August 2014 - LUV My dogs

LUV My dogs

Everything about your dog!

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

How to Train Your Dog with Hand Signals

How to Train Your Dog with Hand Signals
  Canines are visually oriented animals and will understand hand signals for dogs very well. They can read your body language more easily than understand your spoken words.
  Dog Training Hand Signals should be a chapter in every dog training manual. Training your dog to respond to hand signals can be fun to teach and very easy for your dog to learn, understand and obey.
  Hand signals are sign language. You use your hands to signal to your dog what you want him to do, such as sit or lie down. There are some standard hand signals recognized by most dog trainers, but you can also create your own signals to train a dog.
  The first thing to do is to choose a specific and clearly identifiable hand movement or gesture to associate with each command. Getting your dog to respond to that gesture is merely the act of repetition till you succeed.
  You start with issuing the verbal command performing the chosen gesture at the same time. You reward the dog with a treat each time the command is obeyed.
  When there is clear and spontaneous response to the verbal command and hand signal combination, you then drop the verbal command and start over again only with the hand signal, rewarding the dog with a treat each time the hand signal is obeyed.
  Repeat continuously till there is a spontaneous response to the hand signal. Drop the food reward and continue only with the hand signal till there is a clear and spontaneous response.
  Now you have mastered dog training hand signals, and will be having your dog, coming to you, sitting down, or lying down near you all on the movements of your hand.

1. Sit
  Begin the training session by standing your dog in front of you, with your hands hanging normally and loosely by your sides and with a treat in the hand that you have chosen to use in the signal.
  Begin the dog training hand signal by bringing the hand slowly and deliberately up, folding it at the same time as if you are about to throw something over. Let your movement be gradual and reward the dog with the treat as soon as it 'sits'. Repeat till there is no hesitation by the dog in responding to the command.
  Repeat hand signal without verbal command till the dog responds without any hesitation, rewarding each time with a treat. Then repeat the hand signal with intermittent rewards, then one reward every three to four commands and finally no rewards at all.
  Test hand signal for spontaneous response without any reward.


2. Down
  Begin this session by sitting your dog in front of you, with your hands hanging normally and loosely by your sides with a treat in the hand that you have chosen to use in the signal.
  The hand movement for this signal would be the raising your hand above your head. Follow the same procedure as you did in the 'Sit' command and test finally for spontaneous response without any reward.



3. Come
  Begin this session with the dog in front of you, and your hands hanging normally and loosely by your sides with a treat in the hand that you have chosen to use in the signal.
  The hand movement for this signal would be raising your hand to touch the opposite shoulder. If you are using your right hand touch your left shoulder.
  Follow the same procedure as you did in the 'Sit' and 'Down' commands and test finally for spontaneous response without any reward.


4. Stay
  Like a crossing guard would show at intersections, holding a hand with the palm facing out and forward means stop or "stay." Try alternating this signal with the "come" gesture for an impromptu red light/green light training game.

5. Bring It
  This is a key command to any game of fetch — unless you want to be doing all the retrieving yourself. In addition to giving the verbal command, place your hand at doggie eye level with palm facing the pooch, which gives you the perfect placement to then receive the item as he learns to let it go right in your hand.

Train with repetition
  Continue to practice all of the commands, using hand signals when walking, before feedings, or when letting the dog in from relieving themselves. This is not about control but canine communication and building habits.

Tips
  • Dogs that are trained for work in the movies, all respond to hand signals so when you see dogs in the movies do great things,understand that they are obeying hand signals.
  • Practice with your dog often and once he's got it down, offer verbal or physical praise as opposed to treats. Some dogs become too reliant on the treats and will not perform if a treat is not being offered.
Warnings
  • Do not exceed about 10-15 minutes of training time, your dog may get bored and the learning could become a struggle of wills rather than productive.
  • Make sure your dog has plenty of breaks during training sessions



Read More

How to Stop a Dachshund Puppy From Biting

How to Stop a Dachshund Puppy From Biting
  Dachshunds were bred to track and kill pests. They had to be able to work unaided, be courageous and intelligent in order to chase down and grab hold of their prey. Today we can still glimpse these traits in Dachshunds who bark at other dogs or people, or who become aggressive. Dachshunds need to be taught at a young age to minimize problems like these associated with their breed nature. The first time you set eyes on any kind of dominance or aggression in your Dachshund puppy, especially biting, you have to act.
  When a Dachshund is a puppy they look cute and really don’t do much damage when chewing and biting. Many people think that this is OK, or even funny, but it isn’t. What they don't recognize is that these little nips are shows of dominance that may develop to direct aggression later in life. Left unaddressed your Dachshund puppy will grow up thinking that it is acceptable to chew on anything they want, causing hundreds, even thousands of dollars of damage to your expensive furniture, floors , shoes and your hands. The end conclusion is that dogs end up being taken to a shelter or, even worse, being euthanized. 
  It’s vital to learn how to stop your Dachshund biting at the puppy stage.  A lot of people think it’s okay to let a Dachshund puppy get away with biting as it seems harmless and just a bit of fun.  However this is not the case at all.  In fact your little Dachshund puppy is biting as a form of dominance because they are trying to become the leader of your pack .  Really as their owner you should be the leader – not your Dachshund.  So if you continue to let your Dachshund puppy bite, it can lead to very bad behavioural problems in the future.

Begin at a Young Age 

  Once you are searching for a Dachshund puppy ask the breeder to show you a litter. Observe the puppies playing and experimenting with behaviors and see how they learn through pointers from their litter mates. With puppy biting watch how if one puppy nips another, the one who was nipped will most likely bite back. The puppy who bit first quickly learns that when they bite, someone bites back, and the behavior soon stops. 
  When you bring your Dachshund puppy home you have to be consistent and not permit the biting restart. Begin training immediately that you spot your Dachshund puppy biting. In young puppies the biting you see is still play biting, trying out behaviors to observe which are alright and which are not. Never strike any Dachshund, in particular not a young puppy. They are still in their socialization and learning stage and will not appreciate what has happened. Dachshunds upset at an early age are more likely to develop issues with aggression when they age. 
  Consistency and even handedness are the keys when stopping Dachshund puppy biting, and in fact when training Dachshunds at all. Dachshunds react most favorably to positive training methods, particularly if they believe they are in charge! Again, consistency is vital. Be sure to give a reward  for positive/sought after behaviors and discourage unwanted behaviors. All family members have to know how to train your Dachshund so they are providing the same, constant information and rewards. Change your interactions with your Dachshund so you are not inadvertently reinforcing bad behavior. For example, with Dachshund puppy biting do not play tug of war or wrestle with them. Dachshunds were designed to be hunters and will probably notice a tug toy as prey. Don't be surprised to hear them growling and spot them biting at the toy, and you, if you play tug!

Aged One Year
  If you did not stop your Dachshund from biting as a puppy then they may still continue to bite as they reach one year of age.  If this is the case, then it’s really important you learn how to stop your Dachshund from biting at this point in their lives.
  A good place to start is to stop playing games that encourage biting such as tug of war and play fighting.

   It’s also vital that you have set rules for your Dachshund so that they realise that you are the leader of the pack, not them.  If you show your leadership position, then your Dachshund will be less likely to bite.


How to Stop a Dachshund Puppy from Biting 
  When your Dachshund puppy nips you is your first thought to spank them? If so, think again, this is not the correct action to take. The right thing to do is to demonstrate to them biting is not okay. Tell them "No" in a firm tone, or make a loud yelp . Present your Dachshund one of their own toys to play with, praising them when they start to chew it.

  When you are consistent using this system you will become aware of your Dachshund puppy quickly learns that biting you is not acceptable, but chewing their toys is. This method will work with Dachshunds of all ages, although it may be harder on adults who have not been trained or taught to not bite. 

Older Dachshund’s and Biting
  If you were unable to stop your Dachshund from biting at the puppy stage or as they reached one year of age then they have probably continued biting as they got older.  This is most likely because your Dachshund thinks they are the leader of your pack.

  At this stage of your Dachshund’s life it will be much harder to stop them from biting.  But it’s really important you still do take the steps and learn how to stop your Dachshund from biting for the safety of those around you.  The best thing to do at this point is to seek the help of a professional dog trainer.  They are the experts in situations like this and will be help you get your Dachshund’s biting under control.


  If your Dachshund is more aggressive than just giving the occasional nip or gentle bite you have to go to puppy or dog training classes or get the advice of a veterinary behaviorist. A training class will give you professional assistance in stopping your Dachshund puppy biting and will also offer an opportunity for socialization with other dogs and people, something that is very important for Dachshunds.

Read More

Everything about your Greyhound

Everything about your Greyhound
  Nicknamed the 40-mph-couch potato, Greyhounds are quiet, gentle, affectionate dogs who can fit into almost any home. They love a cushy sofa and they are satisfied with a 20-minute walk.
  Greyhounds were originally bred as hunting dogs to chase hare, foxes, and deer. Canines in this dog breed can reach speeds of 40 to 45 miles per hour, making them the Ferraris of the dog world. Not surprisingly, Greyhounds made a name for themselves as racing dogs and are still used in racing today. They also participate in many other dog sports, including lure coursing, conformation, obedience, and agility. Beyond their grace and speed, people love them for their sweet, mild nature.

Overview
 Whether or not you've seen one in the flesh, you know what a Greyhound looks like. The iconic hound with the aerodynamic build epitomizes speed with his narrow head, long legs, and muscular rear end. We've all seen images of this sprinter, if only through seeing it plastered on the side of a bus, but many of us don't truly know the breed.
  One of the most ancient of breeds, Greyhounds probably originated in Egypt and have been prized throughout history. Historic figures who were captivated by this breed include Cleopatra, Queen Elizabeth I of England, and General Custer, who raced his dogs the day before he set off on his fateful trip to Little Big Horn. The patronage of the two queens led to Greyhound racing being dubbed the "Sport of Queens."
  Aside from its royal fans, there's a lot to love about the breed. The Greyhound combines a stately appearance with a friendly attitude toward people and other dogs. Loyal and affectionate with his family, he's not aggressive toward strangers, although he will let you know — through a bark or a subtle pricking of his small, folded ears — that someone's approaching your home.
Greyhounds have a reputation for high energy levels, but in reality their favorite pastime is sleeping. Designed as sprinters, not distance runners, they'll be satisfied with a daily walk, although active people find they make good jogging or running partners. In fact, Greyhounds do fine in apartments or homes with small yards-although they need a solid fence to keep them from chasing animals they might see as prey, such as squirrels, rabbits, or trespassing cats.
  Regardless of their strong prey drive, there's no doubt that this is a wonderful breed that deserves many belly rubs. Whether you bought your Greyhound from a show breeder or adopted him from the racetrack, you'll find yourself regarding this breed with the same respect that others have given it throughout its long and glorious history.

Other Quick Facts
  • The Greyhound has a long, narrow head; small ears; dark eyes; a long, muscular neck that is slightly arched; a broad, muscular back; a deep chest; a long, fine, tapering tail; and a short, smooth coat that can be any color or pattern.
  • Greyhounds are the fastest of the dog breeds. They have been clocked at 44 miles per hour, which along with their restful attitude has earned them the nickname “40-mph couch potato.”
  • President Rutherford B. Hayes, in office from 1877 to 1881, kept several dogs in the White House, including a Greyhound named Grim.
  • Comparable Breeds: Borzoi, Saluki

 History
  Historically, these sighthounds were used primarily for hunting in the open where their keen eyesight is valuable. It is believed that they  were introduced to the area now known as the United Kingdom in the 5th and 6th century BCE from Celtic mainland Europe although the Picts and other peoples of the northern area now known as Scotland were believed to have had large hounds similar to that of the deerhound before the 6th century BCE.
 The breed's origin is romantically reputed to be connected to Ancient Egypt, where depictions of smooth-coated sighthound types have been found which are typical of Saluki (Persian greyhound) or Sloughi (tombs at Beni Hassan c. 2000 BCE). However, analyses of DNA reported in 2004 suggest that the Greyhound is not closely related to these breeds, but is a close relative to herding dogs. Historical literature on the first sighthound in Europe (Arrian), the vertragus, the probable antecedent of the Greyhound, suggests that the origin is with the ancient Celts from Eastern Europe or Eurasia. Greyhound-type dogs of small, medium, and large size, would appear to have been bred across Europe since that time. All modern, pure-bred pedigree Greyhounds are derived from the Greyhound stock recorded and registered, firstly in the private 18th century, then public 19th century studbooks, which ultimately were registered with coursing, racing, and kennel club authorities of the United Kingdom.
  The name "Greyhound" is generally believed to come from the Old English grighund. "Hund" is the antecedent of the modern "hound", but the meaning of "grig" is undetermined, other than in reference to dogs in Old English and Old Norse. Its origin does not appear to have any common root with the modern word "grey" for color, and indeed the Greyhound is seen with a wide variety of coat colors. The lighter colors, patch-like markings and white appeared in the breed that was once ordinarily grey in color. The Greyhound is the only dog mentioned by name in the Bible; many versions, including the King James version, name the Greyhound as one of the "four things stately" in the Proverbs. However, some newer biblical translations, including The New International Version, have changed this to strutting rooster, which appears to be an alternative translation of the Hebrew term mothen zarzir. But also the Douay–Rheims Bible translation from the late 4th-century Latin Vulgate into English translates "a cock".
According to Pokorny the English name "Greyhound" does not mean "grey dog/hound", but simply "fair dog". Subsequent words have been derived from the Proto-Indo-European root *g'her- "shine, twinkle": English grey, Old High German gris "grey, old", Old Icelandic griss "piglet, pig", Old Icelandic gryja "to dawn", gryjandi "morning twilight", Old Irish grian "sun", Old Church Slavonic zorja "morning twilight, brightness". The common sense of these words is "to shine; bright".
  In 1928, the very first winner of Best in Show at Crufts was Primley Sceptre, a Greyhound owned by H. Whitley.

Personality
  Greyhounds generally have a wonderful temperament, being friendly and non-aggressive, although some can be aloof toward strangers. Give them a treat, though, and they're likely to become a friend for life.
  They're intelligent and independent, even catlike in many ways. They do have a sensitive side and are quick to react to tensions in the home. They can become shy or timid with mistreatment, even if it's unintentional. Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.
  Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, the Greyhound needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Greyhound puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
   Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Health
 The Greyhound, which has an average lifespan of 10 to 13 years, is not prone to any major health problems. However, some of the minor ailments that can affect the breed include osteosarcoma, esophageal achalasia, and gastric torsion. Both the AKC and NGA Greyhounds cannot tolerate barbiturate anesthesia and are susceptible to tail-tip injuries and lacerations, while retired NGA Greyhounds are prone to racing injuries like muscle, toe, and hock injuries.
 The Greyhound will do okay in an apartment if it gets enough exercise. It is relatively inactive indoors and a small yard will do. Greyhounds are sensitive to the cold but do well in cold climates as long as they wear a coat outside. Do not let this dog off the leash unless in a safe area. They have a strong chase instinct and if they spot an animal such as a rabbit they just might take off. They are so fast you will not be able to catch them.


Exercise
  Greyhounds that are kept as pets should have regular opportunities to run free on open ground in a safe area, as well as daily long, brisk walks, where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead. In a dog's mind the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the human. Greyhounds love a regular routine.


Care
  Regular exercise in the form of an occasional run and a long walk on leash is good for the Greyhound. It loves to chase and run at great speeds outdoors, so it should be only let out in safe, open areas. The breed also requires warm and soft bedding and does not like living outdoors. It is easy to maintain its coat - just an occasional brushing to get rid of dead hair.

Grooming
  Greyhounds have a short, smooth coat that is simple to groom. Brush it weekly with a hound mitt or rubber curry brush to remove dead hair and distribute skin oils that keep the coat shiny. Greyhounds shed, but regular brushing will help keep the hair off your floor, furniture, and clothing. Bathe as needed. If you do a good job of brushing your Greyhound, he probably won’t need a bath very often.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Be aware that Greyhounds are especially sensitive about having their feet handled and nails trimmed. Do your best not to cut into the quick, the vein that feeds the nail. It’s painful and your Greyhound will remember next time and put up a fight. It’s also important to brush the teeth frequently for good overall health and fresh breath. Greyhounds - track dogs in particular - are known for developing periodontal disease, so brushing and annual veterinary cleanings can help keep dental disease at bay.

Is this breed right for you?
  A reserved and quiet breed, the Greyhound feels comfortable living in a quiet home. Not a good playmate for younger children, this dog will do better with older children or as an only pet. Known to chase anything that runs, including cats, these pups are only good with felines if trained. OK for apartment living if regularly exercised, the Greyhound does best living indoors with a small yard for playtime.


Children and other pets
  Greyhounds can be patient with children and have been known to step delicately around toddlers, but they do best in homes with older children who know how to act around dogs. They're more likely to walk away from a teasing child than to snap at him.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  Although Greyhounds do very well with other dogs, they can view smaller dogs, cats, or other small pets as prey, especially if the animals run from them. Some have a much lower prey drive than others, but it's always best to supervise your Greyhound around smaller animals. Instinct can overcome training, and Greyhounds have been known to injure or even kill smaller pets.
And even if they're best friends with your indoor cat, they may view outdoor cats that come onto their property as fair game.

Did You Know?
  A description written in 1486 is a poetic notion of just how a Greyhound should look: “A Greyhound should be headed like a snake and necked like a drake, backed like a beam, sided like a bream, footed like a cat and tailed like a rat.”


A dream day in the life of a Greyhound
  Prone to bloat, the Greyhound does best with breakfast, lunch and dinner. Lazily waking up in the morning to a rubdown, he'll enjoy sticking to his routine of a morning walk before his owner leaves for work. Enjoying having the house to himself, he'll lazily keep an eye on everything while you're away. Greeting you when you come in the door, he'll be ready for a run and perhaps a bit of racing before the day is over. Just make sure to keep him on the leash in case he spots a rabbit and feels the need to chase it down.
Read More

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Introducing Your New Dog To Your Old Dogs

Introducing Your New Dog To Your Old Dogs
  The introduction of unfamiliar dogs to other dogs may be a perilous journey. This can be very stressful for the dogs and the owners. But to help alleviate this stress, we must understand why the introduction is difficult for our dogs .
  Maybe you have heard of children fighting over the attention of their parents or a toddler developing sibling rivalry with the new baby on the way. Conflicts and competition between siblings is referred to as sibling rivalry. It can be very irritating to watch. If you're a parent, seeing your kids fight with one another over small things can be very taxing. Did you know that this kind of competition can also happen between dogs? This normally happens when you bring home a new puppy. Your will notice your old dog becoming jealous over your new pet. Having that said, it is important to introduce properly the new dog to your resident dog or packs. How? Here's how you can make the transition easier for you and your pets.
  Maximizing the potential for a great relationship between your new dog and your current dog is a two-step process. It involves the actual introduction and then management of the new dog in your home. We’ll start with introductions and then give you guidelines for helping your dogs through the initial transition weeks of being together in your home.

Step1. Take Your Dog To A Park With The Other Dogs

  Go for a walk and take your old dogs with you. Go to a nearby park where the other dogs are hanging out. Observe how your dogs gets along with the other packs. Take note and address any belligerent behaviors that your dogs are showing. If there are, it may not be the best time to present a new pet in the family. You may want to address first your old dogs' aggressive behavior problems. If your dog is able to relate well with the other dogs, it shows that they are ready ready for the new addition to the family.

Step2. Prepare For The Arrival Of The New Dog.
  Plan and prepare the things that your new pet will need like a bed, crate, food and chew toys. During the first weeks at home, you cannot expect your resident dogs to allotment what they have with the new dog.

Step3. Before Taking Home The New Pet

  Before bringing home the new dog, make sure to visit the new dog at least once in a while. You can bring something with you like an old bedclothes from home. This will acquaint your new pet with the odors of his new life with you. Take the item back to your home and let your old dogs smell the blanket. This will give them an idea about the smell of the new dog.

Step4. Arrival Of The New Pet

  Bond with your resident dogs before you pick up the new addition to the family. Embrace your dogs, feed them, and talk to them. When picking up your new pet, wear the same clothes that you wear when you bond with your old dogs. The new dog will smell the scent of your other dogs on your clothes. This will give him an idea of what is in store for him. If possible, have another person drive you home. Do not bring your old packs with you too. This will allow you to bond with your new pet.

Step5. Find A Neutral Location To Introduce Your Dogs

  Dogs are territorial animals. Make sure that you introduce the dogs in a neutral location like a park or neighbor's front yard so that the new dog will not look like an intruder. Each dog must be on leashes and if possible, must be handled by a separate person.

Step6. Observe The Dogs When Being Introduced

  Briefly, let the dogs sniff each other. This is a normal dog greeting behavior. As they are exploring the new dog, introduce the dogs using a happy and friendly inflection. Do not allow them to sniff too long because it can escalate an aggressive behavior. Give positive remarks to your old dogs if they show good behavior.

Step7. Taking The Dogs Home

  Once you examine them tolerating one another, you can take them home. Depending on the size of the dogs, you can take them in one car or separate cars. Make sure that you have other people accompanying you if you will drive them in one car.

  After what seems like an eternity but is really only about three weeks, you'll begin to notice some signs of harmony between the dog and the puppy. If you have done your part helping the dog and puppy develop their communication skills, this is the beginning of a fabulous friendship—or at least a peaceful co-existence. Not all dogs love each another, so don't be disappointed if your dog doesn't fall head over heels in love with the new dog in the house. There is enough love for both, and comfortable cohabitation is a fine accomplishment.

  Indeed, introducing a dog to your resident dogs is not an easy task. Just be patient and don't give up. If you have problem introducing your dogs, you can contact a professional animal behaviorist for assistance.

Read More

Everything about your Doberman Pinscher

Everything about your Doberman Pinscher
  Although the Doberman has a reputation as a sharp and even sinister dog, his devoted fans consider him the most loving and loyal of companions. Believe it or not, a good Doberman is a stable, friendly dog - unless you threaten his family.
  The Doberman Pinscher was developed in Germany during the late 19th century, primarily as a guard dog. His exact ancestry is unknown, but he's believed to be a mixture of many dog breeds, including the Rottweiler, Black and Tan Terrier, and German Pinscher. With his sleek coat, athletic build, and characteristic cropped ears and docked tail, the Doberman Pinscher looks like an aristocrat. He is a highly energetic and intelligent dog, suited for police and military work, canine sports, and as a family guardian and companion.


Overview
  Because the Doberman Pinscher came into existence at the end of the 19th century, he is, in the world of dogs, the new kid on the block. This hasn't stopped the Dobie, as he is affectionately called, from becoming one of the most popular and recognized breeds in the United States.
  His look is elegant and his style is athletic; the Dobie is also intelligent, alert, and loyal. He is a courageous guard dog as well as a beloved family companion.
  The Dobie's fierce reputation precedes him. He is feared by those who don't know him, stereotyped as highly aggressive and vicious. True, he is a formidable guardian, but he is usually a gentle, watchful, and loving dog. He does not go looking for trouble, but he is fearless and will defend his family and turf if he perceives danger.
  The Doberman Pinscher enjoys being part of a family. He likes to be close to those he loves and, when this love is present, he is a natural protector. He is trustworthy with his family's children, friends, and guests as long as he is treated kindly.
  In spite of his positive qualities, the Dobie isn't the right breed for everyone. He's large, at 60 to 80 pounds, and he's extremely active, both physically and mentally. He needs a lot of exercise.
  He also needs plenty of mental challenges to keep him from becoming bored. He needs a strong owner/pack leader who can take time to properly socialize and train him, and who will keep him busy every day. This may be too much to handle for people who lead a more laid-back lifestyle.
  The current look of the Dobie is slimmer and sleeker than that of past years. His temperament has also changed somewhat, say breed enthusiasts, softening a bit from his early days in Germany, though he is still an excellent guard dog.
  Originally, Dobies' ears were cropped to increase their ability to locate sounds, and tail docking gave the breed a more streamlined look. North American breeders usually dock the tails and crop the ears of Doberman puppies, though it's not mandatory. Docking and ear cropping is illegal in some countries.
  Those who know him say that a well-bred and properly socialized Dobie is an excellent pet and companion, suitable for families with other dogs, gentle with young children, and overall a loyal and devoted family member.

Highlights
  • The Doberman has a great deal of energy and needs a lot of exercise.
  • This breed can be protective, so don't be surprised when he assumes the role of household guardian.
  • The Dobie will assume the alpha role in your household if you're not a strong leader. Early, consistent training is critical to establish your role as pack leader.
  • The Dobie is sensitive to cold weather and needs adequate shelter in winter (he likes to be in the house next to the fireplace).
  • The Doberman Pinscher is a family dog and shouldn't be left alone. He thrives when he's included in family activities.
  • The Doberman has gained a reputation as being vicious. Even though your Doberman may have a sweet personality, neighbors and strangers may be afraid of him.
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Doberman originated in Germany, created by tax collector Louis Dobermann to keep himself and the taxes he carried safe from thieves.
  • In the 1950s, long before the advent of agility and freestyle competitions, the Doberman Drill Team thrilled audiences with their amazing physical feats. Today the breed is highly competitive in obedience and agility trials as well as many other dog sports and activities.
  • The Doberman who is raised with children and other pets will love and protect them and be a good companion for kids.
  • The first Doberman to win Best in Show at Westminster was Ch. Ferry v Raufelsen of Giralda in 1939. He was followed by his grandson, Ch. Rancho Dobe's Storm, who had back to back wins in 1952 and 1953 and more recently by Ch. Royal Tudor Wild as the Wind in 1989.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Guardian Dog
Average lifespan: 10-11 years
Average size: 66-88 pounds
Coat appearance: Short, hard, thick
Coloration: Black, red, blue, and fawn
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Athletic build, muscular body, ears pricked and erect, tail short and cropped
Possible alterations: Dobermans are born with floppy ears and long tails.
Comparable Breeds: Dalmatian, Rottweiler
History
  Doberman Pinschers were first bred in the town of Apolda, in the German state of Thuringia around 1890, following the Franco-Prussian War by Karl Friedrich Louis Dobermann. Dobermann served in the dangerous role of local tax collector, and ran the Apolda dog pound. With access to dogs of many breeds, he aimed to create a breed that would be ideal for protecting him during his collections, which took him through many bandit-infested areas. He set out to breed a new type of dog that, in his opinion, would be the perfect combination of strength, speed, endurance, loyalty, intelligence, and ferocity. Later, Otto Goeller and Philip Greunig continued to develop the breed to become the dog that is seen today.
  The breed is believed to have been created from several different breeds of dogs that had the characteristics that Dobermann was looking for, including the German Pinscher, the Beauceron, the Rottweiler, the Thuringian Sylvan Dog, the Greyhound, the Great Dane, the Weimaraner, the German Shorthaired Pointer, the Manchester Terrier, the Old German Shepherd Dog, the American Pit Bull Terrier, Thuringian Shepherd Dog . The exact ratios of mixing, and even the exact breeds that were used, remain uncertain to this day, although many experts believe that the Doberman Pinscher is a combination of at least four of these breeds. The single exception is the documented crossing with the Greyhound and Manchester Terrier. It is also widely believed that the old German Shepherd gene pool was the single largest contributor to the Doberman breed. Philip Greunig'sThe Dobermann Pinscher (1939), is considered the foremost study of the development of the breed by one of its most ardent students. Greunig's study describes the breed's early development by Otto Goeller, whose hand allowed the Doberman to become the dog we recognize today. The American Kennel Club believes the breeds utilized to develop the Doberman Pinscher may have included the old shorthaired shepherd, Rottweiler, Black and Tan Terrier and the German Pinscher.
  After Dobermann's death in 1894, the Germans named the breed Dobermann-pinscher in his honor, but a half century later dropped the 'pinscher' on the grounds that this German word for terrier was no longer appropriate. The British did the same a few years later.
During World War II, the United States Marine Corps adopted the Doberman Pinscher as its official War Dog, although the Corps did not exclusively use this breed in the role.
In the post war era the breed was nearly lost. There were no new litters registered in West Germany from 1949 to 1958. Werner Jung is credited with single-handedly saving the breed. He searched the farms in Germany for typical Pinschers and used these along with 4 oversized Miniature Pinschers and a black and red bitch from East Germany. Jung risked his life to smuggle her into West Germany. Most German Pinschers today are descendants of these dogs. Some pedigrees in the 1959 PSK Standardbuch show a number of dogs with unknown parentage.
  In the United States, the American Kennel Club ranked the Doberman Pinscher as the 12th most popular pure-breed in 2012 and 2013.





Personality
  A super-intelligent and super-active dog — that's what you get when you get a Doberman Pinscher. You also get an extremely loyal, trustworthy dog who's playful and fun-loving with his family. He's a natural protector who won't hesitate to act when he thinks his family is under threat, but he is not aggressive without reason.
  The Dobie likes to be busy, physically and mentally. He learns quickly, and training him is easy. Because he learns so fast, it's challenging to keep lessons fresh and interesting. He can have his own ideas about things, though typically he's not overly stubborn or willful with an owner who provides consistent, kind leadership.
  The Dobie takes a while to grow up. He remains puppyish until he is three to four years old.
Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who's beating up his littermates or the one who's hiding in the corner.
  Always meet at least one of the parents — usually the mother is the one who's available — to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you're comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.
  Like every dog, the Dobie needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Dobie puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.
  Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.



Health
  The Doberman Pinscher has a lifespan of 10 to 12 years. Wobbler's syndrome, cervical vertebral instability (CVI), and cardiomyopathy are some serious health problems affecting Dobermans; some minor diseases seen in this breed of dog include canine hip dysplasia (CHD), osteosarcoma, von Willebrand's disease (vWD), demodicosis, and gastric torsion. Albinism, narcolepsy, hypothyroidism, and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) are occasionally seen in Dobermans, while the Blue Doberman is more prone to hair loss. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run cardiac, eye, hip, and DNA tests.


Living Conditions
  Will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised, but does best with at least an average-sized yard. Dobes are very cold sensitive and are not outside dogs. That is why police in areas where it gets cold are not able to use them.

Exercise
  The Doberman is very energetic, with great stamina. They need to be taken on a daily, long walk or jog, and need to be made to heel beside or behind the human holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the humans.

Care
  The Doberman requires mental and physical exertion daily or it may become destructive or frustrated. This need can be easily met with a walk on a leash, a run in an enclosed area, or a long jog. And while it can live outdoors in cool climate, the Doberman is most effective indoors as a guardian and a family companion. Its coat requires minimal care.

Grooming
  Grooming is a breeze. Brush the Doberman with a slicker brush or hound glove every week, or even just run a wet towel over him. On the days he needs a bath, use a dog shampoo, not a human product. Rinse thoroughly and let him shake dry or towel-dry him.
  The Doberman sheds moderately. Regular brushing will help keep him and your home neat.  As with any dog, brushing before a bath helps eliminate more dead hair, which leaves less hair to shed. Your vacuum cleaner will work longer if you brush your Doberman regularly.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Brush his teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  The Doberman Pinscher is definitely not right for everyone. This is a highly intelligent breed meant to guard and work, and its owners must have the time and dedication to provide proper upbringing to this potentially dangerous breed, especially for households with young children. Highly trainable and loyal, the Doberman Pinscher makes a wonderful addition to an experienced household. This is a tidy breed as it does not shed much and has a low-maintenance grooming routine.

Children and other pets
  The well-bred Doberman is a wonderful family dog. He is trustworthy and protective of the children in his family, as long as he's been socialized and trained appropriately. Children must be respectful and kind to the Dobie, and he will be just that in return.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  He's also friendly with other dogs and animals in his home, especially if he has been raised with them. He can be aggressive toward dogs outside his family if he considers them a threat to his loved ones.

Famous Doberman Pinschers
  • Graf Belling v. Grönland: first registered Dobermann, in 1898.
  • First Doberman registered with the American Kennel Club, 1908
  • Ch. Big Boy of White Gate (owner/breeder Howard K. Mohr) wins the 1st Best in Show for an American-bred Doberman at the Rhode Island Kennel Club show, 1928.
  • Ch. Ferry v Raufelsen of Giralda (owner/breeder Mrs. M Hartley Dodge) is the first Doberman to win Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club show, 1939
  • Kurt, A Doberman who saved the lives of 250 U.S. Marines when he alerted them to Japanese soldiers. Kurt became the first k-9 casualty, July 23, when he was mortally wounded by a Japanese grenade. He was the first to be buried in what would become the war dog cemetery and he is the dog depicted in bronze sitting quiet but alert atop the World War II War Dog Memorial. Kurt, along with 24 other Dobermans whose names are inscribed on the memorial, died fighting with the US Marine Corps against Japanese forces on Guam in 1944.
  • Ch. Rancho Dobe's Storm: back to back Westminster Best in Show (1952, 1953). While other Dobermans may have more group or best in show or even more breed wins than Ch Rancho Dobe's Storm, he remains the only Doberman that has never been defeated by another Doberman.
  • Bingo von Ellendonk: first Dobermann to score 300 points (perfect score) in Schutzhund.
  • Ch. Cambria Cactus Cash: Sired 155 AKC champions as of January 2011.
  • Ch. Borong the Warlock: won his championship title in three countries, including 230 Best of Breed, 30 Specialty Show "bests," six all-breed Best in Show, and 66 Working Groups. He was the only Doberman ever to have won the Doberman Pinscher Club of America National Specialty Show three times, and in 1961 five Doberman specialists judged him Top in the breed in an annual Top Ten competition event.
  • Am. Ch. Brunswigs Cryptonite: achieved Best In Show on 124 occasions
Did You Know?
  Doberman’s get a bad reputation as attack dogs. Alpha in the Academy Award-winning film “UP” embodies every stereotype of the Doberman Pinscher: he’s both mean and not very smart. Fortunately, he’s also fictional and nothing like a real Doberman.

A dream day in the life of a Doberman Pinscher
  The Doberman Pinscher is a dog who thrives on work. Give this workaholic a job and he'll be the happiest pup on the block. Whether it's standing guard for the household, getting involved with search and rescue or any other type of accelerated training, this no-nonsense breed is up for the challenge.
Read More

Everything about your Golden Retriever

Everything about your Golden Retriever
  The Golden Retriever is one of the most popular dog breeds in the U.S. The breed's friendly, tolerant attitude makes him a fabulous family pet, and his intelligence makes him a highly capable working dog. Golden Retrievers excel at retrieving game for hunters, tracking, sniffing out drugs, and as therapy and assistance dogs. They're also natural athletes, and do well in dog sports such as agility and competitive obedience.
  This sporting breed has a sweet, gentle, people-pleasing personality. A well-bred Golden Retriever does not have strong guarding instincts, so don’t expect him to protect your home from burglars. He will, however, make friends with them and show them where the treats are.


Overview
  It's no surprise that the Golden Retriever is one of the top ten most popular dogs in the U.S. It's all good with the Golden: he's highly intelligent, sociable, beautiful, and loyal.
He's also lively. The Golden is slow to mature and retains the silly, playful personality of a puppy until three to four years of age, which can be both delightful and annoying. Many keep their puppyish traits into old age.
  Originally bred for the physically demanding job of retrieving ducks and other fowl for hunters, the Golden needs daily exercise: a walk or jog, free time in the yard, a run at the beach or lake , or a game of fetch. And like other intelligent breeds who were bred to work, they need to have a job to do, such as retrieving the paper, waking up family members, or competing in dog sports. A tired Golden is a well-behaved Golden.
  As well as giving your Golden Retriever physical and mental exercise, you should also be prepared to include him in your family activities. The Golden Retriever is a family dog, and he needs to be with his "pack." Don't consider getting a Golden unless you're willing to have him in the house with you, underfoot, every day.
  There's one other potential drawback to the breed: He's definitely not a watchdog. He might bark when strangers come around, but don't count on it. Most likely, he'll wag his tail and flash that characteristic Golden smile.

Highlights
  • Golden Retrievers shed profusely, especially in the spring and fall. Daily brushing will get some of the loose hair out of the coat, keeping it from settling on your clothing and all over your house. But if you live with a Golden, you'll have to get used to dog hair.
  • Golden Retrievers are family dogs; they need to live indoors with their human "pack," and shouldn't spend hours alone in the backyard.
  • Golden Retrievers are active dogs who need 40-60 minutes of hard exercise daily. They thrive on obedience training, agility classes, and other canine activities, which are a great way to give your dog physical and mental exercise.
  • Although they're gentle and trustworthy with kids, Golden Retrievers are boisterous, large dogs that can accidentally knock over a small child.
  • Goldens love to eat, and will quickly become overweight if overfed. Limit treats, measure out your dog's daily kibble, and feed him in regular meals rather than leaving food out all the time.
  • Because the Golden Retriever is so popular, there are many people breeding Goldens who care more about making money out of the demand for puppies than in breeding happy, healthy dogs. To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Golden has a dense, water-repellent double coat that comes in various shades of gold. Goldens shed heavily and require frequent brushing to keep the fur from flying.
  • Goldens typically have litters of six to eight puppies. Most breeders like to keep puppies until they are at least eight weeks old. This gives the puppies time to learn how to behave toward other dogs and gives the breeder time to evaluate the puppies’ personalities so she can place each one in just the right home. A bonus is that puppies of this age are more mature and more easily housetrained.
Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size: 55-75 pounds
Coat appearance: Long, dense, firm
Coloration: Any shade of golden
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Luxurious golden coat, sturdy and well-balanced body frame.
Possible alterations: Cream or red coloration not accepted by AKC.
Comparable Breeds: Irish Setter, Labrador Retriever


History
  The Golden is one of the breeds created during the dog-loving Victorian era. The breeds in his background probably included a yellow retriever, the Tweed Water Spaniel, wavy- and flag-coated retrievers and a red setter.
  Dudley Marjoribanks, Lord Tweedmouth, is generally credited with producing the first dogs that were to become known as Golden Retrievers, but recent research into studbooks, old paintings and other sources suggests that dogs similar to the Golden Retriever, possibly a type of setter, existed before Lord Tweedmouth began breeding them at his Scottish estate, Guisachan. England’s Kennel Club classified the dogs as “Retriever — Yellow or Golden” in 1911, then changed the name to “Retriever — Golden” in 1920.
 Golden Retrievers were first registered with the American Kennel Club in 1925 and were officially recognized as a breed in 1932. Since then they have established themselves as versatile companions, hunting dogs and working dogs. Goldens are found doing search and rescue, animal-assisted therapy, arson detection, drug detection and assistance work for people with disabilities. Their energy, enthusiasm and intelligence make them well suited to learning and performing almost any task.
  Today, Goldens are among the most beloved of breeds and rank fifth among the breeds registered by the AKC.



Temperament and Personality
  Ask anyone about the defining characteristic of the Golden Retriever, and the answer you will always get is temperament. The hallmark of the Golden is his kind, gentle, eager-to-please nature. He craves affection and will seek it from strangers as well as his own family.
Goldens are adaptable and people-oriented, and those characteristics are at the top of the list of reasons people love them. Unfortunately, the breed’s popularity has meant that careless or clueless people have begun churning out Goldens without any attempt to maintain their sweet, gentle disposition. Shyness and aggression can be problems, leading to fear biting or unfriendliness toward people and other dogs.
  Proper Goldens love everyone, but that love for people will often translate into jumping as a form of greeting. Basic, early obedience training is a must for these big, rambunctious dogs. Fortunately, Goldens are very easy to train, and a small investment of time when the dog is young will pay off when he's full-grown. He will readily sit on command, walk on a leash without pulling and come when called.
  If not trained, socialized and exercised daily, the good-natured exuberance of Goldens – especially as adolescents and young adults – can be overwhelming, and even frightening to small children, despite the dog’s best intentions to be friendly. Choose a Golden as a family dog only if you are prepared to supervise kids and dog when they are together and make sure everyone plays nicely. It’s normal for puppies to chase and bite in play, so you need to teach a Golden pup how to act around kids, as well as teach the kids how to play properly with the dog.
  Any dog, even a Golden, can develop obnoxious levels of barking, digging, food stealing and other undesirable behaviors if he is bored, untrained or unsupervised. And any dog can be a trial to live with during adolescence. In the case of the Golden, the “teen” years can start at six months and continue until the dog is two or three years old. Start training early, be patient and be consistent, and one day you will wake up to find that you live with a great dog.
  The perfect Golden Retriever is a product of his environment and breeding. Whether you want a Golden as a companion, show dog, canine competition dog or all three in one, look for one whose parents have nice personalities and who has been well socialized from early puppyhood.

Health
  The Golden Retriever has a lifespan of between 10 and 13 years. Some of its minor health problems include hypothyroidism, sub-aortic stenosis (SAS), eye disorders, elbow dysplasia, mast cell tumors, and seizures. Osteosarcoma is also occasionally seen in Golden Retrievers. Other major health concerns for the breed include lymphoma, canine hip dysplasia (CHD), hemangiosarcoma, and skin problems. To identify these conditions early, a veterinarian may recommend heart, hip, thyroid, eye, or elbow tests during routine checkups.

Living Conditions
  This breed will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are moderately active indoors and will do best with at least a medium to large yard.

Exercise
  The Golden Retriever needs to be taken on a daily, brisk, long walk, jog or run alongside you when you bicycle, where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as instinct tells a dog that the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the human. In addition, they like to retrieve balls and other toys. Be sure to exercise this dog well to avoid hyperactivity.

Care
  To encourage turnover over of the coat and minimize buildup of hair inside the house, it is best to routinely brush a Golden Retriever's coat at least twice a week. And though it is capable of living outdoors, the Retriever is at its best when kept indoors with the family. In addition, it is important for the Retriever to maintain a daily exercise routine, or take part in active games, so that it can spend its natural energy and relax comfortably  during "non-playing" hours.

Grooming
  It takes some dedication to live with a Golden Retriever. The Golden's profuse coat requires regular brushing and bathing to remove debris and mats. And while all dogs shed, Goldens do it with the same enthusiasm they bring to swimming and retrieving. You can keep it under control with daily brushing to remove the dead undercoat, but if shedding is a deal-breaker at your house, this is not the breed for you.
  Like most retrievers, Goldens love water. When your Golden gets wet - and he will - give him a thorough freshwater rinse to remove chlorine, salt or lake muck from his fur, all of which can be drying or otherwise damaging to the coat. Keep his ears dry to prevent infections, and use an ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian after he goes swimming.
  The rest is basic care. Trim his nails as needed, usually every few weeks, and brush his teeth for good overall health and fresh breath.

Is this breed right for you?
  Goldens can adapt to just about every lifestyle and environment; however, they're best suited for families with children and large living spaces with room to roam. They can do well in small apartments if daily exercise is incorporated into their routine. Owners must dedicate time for regular grooming to prevent knots in their long golden coat. Goldens are eager to please their human counterparts and therefore excel at training since they love the bond it creates for their master-canine relationship. Families with young children are encouraged to enroll their Golden into basic obedience courses early on.

Children and other pets
  The amiable Golden Retriever isn't bothered by the noise and commotion of kids — in fact, he thrives on it. He's a large, strong dog, though, and he can easily knock over a small child by mistake.
  As with every breed, you should always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or sleeping or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog, no matter how friendly, should ever be left unsupervised with a child.
  The Golden's attitude toward other pets is the more the merrier. He enjoys the companionship of other dogs, and with proper introductions and training, can be trusted with cats, rabbits, and other animals.

Notable dogs
  Liberty, the presidential pet of President Gerald R. Ford,and Victory, the presidential pet of Ronald Reagan, were Golden Retrievers
  The breed has also featured in a number of films and TV series, including: Air Bud and Air Bud: Golden Receiver, Full House, Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey and Homeward Bound II: Lost in San Francisco, Fluke, Napoleon, Up, Pushing Daisies, The Drew Carey Show, and Cats & Dogs. Cash from The Fox and the Hound 2 was also a mix of this breed, as was Whopper from Pound Puppies.

Did You Know?
  During the Ford Administration, a Golden Retriever lived in the White House. Liberty, a gift to President Gerald Ford from his daughter Susan, spent her days keeping him company in the Oval Office and splashing in the pool at Camp David.


A dream day in the life of a Golden Retriever
  A day at the lake or pond playing fetch would be a dream day in the making for this water-loving breed. Hanging out at the park with the whole family and even making a few new neighbor friends keep this pooch's tail wagging. For an extra-special day, going for a brisk run or walk on a cool day will keep a smile on this naturally happy breed.

Read More