How to Persuade Your Parents to Get a Dog - LUV My dogs

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Wednesday, May 21, 2014

How to Persuade Your Parents to Get a Dog

  This is a common question and something that a lot of kids need to deal with. Personally I think that all kids should be allowed to have a dog; not all parents agree with me, of course. Dogs require a lot of time, a lot of work, and sometimes they even require a lot of money. This is usually why parents decide not to get a dog.
  The most important thing to remember is that dogs are intelligent living beings that have thoughts and feelings. Dogs and other pets cannot be cast aside when we are busy or lose interest. When you get a pet, you get responsibilities that last a long time.
  The first step in convincing your parents to have a dog is to find out what they think about having a dog. The more you can find out what their concerns are, the better you can put forward your ideas.

What Every New Dog Owner Should Know
  If you are thinking about getting a puppy, you'll want to make sure that the puppy is right for you. First, you want to make sure the dog is child-friendly if you have kids. You want to figure out what size of dog you want and the energy level of dog you want. Then you need to start looking at good places to get your dog. This process could take a while but it's worth it. You may want to go to many different shelters and ethical breeders to make sure you have found the right dog. You really want to make sure that you and your family get along with the new puppy.

  There are several reasons why your parents may not want a dog:
  • Dogs cost money.
  • They are a lot of work.
  • They need long-term commitment.
  • Some people are allergic to dogs.
  • Some people don't like dogs.
  The costs of a dog include:
  • the original purchase price
  • veterinarian bills
  • food
  • obedience classes
  • other things that the dog needs, such as leashes and toys.
Show the Benefits of Having a Dog!
  •   Say that having a dog will make you spend more time with your family. Parents love hearing more about family time and less about all the time you spend away from home with your friends, or all that time you spend online alone in your room.
  • Say that having a dog will make you spend more time outside. Are your parents tired of all the time you spend alone in your dark room, staring at your computer or playing video games? Are they always telling you to go outside and enjoy the sunshine? If so, tell them that having a dog will make you spend more time in the park, in the sunlight, and more time getting physical exercise instead of texting your friends or eating junk food.
  • Show them that having a dog can improve your mental health. Having a dog is therapeutic -people who own dogs have been known to live longer and to be happier. A dog knows when you're upset and can comfort you in times of stress. Dogs are intuitive creatures that know exactly how to cheer up their owners. Maybe your parents spend a lot of time at work - tell them that having a dog in the house will not only be soothing for everyone, but that a dog can keep you company while they're away.
  • Show them that having a dog will make them feel more secure. Homes that obviously have dogs inside are known to be much less likely to be robbed. Show your parents that a dog, once trained, will not only be your life long companion, but he'll also be your protector. If you're old enough for your parents to go on vacation without you, tell them how much more secure you'd feel if there was a dog by your side.
  • Show them that having a dog will teach you responsibility. Though you should already demonstrate responsibility to show your parents that you're capable of having a dog, tell them that having a dog will make you an even more responsible and careful person, whether you're headed to high school or college in a few years.
  • Show them the benefits of getting the particular dog you want. You should do your research to find the breed of dog you want and how and when you can get it. Don't just abstractly say, "I want a dog!" Instead, say, "I want a chocolate lab!" or whatever breed of dog you may like. This shows that you have put time and effort into thinking about what kind of dog you want and how it will benefit you and your family.'
Address Their Concerns
  • Show them that you will walk the dog. They may be worried that you will get the dog, get bored, and force them to take care of the little creature instead. Tell them that you've already selected the best walking times for the dog and are determined to walk the dog every day; if you have a sibling, show that you've split up the walking duties. To prove your point, you can even go for walks on your own during the appointed doggie-walking times. Show them that you mean business.
  • Show them that the dog won't destroy their home. Your parents may be worried that the dog will chew up all of their furniture and cords, bring dirt into the house, and shed all over the place. It's your job to show them that none of this will happen.
  • Show them that you'll be able to give the dog medical care. Do your research in advance and find the best vet in your area. Ask your friends with dogs which vets they recommend, or do research on your own. Try to find a vet that is close to home so you can walk to his office if you don't drive, and show your parents that you've already done your research and can take care of it.
  • Show them that the dog won't be expensive. If cost is really a big concern, you should get a puppy at a pet shelter; the dog won't be expensive and you'll be doing a great deed by taking in a puppy in need. Research how much dog toys, beds, food, leashes, and anything else costs, and make a chart showing your parents how much this adds up to, and how you'll go about paying for it.
  • Show them that you have a game plan for watching the dog if your family goes on vacation. Your mom might ask, "What will we do when we go away to the beach for a week?" Don't get caught off guard and do your research in advance. Find a doggie day care nearby that can take your dog in, or find a close friend or neighbor who is willing to take care of the dog.
  • Show them that you won't get bored with the dog. Your parents may worry that once you get the dog, you'll stop taking care of it after a few weeks. To ease their concerns on this front, tell them that you're willing to wait a few months and to keep discussing the dog to show that this isn't just a passing phase; you're really committed to getting a dog and are willing to wait to show them how dedicated you really are.
Demonstrate Your Responsibility
  • Pull your weight with household chores. If you want your parents to see that you'd be a great dog owner, then you have to be able to do the basics: make your bed, keep your room clean, wash the dishes, and do anything that is required of you. Then, take it to the next level - pick up more household chores, help cook dinner, mow the lawn, do laundry, or do whatever you can to go above and beyond what is required of you.
  • Keep your grades up. If you want your parents to see that you can handle the added responsibility of a dog, then you should make sure to keep your grades up as you continue to ask to add a new member to your family. If you can, try to do even better in school to show them that you're committed to working hard and doing whatever it takes to get the dog.
  • Show them that you can take care of something. Have your parents give you something to take care of for a set amount of time. It can be an egg , a sack of flour, a plant, or even a hamster. Doing well on this test run may show your parents that you're responsible and serious about wanting a dog. Though this may seem silly, you should treat the situation with the utmost seriousness.
  • Do a "test run." If you have a friend or family member who needs someone to take care of his or her dog for a little while, you should take them up on their offer. Taking in the dog for the weekend or a few days will show your parents that you're ready to take on a pet, and it will make them see how happy you are to be hanging out with a furry creature.
  • Get a part-time job if you can. Depending on your age, you can get a part-time job at the mall or at the store at your local pool club. Maybe you can deliver papers, babysit, or help out a neighbor with chores, mowing the lawn, or shoveling snow. Getting a part-time job or even just finding a small way to make money will help your parents see that not only will you be able to handle some of the expenses of having a dog, but also that you're able to take on added responsibility.
  • Give them time to think about it. Remember, don't ask them over and over every day, or they will shut you out. If they say no, keep showing maturity and understanding, keep being helpful in the house, and occasionally mention the dog, to make them get used to the idea. Being patient will also show them that you're so committed that you're willing to wait.
Tips

  • Dogs, especially puppies, need a lot of things to chew on while they are developing their teeth. You can also find suggestions on how to keep your dog from chewing your shoes and clothes. You must be prepared to get them appropriate toys to chew.
  • Offer to pay for the dog yourself. This will show that you want one enough to spend your own money on it, and that you won't think of it as just another toy to play with until you get bored.
  • While you are waiting for your parents approval, here are some other ways to be around dogs: find out where the animal shelters are in your neighborhood and go volunteer there to help take care of some homeless dogs or find out if there are elderly neighbors who have dogs and cannot walk them regularly. You could volunteer to walk their dogs for them, even for free if you are okay with that.
  • If your parents say no because the weather in your area doesn't allow the dog to live outdoors, find an indoor area that is acceptable to your parents where the dog can stay when the weather is bad.
  • In some cases, family members might be afraid of getting a dog. For example, if a previous dog bit a friend/ family member, was too aggressive,or was too hyperactive, most parents will hesitate before agreeing to get a dog. However, if you wait a while  and you still want a dog, they will most likely have gotten over their fears or peeves.
Your Pup's First Day Home
  When your new puppy is brought home, make sure to spend lots of time with him, so he gets used to the new environment. If you have any other pets at home, give them equal attention so they still feel loved. Bring your new pup to a room with all of his new toys, food and bed. This will be the "puppy" room for the next few days. Once the puppy has been in the house for a couple weeks he can explore other rooms.
  If you follow any tips or instructions above it will help prepare our family for a puppy. I hope this essay will convince you to get a new family member for our household.

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