June 2016 - LUV My dogs

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

7 summer safety tips to keep your dog happy and healthy all season long

7 summer safety tips to keep your dog happy and healthy all season long
  The warm summer months are the perfect time to take your dog with you for outdoor, family fun. But with the rising temperatures, dogs can easily get overheated in the summer, causing them to become dehydrated and sick.  Not only is it important to keep dogs safe in hot weather, it’s also important to keep them clear from hazardous chemicals and certain foods. 

1. Watch out for heat stroke
  A dog panting in the afternoon heat isn't necessarily a good thing. Some of the most common signs of heat stroke and hyperthermia include excessive panting and drooling, increased body temperature, reddened tongue and gums, lethargy, low urine production and rapid heart rate. Make a mental note to bring extra water for your pup anywhere you go and keep a water bowl stocked in your beach or pool bag, too. Since dogs are not able to cool off as efficiently as people by sweating, heat stroke on a warm summer day is a major risk. Staying hydrated can help a dog maintain their metabolism and lower temperature, though an indoor break may be needed after a hot afternoon of exercise at the park.

2.Never leave your dog in the car on a hot day
  Temperatures in cars can rise quickly so make sure to take your dog with you when you get out of the car. If you must leave your dog in the car, be sure to leave the windows down, which will allow the air to circulate and keep your dog safe.
  More about this subject: Things you must know about car travel

3. Beat the Sun
  Pets are smarter than we give them credit for, and prefer staying at home and laying on cool surfaces in the heat of the day. Save your outdoor time with your pet for early in the morning or in the evening once the sun has set. By taking your daily walk, run or visit to the park either before or after the sun is at its hottest, the air will be easier for your pet to breathe and the ground will be cooler on the pads of their paws.

4. Keep an eye out for antifreeze
  Antifreeze is something to watch out for all year 'round, as all cats and dogs find it delicious, but even in small amounts it is poisonous. In the summer, cars tend to overheat and leak antifreeze, so be on the watch when walking your dog.

5. Brush your dog regularly. 
  A clean, untangled coat can help ward off summer skin problems and help your dog stay cool. If you want to give your dog a haircut, and your vet thinks it will help him cope with the heat, keep his fur at least one inch long to protect him from the sun.Shaving down to the skin is not recommended.

6. Apply Sunscreen
  That’s right, you should apply sunscreen on your if he or she spends more than just a few minutes outside everyday in the hot summer sun. Pets with light skin and short or thin hair coat are particularly prone to sunburn or skin cancer. The sunscreen should be fragrance free, non-staining, and contain UVA and UVB barriers similar to sunscreens made for humans. Consult your veterinarian, but there are some sunscreens available made specifically for pets.

7. Flea and tick safety
  Fleas and other bugs can carry infections and cause your dog to get sick. Avoid bug bites by giving your dog a vet-recommended regimen. Whether its drops, special shampoo, or a simple brush-through you’ll ensure your dog’s safety no matter what insects may be around this summer.

Other articles here :
Traveling With Your Dog
Things You MUST Know About Car Travel with Your Dog
The Secrets To A Happy Dog
Summer Safety for Dogs


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Everything about your Pit Bull

Everything about your Pit Bull
  The American Pit Bull Terrier has been known by many names, including the Pit Bull and the American Bull Terrier. It is often confused with the American Staffordshire Terrier, however, the United Kennel Club recognizes the American Pit Bull Terrier as its own distinct breed. Affectionately known as "Pitties," the Pit Bull is known for being a loyal, protective, and athletic canine breed.

Overview
  The American Pit Bull Terrier, also known at times as the Pit Bull, the Pit Bull Terrier, the American Bull, the American Pit Bull, the American Pit Bull Dog, the Pit Dog, the Half-and-Half, the American Bull Terrier, the Yankee Terrier, the Yankee Bull Terrier and the Staffordshire Terrier, descends from the Staffordshire Bull Terrier of England. This is a well-balanced dog whose tremendous strength is unusual for its moderate size. Pit Bulls, who are not recognized by the American Kennel Club, share a common history with the AKC-recognized American Staffordshire Terrier. Pit Bulls, like Am Staffs, are stocky, powerful yet agile, well-muscled and highly intelligent. Although descended from dogs bred for bull baiting and pit fighting, and unfortunately still used by unscrupulous owners in illegal dog fighting circles, Pit Bulls have many remarkable qualities, including their gameness, trainability, loyalty and affection.
  The Staffordshire Terrier was accepted for registration in the American Kennel Club Stud Book in 1936. The name of the breed was revised in 1972 to the American Staffordshire Terrier, to distinguish it from the Staffordshire Bull Terrier of England, which is much lighter in weight. The American Pit Bull Terrier was the first breed registered with the United Kennel Club, in 1898. Pit Bulls and Am Staffs are virtually the same animal, with different club registrations. Most Pit Bulls are between 17 and 19 inches at the withers and weigh on average between 60 and 80 pounds. Their short, stiff, glossy coat can be of any color or color combination. Pit Bulls require minimal grooming; brushing with a firm-bristled brush and an occasional bath should suffice.

Highlights
  • American Pit Bull Terriers are not a good choice for people who can give them little or no attention.
  • They must be trained and socialized when young to overcome the breed's tendencies toward stubbornness and bossiness, which combined with his strength can make him hard to handle if he hasn't learned you are in charge.
  • Your American Pit Bull Terrier must be kept on leash in public to prevent aggression toward other dogs. It's not a good idea to let these dogs run loose in dog parks. While they might not start a fight, they'll never back down from one, and they fight to the finish. American Pit Bulls who aren't properly socialized as puppies can become aggressive toward other dogs.
  • Breed-specific legislation almost always includes this breed. Be aware of rules in your area as well as neighboring regions if you travel with your dog.
  • American Pit Bull Terriers have a great need to chew, and powerful jaws make quick work of cheap or flimsy toys. Give yours only tough, durable toys that can't be chewed up and swallowed.
  • American Pit Bull Terriers are best suited to owners who can offer firm, fair training, and gentle consistent discipline.
Quick Facts

  • The term “Pit Bull” is often applied indiscriminately to APBTs, American Staffordshire Terriers and sometimes Staffordshire Bull Terriers, a British breed. The term may also be used to label any dog who resembles those breeds, even if he is a Lab mix with little or no “Pit Bull” in his background.
  • An APBT comes in any color, pattern or combination of colors, except merle.
  • Celebrities who count Pitties as their best friends include actresses Jessica Alba, Jessica Biel and Alicia Silverstone; cooking guru Rachael Ray; and political satirist Jon Stewart.
Breed standards
Dog Breed Group: Terrier Dogs
Height: 1 foot, 5 inches to 1 foot, 7 inches tall at the shoulder
Weight: 30 to 85 pounds
Life Span: 12 to 16 years
Comparable Breeds: Bull Terrier, Staffordshire Bull Terrier

History
  Pit bulls were created by breeding bulldogs and terriers together to produce a dog that combined the gameness and agility of the terrier with the strength of the bulldog. In the United Kingdom, these dogs were used in blood sports such as bull-baiting, bear-baiting and cock fighting. These blood sports were officially eliminated in 1835 as Britain began to introduce animal welfare laws. Since dogfights were cheaper to organize and far easier to conceal from the law than bull or bear baits, blood sport proponents turned to pitting their dogs against each other instead.
Dog fighting was used as both a blood sport  and a way to continue to test the quality of their stock. For decades afterwards, dog fighting clandestinely took place in small areas of Britain and America. In the early 20th century pit bulls were used as catch dogs in America for semi-wild cattle and hogs, to hunt, and drive livestock, and as family companions. Some have been selectively bred for their fighting prowess.
  Pit bulls successfully fill the role of companion dogs, police dogs, and therapy dogs. Pit bulls also constitute the majority of dogs used for illegal dog fighting in America. In addition, law enforcement organisations report these dogs are used for other nefarious purposes, such as guarding illegal narcotics operations, use against police,and as attack dogs.
In an effort to counter the fighting reputation of pit bull-type dogs, in 1996 the San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals renamed pit bull terriers to "St. Francis Terriers", so that people might be more likely to adopt them. 60 temperament-screened dogs were adopted until the program was halted, after several of the newly adopted pit bulls killed cats. The New York City Center for Animal Care and Control tried a similar approach in 2004, relabeling their pit bulls as "New Yorkies", but dropped the idea in the face of overwhelming public opposition.

Personality
  These dogs love people and have no idea that their size is something of a deterrent to being a lap dog. Confident and keenly aware of their surroundings, they are watchdogs in that they may alert you to the presence of strangers, but that's primarily because they're eager to greet "their" guests.
  While their love of people makes them failures as guard dogs, their courage is unmatched and they will defend their family with their lives.
  Like every dog, American Pit Bull Terriers need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your your puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  Due to their athleticism and diverse breeding background, the Pit Bull tend to be a hardy breed, with an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, longer than many breeds of a similar size.   There are some genetic conditions to be watchful for. The Pit Bull tends to suffer from bone diseases such as hip dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy and kneecap dislocation. The Pit Bull can also suffer from skin problems, such as mange and skin allergies, because of its short coat. Other health ailments seen in Pit Bulls include thyroid and congenital heart defects.

Training
  Pitbulls require assertive owners who are adamant of being the leaders in their households. Laid back owners who can’t be bothered to work with the dog in obedience training, should rethink their decisions to getting a Pitbull. Pitbulls want to be the dominant entity in the home and without a strong leader; the family and home will be in chaos and under the control of the dog.
  All training should be done in a positive way. Harsh and physically abusive techniques will only cause the Pitbull to balk or protect himself. Indeed, dogs do have the same fight or flight instinct that humans have. Positive training techniques using praise and treats work best for Pitbulls.

Care
  Expect to spend about an hour a day walking, playing with or otherwise exercising this dog. While they love people, American Pit Bull Terriers are strong for their size and can be stubborn if left to their own devices. Begin obedience training early and continue it throughout the dog's life. Training is the foundation for a strong relationship with your American Pit Bull Terrier.
  American Pit Bull Terriers should not be left outside for long because they can't tolerate the cold well. Even regardless the climate, these dogs do best as housedogs. They form strong attachments to their families and will suffer if left alone for long periods.

Exercise Requirements
  Pitbulls are bundles of energy. They need loads of exercise to keep them healthy and happy. This hybrid dog will gladly go hiking in the mountains, running through the neighborhood or tearing through the yard chasing varmints. He is active and must have loads of exercise.
  Not the best option for apartment dwellers, Pitbulls need to have a place to burn off their energy. Without proper exercise, the Pitbull can and will become destructive. Owners can come home from work to find furniture torn apart, holes chewed in walls and doors demolished. These are strong dogs and can really cause thousands of dollars in damage without proper exercise and stimulation.

Living Conditions
  Pits will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are very active indoors and will do alright without a yard provided they get enough exercise. Prefers warm climates.

Grooming
  The grooming needs of the Pit Bull are modest. Brush his coat a couple of times a week to help manage shedding.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually twice a month. Brush the teeth frequently — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian.

Children And Other Pets
  American Pit Bull Terriers love children, and we don't mean for breakfast. Sturdy, energetic, and tolerant, they are ideal playmates. That said, no dog of any size or breed should ever be left unsupervised with children.
  When no adult can be there to oversee what's going on, dogs should be crated or kenneled, especially after they reach sexual maturity, when they may begin to test the possibility of becoming "pack" leader.
  Don't allow children to pull on a dog's ears or tail. Teach them never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away.
  Because of their dog-fighting heritage, some American Pit Bull Terriers retain a tendency to be aggressive with other dogs, but if they are socialized early and trained to know what behavior is expected of them, that aggression can be minimized or overcome, and many are dog- and cat-friendly. Just to be safe, they should always be supervised in the presence of other pets.

Did You Know?
  Pit Bulls descend from crosses between Bulldogs and Terriers. The goal was to create a dog with the strength and tenacity of the Bulldog and the speed and agility of the Terrier.

Notable pit bulls
  Pit bull breeds have become famous for their roles as soldiers, police dogs, search and rescue dogs, actors, television personalities, seeing eye dogs, and celebrity pets. Historically, the Bull Terrier mix Nipper and the American Staffordshire Terrier, Pete the Pup from the Little Rascals are the most well known. Lesser known, but still historically notable pit bulls include: 
  • Billie Holiday's companion "Mister",
  • Helen Keller's dog "Sir Thomas",
  • Buster Brown's dog "Tige",
  • Horatio Jackson's dog "Bud", 
  • President Theodore Roosevelt's Pit Bull terrier "Pete", 
  • "Jack Brutus" who served for Company K, 
  • the First Connecticut Volunteer Infantry during the civil war, 
  • Sergeant Stubby who served for the 102nd Infantry, 26th (Yankee) Division during World War I, 
  • and Sir Walter Scott's "Wasp".
Contemporary significant pit bulls are
  • Weela, who helped save 32 people, 29 dogs, 3 horses, and 1 cat; 
  • Popsicle, a five-month-old puppy originally found nearly dead in a freezer, who grew to become one of the nation's most important police dogs;
  • Norton, who was placed in the Purina Animal Hall of Fame after he rescued his owner from a severe reaction to a spider bite;
  • Titan, who rescued his owner's wife, who would have died from an aneurysm, 
  • D-Boy, who took three bullets to save his family from an intruder with a gun,
  • Lilly, who lost a leg after being struck by a freight train while pulling her unconscious owner from the train tracks
  • Daddy, Cesar Millan's right-hand dog was famous for his mellow temperament and his ability to interact calmly with ill-mannered dogs.







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Monday, June 20, 2016

10 Most Dangerous Dog Breeds

10 Most Dangerous Dog Breeds
  Regardless of the breed, we can typically point to a puppy’s upbring to explain significant parts of its personality. However, certain breeds of dog have earned their terrible reputations, often labeled as vicious because of their apparent predisposition to violent interactions with other dogs and humans. Still, it has been suggested that training and domestication could iron out the kinks in the nature of an aggressive canine.
  So, almost any breed of dog can be a wonderful companion, but almost any breed of dog can kill. It’s true, though, that certain breeds are most susceptible to falling victim to a powerfully aggressive nature, and with a combination of improper care and the physical attributes and characteristics of a violent breed, these ten most dangerous breeds of dogs cause a higher number of injuries and fatalities than any other.

1. Pit Bull
  Pit Bull is one of the dangerous dog breeds in the world which types include Stafford shire bull terrier, American Pit Bull Terrier, and American Stafford shire terrier. The Pit Bull dog breed is very difficult to identify through its physical characteristics even experts may face difficulty to visually recognize the dog breeds. Pit Bull has various well known types having different behavior and temperament level towards their owners and strangers while some are both independent and stubborn and can’t be inexperienced dog owner may injure or kill other animals.
  Pit bulls often attract the worst kind of dog owners because of their power. Especially immoral people who are only interested in these dogs for fighting (which is unacceptable). While pit bulls were once considered especially non-aggressive to any people, their reputation has changed because of unscrupulous breeders and irresponsible owners. In fact, Pit bulls are commonly confident, people-oriented dogs that can develop a strong sense of dependence on their owners.

Facts About Pit Bulls: 
  • Though these dedicated companions love people more than anything but improper training can sometimes make them aggressive. They can even attack humans if not trained the right way. Otherwise, they won’t harm humans
  • 86.8% of American Pit Bull Terriers have passed their temperament tests
  • No matter what the task is, when pit bulls are committed to any task, they carry out it with full enthusiasm. It’s often the nature of pit bulls, which make us think that they have locking Jaws especially when they bite on something and refuse to release it that easily
  • Pitbulls are widely known for illegal sport of dog fighting
More about Pit Bull here...Everything about your Pit Bull


2.  Rottweilers
  Rottweilers are one of the most popular dog breeds in the world. They are powerful dogs with strong jaws, primarily meant to protect. They generally don’t like strangers and other dogs and if they think their owners are in danger, they can be very dangerous.
  This breed is often used as a police dog or guard dog. As an old breed dating as far back, according to historians, to the Roman Empire, Rottweilers have also been used as herding dogs.
  Many experts advise Rottweiler owners to seek professional training for their dogs as their strength is an inherent risk, particularly for children. If you choose to have one of these dogs, be sure it is properly socialized and always remain vigilant regarding its temperament.

Rottweiler Facts:
  • Rottweilers fall under “working dog breeds” category. It is one of the widely known Rottweiler facts
  • Life expectancy of this dangerous dog breed is around 12 to 14 years
  • After completing their first year, Rottweilers are considered as adults. 1 Rottweiler year is equivalent to 16 years of human age. After they complete 2 years, just add 5 years to find its equivalent human age
  • Generally, Rottweilers are considered unsuitable for family pet
More about Rottweiler here...Everything about your Rottweiler

3. Huskies
  Huskies is dog breed to pull sleds in northern regions which usually known for their fast pulling style mostly recognizable by its thickly furred double coat. Huskies are a very active, energetic, and resilient breed and one of dangerous dog breeds in the world because of their aggressive nature towards others. Huskies aren’t much violent but only few reasons made them vicious which can be reduced through positive reinforcement training program but consistency needed with these sessions and turned to be destructive without proper care. 

  However, they can be dangerous to smaller animals due to their strong predator instinct and are known for being destructive if they are bored.
  Huskies are very energetic and intelligent dogs. But their training is a complicated thing, and this dog is not recommended for beginning dog owners.

Husky Facts:
  • Although huskies have nabbed a spot in the list of most dangerous dog breeds, generally they are more friendly towards children, your visitors and other dogs. But again, you should train them properly
  • However, factors like improper training, poor socialization and bad social experiences can turn them aggressive
  • Due to its high shedding, huskies often don’t suit people who are allergic to dog hairs or want their home to be clean all the time
More about Husky here...Everything about your Siberian Husky

4.German Shepherds
  Famous K-9 dogs. They are known to be fearless and confident dogs. German Shepherds are in need of constant and serious physical activity though, and they seem to give preference to long walks and active games.
  The large-sized working dog breed German Shepherd developed originally for herding sheep stand among the top popular dog breeds in the United States and United Kingdom. The highly active and self assured dogs are keen to learn and eagerness to have a purpose proved as excellent guard dogs and best for search missions. German Shepherds are responsible for biting having a tendency to attack other breeds and human also became victims several times for which they are added among the most dangerous dog breeds in the world.
  The bite of a German Shepherd has a force of over 1,060 newtons, and some studies show that German Shepherds have a tendency to bite and attack smaller dogs.  German Shepherds are commonly used as police dogs today.



German Shepherd Facts:
  • Even though their aggressive nature had labeled them to be as one of the dangerous dogs but when they are trained properly, believe me — they are your best companion
  • By nature, German Shepherd is fond of food, fun and friends
  • These dogs show immense curiosity in exploring their surroundings. If you own one, you must have observed. This inquisitiveness behavior is apparently when he or she is a puppy
  • German shepherd can pick up great speed and at the same time can halt all of a sudden without stumbling on anything or its surroundings
  • German shepherd is an extreme hair shredder. Even if you brush its hair for every 15 minutes, you will still see hairs floating in air. So brush its hair every day if you want to keep your home hygiene
  • Though German Shepherds are subject to suffer from many different types of illnesses, most common one is “hip dysplasia”, which occurs due to poor breeding practices
More about German Shepherd here...Everything about your German Shepherd

5.Alaskan Malamutes
  A large breed of domestic dog Alaskan malamute is also among the top dangerous dog breeds in the world following their temperament and aggression if not trained and instructed well. Alaskan malamute can be described as more strong and sturdy compared to other dog breeds, very fond of people usually quiet dogs, seldom barking. These dogs can be dangerous or fatal for other human who are unknown to them only when they feel any danger for them and their owner or family member but other cases can be resolved through training sessions.


  Although some of these dogs are still used for mushing or sledding, most are employed as family pets where they tend to be beloved by their households.
Of course, these dogs, like other Arctic dogs, have a high prey drive. They must be watched with other small pets in the home. Due to their size, they should also be supervised around young children.
  As high-energy dogs, these animals are most likely to thrive and exhibit best traits when they have been properly socialized and have access to the exercise they need. It’s never good for Alaskan Malamutes to be caged or kept from mental stimulation.

Facts About Alaskan Malamutes:
  • Alaskan malamutes are slow learners. So you will need a lot of patience to train these dog breeds
  • These dogs are prolific hair shedders. Just bring Alaskan Malamutes to your home and watch how sooner your home is piled with whole lot of hairs
  • Alaskan Malamutes have the ability to make variety of sounds in order to convey their needs to you. As these dog breeds enjoy human company, you got to spend plenty of time with them to keep them happy
  • They need whole lot of energy, exercise, love and your attention too. Malamutes that lack exercises frequently misbehave & at times can turn dangerous too
  • They are ridiculously friendly with well-behaved kids
  • These dog breeds insist you to allow them to be a part of your family activities
More about Alaskan Malamutes here...Everything about your Alaskan Malamute

6. Doberman Pinschers
  Doberman Pinschers were once commonly used as police dogs, but this is less commonplace today. Dobermans can be often be aggressive towards strangers, but less frequently towards their owners. The breed’s reputation has improved in recent years, but their size and strength still makes them potentially dangerous. 
  Famed for their alertness, loyalty and intelligence, this breed of dogs is considered to be the best guard dog where they only attack if they are provoked or sense that their family and their property is in dangerAlthough once used as guard dogs or police dogs, they also exhibit aggressive behavior directed to strangers and other dogs, though owner-directed aggression is low. Their aggression due to their size and strength can also make them potentially dangerous.
  Trained properly, these dogs can become very loyal to their masters, but aggressive towards perceived threats to their owners. 

Doberman Pinschers Facts:
  • These intelligent dog breeds are often referred as “Dogs with a human brain”. Although Doberman pinchers serve you faithfully, you still have to train them properly with your leadership. Else, they assume they are the leaders
  • These dogs will do their best when they have something to do. They can even watch TV, help your business and suddenly can sit on your lap too. However, they are completely reserved with strangers.
  • Doberman pinchers can do self-estimations. So if your family is being threatened, you don’t have to utter a word. They will automatically sense and do everything to protect you
  •  As these dogs are highly intelligent and energetic, improper training can cause behavioral issues. This is why it has made my list of dangerous dog breeds.
  • These dog breeds are more sensitive to sounds. In fact, they can hear sounds 250 yards away
More about Doberman Pinschers here...Everything about your Doberman Pinscher

7. Chow Chows
  Some will be surprised seeing the Chow Chow in this ranking, but, nevertheless, this breed is one of the most aggressive dogs in the world. At first glance, Chow Chows are very attractive and cute fluffies, also the representatives of China. Before you buy this dog, you must remember that an adult Chow Chow cannot safely play with unfamiliar dogs and be left alone with children, because they are very irritable and defend their right to their food with a spiteful grin.
  Also Chow Chow are good guards, as they are very devoted to their owner, would not allow a stranger to approach to the master, and won’t not let anyone into their territory.  Better don’t try to get near a chow chow’s owner without his or her permission. Because chow chow is the one of the most aggressive dog breed in the world. They were bred for hunting and helping shepherds.
  They are usually held as pets, and due to their size they can be kept in apartments. The danger rests when they lack exercise or are just generally bored, and will sometimes lash out at strangers and even owners due to boredom.

Chow Chow Facts:
  • Chow Chow dog breed is the only dog breed that has purplish lips and tongue
  • Originating in China, Chow Chows are there since 4000 years. Therefore, they are believed to be one of the oldest dog breeds. Some experts believe that these dogs were the very ones to be evolved from wolves.
  • Chow Chows are usually stubborn. As they are more dominant, it’s good to train and socialize them when they are young
  • Once Chow Chows complete 1 year, they should be considered adults
More about Chow Chow here...Everything about your Chow Chow

8. Great Danes
  The large German breed of domestic dog Great Dane has enormous body and height known for looking physical affection from their owners. Great Dane are generally well disposed towards other pets including dogs and familiar human and not exhibit any extreme aggressiveness towards them but if not well trained or socialized can be very fearful and aggressive nature dog breed for unfamiliar human or any stranger happens towards them for which they have been added among the most dangerous dog breeds in the world.
  If trained properly then a Great Dane can be a gentle giant, but since these dogs are such large and imposing creatures they can prove to be very dangerous if improperly cared for.   Fully grown male Great Danes could well be killing machines, as they can weigh as much as 200 pounds and stand 86 cm tall. 

Facts About Great Danes:
  • “Giant George”, a Great Dane was measured 43-inches tall but it weighed only 245 pounds. It made a Guinness record for being the world’s tallest dog ever. There is a short sweet story about this gentle giant. You can read more about this here: “Top 10 Biggest Dog Breeds in the World”.
  • Apartment living is quite fine for this huge dog breed. Just half-an-hour walk a day can keep Great Danes fit
  • Great Danes grow rapidly. Within a year, it can grow 6 feet tall
  • These dog breeds barely eat their food
  • Great Danes are one among emotionally sensitive dog breeds. They won’t respond well to hard training methods. On the other hand, anxiety can easily kill this dog 
  • You can’t expect a poorly bred Great Dane to be a Scooby Doo friendly anyway
More about Great Danes here...Everything about your Great Dane

9. Boxer
  This dignified-looking dog is known for its distinctive head.
Revered for bravery and stamina, the boxer can make a great family pet; however, owners must be diligent when raising their boxer to be obedient and must also curb aggressive tendencies.
  The Boxer tends to be loyal and loving to its family; yet, again, proper socialization must be provided.
  Intelligent and generally tractable, the Boxer can make a great family pet, especially when positive reinforcement is employed during training.
  By nature, Boxers are not known to be vicious or overly aggressive as some breeds are. However, these negative tendencies may occur in neglected or mistreated dogs. For this reason, it’s important to get to know an adult Boxer well before introducing it to a family situation.
  Boxers are quite strong and may inflict serious injury if they choose to attack. Many trainers have insisted that Boxers boast above-average intelligence. They are very trainable and will reward their owners with loyal and even temperaments when induced. When obtaining a Boxer puppy, it’s important to provide adequate socialization.
  Though the breed was developed in Germany as a hunting dog, it is today typically employed as a companion or family dog. Some Boxers are used as guard dogs.

Facts About Boxers:
  • In United States, Boxers are the sixth most popular dog breeds
  • They became popular after WW-II when soldiers brought them home as their pets
  • One of the most funny facts about boxers is that they snore loud
  • In the past, you could have seen boxers in circus ring performances. The reason: they are intelligent and easily trainable. Thus, people used them to make money
  • Originally, these dog breeds were developed in Germany. There they are still used as police dogs
  • Boxers are loyal and die to please you. But if you punish them hardly for their wrong behaviors, they will turn worse
More about Boxer here... Everything about your Boxer

10. Akita
  Akitas are well known for their dominant temperament. Because they have a mind of their own, they can exhibit unruly behaviors which may make them risky in some situations.
  For this reason, the Akita requires a skilled owner who takes time to instill this dog with obedience.
  Akitas were originally bred to hunt deer and bears in their native Japan. They are bred for strength, endurance, and courage. As one of the world’s oldest native hunting breeds, the Akita still enjoys this pursuit and requires a good deal of exercise and mental stimulation to avoid boredom. A bored Akita is likely to find a negative pastime to occupy itself.
  Akitas boast thick double coats and don’t mind cold weather like other Spitz types of dogs such as the Siberian Husky. The breed is extremely territorial when it comes to its property. This is one reason why many people prefer the breed as it helps deter trespassers.
  Akitas can make excellent companions. Although they can be aggressive, with the right owner and family, they can make great pets. The idea is to provide an environment that allows them to thrive.

Facts About Akitas:
  • Akitas are loyal and fearless companion for your family
  • This dog breed would not back down from challenges in any situation and can’t be frightened so easily
  • If you don’t train and socialize them properly, this affectionate yet bold animal can screw up and turn into one of the most dangerous dog breeds
More about Akita here...Everything about your Akita


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Monday, June 13, 2016

The 10 Best Apartment Dogs

The 10 Best Apartment Dogs
  There's a breed of dog for every person and lifestyle. But just because a certain breed is a match for your personality, it doesn't necessarily mean that breed is a good choice for you. If your home is a small apartment in a big city, it's not a good idea to adopt a breed that needs a lot of time and space outdoors. Fortunately, there are still plenty of options to fit your life.
  Size does matter – especially if you live in compact quarters. Whether you live in a cramped condo, an adequate apartment or closeted quarters, there’s a dog that will fit into your living space.

1. Basenji

  The Basenji is a great option when you have close neighbors and thin walls. This barkless dog rarely gets taller than 18 inches or over 25 pounds. But beware, when left unattended for long periods of time, the Basenji can be a mischievous companion.

2. English Bulldog

  This medium-sized dog doesn’t like to move around much, so an English Bulldog makes a wonderful dog for an apartment (as long as you don’t mind a little extra drool and snoring!). If this breed could talk, he would tell you he’d much rather hang on the couch than at the dog park. And if you don’t like to move about much, good news – the English Bulldog is just as lazy as you!

3.Boston Terrier

  The Boston terrier's nickname is "the American Gentleman," and it's not just for their black-and-white, tuxedo-like coats. They are also polite as a dog can be, and therefore ideal apartment pets. They're quiet, so they won't annoy your neighbors, and they bond closely with their owners, showing undying affection and loyalty. They're also conveniently small, and require only moderate amounts of exercise. Brisk city walks should be enough; no sprawling backyards necessary.

4.Bichon Frise

  Even at their largest, the Bichon Frise  won’t get taller than a foot. These little furballs are energetic, which means they love to play, but also need daily exercise. Bichons also shed less than similar breeds, making them ideal to leave with in close quarters or for people with allergies.


5. Great Dane
  “Huge dog” doesn’t seem like it fits with “great apartment dog,” but the Great Dane (at a majestic 100 to 130 pounds) is such a natural loafer that, though your couch will probably be fully occupied, he’ll take up far less space than you might think. Add to that his calm demeanor, friendliness, trainability, and quiet nature, and the Great Dane makes an excellent choice among apartment dogs.

6.Bulldog

  The Bulldog is perhaps most well-known for his laziness, making them a perfect dog for apartments. A short walk is all these guys need to keep them happy. Otherwise, they’re content to just laze around and snooze. They’re an incredibly gentle dog breed and rarely get taller than a 18 inches high.

7.Shih Tzu

  This regal-looking companion is small in size and maintenance. She doesn’t need much room to move around in. As long as she’s pampered, she’ll be happy. Shih Tzus aren’t a high energy dog, so you won’t need to make many daily trips outdoors for walks. If you don’t mind grooming all that hair, this may be the perfect apartment dog for you. 

  Years of being toted around in starlets' purses may have given this breed something of a privileged diva reputation, but they're actually quite gentle and low-maintenance. After all, how many other breeds are patient enough to tolerate being kept in a purse in the first place? Their tiny size means they can make it in even the most closet-y of New York studio apartments, and even longhaired chihuahuas require only moderate grooming. Keep in mind, though, that Chihuahuas can be a bit loud, so think twice if your pad has thin walls.

  Dachshunds love to be active, but luckily you’re the just the person to take them to the dog park twice a day. Right? Although they can be a little bit stubborn and tend to adapt better to adults and older children than small children, they are extremely affectionate and protective of their loved ones.

  Havanese dogs are small and adaptable to any kind of living situation, including apartment life. They're playful, but they'll burn enough calories charging around your home that gobs of outdoor time won't be necessary. That said, they're relatively quiet, so they won't disturb your neighbors with lots of yapping. One caveat: Of all the breeds on this list, the Havanese is the most high-maintenance in terms of grooming.

As always, it’s important to remember that every dog is an individual. While every breed has a general personality and disposition, there will always be variations. Do your research carefully and be sure to pick a pet that will fit your home, lifestyle, and personality.
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Things You Need To Know Before Getting a Dog

Things You Need To Know Before Getting a Dog

  Pets give us unconditional love and loyalty, and provide constant companionship. Adopting a pet, however, is a big decision. Dogs, cats and small animals are living beings that require a considerable amount of time, money and commitment — over 15 years worth in many cases. Pet ownership can be rewarding, but only if you think through your decision before you adopt.

  There are many important things to consider before you start looking to buy/adopt a dog - from finding out if you are ready, to discovering the right breed to suit your lifestyle.

You're going to spend a lot of money.
  Whatever you think you're going to spend on a dog, triple it. Better yet, quadruple it. And depending on your dog, double whatever the sum of your quadrupling.
  Americans spent $55.7 billion on pets in 2013. We spent an estimated $58.5 billion in 2014. In fact, every year, we spend billions more than the previous year on our non-human family members. Why? Because we care.

A dog is for life

  Owning a dog is a lifetime commitment. Animals develop deep bonds with you and your family. Any change in ownership can be extremely traumatic, so you should be prepared for the responsibility involved in dog ownership. Dog owners need to be able to provide shelter, food, water, medical care, and love and attention.

Check out how dog-friendly your neighborhood is. 

  How are the dogs that live near you? Is there a park or hiking trails nearby? Where’s the closest vet and 24-hour emergency? Do you have relationships with your neighbors? How socialized your neighbors’ dogs are is an indication of how your own may be – of course, this is up to you as the pack leader, and if your neighborhood doesn’t provide socialization opportunities, you will need to find other ways to properly socialize your new dog.

Be prepared to groom your dog

  Groom your dog, making sure to ease into a grooming routine. Begin with shorter sessions, and gradually increase to the normal grooming session. Be sure that whoever is grooming the dog pets it frequently, and that your dog is rewarded in the end. Your dog’s nails should not touch the ground, and your dog should be brushed regularly. This will prevent tangles and reduce the risk of skin irritation. Your vet can help you plan an appropriate grooming schedule for your particular dog, depending on breed and hair type.

Any extra mental and physical energy you have? 
  When you come home tired at the end of a long work day, the exuberance with which your dog greets you is absolutely wonderful. And now the dog's stored-up energy needs to be burned off for sanity's sake.
  For the most part, any dog of any size or age needs at least an hour-long walk every day, bare minimum. Dogs with more energy need more walking . If you're lucky, you may have other people around you who can take on some of that walking. But if you're not, that means as soon as you walk in the door at the end of the day, you need to turn around and walk out of it, dog in tow.

   No matter who your dog is, you're likely to have some things that you have to invest mental energy into working on every day, on top of the physical energy that goes into making sure the dog is exercised.

Allow your dog to be social
  Socialize your dog early on. By exposing your dog to various people and environments—not to mention other dogs—it will become a more stable, happy, and confident animal. Be sure to continue socialization beyond the puppy years. Socialization reduces the likelihood that your dog could become fearful or aggressive toward other people and animals.

Don’t make an emotional decision when choosing a dog.
  When you decide the time is right, leave your emotions at the door. Going into a shelter is devastating and sad. But if you let your weaker emotions control your brain and feel sorry for the dog, you may end up adopting a dog that isn’t right for you, your family, or your environment. Save yourself the heartache and struggles later by being methodical and aware now.

Be prepared for house training
  Puppies require house training as they will not automatically know that the yard—not the house—is the appropriate place to… Do their business. It’s the responsibility of the owner to house train the dog. This requires time, lots of patience and a consistent and dedicated regimen.

You’ll be a dentist
  Brush your dog’s teeth in order to prevent dental diseases. Three to five times a week is recommended, and your vet can give you a lesson as well as recommend an appropriate toothbrush and paste.

Say goodbye to spontaneous travel
  Having a dog is a bit like having a kid in that unplanned weekend-getaways or random all-nighters aren't really in the cards. Now that you have a dog, even a late-night dinner date — let alone the basic camping trip — takes more planning. Spontaneity is tough when you have an animal 100 percent dependent on you.
  If you're planning a weekend getaway, it means either finding a pet-sitter you trust, or a hotel that takes dogs. Even for camping, you'll need to check that the campground allows dogs and what the rules are.

It's not going to be what you expect.
  In fact, while we're talking about expectations, let's go ahead and toss all of them out the window. If you're getting a dog because you have certain expectations for what your life will be like with one, just know this: It probably won't be what you thought it'd be. It'll be just as great, but different.

Be sure about your decision
  Above all, make sure that getting a dog is a wise decision for you, your family and your living situation—not just now, but 10, 12, and even 15 years from now.

One thing about owning a dog is universally true: if you do it right, and go into it with your eyes wide open, bringing a dog into your life is going to be one of the best things you ever do.
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