Dog Adoption Checklist - LUV My dogs

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Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Dog Adoption Checklist

  Congratulations on deciding to adopt a dog! You are embarking on a wonderful and rewarding relationship. When you adopt a dog there are many responsibilities and lifestyle adjustments to consider.

Questions for All Adopters:
  • Do you have any other dogs and how will they react to a new dog?
  • Is your current residence suited to the dog you’re considering?
  • How will your social life or work obligations affect your ability to care for a dog?
  • Do you have a plan for your new dog during vacations and/or work travel?
  • How do the people you live with feel about having a dog in the house?
  • Are you  intolerant of hair, dirt and other realities of sharing your home with a dog, such as allergies?
  • Do you or any of your household/family members have health issues that may be affected by a dog?
  • What breed of dog is the best fit with your current lifestyle?
  • Is there tension in the home? Dogs quickly pick up on stress in the home, and it can exacerbate their health and behavior problems.
  • Is there an adult in the family who has agreed to be ultimately responsible for the dog’s care?
Your dog is more likely to get loose from you and lost in the first few weeks they are home than any other time.  Be sure to provide them a secure collar and ID tag as soon as possible.  Actually, its a great thing to bring with you when you pick up your newly adopted pet.  And make sure they wear their collar at all times.  Often people make the mistake of removing the collar when their dog is in the house thinking they will never get out of the house without it.  Sadly, too often owners forget to put the collar back on or the dog slips out the door unexpectedly and is now lost without any identification.  Get a collar and tag as soon as possible!

  All dogs require a veterinary exam, a series of vaccinations and regular grooming.  While we will given them their Parvo Distemper (DHLPP) vaccination, Bordatella (INB - kennel cough) and worming, puppies may require additional vaccinations and worming after adoption, so make sure and follow up with your vet for these if needed.  Also all dogs will need their Rabies vaccination if they have not had it already.

  Your home and yard should provide proper confinement and reasonable space for the size of your dog.  When outside, your new dog or puppy should always be on a leash if you don’t have a safe enclosure.

   New house pets should be closely supervised when with other pets and children while they become familiar with their new home.

  Housebreaking your new dog should be done with encouraging words. They should be taken outside after meals and right before and after sleeping. Crate training is an effective training method. There is lots of useful training information on the Web and specifically crate training.

  All dogs need exercise, so allow your dog to play outside everyday. Young dogs and puppies may have extra energy, causing them to chew. Try not to leave them alone for long periods of time and consider crate training to housebreak and curb bad habits.  Organized training is also beneficial and there are several obedience training schools in our area.  Ask friends or other dog owners for the name of someone you can trust. If you cannot find a trainer, HSOP will recommend someone for you.

 In addition to a collar and tag, we also encourage microchipping which we also can do for you here at the Shelter for a small fee.

New Dog Supplies Check List
  • Dog collar, leash, and identification tags
  • Nutritious dog food
  • Dog crate or carrier
  • Dog bed
  • Food and water bowls
  • Dog grooming tools (shampoo, brush and nail clippers)
  • Dog toys
  • Treats & chews  
Other Considerations:
  • What do you expect your dog to contribute to your life? For example, do you want a running and hiking buddy, or is your idea of exercise watching it on TV?
  • If you are thinking of adopting a young dog, do you have the time and patience to work with the dog through its adolescence, taking house-breaking, chewing and energy-level into account? 
  • Have you considered your lifestyle carefully and determined whether a younger or older dog would be a better match for you?
  • Can you train and handle a dog with behavior issues or are you looking for an easy-going friend?
  • Do you need a dog who will be reliable with children or one you can take with you when you travel?
  • Do you want a dog who follows you all around the house or would you prefer a less clingy, more independent character?
Size Considerations:
  • What size dog can your home accommodate?
  • Will you have enough room if your dog grows to be bigger than expected?
  • What size dog would suit the other people who live in or visit your home regularly?
  • Do you have another dog to consider when choosing the size of your next dog?
  • How big a dog can you travel comfortably with?

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