s owner display consistent leadership as this dog can turn willful and stubborn if faced with a meek or passive owner.

Exercise Requirements
  Otterhounds have a great deal of stamina and require strenuous and daily exercise. They make excellent jogging and hiking partners and can keep up a steady trot for the better part of the day. When not exercised sufficiently they can sometimes turn destructive.

Grooming
  The Otterhound has a rough double coat that sheds water and has a crisp texture. It’s easy to care for with weekly brushing. The coat can be two to six inches long, and some coats are oilier than others. An Otterhound who has a longer, oilier coat gets dirty more quickly than one with a shorter, less oily coat, so the need for bathing varies. Some Otterhounds need a bath monthly, while others can get by with a bath only once a year. However frequently you bathe him, plan to clean the Otterhound’s beard after every meal to prevent odor. You will also spend a lot of time cleaning his feet, which have a tendency to attract mud and debris.
  With some Otterhounds, you may need to strip the coat once or twice a year to maintain its crisp texture. Stripping is the process of pulling out dead hair by hand. Ask your dog’s breeder if it is necessary and how to do it. Clipping the coat will make it soft, which is okay as long as you don’t show your dog and don’t mind the loss of the traditional texture. The Otterhound Club of America offers good grooming tips on its website.
  Anytime the Otterhound gets wet, whether from a bath, a swim, or a face wash, be sure you dry him completely to avoid a mildew-like effect, especially under the chin or any other place he has skin folds. In addition, if the Otterhound doesn’t get dry right down to the skin, he can develop painful, itchy, tender spots.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails every week or two and keep his ears clean and dry. Good dental hygiene is also important. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Otterhounds are boisterous, fun-loving dogs, but because of their size and tendency toward clumsiness, you should supervise them when they are with small children. They love children and wouldn't hurt them intentionally, but their size and exuberance might cause them to knock a small child to the ground. The Otterhound is probably better suited to a family with older children, ages 10 and up.
  If properly trained and socialized, the Otterhound gets along well with other dogs. Use caution when introducing him to small pets, however. The Otterhound's hunting instinct is strong, and he's likely to chase animals he perceives as prey.

Is this breed right for you?
  A loving and devoted companion, the Otterhound is good with children of all ages. Affectionate and smart, this breed gets along well with all members of the family, including cats. Known to have a knack for hunting, he may chase small animals and fish if given the opportunity. A terrific companion and great for outdoor life and camping, he'll enjoy any type of activity that involves swimming. Although inactive indoors, this breed is not recommended for apartment living due to his large size and need for regular exercise.

Did You Know?
  The water-loving Otterhound has large webbed feet to facilitate his ability to swim. Combined with his rough coat, they give him a look all his own.

A dream day in the life of an Otterhound
Waking up to hang out with the family around the breakfast table, the Otterhound will be ready for his morning walk. Once back inside, he'll snooze before the gang leaves. When alone, he'll ensure the home turf stays protected. Frequenting the backyard, he may swim a few laps in the pool. Once home, he'll greet you with a furry smile. After a rubdown and another walk, he'll be ready to relax with the entire family.
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Everything about your Xoloitzcuintli

Everything about your Xoloitzcuintli
  The Xoloitzcuintli dog breed, sometimes called the Mexican Hairless, may well have descended from the first dogs to set paw on the North American continent. In their native Mexico and Central America, they were popular “doctors,” the heat given off by their body being comforting to people with arthritis and other ailments; people still like to cuddle with them today.

Overview
  The first breed of the Americans, the Xoloitzcuintli is the oldest dog on the planet and the official pooch of Mexico. A godlike or healing dog, the name comes from the Aztec language. Also known as a Xolo, this is the first breed inducted into the American Kennel Club. The breed nearly fell into extinction in the 1800s. Becoming popular again thanks to celebrities, the breed was re-inducted into the AKC in the mid- to late 1900s. Often referred to as a Mexican Hairless Dog, there are actually a few varieties of the breed. Coming in toy, miniature and standard, one in five of the breed is born with hair. The only dog beginning with the letter X, the Xolo is still used as a protector against evil spirits in Central America. Often used in ugly dog competitions, these pups enjoy warmer weather and have very sensitive skin.

Highlights
  • The Xolo comes in three different sizes, so the breed is adaptable to any type of home.
  • Native to Mexico and Central America, the Xolo is also known as the Mexican Hairless.
  • The Xolo is thought to date to pre-Columbian civilizations.
  • Although he’s known as a hairless breed, the Xolo also comes in a coated variety.
  • The Xolo’s body is slightly longer than it is tall.
  • In addition to being a great companion, the Xolo is also a protective watchdog.
  • The Xolo’s lack of an insulating fur coat makes him feel warm to the touch, even though his body temperature is not any higher than that of other dogs.
  • The Xolo was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2011 as a member of the Non-Sporting Group.
  • There are fewer than 1,000 Xolos in the United States, with approximately 30,000 worldwide.
  • The Xolo is not hypoallergenic, although his hairless body may be less likely to trigger allergies in susceptible individuals.
  • The Xolo can have a strong prey drive and is likely to chase other animals.
Other Quick Facts:
  • Some say the Xolo resembles a hot water bottle with pig eyes, bat ears, and a rattail.
  • Not every Xolo is hairless - there is also a variety with a short, smooth coat.
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Sighthound and Pariah
Average lifespan: 16 - 20 years
Average size: 5 - 45 pounds depending on size variety
Coat appearance: Soft and smooth if hairless or short and flat if hairy
Coloration: Black, gray, gray-black, red, bronze
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Unique look with bat-like ears and features; dark, almond-shaped eyes; long tail and strong, athletic legs
Possible alterations: May be born with hair or have blue eyes
Comparable Breeds: American Hairless Terrier, Chinese Crested

History
  Sometimes called the first dog of the Americas, the Xolo is a hairless breed that has been in existence for many centuries, as evidenced by depictions on pre-Columbian pottery and reports from the Spanish conquistadors. The warm-bodied dogs were prized for their healing properties and were known for helping with toothaches, insomnia, and ailments that benefit from warmth, such as rheumatism and asthma. They also warded off evil spirits and intruders.
  Xolos were popular in the 1930s and 1940s. Artists like Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera often portrayed the breed in their works. But as so often happens, the Xolo lost popularity. The breed's numbers dropped so low that the American Kennel Club eliminated the Xolo from its stud book.
  However, Xolos recently made a comeback. The United Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1993, and The American Kennel Club brought it back into the fold in 2011 as a member of the Non-Sporting Group.

Temperament 
  The Xoloitzcuintli love people – in fact, they are often called “Velcro dogs” because they are so attached to their owner. They will want to be with you always, so your Xolo will never run away from home. Don’t be surprised if your dog is emotionally tuned into you. If you’re sad, your Xolo will know and want to comfort you. He makes a great watchdog, but not a good guard dog. When strangers come over to visit, your Xolo may be aloof to their presence.
  Because of their size, you may want to coddle your Xoloitzcuintli, but resist the urge. This could  lead to behavioral problems or little dog syndrome. Even though they aren’t yappy, they can be pushy if you let them get away with everything.
  If you’re away from home for long periods of time, the Xoloitzcuintli is not the dog for you.     He needs to be with people and can’t be left alone all day. If fact, if he is left alone too long, your Xolo may try to climb or dig their way out – separation anxiety can be an issue with this breed. They work well with a schedule and will become upset if it changes.

Health Problems
  Most of the Xolo’s health concerns are due to its lack of hair. In the summer, this dog is susceptible to sunburn, so he’ll need protection such as a shirt or sunscreen. In the winter, he’ll need protection from the cold – a sweater, jacket and boots will help protect him.
  As well, the Xolo should not be overly bathed or rubbed with lotion. This causes acne and other infections in the pores. Another interesting health fact about Xoloitzcuintlis is that the breed has fewer teeth than most other dogs – they are often missing their missing their premolars and bicuspids.

Care
  The Xoloitzcuintli needs very little grooming. Generally, a soft, warm cloth to cleanse the skin is sufficient.  Exercise needs are moderate. Daily walks or jogs and outdoor play during warm weather will benefit the Xolo’s health.  Skin care should be undertaken carefully, with regular checks to make sure the skin has not become too dry. Skin care products, lotions, shampoos or anything that has the potential to irritate the skin should be avoided.
  With these precautions in mind, keeping your Xolo safe from harsh sunlight, as well as protecting it from cold temperatures will be main concerns. Because they are sensitive to climate, Xolos are considered indoor dogs. They should never be left outdoors for long periods of time. During cold seasons, your Xolo may be more comfortable wearing a sweater, and of course, spending as little time outdoors in the cold as possible.

Living Conditions
  Young Xolos require a lot of exercise, discipline and attention, lots of toys and things to do to keep them happy and out of trouble. If you do not have the time required for the first year, you may consider a trainer, dog walker, or doggy day care while at work all day. Or an older Xolo. As they mature, they calm down and are very easy going, quiet and laid-back, and are content to stay at home while you work. However, they would prefer to go with you if they can and do very well at work with you. This does not mean they are not game to go jogging, hiking or any other activity, it just means they don't require as much as, say, a working breed or terrier breed.

Trainability
  Xoloitzcuintlis are smart dogs, which means they catch on to training activities quickly, but they must be taught early and often. Xolos can quickly take over and control a training session, so training must be conducted with absolute consistency, and training should be made as interesting as possible to keep the dog engaged. Xolos respond the best to reward-based training whether that reward is praise or food, and they will shut down if treated with a heavy hand. All family members should take part in the training of a Xoloitzcuintli, that way the dog knows to respect all members of the household.
  Some owners have experienced problems trying to housetrain a Xolo. Their hairless bodies are sensitive to extreme weather conditions, so housetraining in the winter can be a challenge. Crate training usually works the best, as Xolos like to have their own personal space and will be less inclined to mess in that space.

Exercise Requirements
  To keep boredom at bay, you’ll need to keep your Xoloitzcuintli engaged both mentally and physically… otherwise, you’re asking for trouble! You’ll need to walk your Xolo daily to keep mischief at bay. Indoors, always make sure a rousing play time to help release some of his energy.
  The great thing about the Xoloitzcuintli is that they can live in pretty much any kind of house, big or small. As long as they get enough exercise, these dogs are happy and adaptable. As long as you’re involved in the activity at hand, they will gladly participate.

Grooming
  Grooming the Xolo is pretty easy, but there are some special considerations for this hairless breed. If he has a coat, brush weekly with a very soft brush. Wipe the skin daily with a cloth dampened with warm water to remove dirt. A bath with a mild dog shampoo once a week or every few weeks helps keep the skin blemish free. Apply moisturizing lotion daily or as needed, depending on skin condition and climate. Some hairless breeds are sensitive to lanolin, so ask the breeder what lotion she uses on her dogs.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, and brush the teeth frequently with a soft toothbrush and doggie toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears every week and clean them if needed using a cleaner recommended by your veterinarian.   Hairless breeds are prone to sunburn so apply sunscreen or dress him in a doggy T-shirt. He may need warm doggie clothing in the winter months.

Children And Other Pets
  The family-oriented Xolo can be good with children, especially if he is brought up with them. He’s not a big fan of having his ears or tail pulled, however, so supervise any interactions with very young children. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Xoloitzcuintli can get along well with other dogs and cats if they grow up with them. They may be less sociable toward strange dogs, however, and their high prey drive inclines them to chase cats and other furry animals they see outdoors.

Is this breed right for you?
  A kind and family-oriented breed, the Xolo should be monitored around young children. Good for apartment living, this dog will need adequate exercise to remain happy. Due to jumping, it's best that a Xolo has a fenced-in yard. Preferring warmer climates, Xolos cannot be outside pets due to their tender skin, and will not do well being kenneled either. Requiring sunblock and care, a Xolo is easy to groom but will need extra maintenance for his sensitive skin. In addition, he does require a special diet to avoid stomach problems. A nice breed, the Xolo is very attached to his owner and can be emotionally hurt easily. Intelligent, he's easy to train and will not respond well to harsh leadership. Considered a good watchdog, he will protect and serve his master without second thought.

Did You Know?
  The Xolo’s name is a combination of Xolotl, an Aztec god, and Itzcuintli, an Aztec word for dog.

In popular culture
  • Xolo was featured in Royal de Luxe's street theater performances in Guadalajara, Mexico (November 2010), Nantes, France (May 2011), and Liverpool (April 2012). A huge puppet of the dog accompanied the company's famous Giants.
  • Club Tijuana Xoloitzcuintles de Caliente is a Mexican football club named after the dog breed.
  • The Xolo was featured for the first time in the 2012 Westminster Dog Show.
  • A Xolo photograph won 1st place in the "Animal Kingdom" Life Framer competition (2015).
A dream day in the life of a Xoloitzcuintli
  If the Xoloitzcuintli had his way, he would sit on his owner's lap from sunup to sundown. However, since this may not be the healthiest way for him to live his life, it would be best to incorporate a walk and playtime in the Xolo's day. Enjoying playing outside, the breed will like to play with the older children and climb fences or trees if available to him. Going to sleep at his owner's feet, the Xolo will dream the night away while he keeps his ear out to protect the home.
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Everything about your Chinook

Everything about your Chinook
  Created in the White Mountains of New Hampshire, the Chinook dog breed made his name on Admiral Byrd’s first Antarctic expedition in 1928. These days he’s a multipurpose dog who’s happy hiking, competing in agility and other dog sports, pulling a sled or other conveyance, and playing with the kids.

Overview
  This rare breed of sled dog got his start when musher Arthur Treadwell Walden of Wonalancet, New Hampshire, bred a farm dog of unknown heritage with a “northern” husky, producing a litter of puppies with tawny coats. One of the pups, named Chinook, grew up to father a breed of dogs who not only had his physical characteristics but also his gentle disposition. Indeed, the calm and dignified Chinook lavishes plenty of affection on each family member, but he’s best known for his love of children.
  With his heritage as a hard-working sled dog, the Chinook is intelligent and easy to train if you use positive reinforcement techniques, such as praise, play, and food rewards. If you lead an active, outdoorsy lifestyle, this is the dog for you. Chinooks are great companions for hikers and backpackers, and they thrive at dog sports, including sledding and skijoring.   They also perform well in agility, herding, obedience, and rally.

Highlights
  • Chinooks have a gentle, even temperament and are rarely shy or aggressive.
  • Chinooks should live indoors with their people, preferably in a home where they have access to a safely fenced yard.
  • Chinooks can be diggers.
  • Chinooks need 30 to 60 minutes of daily exercise. They enjoy hiking, jogging, and pulling, whether what's behind them is a sled, wagon, or person on skis or skates.
  • Chinooks are smart and learn quickly, but if you're not consistent in what you ask of them, they'll take advantage of you.
  • Chinooks are not barkers but can be talkative, whining and "woo-wooing" to express their opinions.
  • Chinooks have thick coats and shed heavily twice a year; the rest of the year they shed small amounts daily.
  • Chinooks need daily brushing to keep their coats clean, but baths are rarely necessary.
  • Chinooks love kids when they're raised with them, but can be reserved with them otherwise.
  • Never buy a Chinook from a puppy broker or pet store. Reputable breeders do not sell to middlemen or retailers, and there are no guarantees as to whether the puppy had healthy parents. Reputable breeders perform various health tests to ensure that their breeding dogs don't pass on a predisposition to genetic diseases.
  • Interview breeders thoroughly, and make sure the puppy's parents have been screened for genetic diseases pertinent to that breed. Ask breeders about the health issues they've encountered in their dogs, and don't believe a breeder who claims that her dogs never have any health problems. Ask for references so you can contact other puppy buyers to see if they're happy with their Chinook. Doing your homework may save you a lot of heartbreak later.
Other Quick Facts
  • In Inuit, Chinook means “warm winter winds.”
  • The Chinook is an uncommon breed, so expect to wait up to a year for a puppy to become available.
  • A Chinook can have either drop or erect ears, and you won’t be able to tell which type he’ll have until he’s four to six months old.
  • His hefty size may ward off an intruder, but the Chinook is not a guardian breed.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working Group
UKC group: Northern Breed Group
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size: 55 - 70 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense to medium double coat
Coloration: Tawny, honey or reddish-gold
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Muscular frame, wide nostrils, black nose, dark brown or amber eyes, moderate webbed toes and long curved tail
Possible alterations: May be white in color or have dewclaws, which are typically removed.
Comparable Breeds: Siberian Husky, Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

History
  The Chinook is one of an increasing number of breeds claiming to be “made in America.” The powerful yet friendly dogs were created by musher Arthur Treadwell Walden, who started with some Greenland Husky sled dogs and a mastiff-type farm dog.  Walden was put in charge of assembling the team of 16 Chinooks used to transport supplies for Admiral Richard Byrd’s trek to Antarctica in 1927. Walden’s original dog, named Chinook, was part of this illustrious team.
  Following the expedition, Walden sold his kennel to Milt Seeley, Julia Lombard, and Perry and Honey Greene, but the breed’s numbers began to dwindle. In 1965, the Guinness Book of World Records declared the Chinook the most rare breed of dog in the world. When Neil and Marra Wollpert tried to find a Chinook in 1981, they discovered that there were only 11 dogs left who could be bred, so they worked successfully to preserve the dogs and rebuild the population.
  In an attempt to further save the breed, the Chinook Owners Association, in conjunction with the United Kennel Club, instituted a crossbreeding program. The intent was to add genetic diversity to the Chinook’s gene pool. Today, Chinooks are still uncommon — only 638 were registered with the American Kennel Club’s Foundation Stock Service in 2009. But the breed, which has been named the state dog of New Hampshire, appears to have a future.

Temperament
  One of the most wonderful traits of the Chinook is its gentle, even temperament, making it one of the easiest to own of all sled dog breeds. These calm and patient animals get along famously with children and other dogs. They are neither aggressive nor timid and, as working dogs, are programed to please their people. The Chinook does not make a good guard or watch dog. However, they do make wonderful dogs for high-energy families that have lots of time to spend with their pets. They will not thrive spending most of their time alone or apart from their family. Chinooks need constant companionship, either from other dogs or from their owners. A family that does not allow a dog in the house or rarely has time to train, exercise and socialize with their dog should consider a different breed. The Chinook has no trouble making friends but can be reserved at first with strangers or in unfamiliar surroundings.

Health Problems
  For the most part, Chinooks are pretty healthy dogs. They are prone to certain afflictions such as Cataracts, Seizures and Hip Dysplasia. Skin allergies have also been known to occur within the breed.

Care
  The coat of a Chinook requires little grooming, but because of its thickness it does shed, so a daily brushing may help to keep the shedding manageable. It requires moderate exercise and is a good family pet.

Living Conditions
  Chinooks adapt well to family life and prefer to accompany their "pack" on outings such as hiking or camping. They do not like to be left alone! Long periods of time without their family can lead to destructive behavior. Also, if left outside, they may attempt to dig under a fence. Although they are working dogs, Chinooks require little activity. They are happy to go along on long walks or hikes, but they are just as content to nap on the couch.


Trainability
  Chinooks are smart, versatile and highly trainable. However, they are strong-willed and can be a bit pushy. Almost every Chinook requires correction in order to avoid taking a dominant position in the household. This breed requires an owner with a firm but gentle hand to prevent personality and hierarchy controversies. Chinooks are high-spirited dogs that need consistent training and discipline in order to establish and maintain proper manners.   Training sessions give a Chinook the opportunity to expend some of its excess energy and use its brain power for constructive purposes. Chinooks are very clever, but they are likely to resist authority in favor of their own desires. Training a Chinook requires not just five or six weeks; training needs to continue every day for the rest of the dog’s life.

Exercise Requirements
  Every dog requires some form of exercise but the Chinook is a breed that craves it. He’ll never run around the backyard catching and bringing back balls or Frisbees but he’ll be a ready, willing and able jogging buddy or hiking companion. The Chinook will gladly stroll through the neighborhood with you on the other end of the leash or hop in the car for a trip to the pet store. With this being said, he will be thrilled to pull your kids’ sleds through the snow in the winter and do so exuberantly. He’ll even pull them around in their wagons in the summer. It’s simply that he was not born to retrieve things and few Chinooks enjoy that tedious task.
  After a good exercise session, he’ll be quite happy to stretch out in the kitchen while you make dinner or curl up next to you on the couch and watch TV. The Chinook is a calm companion indoors provided he does have a workout every day.

Grooming
  The Chinook has a thick, easy-to-groom double coat that sheds lightly every day. To remove dead hair and distribute skin oils, brush the coat once or twice a week. Baths are rarely necessary. Twice a year, the Chinook goes through a heavy shed, known as blowing coat. The process lasts for about three weeks, and you’ll want to brush your Chinook more often during that time to keep the loose hair under control.
  The rest is routine care: Chinook nails grow quickly, so trim them weekly. And brush his teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
   A gentle and friendly Chinook can be a kid's best friend if they're brought up together. If your Chinook hasn't been socialized with kids, introduce the two slowly and calmly so the Chinook can become accustomed to the child at his own speed.
  Regardless, always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any ear biting or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Because he was created to be a sled dog, the Chinook is a good team worker and usually gets along with other animals, cats included, but early socialization to other pets is still important. Males who haven't been neutered may be aggressive toward other males, especially unneutered males.

Is this breed right for you?
  Although bred as a working dog, the Chinook makes an excellent family pet with adults and children alike, although it is best that it is exposed to kids as a puppy. A calm and easy temperament, it is alert when needed and docile during rest periods. Tremendously loyal, the breed will follow its owner like a shadow and may experience separation anxiety. The Chinook will also need to be socialized early on and know that it is a dog and not a human. In addition, the breed requires very regular exercise and grooming.

Did You Know?
  In 1927, a team of 16 Chinooks accompanied Admiral Richard Byrd on his first expedition to Antarctica.

A dream day in the life
  The Chinook will likely wake up in the bedroom of its owner. Following you diligently, the breed will likely be your shadow throughout the day. After a long and brisk run, it'll settle in for breakfast with you. It will continue its day of activity, running in and out of the house and playing with the other members of the family. After its very busy day, it'll snooze happily at your feet.





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Everything about your Irish Wolfhound

Everything about your Irish Wolfhound
  Known as the tallest of dog breeds, Irish Wolfhounds are truly gentle giants. This breed is famous for being easy going, soft natured, calm, sensitive, sweet, and patient. A relatively good watch dog that can provide some protection, the Irish Wolfhound is excellent with children, strangers, pets, and other dogs.
  Friendly and loving to its owners, the Irish Wolfhound is intelligent, which makes it an easy dog to train. It needs regular exercise so it can stretch those long legs. If you’ve been toying with the idea of bringing an Irish Wolfhound into your home, read on to find out more.

Overview
  Royal and popular in Ireland, the Irish Wolfhound gained much fame when showing off its ability to fight off wild animals in arena sports. With an ability to hunt elk and wolves, the breed gained a high honor in the hunting world. Given as gifts of stature in the days of the Greeks, this gentle giant is seen as a kind-natured breed with a large body and heart.

Highlights
  • Irish Wolfhounds are not recommended for apartment living. Although they have relatively low activity levels inside, they need room to stretch out and aren't built for negotiating stairs.
  • Irish Wolfhounds require at least 40 minutes of daily exercise and do best in a home with a large fenced yard.
  • Irish Wolfhounds need a fenced yard to keep them from chasing prey away from their yards. They should not be kept in a yard with underground electronic fencing. The desire to chase is too strong to be overcome by the threat of a momentary shock.
  • The Irish Wolfhound is a gentle dog who usually gets along well with everyone. With early socialization and training, he'll be gracious toward other dogs and forbearing of indoor cats. He'll view outdoor cats and other animals as fair game.
  • If you are looking for a long-lived breed, the Irish Wolfhound is not for you. He lives roughly 6 to 8 years and his giant size predisposes him to many health problems.
  • Irish Wolfhounds do not make good guard dogs although their size can be a deterrent to a would-be intruder.
  • The Irish Wolfhound is an average shedder and only needs to be brushed on a weekly or bi-weekly basis. You'll need to strip the longer portions of his coat if you want to keep him looking like the Irish Wolfhounds that compete in the conformation ring.
  • Irish Wolfhounds should be walked on leash to prevent them from chasing animals or other moving objects, such as radio-controlled cars.
  • The Irish Wolfhound is not a pony and should not be ridden by children, no matter how small. His joints aren't built for the strain. Nor is he built for pulling a cart or other vehicle.
  • Irish Wolfhounds thrive when they are with their owners. They are not outdoor dogs, although they enjoy playing outside.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • When you look at an Irish Wolfhound, you’ll see a dog of great size and commanding appearance with dark eyes, small ears, and a rough coat that can be gray, brindle, red, black, white or fawn.
  • Over the centuries, the Irish Wolfhound has been known as the Big Dog of Ireland, Greyhound of Ireland, and Great Hound of Ireland.
  • Comparable Breeds: Borzoi, Scottish Deerhound

History
  In 391 CE, all Rome marveled at seven giant dogs from Ireland presented as a contribution to the city’s shows and games by consul Quintus Aurelius Symmachus. The consul’s thank-you note to his brother, who had procured the dogs, is thought to be the first written mention of what was to be called the Irish Wolfhound.
  Over the centuries, the enormous Irish hounds populated a number of royal courts, including those of England’s Edward III, Henry VIII, and Elizabeth I, as well as France's Henry IV. The dogs were also presented as royal gifts to the courts of Sweden, Denmark, and Spain.
  Unfortunately for the Wolfhounds, they did their job a little too well. By the 18th century, their numbers had decreased. They were no longer needed because they had hunted Britain and Ireland’s wolves to extinction. The Earl of Chesterfield complained in 1750 that, despite a two-year search, he had been unable to obtain any of the dogs because the breed had become so rare. Twenty years later, author Oliver Goldsmith wrote that the dogs were kept only as curiosities in the houses of gentlemen and noted “He is extremely beautiful and majestic in appearance, being the greatest of the dog kind to be seen in the world.”
  The great dogs might have faded into the history books had it not been for the efforts of Captain George Graham. In 1862, he managed to obtain some of the few remaining Wolfhounds and crossed them with Scottish Deerhounds, the Tibetan Borzoi, a Pyrenean wolfhound, and a Great Dane. It took 23 years to restore the breed.
  The American Kennel Club recognized the Irish Wolfhound in 1897. The breed ranks 79th among the dogs registered by the AKC, a respectable showing for a giant dog.

Personality

  Irish wolfhounds have a heart as big as the rest of them. They are gentle, noble, sensitive and easygoing. Despite the fact that they can run at great speed, most of their actions around the house are in decidedly slow motion, and they are definitely not snap-to-it obedience prospects. They will eventually mind you, just at their own pace!

  Just under the surface of their gentle exterior does lie the nature of a coursing hunter, so Irish wolfhound owners must be vigilant when outdoors. Like all sighthounds, Irish wolfhounds love to chase animals that are running away from them, and they can take their time responding to your calls to come back. Yet Irish wolfhounds are generally model citizens with other dogs, pets and children. Their great size is usually enough to scare away intruders; this is fortunate, as most Irish wolfhounds are pacifists and not great protection dogs.

Health Problems
  Just like all dog breeds, the Irish Wolfhound can suffer from health problems. Some health issues that are common to this breed are bone cancer, cardiomyopathy, hip dysplasia, Von Willebrands, PRA and bloat .
  To keep your Irish Wolfhound healthy, make sure to take your dog out for regular exercise and visit the veterinarian when needed.

Care
  When it comes to the dog’s care, its coat requires to be combed or brushed two times in a week and at times it is a good idea to trim its stray hair. Dead hair needs to be stripped twice a year. The hound loves stretching its legs and long walks, thus daily exercise is a must. Indoors the dog requires a lot of good space to stretch its body on a soft surface. Lying frequently on hard areas can cause the development of calluses.

Living Conditions
  The Irish Wolfhound is not recommended for apartment life. It is relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. This is a giant breed that needs some space. It may not fit well in a small or compact car.It needs to be part of the family and would be very unhappy in a kennel. Being a sighthound, it will chase and so need a secure, fenced area for exercise.

Training
  Training an Irish Wolfhound is quite easy, since this breed is intelligent and loves to please. Start training as early as possible, as you will find a puppy easier to handle. Start your training with leash control. The Irish Wolfhound likes to pull on the leash, so you need to teach your dog that this behavior is unacceptable. Leash training is especially important because as your dog grows bigger, it will have no problems dragging you along on its leash.
  The best way to train an Irish Wolfhound is to be consistent and patient. When your dog follows a command, reward it with a treat, and when it does something wrong, firmly but positively correct the behavior.
  Because the Irish Wolfhound is smart, it will quickly understand what is expected. You should continue to work with your dog, even when it starts to mature. As well, be sure to socialize your Irish Wolfhound with other dogs and people so that it does not become frightened.

Exercise
  This is one large dog and it needs a large area to play and exercise in. You’ll need to take your Irish Wolfhound out for a walk or run at least twice a day. You can incorporate your dog’s exercise routine into your workout routine if you like to ride a bike, run or rollerblade. This is where leash training comes in handy, so be sure to start this training from the time your dog is a puppy.

Grooming
  The Wolfhound has a rough coat that is especially wiry and long over the eyes and beneath the jaw. Extensive grooming is done to give the dog a perfect appearance in the show ring, but for a pet owner the coat is easy to maintain. There's just a lot of dog to groom.
  Brush or comb the shaggy, wiry coat once or twice a week to remove dead hair and prevent or remove any mats or tangles. The double coat sheds moderate amounts year-round but doesn’t go through a heavy annual or biannual shed. A bath is rarely necessary.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Irish Wolfhounds are gentle with children, but simply because of their large size they can accidentally knock toddlers down and scare or injure them. They're best suited to homes with older children. Irish Wolfhounds are not ponies, and children cannot ride them. Your Wolfhound can be injured if children try to ride him.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  With early socialization and training, your Irish Wolfhound should get along well with other dogs. He may chase small animals such as cats unless brought up with them and taught not to. It's vital to properly introduce him to other animals in the household and supervise their interactions. He'll consider outdoor cats and other small animals fair game.

Is this breed right for you?
  A large and loving breed, he does well with both children and other animals. Mostly inactive indoors, this dog is not suited for apartment life based on his size. In need of a large yard and living space, he does best when part of the family. A devoted and friendly pet, he has a sincere sense of loyalty to his owners. More likely to say hello to a stranger than to ward him off, most people are scared of him based on his size. A smart pup, he'll love you unconditionally until his short life ends.

Did You Know?
  Welsh folklore tells the story of Gelert, a brave Wolfhound who protected his master’s son when a wolf broke into the house. When the father returns, he sees the dog with blood on his mouth and kills him in a rage. He then finds the baby, safe, next to the body of the dead wolf. A village named Beddgelert (Gelert’s Grave) commemorates the story.

A dream day in the life of an Irish Wolfhound
Waking up to sniff out the home, the Irish Wolfhound will lazily greet you awake with a swipe of his tongue. Going downstairs to check on the rest of the family, he may take a snooze again before breakfast. After a good meal, he'll run outside for a bit to sniff out the yard for any new smells. After a nap in the sun, he'll head back inside to hang out with the family. Watching the house while his owner is away at work, the Irish Wolfhound will only ask for a good petting before going to bed with you.

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Everything about your Bearded Collie

Everything about your Bearded Collie
  Lovingly referred to as the Beardie, the Bearded Collie is an intelligent, curious-looking dog breed that loves to play with children. Thought to be originally from Britain, it later spent some time in Scotland as a sheep and cattle herder before coming to America. The Bearded Collie is now mostly bred for dog shows, though it makes an excellent family companion.

Overview
  The Bearded Collie is one of Scotland furriest and loyal imports.  Cheerful and happy-go-lucky, the Beardie, as this breed is affectionately called, is affectionate, playful and lively. A wonderful playmate for children and a friend for life, the Bearded Collie loves to be near its family. Smart, strong and focused, this breed is still a staple on Great Britain farms as it puts in a solid day’s work and never complains .
  One of the things you’ll notice about the Beardie is that it has a bounce in its step, which can no doubt be attributed to its exuberant and high-energy personality. But even though this dog is bubbly and boisterous, it can also be stubborn and strong-willed as well. Read on to learn if the Bearded Collie is the right fit for your lifestyle.

Highlights
  • Beardies don't like to be confined and may become nuisance barkers if frequently left alone.
  • Beardies require about an hour of exercise daily in a fenced area where they can run.
  • Beardies can be headstrong, so obedience training is a must. Start early!
  • Bearded Collies will bark to let you know people are approaching, but they are not guard dogs of any kind.
  • A bored Beardie is an excellent escape artist!
  • The Bearded Collie coat requires weekly brushing, more during their annual shedding season.
  • Some Beardies can react to monthly heartworm preventive. Discuss this with your veterinarian to decide whether a daily preventive is a better choice.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from a backyard breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Beardie is a medium-size dog with a rectangular body and a shaggy coat that can be black, blue, brown or fawn, with or without white markings.
  • A Beardie’s eyes are the same tone as his coat color, so black and brown dogs have brown eyes while blue dogs have grayish-blue eyes. Fawn-colored Beardies have an unusual light-brown eye with a touch of hazel or lavender.
Breed standards
AKC Classification: Herding
UKC Classification: Herding Dog 
Energy Level: Very Energetic
Longevity Range: 12-14 yrs.
Height: 20-26 inches
Weight: 40-60 pounds
Coat:  long double coat with furnishings
Color: black, blue, brown, or fawn with white or tan markings.
Comparable Breeds: Briard, Old English Sheepdog

History
  The Bearded Collie's history is a combination of fact and legend. Kazimierz Grabski, a Polish merchant, reportedly traded a shipment of grain for sheep in Scotland in 1514 and brought six Polish Lowland Sheepdogs to move them. A Scottish shepherd was so impressed with the herding ability of the dogs that he traded several sheep for several dogs. The Polish sheepdogs were bred with local Scottish dogs to produce the Bearded Collie.
  It is generally agreed that Mrs. G. Olive Willison founded the modern Bearded Collie in 1944 with her brown bitch, Jeannie of Bothkennar. Jeannie was supposedly a Shetland Sheepdog, but Mrs. Willison received a Bearded Collie by accident. She was so fascinated by the dog that she wanted to begin breeding, so she began searching for a dog for Jeannie. While walking along the beach, Mrs. Willison met a man who was emigrating from Scotland; she became the owner of his grey dog, David, who became Bailie of Bothkennar.
  Bailie and Jeannie of Bothkennar are the founders of the modern breed; there are only a few other registrable blood lines, preserved in large part by the perseverance of Mr. Nicolas Broadbridge  and Mrs. Betty Foster. These are based on Turnbull's Blue—a Bearded Collie from pure working stock, registered in ISDS when ISDS still registered non-Border Collies. He sired three litters of registerable Bearded Collies.
  The breed became popular during the last half of the 20th century—propelled, in part, by Potterdale Classic at Moonhill, a Bearded Collie who won Best in Show at Crufts in 1989. The Bearded Collie Club celebrated its Golden Jubilee in 2005.The bearded collie is also very good natured and is good as a family pet and a working dog and a show dog.

Personality
  A Beardie is smart, resourceful, and confident. His bouncy, bubbly personality makes him fun to be with, but when it comes to training he can be an independent thinker who likes to have his own way. He's a boisterous playmate for children and has a sense of humor that makes him a joy to be around.
  When choosing a Beardie puppy, remember that temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.
  Temperament varies in individual dogs. Some Beardies are sweet and quiet, while others are loud and enthusiastic. Tell the breeder what you're looking for in a dog, and she can help you choose the puppy that will fit your personality and lifestyle.
  Always meet at least one of the parents to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.

Health
  Although the Bearded Collie is a healthy breed, some problems owners may be faced with may include Addison’s disease, allergies, autoimmune disorders, cerebrovascular disease, congenital elbow luxation, eye issues, hip dysplasia and hypothyroidism.

Care
  The Beardie is an indoor/outdoor dog. He needs to live inside with his people with access to a yard or fenced acreage where he can run. He's not suited to apartment life. Beardies enjoy being with their people, whether they're indoors or outdoors. They'll be satisfied with a couple of half-hour walks or play sessions with a ball daily.
  Obedience training is a must if you are going to establish order and discipline in your dog's life. Make learning fun, and teach them with positive reinforcement techniques such as food rewards, play, and praise. Bearded Collies do not learn under abusive or harsh conditions. Begin training early and you will obtain excellent results. To ensure that he doesn't accidentally knock over a toddler or older person, teach him to sit for attention.

Living Conditions
  The Bearded Collie is not recommended for apartment life. They are fairly active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard. Beardies can sleep outdoors and make excellent farm dogs. They are also good in windy, rugged or wet areas since the dogs will go out in all weather conditions. It does not like to be confined and should have a place to run off of its lead. The Beardie prefers to be outdoors.

Trainability
  Bearded Collies are trainable and thrive with obedience, agility, herding, utility and/or other performance tasks. Their enthusiastic personality makes them stand out in the conformation show ring as well. Obedience training can be a wonderful performance activity for both owner and dog. However, Beardies do have an independent spirit that can make them challenging to train. They are easily bored, so keeping the training interesting is important.   When done with patience and good attitude, the results of training Bearded Collies can be incredibly rewarding.

Exercise 
  This is a herding dog, so the Bearded Collie needs to be active. It’s what the breed was developed to do, so they need to be put to work. Because it needs to be kept busy, this breed wouldn’t be the best choice for an apartment – the Beardie would do best in a large yard or even in a farming environment.
  Smart and energetic, you’ll want to keep your Bearded Collie happy by keeping it busy. There are plenty of ways to do that. This breed loves the outdoors, so brink it along on a long walk, jog, hike or bike ride. Or take training up a notch and get your dog into agility competitions. Or put your Bearded Collie to work in a way that benefits the community and train it as a therapy dog, a job well suited from this breed. The Beardie has had much success in hospitals, nursing homes and rehabilitation centers.

Grooming
  The glory of the Bearded Collie is his coat. The most difficult part of caring for a Beardie is also his coat. Expect to half an hour to an hour weekly grooming it. Brushing and combing with a pin brush or slicker brush and stainless steel comb will keep his double coat tangle-free. Mist the coat with water or anti-tangle spray before brushing so you don’t damage the hair. It’s a good idea to have the breeder show you how to brush the coat of an adult dog. Bathe your Beardie every six to eight weeks or more often, particularly if (or when) his furry hindquarters become soiled with feces.
  Along with time devoted to coat care, be prepared for dirt, mud and debris tracked in on the dog’s furry feet. A light trim may lessen the mess a bit and gives the feet a neat appearance.
If you groom him regularly, the Beardie shouldn’t shed much, but he goes through a heavier shed each year that lasts two to four weeks. They also shed heavily during a two- to three-month period when their puppy coat is coming out and their adult coat is coming in.     Grooming a puppy takes very little time at all, but you want to start early so he can become accustomed to sitting still while you work on his coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once a month. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian.

Children And Other Pets
  Full of bounce, humor, and energy, Beardies are excellent playmates for kids. Of course, it's important to teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Beardies get along well with other dogs and cats if they're introduced to them early, although they can be possessive of their toys. "Mine, all mine" is their motto. They always enjoy a game of chase, so they do best with cats that stand their ground rather than turn tail and run.

Did You Know?
  Beardie puppies are born dark, and it’s not always clear what color they will be when they grow up. The coat lightens as they mature and then starts to darken again when they are 12 to 18 months old. The coat may not reach its final color until the dog is four years or older.

In popular culture
  • The role of Nana in the original production of the James Barrie play Peter Pan was performed by a Bearded Collie.
  • Cole, is a Bearded Collie and is featured in the 2006 film, The Shaggy Dog.
  • A Bearded Collie is also featured in the 2009 film, Hotel for Dogs.

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