February 2016 - LUV My dogs

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Friday, February 26, 2016

Everything about your French Bulldog

Everything about your French Bulldog
  French Bulldogs may look tough on the outside, but inside they are lovably soft, caring and easygoing. These dogs spread the good vibes wherever they go. Outgoing and open, they love nothing more than to cuddle on the couch, romp on the carpet or play in the yard. Boasting unlimited energy, they sometimes have no idea when (or how) to stop their motors.
But, with a Frenchie, things never get out of hand. They rarely lose their cool, snap or bark. They simply want to roll around and play.

Overview
  With a tough-on-the-outside, sweet-on-the-inside demeanor, unmistakable bat-shaped ears and distinctive bow-legged gait, the French Bulldog has gained so much popularity that he’s fast becoming the city-dwellers' dog of choice. He's small – under 28 pounds – and has a short, easy-care coat that comes in a variety of colors. He doesn't need a great deal of exercise, fits comfortably into a condo, co-op or apartment, and is far less likely to bark than many small dogs. In fact, other than being a little pugnacious with other dogs, it would be hard to imagine a better dog for city living.
  The French Bulldog should be on the short list of breeds for anyone who lives without a vast tract of suburban backyard. He's also a good choice for those who might have trouble giving a more active breed ample exercise.
  The Frenchie will make you laugh. He's a charming, clever dog with a sense of humor and a stubborn streak. Bred for centuries as a companion, he's very fond of people, and becomes particularly attached to his family. In fact, sometimes he becomes a little too attached, which means he's not the best choice for someone who'll be away long hours every day. It also means he absolutely, positively cannot live in the backyard or garage, but only indoors as a member of the family. That's doubly true given that he, like all brachycephalic, or "flat-faced" breeds, has difficulty regulating his body temperature and needs to live in a climate-controlled environment.
  The Frenchie can also be a little hard to housetrain and may not be safe with a slow-footed family cat. He also snores, which might seem like a minor problem until you've actually heard the dramatic sounds that can emanate from his small body.
  For exercise, Frenchies jump on and off the furniture and do the “Frenchie 500” circuit through the house. A short daily walk of 15 to 20 minutes will help to keep them in shape. Schedule walks and outdoor playtime for cool mornings and evenings. Frenchies are sensitive to heat and can quickly succumb to heatstroke. This is not the breed for you if you enjoy hiking or jogging with a dog.
  Breeders like to send French Bulldog puppies to their new homes when they are nine or 10 weeks old. Frenchie puppies can become unpleasant little tyrants if they don’t get to spend the optimal amount of time with their mother and littermates, learning the rules of behavior toward people and other dogs.
  The French Bulldog does best in a family where someone is home most of the day. He’s not always good with small children or cats, and he can be aggressive toward dogs he doesn’t know. When a Frenchie is the right match for you, though, you’ll find it’s impossible to have just one.

Highlights
  • French Bulldogs do not need a lot of exercise, but they do need daily walks to keep them at a healthy weight.
  • French Bulldogs do not handle heat very well and need to be monitored on hot days to ensure that they don't overexert themselves.
  • French Bulldogs can be easy to train, but they can also be stubborn. Be firm and patient when training this breed.
  • If you value cleanliness the French Bulldog may not be the dog for you, since he is prone to drooling, flatulence and some shedding. He can also be difficult to housetrain.
  • French Bulldogs can be a quiet breed and are not known as a breed that barks frequently although there are exceptions to every rule.
  • Because they don't tend to be excessive barkers, French Bulldogs make exceptional apartment dogs.
  • Although it is important to always supervise young children and dogs when they are together, the French Bulldog does very well with children.
  • French Bulldogs make wonderful watchdogs, but they can become territorial. They also like being the center of attention, which can lead to behavioral problems if they are overindulged.
  • French Bulldogs are companion dogs and thrive when they have human contact. They are not a breed that can be left alone for long periods or left outside to live.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store.
Other Quick Facts
  • French Bulldogs are restful and have minimal exercise needs, so they are a good choice for couch potatoes.
  • The French Bulldog should not weigh more than 28 pounds, making him easily portable.
  • French Bulldogs can be stubborn when it comes to housetraining. Be patient, be consistent, and consider the use of paper training or puppy pee pads to get around the problem (although it's always best to get the pup outdoors).
  • Frenchies snort, snore and grunt, and they are known for making other odd noises.
  • Frenchies are not good swimmers and should not have access to pools, spas or other bodies of water.
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Companion
Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
Average size: 19 - 28 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, smooth and glossy
Coloration: Brindle, white, fawn, brindle and white
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Sturdy, compact and muscular body; black nose with a short muzzle; top lip hangs below the corners of the bottom lip; dark, rounded eyes; slight wrinkling around the neck and back; straight or corkscrew tail
Possible alterations: May have darker coloration
Comparable Breeds: Boston Terrier, Pug

History
The “bouldogge Francais,” as he is known in his adopted home country of France, actually originated in England, in the city of Nottingham. Small bulldogs were popular pets with the local laceworkers, keeping them company and ridding their workrooms of rats. After the industrial revolution, lacemaking became mechanized and many of the laceworkers lost their jobs. Some of them moved to France, where their skills were in demand, and of course they took their beloved dogs with them. The dogs were equally popular with French shopkeepers and eventually took on the name of their new country.
  In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the dogs became popular with members of the Paris bohemian class: ladies of the night, artists, writers such as the novelist Colette, and wealthy Americans doing the Grand Tour. Impressionist artist Toulouse Lautrec even put a Frenchie in one of his paintings, “Le Marchand des Marrons.”
  The Frenchie has gained rapidly in popularity in the past decade. Today, the breed ranks 21st among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club, up from 71st in 2000, a testament to his qualities as a companion.

Temperament
  The French Bulldog, like many other companion dog breeds, requires close contact with humans. They have fairly minimal exercise needs, but do require at least daily short walks.   The French Bulldog is sometimes called 'Frog dog' or a 'Clown dog.' Frog dog is in reference to the unique way they sit with hind legs spread out. Clown dog is because they are known to be fun loving vivacious 'clowns of the dog world.' Their calm nature makes them an excellent choice for apartment dwellers, as does their sensible attitude towards barking.
  Their bulk and their compromised breathing system makes it impossible for them to regulate their temperature efficiently. The French bulldog has only a single short coat. What this all means for the dog is that it becomes cold very easily. Also, they will very likely need to have some extra covering inside during the winter if you live in a particularly cold area.   These dogs need warm clothing when out in cold weather. Precautions must be taken when exercising during hot or humid weather, as they are prone to heat stroke. It is also recommended that French Bulldogs who live indoors have access to air conditioning to regulate their temperature, provided the air conditioning is not set too low.
  French Bulldogs make excellent companions. The French Bulldog rarely barks, and if he does it is to draw attention, to point out that she needs something (like attention), or just because he is not happy he may give the "Frenchie death yodel." This breed is patient and affectionate with its owners, especially with children, who are especially protected by the females. French Bulldogs can easily live with other breeds when the proper introductions are done.
  They are ranked 58th in Stanley Coren's The Intelligence of Dogs. There are certain exceptions to this average level of canine intelligence; a French Bulldog named Princess Jacqueline which died in 1934 was claimed to understand 20 words, reacting correctly.

Health Problems
  French Bulldogs are prone to joint diseases, spinal disorders, heart defects and eye problems. Dams often have to deliver pups by cesarean section, because pups have relatively large heads. They often have respiratory problems. They tend to wheeze and snore and have trouble in hot weather. Prone to heatstroke. An overweight Frenchie may have trouble breathing, because of a swollen abdomen. Do not overfeed this breed. Putting them under anesthesia is risky because of their breathing issues.   French Bulldogs are high maintenance and potential owners need to be aware that their vet bills may be high. Take this into consideration before choosing a Frenchie puppy.

Activity Requirements
  French Bulldogs need a couple of 15 minutes walks every day to maintain their physique, and a few sessions of playing ball to keep them entertained. Their size and activity requirements make them good apartment dogs, but they are just as happy in a big home or on a farm with lots of wide open space. Frenchies don't care so much about the size of their home, as they do the size of their owners heart.
  French Bulldogs should not be exercised too hard in the summer months, as they are prone to heatstroke. Swimming pool owners should be alert – this breed can not swim and falling into a pool could be life-threatening to a Frenchie.

Care
  Although the Frenchie is a fun-loving dog, it has minimal exercise needs. It loves an outdoor romp but does not enjoy hot and humid weather. In fact, the French Bulldog is not suited for outdoor living and cannot swim.
  A short on-leash walk is adequate to fulfill most of the dog’s physical needs. Coat care is minimal but the facial wrinkles of the dog need regular cleaning. In addition, Frenchies tend to snore, drool, and wheeze.

Living Conditions
  Frenchies are good for apartment life. They can be fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard. They do not do well in temperature extremes.

Trainability
  French Bulldogs can be a training challenge. They are stubborn and quickly lose interest in repetitive activities. Training should be conducted in short sessions, and the routine should be mixed up to keep the Frenchie's interest. Showering a Frenchie with affection and treats when training is the best way to get results from him. Discipline, punishment and yelling will cause this dog to stop listening all together.
   House training is a long, drawn out process with a French Bulldog. It can take six months to fully train them, and many breeders recommend crating a Frenchies for that period of time.

Grooming
  The French Bulldog has a short, fine, smooth coat that is easy to groom. Brush him weekly with a rubber hound glove or a soft bristle brush. Bathe monthly or as needed to keep the coat clean.
  Frenchies don’t shed much, but twice a year they lose their undercoat. During the spring and fall shedding seasons, use a stripping comb and grooming mitt to remove the excess hair.
  The only other grooming required is routine nail trimming, ear cleaning, tooth brushing and wrinkle care. The deep skin folds may need to be cleaned only a couple of times a week or every day. Wipe out the crud from the wrinkles with a soft, damp cloth or a baby wipe, then dry them thoroughly. If moisture is left behind, wrinkles become the perfect petri dish for bacterial growth. Do the same for the indentation at the tail set and the outer vulval area.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the toenails as needed, usually every few weeks. They should never get long enough that you hear them clacking on the floor. Brush the teeth frequently for good dental health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Frenchies get along well with children, and they're not so tiny that they can't live in a household with a toddler. That said, no dog should ever be left alone with a young child. It's just common sense to supervise and make sure that neither is poking or otherwise harassing the other.
  When they are socialized to them during puppyhood, Frenchies can get along well with other dogs and cats. Overly spoiled Frenchies, however, may be jealous toward other dogs, especially if those other dogs are getting attention from the Frenchie's very own person.

Is this breed right for you?
  A breed that gets along well with children and animals, the French Bulldog not only makes an excellent companion but a great family dog too. Well-suited for apartment life, this breed will need regular exercise. Playful, he can romp in the yard for hours on end. In need of guidance with a strong leader, the French Bulldog requires a lot of human interaction, socialization and affection to avoid any aggressive behavior. A clean dog, he has an average shedding rate and requires low-maintenance grooming. Easily overheated, it's best that the Frenchie lives in a cooler climate.

Did You Know?
  The wee French Bulldog is popular with celebrities - actor Leonardo di Caprio shares custody of his Frenchie with ex-girlfriend Gisele Bündchen.

A dream day in the life of a French Bulldog
  Waking up in the arms of his owner, the French Bulldog will snooze until his master rises. Once up and at 'em, he'll want to be let out first in the morning to work off some of his high energy. Trotting back inside, he'll be ready for lunch and a bit of cuddle time on the couch. After receiving some affection, he'll greet the other members of the family while romping around the house and backyard. Once the day has ended, the French Bulldog will crawl into bed with his loving master.


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Everything about your Finnish Spitz

Everything about your Finnish Spitz
  Choosing to add a furry friend to your growing household is a long-term commitment, and picking a breed that fits your lifestyle presents the key to a happy home. With over 160 American Kennel Club-recognized breeds, that decision can seem overwhelming. 
  Finnish Spitz want to be members of the family and are naturally protective. They are sensitive dogs and don't do well in homes where there's a lot of tension. But give them a loving atmosphere and include them in everything you do and they'll become a loyal, lively, and fun-loving friend. We're here to help you meet the breed that's right for you. If you're looking for an active breed that gets along well with every member of the family, learn all you need to know about the Finnish Spitz.

Overview
  The Finnish Spitz barks. That’s the first thing you should know about him. He was developed to bark and that’s what he does. He uses many different sounds to communicate, and “talking” to you will be an important part of his life. Get this dog only if you are willing to teach him when it’s okay to bark and when it’s not. On the plus side, he’s an excellent watchdog and will always let you know if someone is approaching the house or something out of the ordinary is going on.
  This is an active dog that needs daily exercise that will challenge him physically and mentally and prevent him from becoming destructive or noisy in an attempt to entertain himself. Plan to exercise him for 20 to 30 minutes at least once a day. He performs well in dog sports such as agility, flyball, obedience and rally, and is a sturdy and tireless playmate for kids.
  This intelligent and highly trainable dog responds well to positive reinforcement techniques such as play, praise and food rewards, but he is an independent thinker. Don’t expect unquestioning obedience from him and you won’t be disappointed. Keep training sessions short and fun so he doesn’t get bored.
  If the presence of Finnish Spitz dust puppies would make you crazy, reconsider your decision to get this breed. He’s not difficult to groom, but he does shed a fair amount of hair. Brush his double coat weekly to keep it clean and remove dead hair. During spring and fall shedding seasons, daily brushing will help to keep excess hair under control. In addition, trim his nails as needed, brush his teeth, and keep the ears clean to prevent infections.
  Last but not least, it should go without saying that a people-loving dog like the Finnish Spitz needs to live in the house. It’s an unhappy Finnish Spitz who is relegated to the backyard with little or no human companionship.

Highlights
  • Finnish Spitz are lively, high-energy dogs and require lots of daily exercise.
  • These dogs are called Bark Pointers for a good reason. They love to bark! Train them at an early age to stop barking on command, or hope that you have tolerant neighbors!
  • Because Finnish Spitz are hunting dogs, they should never be turned out in unsecured areas. A fenced yard is a necessity.
  • If left outside alone for too long, Finnish Spitz will bark at everything they see unless trained at an early age not to do so.
  • Finnish Spitz take a long time to mature mentally, and can be rather silly and puppyish until they are three to four years old.
  • Hunting dogs in general can be independent thinkers, which makes them appear to be stubborn at times. Finnish Spitz are no different. Learn the proper training methods and motivations, however, and you'll be pleased with your dog's intelligence and willingness to learn.
  • Finnish Spitz generally are good with other pets in the household, but can be aggressive with dogs they don't know.
  • This is a breed that tends to be aloof and suspicious of strangers. They aren't good guard dogs, but they will alert you by barking if someone approaches your home.
  • Finnish Spitz love to eat, especially treats. Since they can be somewhat manipulative, they will try to get as many treats from you as possible and can become overweight. Try giving them a carrot or a low-fat treat instead.
  • Never buy a Finnish Spitz from a puppy mill, a pet store, or a breeder who doesn't provide health clearances or guarantees. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies and who breeds for sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • In Finland this breed is called the Finsk Spetz. Other names include Finnish Hunting Dog and Barking Bird Dog.
  • When you look at a Finnish Spitz, you see a medium-size dog with a wedge-shaped head, small prick ears, a foxlike expression, a square body covered in beautiful red-gold coat and a tail that curls over the back. Males are larger with more coat.
  • The Finnish Spitz was bred to track everything from squirrels and rodents to big game like bears.
  • The Finnish Spitz's ancestors were bred from Spitz-type dogs in central Russia over 2000 years ago.
Breed standards
AKC group: Non-sporting
UKC group: Northern Breed
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size: 31 - 35 pounds
Coat appearance: Soft undercoat, harsh outer coat
Coloration: Red, auburn, honey
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Square and well-balanced body and frame with a deep chest; resembles a red fox; black nose, lips and black-rimmed eyes; catlike feet and hairy tail that curls upward
Possible alterations: Born with a darker coat that gets lighter as he gets older
Comparable Breeds: Siberian Husky, Chinese Shar-Pei

History
  The Finnish Spitz developed from selectively bred Spitz-type dogs that inhabited central Russia several thousand years ago. Isolated Finno-Ugrian tribes in the far northern regions bred dogs according to their specific needs. 
  These small clans of woodsmen relied on their dogs to help them obtain food, and the excellent hunting ability of the Finnish Spitz made it a favorite choice.
  By 1880, as advanced means of transportation brought diverse peoples and their dogs together, Finnish Spitzes mated with other breeds of dogs, and were becoming extinct as a distinct breed. At about that time, a Finnish sportsman from Helsinki named Hugo Roos observed the pure native Finnish Spitz while hunting in the northern forests. He realized the many virtues of the pure Finnish Spitz breed and decided to select dogs that were untainted examples of the genuine Finnish Spitz in order to try to revive the breed.Thirty years of careful breeding resulted in the modern Finnish Spitz; the dogs are descendents of his original foundation stock.
  In the 19 th century, as mass transportation became more available and convenient, the Finns began crossing the Finkie with other breeds, so much so that by 1880 few examples remained of the original, unadulterated dog. Two hunters from Helsinki realized what was about to be lost and launched a successful effort to revive the breed, culminating in the breed’s recognition by the Finnish Kennel Club in 1892.
  The Finnish Spitz was first imported to the United States in 1959. The Finnish Spitz Club of America was founded in 1975, and the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1988, adding it to the Non-Sporting Group. The Finnish Spitz ranks 158 th among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Lineage
Nearly all dog breeds’ genetic closeness to the gray wolf is due to admixture.However, several Arctic dog breeds show a genetic closeness with the now-extinct Taymyr wolf of North Asia due to admixture. These breeds are associated with high latitudes - the Siberian husky and Greenland dog that are also associated with arctic human populations, and to a lesser extent the Shar Pei and Finnish spitz. An admixture graph of the Greenland dog indicates a best-fit of 3.5% shared material, however an ancestry proportion ranging between 1.4% and 27.3% is consistent with the data. This indicates admixture between the Taymyr wolf population and the ancestral dog population of these 4 high-latitude breeds. This introgression could have provided early dogs living in high latitudes with phenotypic variation beneficial for adaption to a new and challenging environment. It also indicates the ancestry of present-day dog breeds descends from more than one region

Personality
  This Nordic breed is active and friendly. His alert nature makes him an excellent watchdog, and he's protective of family members. He may be cautious toward strangers but should never be shy or aggressive.
  He loves children and gets along with other animals, especially when he's been raised with them. On the down side, he's an independent thinker and can be a challenge to train. He may not be mentally and emotionally mature until he's three or four years old.
  Like every dog, Finnish Spitz need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Finnish Spitz puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  All purebred dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit a particular disease. Run, don’t walk, from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee on puppies, who tells you that the breed is 100 percent healthy and has no known problems, or who tells you that her puppies are isolated from the main part of the household for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur in her lines.
  That said, the Finnish Spitz is a pretty healthy breed. Health problems that may be seen include diabetes, hypothyroidism, cataracts, an autoimmune skin condition called pemphigus foliaceous, and epilepsy.
  Do not purchase a puppy from a breeder who cannot provide you with written documentation that the parents were cleared of health problems that affect the breed.   Having the dogs "vet checked" is not a substitute for genetic health testing.
  Remember that after you’ve taken a new puppy into your home, you have the power to protect him from one of the most common health problems: obesity. Keeping a Finnish Spitz at an appropriate weight is one of the easiest ways to extend his life. Make the most of your preventive abilities to help ensure a healthier dog for life

Activity Requirements
  The Finnish Spitz is not a lazy house dog. They were developed to be sturdy bird-hunting companions and they have a built-in need to run and keep their minds active. Their medium size may be appealing to condo or apartment dwellers, but the Finnish Spitz needs several hours of vigorous exercise every day in order to stave off boredom and destructiveness.    
  Active families are perfect for this breed, as they are a true family dog who will happily engage in group activities like jogging, hiking or biking. They adore children and will romp in the yard with kids for hours on end. Yards should be fenced in, as this hunter will take off after birds or small animals and aren't likely to obey calls to return home. For this reason, farms are not an ideal locale for the Finnish Spitz.

Care
  Although the Finnish Spitz can survive outdoors in cool and temperate climates, it prefers living indoors, as it craves social contact. Because it is lively and active, the Finnish Spitz requires daily physical exercise such as a long on-leash walk or a run around the park. One should be careful, however, that this hunting breed does not go hunting on its own.
Its double coat requires occasional brushing every week and more often during the shedding season. The Finkie is not oily and generally remains clean.

Living Conditions
 The Finnish Spitz will do okay in an apartment and without a yard provided it gets enough exercise. It is relatively inactive indoors and prefers cool climates.

Trainability
  Their independent streak, coupled with a four-year strong puppyhood can make a Finnish Spitz difficult to train. Calm assertiveness is the best tack to take with this breed, as they don't respond well to discipline. They can become easily bored with repetitive training exercises, so breeders and trainers recommend keeping sessions short and mixing up the routine.
  Once leadership is established and basic obedience has been mastered, the Finnish Spitz should be graduated to advanced obedience classes or agility training. They are intelligent dogs and need to be mentally stimulated as much as they need to be physically exercised.

Grooming
  This handsome redhead has a double coat of a soft, dense undercoat covered by long, straight, harshly textured guard hairs. The Finnish Spitz is a naturally clean dog, but he does need some grooming. He should be brushed with a slicker brush at least once a week to minimize shed hair around your house, and bathed every three to four months.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually once a month. Brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner. Begin grooming the Finnish Spitz when he is very young so he learns to accept the handling and fuss of grooming patiently.  


Children And Other Pets
  Finnish Spitz love children and will tolerate a lot, walking away when they've had too much. They're sturdy enough that they're not easily injured by toddlers whose motor skills aren't fully developed.
  That said, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how good-natured, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Finnish Spitz get along well with other dogs and cats, especially if they're raised with them, but they can be aggressive toward dogs they don't know. And pet birds might want to watch their back around them.

Is this breed right for you?
  Getting along well with other animals and children, the Finnish Spitz is an awesome addition to families. Regardless of his loud bark, the breed is well-suited to apartment life if given daily exercise and walks. 
 Preferring the indoors, a small yard will do just fine for this dog. It's best that the Finnish Spitz receive a good amount of leadership and training from his owner to avoid poor behavioral traits. Do not let him believe he's the dominant member of the household or he'll act negatively. In addition, this dog requires a good amount of grooming and is a normal shedder.

Did You Know?
  This is one dog who can truly lay claim to the title King of the Barkers. The Finnish Spitz, the national dog of Finland, was developed to be a barking hunting dog. That is, he trails game, and when he finds it, he barks until the hunter arrives to bag it. One Finnish Spitz each year is chosen for his hunting prowess to be King of the Barkers.

A dream day in the life of a Finnish Spitz
  A sweet and mild-tempered dog, he may wake you up with a bark if he hears something out of the ordinary. Spending his day inside with the family, the Finnish Spitz will be happy to let the kiddos roll about and roughhouse with him. Playing quietly with his toys, he will bark when he feels he's protecting the security of his home. Running inside and outside the house, he loves to use his doggie door. Going for a short walk when you return home, he'll be happy to end his day in the comfort of his family.
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Everything about your American Eskimo Dog

Everything about your American Eskimo Dog
  Charming, intelligent, warm and friendly, American Eskimo Dogs are also slightly reserved. Their loyalty to family and home can be intense: Some American Eskimo Dogs will keep strangers from entering the home until their master approves. This makes them a superb watchdog—they are protective without being aggressive.

Overview
  The soft, white, and fluffy American Eskimo is sometimes referred to as "The Dog Beautiful." The Eskie is clever, active and mischievous. If you don’t have those same qualities in equal or greater amounts, he’ll have you wrapped around his little white paw in no time flat. This Spitz breed has many excellent qualities, including three different sizes, but he’s not the right breed for everyone.
  The Eskie twinkles up at you with a keen, alert expression. He loves to have a good time and is always ready for an adventure. His curious and comical nature is sure to make you laugh several times a day. He is sensitive and dislikes discord among family members. Don’t argue in front of him; he won’t like it.
  He bonds deeply to his people, but he is not necessarily the best choice for a family with young children. He can be impatient with being hugged or manhandled and skittish at being approached too quickly. He’s wary of strangers and makes an excellent watchdog. Sometimes, he’s too good a watchdog. It’s not unusual for him to become a nuisance barker, so while his size is perfect for apartment living, his noise level might not be unless someone is home to control him.
  Train the Eskie with patience and consistency and he will be surprisingly responsive. For best results, use positive reinforcement techniques such as praise, play and food rewards.
  Last but not least, it should go without saying that a people-loving dog like the American Eskimo needs to live in the house. It’s an unhappy Eskie who is relegated to the backyard with little or no human companionship.

Highlights
  • Eskies are happy, active, intelligent dogs. They thrive on activity. Plan on keeping your Eskie busy with training classes, games, romps at a dog park, or hikes. A busy Eskie is unlikely to become bored — a state you want to avoid with this breed, because boredom leads to excessive barking, inappropriate chewing, and other annoying behaviors.
  • The Eskie needs to be with his family, so don't plan on leaving him alone for long periods at a time, or he may develop separation anxiety.
  • If you are a confident leader, you'll enjoy life with an Eskie. If you're not, you're apt to have an Eskie that's leading you.
  • Do not trust even a well-trained and well-socialized Eskie with small pets such as birds, hamsters, and gerbils. Chances are, he will succumb to his instincts and give chase.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store.
Other Quick Facts
  • The American Eskimo was a popular circus dog in the early 20th century.
  • The American Eskimo comes in three sizes: Toy, Miniature and Standard.
Breed Standards
AKC : Non-sporting
UKC Northern Breeds
Breed Group: Non-Sporting 
Height:
Toy: 9–12 inches and 6–10 lbs
Miniature: 12–15 inches and 10–17 lbs
Standard: 15–20 inches and 18–25 lbs
Weight: 7 to 10 pounds; 11 to 20 pounds; 20 to 40 pounds 
Life Span: 12 to 15 years
Coat: The American Eskimo Dog has a two-layered coat. The undercoat is short and dense, and the outer coat consists of long straight hair. The coat is thicker and longer around the chest and neck, giving the appearance of a mane. American Eskimo Dogs must be white or biscuit cream--any other color is unacceptable. The American Eskimo Dog sheds twice a year.
Comparable Breeds: Alaskan Malamute, Samoyed



History
  The American Eskimo Dog undoubtedly descended from several European spitz breeds, including the white Keeshond from Holland, the white German Spitz, the white Pomeranian from Germany and the Volpino Italiano, or white Italian Spitz. During the middle part of the 19th century, small, white Nordic-type dogs were common in American communities of German immigrants. Collectively, these dogs became referred to as the American Spitz.   This spunky breed gained extreme popularity for use as trick dogs in traveling circuses across the United States. Supposedly, an American Eskimo named Stout’s Pal Pierre walked on a tightrope in the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus. The public loved seeing their sparkling white coats and quickness, while trainers prized them for these attributes along with their inherent intelligence, agility and trainability.
  Although the reason is not clear, the American Spitz was renamed the American Eskimo in 1917. This modern title mistakenly suggests that these are miniature versions of larger sled-pulling dogs developed in the far northern parts of this continent. The change from “Spitz” to “Eskimo” may be explained by the political climate in the United States during World War I. “Spitz” is a German work that means “sharp point” and was used to describe northern dogs with pointed muzzles, erect ears, curled tails and double coats, and it has been suggested that the name change was an attempt to distance the breed in America from its German origins.
   The national parent club for the breed, the American Eskimo Dog Club of America (AEDCA), was formed in 1985 and opened its studbook in 1986. The AEDCA transferred its studbook to the American Kennel Club in 1993, with more than 1,750 Eskies registered as foundation stock. The American Eskimo Dog became part of the AKC’s Non-Sporting Group and fully recognized in 1995. Eskies are competitive in obedience, agility, rally and the conformation show ring. They are used as narcotics detection dogs and even guard dogs. While popular in the United States, this breed is little-known in other countries.

Personality
  The Eskie is smart, friendly and a good communicator. His alert nature makes him an excellent watchdog, but beware! He is highly vocal. Train him from a very early age that excessive barking isn’t permitted.
  An American Eskimo will let you know what he wants through glances and barks. A look at the cookie jar, followed by a look at you and a look back at the jar sends a very clear message. Hypnotized by his dark eyes and smiling face, you’ll find yourself mindlessly handing him a treat.
  The Eskie gets along with most everyone he meets, but he’s not always patient with tight squeezes from children. Closely supervise interactions with young children, and teach them how to pet the Eskie gently. An American Eskimo should never be shy or aggressive. Say no thanks if a puppy or his parents aren’t approachable.
  Start training your puppy the day you bring him home. Even at eight weeks old, he is capable of soaking up everything you can teach him. Don’t wait until he is 6 months old to begin training or you will have a more headstrong dog to deal with. If possible, get him into puppy kindergarten class by the time he is 10 to 12 weeks old, and socialize, socialize, socialize. However, be aware that many puppy training classes require certain vaccines  to be up to date, and many veterinarians recommend limited exposure to other dogs and public places until puppy vaccines  have been completed. In lieu of formal training, you can begin training your puppy at home and socializing him among family and friends until puppy vaccines are completed.
  Talk to the breeder, describe exactly what you’re looking for in a dog, and ask for assistance in selecting a puppy. Breeders see the puppies daily and can make uncannily accurate recommendations once they know something about your lifestyle and personality. Whatever you want from an Eskie, look for one whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized from early puppyhood.

Health
  The American Eskimo is a hardy breed with an average life span of 12–15 years.This breed tends to become overweight easily, so proper diet and exercise is needed to maintain an overall well being. Health testing should be performed by all responsible breeders and anyone purchasing a puppy should be aware of the genetic problems which have been found in some individuals of the breed, such as PRA (Progressive Retinal Atrophy), luxating patella, and hip dysplasia). None of these problems are common and the breed is generally very healthy. In addition to the rarer problems mentioned, the breed can have a tendency towards allergies and most commonly, tear-staining. This breed also is known in some cases to have dental issues.

Activity
  The standard American Eskimo Dog needs a good workout every day and should be taken for a long jog or walk. Provide plenty of water and shade during exercise to avoid overheating from the heavy coat. Eskies enjoy dog sports. Without interaction they may become bored and destructive.

Care
  All Eskies love cold weather. However, because they create close attachments to their human family, they should be allowed to live indoors. The Eskie's double coat must be combed and brushed twice a week, more during its shedding periods. The Eskie is also very energetic and requires a vigorous workout daily, although the duration of the workout is determined by the dog's size. For example, a larger Eskie requires a long walk or brisk jog, while short walks or a fun outdoor game are sufficient forms of exercise for smaller Eskies.

Living Conditions
  The American Eskimo will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is very active indoors and a small yard will be sufficient.

Training
  There are a few reasons why the American Eskimo Dog was used in circuses. Easily trainable, the Eskie loves to learn tricks. You’ll need to take the leadership role fast, because when this breed senses it can take control over the situation, it will take it. And because it is so intelligent, it will sense when confident leadership is lacking. To get the best results out of training, use positive reinforcement. Once you’ve completed basic training, be sure to enroll your dog in more advanced courses – it will help to stimulate your dog’s mind.
  The American Eskimo Dog is a natural born watchdog, so there’s no training necessary. And even though this breed is a watchdog, it will not develop aggressive traits. Start training as soon as possible for the best results.

Grooming
  The Eskie has a double coat: a dense undercoat topped by longer guard hairs. He has a ruff around the neck, which is more prominent on males than on females. The backs of the legs and the tail are also furry.
  Brush the Eskie’s straight, thick coat a couple of times a week to prevent or remove mats and tangles. Plan to brush it more often when he’s shedding to keep loose hair off your clothes and furniture. You’ll need a slicker brush, pin brush and metal Greyhound comb. Bathe the Eskie about every three months.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks, and brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  The Eskie is an excellent family dog who's affectionate with everyone, including kids of all ages, other dogs, and cats. Of course, adults should always supervise interactions between kids and dogs; the Eskie's high energy level can be overwhelming to extremely young children, so supervision is especially important.
  The Eskie does not receive high marks for living in peace with small mammals and birds, which he tends to chase.

Is this breed right for you?
  An active and intelligent breed, the American Eskimo Dog requires a lot of attention and firm training. Doing well with kids and animals, this working dog enjoys being busy. Not recommended for apartment life, the Eskie needs a lot of daily exercise and a yard to play freely in. 
  It's essential that he receives training, firm leadership and attention. If not, it's likely that the Eskie will act out and display negative behaviors. A true watchdog, he will protect the family from strangers but is happily friendly with family members and friends. In need of a lot of grooming, this breed needs twice-weekly to daily brushing.

Did You Know?
  The American Eskimo breed was developed by 19th-century German immigrants in the United States and was known for a while as the American Spitz

A dream day in the life of a American Eskimo Dog
  An alert breed, it's likely the American Eskimo Dog will be awake before any other family members. Out the door to scour the yard for any intruders or to work the farm, this breed will be happy to trot around until he hears someone in the kitchen. After his daily walk, the Eskie will be happy to receive a bit of petting and praise. Playing around with the kids, he'll keep himself busy going in and out of the house. Lying at the foot of his master at the end of the day, the Eskie will keep his ears up all night for anything that doesn't sound right.

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Thursday, February 25, 2016

Everything about your Italian Greyhound

Everything about your Italian Greyhound
  The Italian Greyhound dog breed was a favorite companion of noblewomen in the Middle Ages, especially in Italy. But this small hound was more than a lap dog, having the speed, endurance, and determination to hunt small game. These days, he's a family dog whose beauty and athleticism is admired in the show ring and in obedience, agility, and rally competitions.

Overview
  One foot lifted from the ground, ears perked, eyes fixed on the horizon -- the Italian Greyhound neither knows nor cares that he's small enough to tuck under your arm. A Greyhound in miniature, he's nonetheless a somewhat fragile toy dog who needs to be protected from larger dogs, rough children, and his own impetuous nature.
  He's a smart dog, but somehow didn't get the memo that he's very, very tiny and his legs are very slender. Broken bones seem to be a fact of life with some Italian Greyhounds, and while some dogs' bones are sturdier than others, it's something every IG owner needs to be prepared for, and prevent if possible.
  The IG can live happily in an apartment, and while he needs to be given enough exercise to keep him tired out when he's young, he'll settle into a comfortable routine once the puppy years are behind him.
  Grooming couldn't be easier: an occasional soft brushing to keep shedding from becoming a problem, along with keeping the nails trimmed and the ears clean, and you're done. Regular teeth brushing is a good idea, too.
  Training is another story. While Iggys, as they’re nicknamed, are tractable and loving people-magnets, they're also stubborn and a bit defiant – and very creative at showing their displeasure. Unlike some very small dogs nipping and barking don't tend to be big problems, but housetraining can be. Use gentle, consistent training and establish acceptable routines from the very beginning, or you might find yourself with a problem.
  Although the Italian Greyhound is extremely small and needs to be protected from rambunctious children and dogs larger than he is, he usually gets along well with other dogs and with cats.

Highlights
  • Italian Greyhounds were bred to hunt and still have the hunting instinct. They'll chase anything that moves, including cars, so when you're outside keep them on leash or in a fenced area.
  • This breed is sensitive to drugs such as anesthetics of the barbiturate class and organophosphate insecticides. Make sure your veterinarian is aware of these sensitivities, and avoid using organophosphate products to treat your home and yard for fleas.
  • Italian Greyhound puppies are fearless and believe they can fly. Broken bones are common in pups between four and 12 months old, particularly the radius and ulna.
  • Although they're clever, Italian Greyhounds have a short attention span and a "what's in it for me?" attitude toward training. Keep training sessions short and positive, using play, treats, and praise to motivate your Italian Greyhound to learn.
  • This breed can be extremely difficult to housetrain. Even if you follow a housetraining program religiously, your Italian Greyhound may never be totally trustworthy in the house. It helps to have a dog door, so your dog can come and go as he wishes. And if your dog gives you the signs that he needs to go outside, take him out that instant — they're not good at holding it.
  • Italian Greyhounds need lots of love and attention, and if they don't get it, they'll become shy or hyper.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The IG is a true hound and enjoys outdoor activity as well as the luxuries of home.
  • The Italian Greyhound can be difficult to housetrain, which means he is not always a perfect candidate for apartment living unless you can stay on top of his need to go out or teach him to use a litter box or papers.
  • The Italian Greyhound has fine, short coat that is simple to groom and comes in most colors and patterns. The coat sheds very little.
  • The IG is highly athletic and is capable of jumping onto tables and countertops.
  • Italian Greyhounds enjoy dog sports such as lure coursing, agility, rally and even weight pulling.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion Dog
Average lifespan: 12 - 15 years
Average size:  6 - 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, smooth, fine
Coloration: Varies
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Other identifiers: Slender, delicate bone structure; elegant and graceful demeanor
Possible alterations: None
Comparable Breeds: Greyhound, Whippet

History
  The name of the breed is a reference to the breed's popularity in Renaissance Italy. Mummified dogs very similar to the Italian Greyhound  have been found in Egypt, and pictorials of small Greyhounds have been found in Pompeii, and they were probably the only accepted companion-dog there. Dogs similar to Italian Greyhounds are recorded as having been seen around Emperor Nero's court in Rome in the first century AD.
  The breed is believed to have originated more than 2,000 years ago in the countries now known as Greece and Turkey. This belief is based on the depiction of miniature greyhounds in the early decorative arts of these countries and on the archaeological discovery of small greyhound skeletons. By the Middle Ages, the breed had become distributed throughout Southern Europe and was later a favorite of the Italians of the sixteenth century, among whom miniature dogs were in great demand. Sadly, though, 'designer' breeders tried, and failed, to make the breed even smaller by crossbreeding it with other breeds of dogs. This only led to mutations with deformed skulls, bulging eyes and dental problems. The original Italian Greyhound had almost disappeared when groups of breeders got together and managed to return the breed to normal. From this period onward the history of the breed can be fairly well traced as it spread through Europe, arriving in England in the seventeenth century.
  The grace of the breed has prompted several artists to include the dogs in paintings, among others Velázquez, Pisanello, and Giotto.
  The breed has been popular with royalty. Among the royal aficionados are Mary, Queen of Scots, Queen Anne, Queen Victoria, Catherine the Great, Frederick the Great and Maud, Queen of Norway.
  The breed is also represented in the film Good Boy!. Nelly is an Italian Greyhound played by "Motif" and "Imp".

Personality
  The Italian Greyhound is sensitive, alert, smart, and playful. He's affectionate with his family, and loves to snuggle with you and stick close to your side all day. Strangers may see a more shy, reserved side of his personality.

Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your IG puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.
  When treated harshly, the Italian Greyhound can become fearful or snappy. Like other hounds, he can have a "what's in it for me?" attitude toward training, so you'll do best with motivational methods that use play, treats, and praise to encourage the dog to get it right, rather than punishing him for getting it wrong.

Health
  The Italian Greyhound, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 15 years, is prone to minor health conditions such as patellar luxation, leg and tail fractures, epilepsy, and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), or major ones like periodontal disease. This breed is sensitive to barbiturate anesthesia and susceptible to portacaval shunt, Legg-Perthes, color dilution alopecia, cataract, and hypothyroidism on occasion. Regular knee and eye tests are advised for this breed of dog.

Exercise
  Italian Greyhounds are active little dogs who need a good, daily walk. In addition, they love to run free and play. Be sure to make them heel on the lead. Dogs not only have an instinct to migrate daily, but to have a leader leading the way. Humans should enter and exit all door and gateways before the dog. In order for your dog to fully respect your authority you need to be their leader rather than the other way around.

Care
  Even though the Italian Greyhound hates the cold and is not suited to outdoor living, it likes daily romps outdoors. Its exercise needs are perfectly met with a nice on-leash walk or a fun-filled indoor game. It likes a sprint and stretching out in an enclosed area. It is very important to brush this dog’s teeth regularly. Minimal coat care is required for the fine, short coat, comprising primarily of occasional brushing to get rid of dead hair.

Living Conditions
 The Italian Greyhound is good for apartment life. They are fairly active indoors and will do okay without a yard. They are sensitive to cold weather. Owners will often put a shirt on them.

Training
  This breed learns quickly. It may wish to have its own way and occasionally will be naughty, so consistency is necessary.

Grooming
  An Italian Greyhound has a short, smooth, fine coat that gleams when it has been cared for. Luckily, that is an easy task. The IG is one of the easiest breeds to groom. Brush him when he gets dusty, or once a week, whichever comes first. Bathe him when you are taking him to a dog show or on a therapy visit or whenever he has rolled in something stinky. He sheds very little.
  The rest is just basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every week or two, and brush his teeth with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Children And Other Pets
  Italian Greyhounds can do well with children, but because they're small and delicate, it's especially important to teach kids that the dog is living animal, not a toy, who must be treated with love and respect. Many breeders will not sell a puppy to a household with children younger than ten years old.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Italian Greyhounds usually get along well with other pets, although you may need to keep an eye on them when they're cavorting about with bigger dogs, who could accidentally hurt them while playing.

Is this breed right for you?
  Due to their small body structure and fragile bone density, it's best to keep this breed away from young children. Also, Italian Greyhounds only thrive with mounds of attention and therefore do better in a quiet environment where one-on-one time is spent cuddling and napping. Not a fan of cold weather, this breed must be provided with ample winter coats and booties if you live in a cold environment. This breed can be skittish and aloof; owners are encouraged to begin socialization and training early on.

Did You Know?
  One of the true companion breeds - dogs bred for the sole purpose of being your best friend - the Italian Greyhound excels at his work. His dark eyes, sleek lines and affectionate nature will earn him a favored place in your lap.

A dream day in the life of an Italian Greyhound
  Whether out in the country or in the city, this breed loves to be alongside a loving human counterpart. They're incredibly fast runners and a day that includes light exercise would suit this breed's activity needs. On a cold day, an Italian Greyhound would prefer a warm coat and booties to stay comfortable but would rather be indoors, quietly enjoying a nap on a loving owner's lap.


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