How to Stop a Dachshund Puppy From Biting - LUV My dogs

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Wednesday, August 20, 2014

How to Stop a Dachshund Puppy From Biting

  Dachshunds were bred to track and kill pests. They had to be able to work unaided, be courageous and intelligent in order to chase down and grab hold of their prey. Today we can still glimpse these traits in Dachshunds who bark at other dogs or people, or who become aggressive. Dachshunds need to be taught at a young age to minimize problems like these associated with their breed nature. The first time you set eyes on any kind of dominance or aggression in your Dachshund puppy, especially biting, you have to act.
  When a Dachshund is a puppy they look cute and really don’t do much damage when chewing and biting. Many people think that this is OK, or even funny, but it isn’t. What they don't recognize is that these little nips are shows of dominance that may develop to direct aggression later in life. Left unaddressed your Dachshund puppy will grow up thinking that it is acceptable to chew on anything they want, causing hundreds, even thousands of dollars of damage to your expensive furniture, floors , shoes and your hands. The end conclusion is that dogs end up being taken to a shelter or, even worse, being euthanized. 
  It’s vital to learn how to stop your Dachshund biting at the puppy stage.  A lot of people think it’s okay to let a Dachshund puppy get away with biting as it seems harmless and just a bit of fun.  However this is not the case at all.  In fact your little Dachshund puppy is biting as a form of dominance because they are trying to become the leader of your pack .  Really as their owner you should be the leader – not your Dachshund.  So if you continue to let your Dachshund puppy bite, it can lead to very bad behavioural problems in the future.

Begin at a Young Age 

  Once you are searching for a Dachshund puppy ask the breeder to show you a litter. Observe the puppies playing and experimenting with behaviors and see how they learn through pointers from their litter mates. With puppy biting watch how if one puppy nips another, the one who was nipped will most likely bite back. The puppy who bit first quickly learns that when they bite, someone bites back, and the behavior soon stops. 
  When you bring your Dachshund puppy home you have to be consistent and not permit the biting restart. Begin training immediately that you spot your Dachshund puppy biting. In young puppies the biting you see is still play biting, trying out behaviors to observe which are alright and which are not. Never strike any Dachshund, in particular not a young puppy. They are still in their socialization and learning stage and will not appreciate what has happened. Dachshunds upset at an early age are more likely to develop issues with aggression when they age. 
  Consistency and even handedness are the keys when stopping Dachshund puppy biting, and in fact when training Dachshunds at all. Dachshunds react most favorably to positive training methods, particularly if they believe they are in charge! Again, consistency is vital. Be sure to give a reward  for positive/sought after behaviors and discourage unwanted behaviors. All family members have to know how to train your Dachshund so they are providing the same, constant information and rewards. Change your interactions with your Dachshund so you are not inadvertently reinforcing bad behavior. For example, with Dachshund puppy biting do not play tug of war or wrestle with them. Dachshunds were designed to be hunters and will probably notice a tug toy as prey. Don't be surprised to hear them growling and spot them biting at the toy, and you, if you play tug!

Aged One Year
  If you did not stop your Dachshund from biting as a puppy then they may still continue to bite as they reach one year of age.  If this is the case, then it’s really important you learn how to stop your Dachshund from biting at this point in their lives.
  A good place to start is to stop playing games that encourage biting such as tug of war and play fighting.

   It’s also vital that you have set rules for your Dachshund so that they realise that you are the leader of the pack, not them.  If you show your leadership position, then your Dachshund will be less likely to bite.

How to Stop a Dachshund Puppy from Biting 
  When your Dachshund puppy nips you is your first thought to spank them? If so, think again, this is not the correct action to take. The right thing to do is to demonstrate to them biting is not okay. Tell them "No" in a firm tone, or make a loud yelp . Present your Dachshund one of their own toys to play with, praising them when they start to chew it.

  When you are consistent using this system you will become aware of your Dachshund puppy quickly learns that biting you is not acceptable, but chewing their toys is. This method will work with Dachshunds of all ages, although it may be harder on adults who have not been trained or taught to not bite. 

Older Dachshund’s and Biting
  If you were unable to stop your Dachshund from biting at the puppy stage or as they reached one year of age then they have probably continued biting as they got older.  This is most likely because your Dachshund thinks they are the leader of your pack.

  At this stage of your Dachshund’s life it will be much harder to stop them from biting.  But it’s really important you still do take the steps and learn how to stop your Dachshund from biting for the safety of those around you.  The best thing to do at this point is to seek the help of a professional dog trainer.  They are the experts in situations like this and will be help you get your Dachshund’s biting under control.

  If your Dachshund is more aggressive than just giving the occasional nip or gentle bite you have to go to puppy or dog training classes or get the advice of a veterinary behaviorist. A training class will give you professional assistance in stopping your Dachshund puppy biting and will also offer an opportunity for socialization with other dogs and people, something that is very important for Dachshunds.

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