September 2014 - LUV My dogs

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Monday, September 8, 2014

Everything about your Lowchen

Everything about your Lowchen
  The Lowchen’s German name means “little lion.” He is a cute, charismatic little dog who loves to clown around and be the center of attention. When he encounters other dogs he sometimes thinks he’s as big as a lion and must be prevented from taking them on. His long, dense coat is soft and comes in any color or combination.
  The Lowchen is a toy dog breed that was developed as a companion dog and still finds itself in this role today. Active and smart, they do very well in dog competitions such as obedience and agility, and surpass the expectations that many have for a family companion.

Overview
  With a name that translates to "lion dog," you might expect the Lowchen to have a fierce demeanor, but with people he's lionlike only in his looks. Playful and gentle, the Lowchen is a great companion for children and adults alike.
  He is surprisingly robust and loves to roughhouse with his people. The Lowchen generally gets along well with everyone, but he can be shy of strangers. With proper socialization, this trait can be overcome, however. Generally, Lowchen will fit into any household whether there are dogs before they arrive or not. They also get along well with other pets.
  The Lowchen is affectionate and loving. They thrive when they are with their people and can fit wherever that person is living, be it an apartment or a large estate. They should not be left outside or in a kennel, and doing so will not only lead to ill health for the dog but also to many temperamental problems. 
  Lowchens are not known for their high activity levels, but they enjoy their role as watch dog and will bark an alert whenever they see something they think merits a response. Some can also be partial to digging, and this habit can be difficult to break.
   The name "lion dog" comes from the traditional Lowchen clip, with close-cut hindquarters and a full, natural mane, but the nickname applies to the little dog's big personality as well. Lowchen have the "small dog...big personality" down pat, and that can be a joy and a frustration.
  They are lively and energetic, sweet and affectionate, and they will challenge any dog or rule if they decide to. They will take over the homes and lives of the people they love, and with their fierce determination and wonderful even temperament they will take over their owners' hearts as well.

Highlights
  • The Lowchen was not developed to be an outdoor or kennel dog. They are companion dogs and are happiest when they are in the company of the people they love.
  • Barking is a much-enjoyed pastime for the Lowchen. They make excellent watchdogs with their alarm barking but they may become a nuisance to neighbors.
  • Lowchen make wonderful apartment residents as long as their exercise requirements are met. Expect to spend at least 20 minutes per day exercising him. He makes an excellent walking companion and will go for long walks with his people.
  • Although the Lowchen doesn't shed much, he still requires regular brushing and grooming to prevent tangles and mats and keep him in good health.
  • Although not all Lowchen exhibit this trait, many enjoy digging and the habit may be difficult to discourage.
  • Lowchen can be shy of new people, and it is important to socialize them at a young age to discourage any fearfulness or timid behaviors.
  • Lowchens are companion dogs and may suffer from separation anxiety whenever their companions leave for the day. They are not the best breed for people who work long hours.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Except to achieve the distinctive “lion” look, the Lowchen’s coat should not be trimmed. It comes in all colors and combinations of colors.
  • The Lowchen can vary in size. European dogs may stand only 10 to 13 inches, while American dogs can range from 12 to 14 inches.
  • The lion cut probably originated as a sanitary measure, but a more romantic story is that court ladies would warm their feet on the dogs’ warm, exposed skin.

Breed standards
  • AKC group: Non-sporting
  • UKC group: Companion
  • Average lifespan: 12 - 14 years
  • Average size: 9 - 17 pounds
  • Coat appearance: Wavy and long
  • Coloration: Black, white, lemon and speckled
  • Hypoallergenic: Yes
  • Other identifiers: Small and compact body with proud head held high; short skull and muzzle with dark, round eyes; high tail and feathered ears
  • Possible alterations: Clipped into a lion trim
  • Comparable Breeds: Bichon Frise, Havanese
History
  The Lowchen’s name comes from German words meaning “little lion.” Paintings and woodcuts give evidence that dogs resembling the Lowchen have existed since the 15th century. A painting by Jan van Eyck, The Birth of the Baptist, which dates to 1422, depicts one of the curious-looking little dogs and is perhaps the earliest visual proof of the breed’s age. The expressive woodcuts by German artist Albrecht Durer also provide Lowchen lovers with a glimpse of their breed’s past.
  During the Renaissance, a period rife with symbolism, the little lion dogs represented courage. Knights who were killed in battle were buried with the statue of a lion at their feet, but if they died of natural causes, the statue of a lion dog was substituted. The little lion dogs were also popular with court ladies, who kept them as lap dogs, flea catchers, and foot warmers.
  As the centuries passed, the Lowchen’s popularity waned. By World War II, the breed was   considered rare and came close to disappearing. A Belgian woman, Madame Bennert, managed to revive the breed with just two females and one male. She worked closely with German breeders to increase the Lowchen’s numbers and maintain its quality. English breeders began importing the dogs in 1968, and three Lowchen were imported by an American couple in 1971.
  The first Lowchen to achieve pop culture stardom was an untrimmed dog who starred as Freeway, the popular canine co-star of the 1980s television series Hart to Hart. The breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1999. Lowchen currently rank 147th among the breeds registered by the AKC, down from 131st a decade ago.


Personality
  The Lowchen is the personification of an even-tempered breed. He is lively and active, affectionate and gentle. He is an intelligent dog who learns quickly and easily. Lowchen are fearless watchdogs and will often alert bark if they see something or someone suspicious. They don't seem to mind that they are small and will challenge larger dogs if they feel the need.
  They take control of their home, and their people may feel as if they've become a beloved possession of their sweet little dog. There is no doubt that the Lowchen is a wonderful breed with a cheerful disposition who has many people opening their hearts and homes to not just one but to many Lowchen companions.
  The Lowchen is a wonderful breed to train. They are intelligent and take to training very quickly. Like many toy breeds, they can have issues with housetraining, but this can be overcome with patience and consistency. Socialization is a must for this breed, which can be shy around people. Lowchen that are not properly socialized can become fearful or timid. They generally get along well with other pets, but socialization with other dogs is important for all breeds.

Health
  The Löwchen, which has an average lifespan of 13 to 15 years, may suffer from minor health problems like patellar luxation or be prone to serious heart conditions. To identify some of these issues early, a veterinarian may recommend knee and cardiac exams for dogs of this breed.

Care
  Although the Löwchen is not meant for living outdoors, it loves access to a yard during the day. Short daily walks or a vigorous game is sufficient to satisfy the exercise needs of the Löwchen, but it is especially fond of mental challenges.
  Its dense coat requires combing or brushing on alternate days. Clipping, meanwhile, should be done once or twice a month, in order to preserve the lion trim, the preferred choice among pet owners.

Living Conditions
  The Löwchen is good for apartment life. It is very active indoors and will do okay without a yard.

Exercise
  The Löwchen needs a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of its exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe, open area off lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.

Grooming
  The Lowchen hallmark is the lion trim he wears: basically a mane of hair extending to the last rib, poufs of hair forming “cuffs” around the ankles, a bare rear end, and a bare tail with a plume of hair left at the tip.
  The hair on the Lowchen is long, dense, and soft to the touch. Expect to spend 10 minutes a night removing tangles and mats from his single coat, and give him a more thorough brushing at least weekly. Take him to a professional groomer for his lion trim every two months. If the lion trim doesn’t appeal to you, keep him in a cute and simple puppy cut.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every week or two. Small dogs are prone to periodontal disease, so brush his teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for overall good health and fresh.

Is this breed right for you?
  An active breed that requires daily activity, the Lowchen is kind to children, family members and other furry friends. A cheerful breed, the Lowchen is very easy to train and is devoted to his family and home. A good watchdog, he does bark a lot. Although small, he believes himself to be quite the mighty pup. Without proper leadership or activity, the Lowchen will misbehave. Requiring some grooming, he's easy to maintain with daily walks and socializing.

Children and other pets
  Lowchen make excellent dogs for families with either children or other pets. They generally do well with children and enjoy playing with them. They are surprisingly robust and exceedingly gentle.
   Lowchen are also very sociable and will do well in homes with other pets and dogs. Unaware of their small size, they often have a desire to challenge larger dogs that they meet in public, so it's important to protect them from themselves.

Did You Know?
  Very popular in parts of Europe in the 1500s, the Lowchen was nearly extinct by World War II. A Belgian woman managed to revive the breed with just two females and one male.

A dream day in the life of a Lowchen
  A happy guy, the Lowchen may be your own private alarm clock. Waking you up with a bark, he's ready for breakfast and his daily walk. After sniffing out the neighborhood, this spirited breed will return home ready to socialize with his family. Playing with the kids and romping with the other animals, he'll be sure to keep watch on your home from morning to night. Barking at even the mailman, all of the neighbors are sure to know where the Lowchen lives. Going to sleep at the foot of his owner, he'll be as happy as a lamb to have spent the perfect day with those he loves the most.
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Everything about your Boston terrier

Everything about your Boston terrier
  The Boston Terrier wears a tuxedo coat and a stylin’ attitude. He is friendly, portable and enthusiastic in everything he does. He gets along well with kids, other pets and pretty much everyone he meets. All in all, he’s a fantastic little companion dog.
  Boston Terriers have been popular since their creation a little more than a century ago. They were originally bred to be fighting dogs, but today, they're gentle, affectionate companions with tuxedo-like markings that earned them the nickname "American Gentleman."

Overview
  The Boston Terrier may have been bred to be a ferocious pit-fighter, but you'd never know it today. The little American Gentleman, as he was called in the 19th century, is definitely a lover, not a fighter, although males have been known to show their terrier ancestry with a bit of posturing when they feel their territory is being invaded by another dog.
  Boston Terriers are known for being very intelligent — sometimes too much so. Their lively, affectionate nature makes them extremely loveable, though their sometimes stubborn nature or spurts of hyperactivity can land them in hot water with their owners. Any angst about their behavior, however, soon melts when they look up at you with those huge, round eyes that seem to say "I love you."
  Although Boston Terriers are small, they're sturdy and muscular. They have a sleek, shiny, straight coat with crisp white markings in a pattern that resembles a tuxedo — part of the reason they gained the name American Gentleman. Boston Terriers' distinctive ears naturally stand erect and are quite large. And then there's those big, beautiful eyes that are set quite apart to add to their outstanding good looks.
  Boston Terriers have a broad, flat-nosed face without wrinkles. They belong to a class of dogs called brachycephalic . Like other brachycephalic dogs, the lower jaw is in proportion to the body, but they have a short upper jaw to give them a "pushed in" face.
  Boston Terriers' carriage give them a presence that goes beyond their size. They have a slightly arched, proud neckline, a broad chest, and a sturdy, boxy appearance. Their tail is naturally short  and set low on the rump.
  The Boston Terrier's small size and lively, affectionate nature make him a great family pet and companion. They love children and amuse people of all ages with their antics and unique, appealing expression. They are especially good companions for older people and apartment dwellers. Although gentle and even-tempered, they can have the spunky attitude of their terrier ancestors.

Highlights
  • Short-nosed dogs like Boston Terriers can't cool the air going into their lungs as efficiently as longer-nosed breeds, and they're much more susceptible to heat stress. Because of their short coat, they can't stand extremely cold weather either. Even in temperate climates, the Boston Terrier should be kept indoors.
  • Because Boston Terriers can have respiratory problems, avoid pulling on your dog's collar to get him to go what you want.
  • Your Boston Terrier is prone to corneal ulcers because his eyes are so large and prominent. Be careful about his eyes when you're playing or taking him for a walk.
  • Depending in part upon their diets, Boston Terriers can be prone to flatulence. If you can't tolerate a gassy dog, a Boston Terrier may not be for you.
  • Because of their short noses, Boston Terriers often snort, drool, and snore .
  • With their large heads and small pelvises, whelping isn't easy for Boston Terrier mothers. If you have thoughts about breeding, be sure you realize that in addition to the potential whelping problems that often require a caesarean section, Boston Terrier litters typically are not large. You may have to wait for several months to get a good quality Boston Terrier puppy from a qualified breeder.
  • While Boston Terriers typically are quiet, gentle dogs, not prone to yappiness or aggression, males can be scrappy around other dogs that they feel are invading their territory.
  • Boston Terriers can be gluttonous about their food, so monitor their condition and make sure they don't become overweight.
  • They can be stubborn, so persistence and consistency are definite pluses in training methods. They are sensitive to your tone of voice, and punishment can make them shut down, so training should be low-key and motivational. Crate-training is recommended while housetraining your Boston Terrier.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Boston Terrier is at home in any situation and never meets a stranger; everyone is a potential new friend.
  • The Boston Terrier is dapper in his black and white tuxedo, but he can also come in brindle or seal with white markings. His short coat is simple to groom and sheds little.
  • Boston Terriers get along well with children as well as other pets.
  • The Boston Terrier takes his name from Boston, Mass, where he was developed.
  • The Boston’s weight ranges from 10 to 25 pounds, with most weighing between 13 and 16 pounds, making them easily portable.
  • Bostons excel in dog sports, including agility, flyball, obedience and rally. They also make great therapy dogs.

Breed standards
  • AKC group: Non-sporting
  • UKC group: Companion Dog
  • Average lifespan: 11 - 15 years
  • Average size: 10 - 25 pounds
  • Coat appearance: Short, smooth, fine
  • Coloration: Brindle, black, seal; all colors have white markings
  • Hypoallergenic: No
  • Other identifiers: Square and sturdy body structure, tuxedo-like coat
  • Possible alterations: None
  • Comparable Breeds: Boxer, Pug
History
  The Boston Terrier breed originated around 1870, when Robert C. Hooper of Boston, purchased a dog Judge from Edward Burnett known later as Hooper's Judge, who was of a Bull and Terrier type lineage. Hooper's Judge is either directly related to the original Bull and Terrier breeds of the 18th and early 19th centuries, or Judge is the result of modern English Bulldogs being crossed into terriers created in the 1860s for show purposes, like the White English Terrier. The American Kennel Club cites Hooper's Judge as the ancestor of almost all true modern Boston Terriers.
  Judge weighed over 27.5 pounds . The offspring interbred with one or more French Bulldogs, providing the foundation for the Boston Terrier. Bred down in size from fighting dogs of the Bull and Terrier types, the Boston Terrier originally weighed up to 44 pounds.    The breed was first shown in Boston in 1870. By 1889 the breed had become sufficiently popular in Boston that fanciers formed the American Bull Terrier Club, the breed's nickname, "roundheads". Shortly after, at the suggestion of James Watson , the club changed its name to the Boston Terrier Club and in 1893 it was admitted to membership in the American Kennel Club, thus making it the first US breed to be recognized. It is one of a small number of breeds to have originated in the United States. The Boston Terrier was the first non-sporting dog bred in the US.
  In the early years, the color and markings were not very important, by the 20th century the breed's distinctive markings and color were written into the standard, becoming an essential feature. Terrier only in name, the Boston Terrier has lost most of its ruthless desire for mayhem, preferring the company of humans, although some males will still challenge other dogs if they feel their territory is being invaded. Boston University's mascot is Rhett the Boston Terrier. The Boston Terrier is also the mascot of Wofford College in Spartanburg, S.C.



Personality
  Known as the American Gentleman, the Boston Terrier is lively, smart, and affectionate with a gentle, even temperament. They can, however, be stubborn, so persistence and consistency are definite musts when training.
  Like every dog, the Boston Terrier needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Boston puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  This Boston Terrier has an averafe lifespan of 10 to 14 years and is prone to minor ailments like stenotic nares, allergies, elongated soft palate, and patellar luxation. Deafness, demodicosis, seizures, corneal abrasions, and cataract may occasionally affect this breed. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip, knee, and eye exams on the dog.
  The Boston Terrier cannot tolerate anesthesia or heat. Additionally, Boston Terrier pups are often delivered by cesarean section.

Care
  The Boston Terrier is a lively dog, but he doesn't have excessive exercise requirements. He's relatively inactive indoors and well suited for apartment dwellers or those who don't have a yard. He enjoys taking a walk with you and playing in a yard, but is definitely an indoor dog and should never be housed outside. Always keep in mind that Boston Terriers can't handle the heat or cold very well.
  Bostons are sensitive to your tone of voice, and punishment can make them shut down, so training should be low-key and motivational. Use positive techniques such as food rewards, praise, and play.

Living Conditions
  Boston Terriers are good for apartment as well as country living. They are relatively inactive indoors and do okay without a yard. This breed is sensitive to weather extremes.

Exercise
  A long daily walk and sessions of free play in a fenced-in yard are all the Boston Terrier needs to stay in shape. They are fairly lightweight and can easily be carried.

Grooming
  The Boston Terrier has a short, smooth coat that is easy to groom and doesn’t shed heavily. Brush him weekly with a rubber hound mitt to remove dead hair and keep the skin healthy.
  The debonair Boston doesn’t have a doggie odor and he shouldn’t need a bath more often than every few months. The rest is basic care. Trim the toenails every few weeks. Long nails can get caught on things and tear off. That’s really painful, and it will bleed a lot. Brush the teeth frequently for good dental health.

Is this breed right for you?
  Boston Terriers make excellent companions for all types of families and individuals. They have great temperaments and easily adjust to many lifestyles. Bostons tend to get along well with other pets and truly love being around others, both canine and human. Though environments associated with extreme heat are not recommended for this short-snouted breed, a close eye on outdoor activity is enough to keep them safe and healthy. If you're looking for a low-maintenance pet, it doesn't get any better than the Boston Terrier; their short coats allow for quick grooming sessions. The shortened snout makes them prone to breathing difficulties resulting in shortness of breath, snoring, snorting and farting. Yes, we said farting. If you prefer to call it "breaking wind" you'd better start looking for a more distinguished breed.

Children and other pets
  The Boston Terrier loves children and makes a good playmate for them. He's small enough that he won't knock them down but large enough that he's not easily injured. In general, he gets along well with other dogs and cats, especially if he's socialized to them at an early age.

Did You Know?
  Boston Terriers were bred in Boston, Mass., and all descend from a dog name Judge. They were first known as Round Heads, Bullet Heads or Bull Terriers, but in 1889 they officially took the name Boston Terrier.

A dream day in the life of a Boston Terrier
  This easygoing breed is happy doing just about anything you're doing. They're prone to heat exhaustion, so you may choose to keep the Boston Terrier mostly indoors during hot summer months but other than that, this loving pup is the perfect size for toting along to any pet-friendly location. Easy to train and a lover by heart, you can bet this breed will love a day of socializing with humans and canines anytime.

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Everything about your German Shepherd

Everything about your German Shepherd
  The German Shepherd Dog is a natural protector and so adaptable and intelligent that he has performed just about every job known to dog. If he had opposable thumbs, he would be unstoppable.
  The German Shepherd Dog is one of America's most popular dog breeds — for good reason. He's an intelligent and capable working dog. His devotion and courage are unmatched. And he's amazingly versatile, excelling at most anything he's trained to do: guide and assistance work for the handicapped, police and military service, herding, search and rescue, drug detection, competitive obedience and, last but not least, faithful companion.

Overview
  Rin Tin Tin, a pup found in a World War I battle zone, became the world’s first canine movie star, forever marking the German Shepherd Dog as one of the most easily recognized breeds. From his imposing size to his erect ears and dark, intelligent eyes, he has achieved legendary status as the ideal canine. A versatile, athletic and fearless working dog, the Shepherd has done just about every job a dog can do, from leading the blind and detecting illicit drugs to bringing down fleeing criminals and serving in the armed forces. An energetic, loyal and devoted companion, the German Shepherd isn’t a breed but a lifestyle.
  The abilities of this breed go far beyond its origin as a herding dog. The German Shepherd has made a name for himself as a police and military dog, guide and assistance dog, search and rescue dog, and detector dog. He has excelled in every canine sport, including agility, obedience, rally, tracking and, of course, herding. German Shepherds still work livestock on farms and ranches around the world, including the United States. If you have horses, they will trot alongside you while you ride and help you put the horses back in the barn when you’re done.
  It takes some dedication to live with a German Shepherd.  Be prepared to provide plenty of exercise and mental stimulation. A half-hour walk twice a day, plus a vigorous play or training session, is a good start.
  The protective but loving German Shepherd is a great choice for families with children, but singles and couples who love the outdoors also match up well with this breed. With sufficient exercise and opportunities to use their considerable athleticism and brains, these versatile companions can handle anything from a small city apartment to a vast ranch.   They're not suited for life in the backyard or a doghouse, but need to live indoors as a member of the family.

Highlights
  • German Shepherds isn't the breed for you if you're away from home frequently or for long periods of time. When left alone they can become anxious or bored, and are likely to express their worry in ways you don't like — barking, chewing, and digging.
  • The German Shepherd is an active and intelligent dog. He must be kept busy learning, playing, and working. Daily exercise, both physical and mental, is a must.
  • German Shepherds can be aloof and suspicious of strangers. To raise a social and well-behaved dog, expose your German Shepherd puppy to many experiences, places, and people. Obedience training, beginning with puppy classes, is important for getting him used to other people and dogs, as well as teaching him basic canine manners.
  • These dogs shed, shed, shed — in fact, their nickname is the "German shedder." Brush him several times a week and buy a good vacuum. You'll need it.
  • Crate training is not only a wonderful way to housetrain a puppy, it helps teach him to be calm and happy when separated from his owner. This is especially important for the German Shepherd, who sometimes suffers separation anxiety, or extreme anxiety when left alone.
  • He's got a reputation for being a great watchdog — and he is — but the German Shepherd should never be chained or tethered just to stand guard. No dog should; it leads to frustration and aggression. The German Shepherd is happiest living indoors with the family, but with access to a large, fenced yard, where he can burn off some of his natural energy.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The German Shepherd is highly intelligent and will not be content to live life as a couch potato. He’s a dog of action, and he needs to live with an active person who will give him a job worthy of his talents.
  • German Shepherds love children and make great family dogs when they are given early socialization and training.
  • Most of us think of the German Shepherd as a black and tan dog, but they can also be sable and solid black. Dogs with white, blue or liver-colored coats are frowned upon by breeders, so don’t fall for marketing claims that those colors are “rare” and command a higher price.
  • A German Shepherd should never be shy, nervous or aggressive.
  • Comparable Breeds: Doberman Pinscher, Rottweiler


History
   As his name suggests, the German Shepherd originated in Germany, where he was created in the nineteenth century primarily by Captain Max von Stephanitz, who wanted to develop a dog that could be used for military and police work. The result was a dog that encompassed striking good looks, intelligence and versatility.
  The adaptable and attractive dogs soon drew the attention of dog lovers in other countries. While Rin Tin Tin is the most famous of the early German Shepherds, he was not the first to come to the United States. One is known to have been brought to the U.S. in 1906, and the American Kennel Club registered a German Shepherd in 1912. The following year, people interested in the breed formed the German Shepherd Dog Club of America.
World War I put a dent in the breed’s burgeoning popularity because the dogs were associated with the enemy. German Shepherds braved artillery fire, land mines and tanks to supply German soldiers in the trenches with deliveries of food and other necessities.
  After the war, movies featuring Rin Tin Tin and fellow German Shepherd Strongheart brought the breed back into favor. American audiences loved them. For a time, the German Shepherd was the most popular breed in the United States.
  One of the best known modern German Shepherds was the first and so far only member of the breed to win Best in Show at Westminster Kennel Club, in 1987. His name was Ch. Covy Tucker Hill’s Manhattan, ROM, nicknamed Hatter. Hatter drew crowds wherever he went and loved meeting his fans, especially children.
  These days, the breed’s star is rising again. Current AKC rankings place him second only to the Labrador Retriever.

Personality
  The German Shepherd personality is aloof but not usually aggressive. He's a reserved dog; he doesn't make friends immediately, but once he does, he's extremely loyal. With his family he's easy-going and approachable, but when threatened he can be strong and protective, making him an excellent watchdog.
  This highly intelligent and trainable breed thrives on having a job to do — any job. The German Shepherd can be trained to do almost anything, from alerting a deaf person to a doorbell ring to sniffing out an avalanche victim.
  One thing he's not good at is being alone for long periods of time. Without the companionship he needs — as well as exercise and the chance to put his intelligence to work — he becomes bored and frustrated. A German Shepherd who's under-exercised and ignored by his family is likely to express his pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as barking and chewing.
  Like every dog, the German Shepherd needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your German Shepherd puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  The German Shepherd has an average lifespan of between 10 to 12 years. It is, however, susceptible to some serious health conditions like elbow dysplasia and canine hip dysplasia (CHD), as well as minor problems like cardiomyopathy, hemangiosarcoma, panosteitis, von Willebrand's Disease (vWD), degenerative myelopathy, cauda equina, malignant neoplasms, pannus, hot spots, skin allergies, gastric torsion, cataract, and perianal fistulas. This breed is also prone to a fatal fungal infection due to the Aspergillus mold. Because of these susceptibilities German Shepherds, like most other dogs, need to be seen by a veterinarian for routine checkups. There they will undergo hip, elbow blood, eye and other tests.

Care
  The German Shepherd can live outdoors in cool or temperate climates, but enjoys living indoors too. Frequent training or exercise sessions are essential for keeping its mind and body active, and because the German Shepherd sheds throughout the year, its coat should be brushed once or twice a week to encourage turnover as well as to minimize buildup in the home.

Living Conditions
  The German Shepherd will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with at least a large yard.

Exercise
  German Shepherd Dogs love strenuous activity, preferably combined with training of some kind, for these dogs are very intelligent and crave a good challenge. They need to be taken on a daily, brisk, long walk, jog or run alongside you when you bicycle. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Most shepherds love to play ball or Frisbee. Ten to fifteen minutes of fetching along with daily pack walks will tire your dog out quite nicely as well as give him a sense of purpose. Whether it is ball chasing, Frisbee catching, obedience training, participation in a canine playgroup or just taking long walks/jogs, you must be willing to provide some form of daily, constructive exercise. The daily exercise must always include daily walks/jogs to satisfy the dog’s migration instinct. If under-exercised and/or mentally challenged, this breed can become restless and destructive. Does best with a job to do.

Grooming
  The German Shepherd Dog has a thick, medium-length double coat that sheds, a lot and constantly, so much that even his fans call him a “German shedder.” The undercoat sheds heavily in spring and fall, and the German Shepherd must be brushed and bathed frequently during that time to get out all the loose hair. The rest of the year, weekly brushing is generally enough to keep him clean. If the German Shepherd is your breed of choice, purchase a heavy-duty vacuum cleaner; don’t get a German Shepherd if you have allergies or are a fussy housekeeper.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails every few weeks, as needed, and brush his teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Any household and any lifestyle are ideal for this versatile breed. Excellent family members and wonderful with children, German Shepherds make great companions and watchdogs with proper training. They can adapt to apartment living with proper daily exercise and can adjust to a variety of climates. Although they make excellent family pets, they take loyalty to their masters extremely seriously. With a long muzzle that can exert up to 238 pounds of pressure, this breed has the capability to cause serious damage. Early training and adaptation is necessary for responsible ownership. If you suffer from allergies or are bothered by dog hair, think twice before getting this breed.


Children and other pets
If he's well trained and has had plenty of exposure to kids, especially as a puppy, a German Shepherd is a great companion for children. In fact, some say he's a cross between a babysitter and a cop, both gentle with, and protective of, the children in his family.
This is a big dog, though, capable of mistakenly bumping a toddler or small child. True to his reserved nature, he's not tail-wagging friendly with kids he doesn't know, but he's generally trustworthy.
  The German Shepherd can also live peacefully with other dogs and pets, as long as he was taught to do so from puppyhood. Introducing an adult German Shepherd to a household with other pets can be more difficult if the dog isn't used to getting along with other dogs or cats. You may need to hire a professional trainer to help, or get advice from the rescue organization if that's where you acquired the adult German Shepherd.

In popular culture
  German Shepherds have been featured in a wide range of media. In 1921 Strongheart became one of the earliest canine film stars, and was followed in 1922 by Rin Tin Tin, who is considered the most famous German Shepherd. Both have stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. German Shepherds were used in the popular Canadian series The Littlest Hobo. Batman's dog Ace the Bat-Hound appeared in the Batman comic books, initially in 1955, through 1964. Between 1964 and 2007, his appearances were sporadic. A German Shepherd called Inspector Rex, is the star of Austrian Police procedural drama program, which won many awards, where German Shepherd Rex assists the Vienna Kriminalpolizei homicide unit. The show was aired in many languages.

Did You Know?
  President Herbert Hoover owned a German Shepherd named King Tut, who was perhaps the first dog to play a successful role in a presidential campaign, helping Hoover to appear kind and approachable.

A dream day in the life of a German Shepherd
  Tall, svelte and athletic with a nose for sniffing out trouble, German Shepherds are most often recognized for their work on the police force. German Shepherds are a product of very careful breeding solely intended for the creation of an ideal service dog. A solid combination of brains and brawn made this breed brave enough to be four-legged soldiers of war while their natural charm made them big-screen approved as seen in the likes of tail-wagging greats, including Rin Tin Tin and Strongheart. Loyal to the core, this breed can be protective and territorial.
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Everything about your Pharaoh Hound

Everything about your Pharaoh Hound
  The Pharaoh Hound is one of the oldest known breeds of domestic dog and is the National Dog of Malta. A medium-sized dog with hard, clean-cut lines, and noble bearing, it is considered a fast hunting dog.
  The Pharaoh Hound is an ancient dog breed who has changed little since his development more than 5,000 years ago. He was the dog of kings and may have hunted gazelles with pharaohs, hence his name. This loyal hunting companion. 

Overview
  The Pharaoh Hound has a remarkable personality characterized by an immense joy of life. Intelligent and affectionate, he takes life as it comes and enjoys clowning for his people.
  As with any hound, he has moments of aloofness and can be strong-willed. But in the main he's a gentle dog who gets along well with others, including children and other dogs. He loves human companionship and will seek out affection and attention from his people while still maintaining his independence.
  One of his most endearing traits is his ability to blush. You may spot a deep rose color on his nose and ears when he's excited, happy, or enjoying some affection. Many owners will train their Pharaoh Hounds to smile. Since this fun-loving breed enjoys smiling so much, it isn't a hard trick to teach.
  While he's too friendly to serve as a guard dog, the Pharaoh Hound will bark to alert you to anyone or anything that seems suspicious. Unfortunately, a lot of things look suspicious to a Pharaoh Hound. He'll also bark if he's left alone for too long or when he's bored, so it's best not to leave him alone for long periods.
  It's wise to keep this dog on leash whenever he's in an unfenced area. Even if he obeys your every command at home, his prey instinct is so strong he'll be off — and temporarily deaf to your commands — if he spots anything interesting.

Other Quick Facts
  • The Pharaoh Hound is the national dog of Malta. His job there was to hunt rabbits.
  • The Pharaoh Hound has a rich tan or chestnut coat with white markings. He has a long, lean, chiseled head, a flesh-colored nose and amber-colored eyes.
  • The Pharaoh Hound blushes a bright pink when he is happy or excited.
  • Pharaoh Hounds are food thieves and don’t mind if you know about it.
Highlights
  • Introduce your Hound to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences, preferably as a puppy. He can be sensitive to changes in schedules and stress, and an unsocialized dog has a harder time adapting to abrupt changes. A properly socialized is a polite and undemanding dog who is wonderful with strangers and other dogs.
  • Pharaoh Hounds can get cold very easily, but they can live in a chilly climate if they're kept indoors and wear a warm coat on wintertime walks.
  • Don't let your Pharaoh Hound run off-leash in an unfenced area. He's got a strong prey drive and will chase other animals for miles. Backyard fences should be too high to jump or climb, and preferably solid so he can't see through it. Underground electronic fencing won't stop a Pharaoh Hound with something interesting in his sights.
  • Pharaoh Hounds can do well in homes with other canines but smaller dogs may trigger their prey drive — as will small pets such as cats and rabbits — and some Pharaoh Hounds are aggressive toward dogs of the same gender.
  • Although sighthounds are not known as barkers, the Pharaoh Hound is an exception. They bark when chasing prey, when they see intruders or hear an unusual noise, or when bored. They can indulge in long bark-a-thons, usually when you're away from the house, which could cause problems if you live in a place with noise restrictions or neighbors that could be disturbed.
  • Pharaoh Hounds are low to average shedders depending on the time of the year and the individual dog. The thin coat leaves their skin vulnerable to scrapes, tears and nicks.
  • Coprophagia, better known as stool eating, is commonly seen in the Pharaoh Hound. The best way to avoid this habit is to scoop the poop right away.
  • Pharaoh Hounds require at least 30 minutes of exercise per day.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.

Breed standards
  • AKC group: Hound
  • UKC group: Scenthound & Sighthound
  • Average lifespan: 11-14 years
  • Average size: 40-60 pounds
  • Coat appearance: Short and glossy
  • Coloration: Red, tan, golden, chestnut
  • Hypoallergenic: No
  • Other identifiers: Athletic, slender, and sleek body type, strong and broad shoulders, ribs protrude out of body, high ears that stand straight, deep-set amber eyes, pinkish-tan nose, long and thin face, pointed muzzle, long and lean neck, long tail that is whip-like
  • Possible alterations: Blushes when excited.
  • Comparable Breeds: Ibizan Hound, Cirneco dell’Etna
History
  In 1647 Giovanni Francesco Abela, in his Della Descrittione di Malta isola nel Mare Siciliano: con le sue antichità, ed altre notizie, wrote "... we have the dogs called Cernechi, much valued for rabbit-hunting, which are often in demand as far away as France, mainly for  steep and stony mountain terrain". Authors such as Cecil Camilleri have taken this to refer to the Kelb tal-Fenek. The modern Cirneco is a Sicilian breed, very similar in structure and appearance, but somewhat smaller 43–51 cm (17–20 in) than the Kelb tal-Fenek.
  In Britain, the first two specimens of the breed were brought from Malta in the 1920s, but no litter was bred. Again, some dogs were imported to the UK in the early 1960s, and the first litter was born in 1963. The breed standard was recognised by The Kennel Club in 1974. The breed was called the Pharaoh Hound although this name was already used by the FCI as an alternative name for the Ibizan Hound at that time. When the FCI abolished this name in 1977 and decided to call the Ibizan Hound exclusively by its original Spanish name Podenco Ibicenco, the term Pharaoh Hound was transferred to the Kelb tal-Fenek, whose breed standard had been recognised by the FCI at the same time.
  There are a number of breeds similar to the Pharaoh Hound in the Mediterranean area, including the Cirneco in Sicily. Others include the Podenco Ibicenco, the Podenco Canario and the Podengo Português. Each breed is slightly different with physical characteristics that match the terrain the dogs hunt on. It is not clear whether those breeds have descended from the same ancestral lines, or whether their similarities have developed due to similar environmental conditions.


Personality
  Pharaoh Hounds love their own people and happily entertain them with their clownish antics. The flip side is that they can be aloof with new people.
  This is a dog who likes to have his own way. Still, he's smart and willing to please — most of the time — which generally makes training easy.
  The Pharaoh Hound can be a bit of a sensitive plant. He picks up on people's feelings and may find a high-drama home very stressful. It's always important to introduce a dog to lots of new people and situations as a puppy, but this is particularly true with a Pharaoh who can grow up to be timid.
  Enroll your Hound in a class. Help him polish his social skills, and invite visitors over regularly, and take him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors.

Health
  Pharaoh hounds, being somewhat uncommon outside of the Maltese Islands of Malta and Gozo, and because they are not profitable for commercial breeding, have not been subjected to as much irresponsible breeding as some more popular breeds.
  Breeders try hard to prevent hereditary diseases from entering the gene pool and according to the American breed club, Pharaohs are virtually free from genetic diseases.Reputable breeders continue to test their breeding stock for genetic conditions such as hip dysplasia, luxating patellas, and myriad eye conditions just to ensure that these disorders do not become a problem. Reputable breeders should be able to show documentation of health screening performed on their breeding dogs. Note that Pharaohs, like most sighthounds, are sensitive to barbiturate anaesthetics. Their ears are thin and prone to frostbite when in cold climates.

Care
  The dog’s coat does not demand much grooming; the occasional brushing is sufficient for removing dead hair. The Pharaoh Hound is capable of sleeping outdoors if given warm shelter and soft bedding, but it prefers to remain indoors with its master and family.   Moreover, a daily leash-led walk or occasional run is recommended, but it will be content as long as it has sufficient room around the home to stretch out in.

Living Conditions
  The Pharaoh Hound will be okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. It is relatively inactive indoors and will do best with at least a large yard. It needs soft bedding and warmth and generally should not be expected to sleep outside except in warm climates...but it would still prefer to sleep with its family. This breed likes to chase things and should not be let off the leash unless it is in a safe area. It can go far away from you if it spies or scents wild game because it never loses its instinct to hunt alone. To prevent this you will need a secure, high fence around your yard. This breed can jump very high to get out of a space.

Exercise
The Pharaoh Hound relishes the opportunity to stretch its legs in a safe area—with frequent long runs. Try to set aside an hour each day to bicycle while the dog runs alongside you on a leash, although it can manage with a long daily walk on the leash and occasional sprints. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human.

Grooming
  The Pharaoh Hound has a short, glossy coat. The texture ranges from fine to slightly harsh. This type of coat is simple to groom. Give it a good going over with a rubber curry brush weekly, then polish it with a chamois cloth (not one that has been treated with any chemicals). The coat sheds very little, and with regular brushing the Pharaoh should need a bath only rarely.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  A loyal and playful dog, the Pharaoh Hound does extremely well with children. Shy and reserved with strangers, he is a quiet and odorless pet in the home. An athlete outdoors, he will do well with a fenced-in yard, but can also fair well with apartment living if exercised regularly. Prone to hunting small animals, the Pharaoh Hound is not paired well with cats. Dominant with other male dogs, the hound generally gets along well with other animals. Due to his nature to feed off human emotion, he will need an owner that possesses both leadership qualities and consistency when training.

Children and other pets
  Pharaoh Hounds are very affectionate with children. Nonetheless, as with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party.
  Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Pharaoh Hounds generally get along with other dogs, although some are aggressive toward dogs of the same gender. And because they see small animals as prey, Pharaoh Hounds aren't suited to sharing a roof with small pets such as rabbits or cats, or even smaller dogs.

Did You Know?
  The Pharaoh Hound has long had a reputation as one of the oldest of breeds, said to date to 3,000 B.C.E. Modern genetics, however, show that the breed was created much more recently, perhaps in the 17th century on the island of Malta.

A dream day in the life of a Pharaoh Hound
  Waking up in the plush and softness of his owner's bed, he would love an early morning snuggle session. After going downstairs for breakfast, he'll say hello to every member of the family. Going outside for a small run and smell of the backyard, he'll head back inside to watch the kids play. Staying calm while they run around and play, he'll be content just being part of the family. After his nightly walk, he'll be just fine snuggling to sleep with his master.
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Thursday, September 4, 2014

Everything about your Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Everything about your Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
  One of the largest of the Toy breeds, Cavaliers follow their people everywhere, just waiting for a chance to jump in a lap. They are also willing and able to go for long walks and hikes, and many enjoy flushing birds, just like their bigger spaniel cousins.
  Although he's born to be a companion, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel dog breed retains the sporty nature of his spaniel ancestors. If he's not sitting on a lap or getting a belly rub, nothing makes him happier than to flush a bird and then attempt to retrieve it. One of the largest of the toy breeds, he's often as athletic as a true sporting breed and enjoys hiking, running on the beach, and dog sports such as agility, flyball and rally. Some have even shown their prowess as hunting dogs. The more restful members of the breed find success as family friends and therapy dogs.

Overview
  The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a beautiful small dog that undoubtedly is a contender for the title of "top tail-wagger." In fact, among the characteristics that Cavalier breeders strive to attain is a tail in constant motion when this breed is moving.
  If the characteristic wagging of the Cavalier's plumy tail doesn't melt your heart, surely his large, dark round eyes will. Warm and lustrous, with a sweet expression, they hold the power to extract constant petting and unlimited supplies of food from people under their spell. Not surprisingly, this breed can easily become fat, which spoils its lovely lines, so be strong and offer a walk or playtime instead of the potato chips and pizza your Cavalier is angling for.
Cavaliers pad through the house on slippered paws, always following in the footsteps of their people. With a Cavalier in residence, you'll never be alone — not even in the bathroom. Because they're so attached to their people, they do best when someone is at home during the day to keep them company. They are a housedog and will never thrive in an environment where they're relegated to the backyard or otherwise ignored.
  When it comes to training, Cavaliers are generally intelligent and willing to try whatever it is you'd like them to do. Food rewards and positive reinforcement help ensure that training goes smoothly. Cavaliers have a soft personality, so yelling at them is counterproductive and likely to send these sweeties into the sulks or into hiding. Instead, reward them every time you see them doing something you like, whether it's chewing on a toy instead of your Prada pumps or not barking in response when the dog next door barks. They'll fall all over themselves to find more things that you like.
  As with many toy breeds, Cavaliers can have issues with housetraining, but if you keep them on a consistent schedule, with plenty of opportunities to potty outdoors, they can become trustworthy in the home.

Highlights
  • Cavaliers have a dependent personality. They love to be with people and shouldn't be left alone for long periods of time.
  • Your Cavalier will shed, especially in the spring and fall. Regular combing and brushing is required.
  • Because he's a spaniel at heart, he may try to chase birds, rabbits and other small prey if he isn't kept on leash or in a fenced yard.
  • Cavaliers may bark when someone comes to your door, but because of their friendly nature, they aren't good guard dogs.
  • Cavaliers are housedogs and should not live outdoors.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • Cavaliers have a silky, medium-length coat with feathering on the ears, legs, chest, feet and tail. They shed moderately.
  • The Cavalier coat comes in four colors: Blenheim (chestnut and white), tricolor (black and white with tan points over the eyes, on the cheeks, inside the ears and beneath the tail), ruby (solid red) and black and tan (black with tan points like those on the tricolor).
  • Cavaliers can get along with cats when they are raised with them, but some have a strong prey drive and will chase cats. Pet birds should also watch their tailfeathers around Cavaliers.
Breed standards
  • AKC group: Toy
  • UKC group: Terrier
  • Average lifespan: 10 - 12 years
  • Average size: 8 - 14 pounds
  • Coat appearance: Silky, medium-length
  • Coloration: Tricolored (beige, white and black), ruby, red and white, black and tan
  • Hypoallergenic: No
  • Other identifiers: Dark eyes and dark-eyed rims; well-proportioned body; scissor-bite teeth; long ears with feathering and medium length coat
  • Possible alterations: Dewclaws may be removed
  • Comparable Breeds: Bichon Frise, Cocker Spaniel
History
  During the early part of the 18th century, John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, kept red and white King Charles type spaniels for hunting. The duke recorded that they were able to keep up with a trotting horse. His estate was named Blenheim in honour of his victory at the Battle of Blenheim. Because of this influence, the red and white variety of the King Charles Spaniel and thus the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel became known as the Blenheim.
Attempts were made to recreate the original King Charles Spaniel as early as the turn of the 20th century, using the now extinct Toy Trawler Spaniels. These attempts were documented by Judith Blunt-Lytton, 16th Baroness Wentworth, in the book "Toy Dogs and Their Ancestors Including the History And Management of Toy Spaniels, Pekingese, Japanese and Pomeranians" published under the name of the "Hon. Mrs Neville Lytton" in 1911.

Divergence from King Charles Spaniel
  In 1926, American Roswell Eldridge offered a dog show class prize of twenty-five pounds each as a prize for the best male and females of "Blenheim Spaniels of the old type, as shown in pictures of Charles II of England's time, long face, no stop, flat skull, not inclined to be domed, with spot in centre of skull."The breeders of the era were appalled, although several entered what they considered to be sub-par King Charles Spaniels in the competition. Eldridge died before seeing his plan come to fruition, but several breeders believed in what he said and in 1928 the first Cavalier club was formed. The first standard was created, based on a dog named "Ann's Son" owned by Mostyn Walker,and The Kennel Club recognised the breed as "King Charles Spaniels, Cavalier type".
  World War II caused a drastic setback to the breed, with the vast majority of breeding stock destroyed because of the hardship. For instance, in the Ttiweh Cavalier Kennel, the population of sixty dropped to three during the 1940s. Following the war, just six dogs would be the starting block from which all Cavaliers descend. These dogs were Ann's Son, his litter brother Wizbang Timothy, Carlo of Ttiweh, Duce of Braemore, Kobba of Kuranda and Aristide of Ttiweh.The numbers increased gradually, and in 1945 The Kennel Club first recognised the breed in its own right as the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.
  The history of the breed in America is relatively recent. The first recorded Cavalier living in the United States was brought from the United Kingdom in 1956 by W. Lyon Brown, together with Elizabeth Spalding and other enthusiasts, she founded the Cavalier King Charles Club USA which continues to the present day. In 1994, the American Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club was created by a group of breeders to apply for recognition by the American Kennel Club. The Cavalier would go on to be recognised by the American Kennel Club in 1995, and the ACKCSC became the parent club for Cavaliers.



Personality
  The gregarious Cavalier takes as his role model humorist Will Rogers, who famously said he never met a stranger. The Cavalier is eager to meet everyone who crosses his path, and if that person sits down and offers a lap (or a treat), so much the better.
  Like any dog, Cavaliers come in a range of personalities, from quiet and sedate to rowdy and rambunctious. They might or might not bark when someone comes to the door, so they're a poor choice as a watchdog — except, that is, for watching the burglar cart off the silver. There are exceptions, of course — some Cavaliers will inform you of every event in your neighborhood and bark ferociously when strangers approach — but overall you're better off buying an alarm system than counting on your Cavalier to alert you to trouble.

Health
  The Cavalier, which has an average lifespan of 9 to 14 years, may suffer from minor health problems such as patellar luxation, and entropion, or major problems like syringomelia, mitral valve disease (MVD), and canine hip dysplasia (CHD). Sometimes retinal dysplasia is seen in the breed. Many Cavaliers also have reduced platelet numbers, but this does not seem to cause any problems. Cardiac, eye, hip, and knee tests are suggested for this breed of dog.

Living Conditions
  Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are good for apartment life. They are moderately active indoors and a small yard will be sufficient. The Cavalier does not do well in very warm conditions.

Exercise
  Cavalier King Charles Spaniels need a daily walk. Play will take care of a lot of their exercise needs, however, as with all breeds, play will not fulfill their primal instinct to walk. Dogs that do not get to go on daily walks are more likely to display behavior problems. They will also enjoy a good romp in a safe open area off-lead, such as a large, fenced-in yard.

Care
  The Cavalier is not suited for outdoor living. Its long coat requires brushing on alternate days. The dog requires a good amount of exercise regularly, in the form of a romp in a secure area or a moderate on-leash walk.

Grooming
  For a coated breed, the Cavalier is relatively easy to groom. The medium-length silky coat is not so heavy that it requires hours of brushing, and it sheds dirt easily. The Cavalier sheds, like all dogs, but regular brushing will remove dead hairs so they don’t float off onto your floor, furniture and clothing.
  The long, silky hair on the Cavalier’s ears, tail, belly and legs, known as feathering, should be brushed two or three times a week to prevent mats or tangles from forming. Be sure to check behind the ears and where the leg meets the body; that’s where they commonly form. Use a slicker brush or stainless steel comb to remove tangles, then bring out shine with a bristle brush. The coat does not require any trimming for the show ring; indeed, such trimming is prohibited by the breed standard.
A bath every two to four weeks will keep the Cavalier smelling sweet. The only other grooming needed is regular ear cleaning, tooth brushing and nail trimming.

Is this breed right for you?
  Perfect for families with older children, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a great companion for families and one-person households. Great for apartment living, the breed will need daily walking to avoid being bored or getting himself into trouble. Preferring company, it's best that he's not left alone for long periods of time. A social breed, it's also best that he's constantly around other people to avoid being shy or reserved.

Children and other pets
  Cavaliers can be great playmates for kids who will enjoy throwing a ball for them, teaching them tricks, participating in dog sports, or simply having them on a lap while they read or watch television. Because of their small size, however, they should be supervised when playing with small children who might injure them accidentally.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  They get along well with other dogs and can learn to play nice with cats and other pets if introduced to them at an early age. It helps if the cat is willing to stand up for herself because a Cavalier enjoys a good game of chase. They even enjoy it if the cat chases back. Some Cavaliers live peaceably with pet birds while others try to eat them — or at the very least pull their tails. Always supervise your Cavalier's interactions with birds and other small animals; they can have a strong hunting instinct.

Did You Know?
“Sex and the City’s” Charlotte York had a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel named Elizabeth Taylor. Real-life celebrities Claire Danes, Terri Hatcher, Mischa Barton, Diane Sawyer, and Jerry O’Connell are Cavalier owners.

A dream day in the life of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
  A loving breed, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel will be happy waking up in the bed of his owner. Stumbling into the kitchen for his daily feeding, the pup will enjoy having a routine in place. After his feeding, you may find him waiting at the door for his daily walk. After a short nap, he'll take a run in the backyard and finish his day snuggling on the lap of his owner while watching favorite television shows together.

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