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Monday, July 31, 2017

Everything about your French Spaniel

Everything about your French Spaniel
  French Spaniels very much enjoy the company of their owners. They are gentle with children, making great pets. Rustic looking, relatively tall and powerfully built, the French Spaniel trains well but is easily intimidated; training should be gentle, firm and consistent. They need human companionship and lots of exercise.

Overview

  The French Spaniel is one of the two tallest spaniel breeds, being taller than the English Springer Spaniel. Males can range in height from 22–24 inches, and females are about an inch shorter. Dogs can range in weight from 45–60 pounds . A normal dog has a muscular appearance with a deep chest and strong legs. The French Spaniel has eyes of a dark amber colour, and a thick tail that tapers towards the tip. The hair is medium, dense, with long feathers on the ears, backs of the legs and tail. It has some waviness on the chest and otherwise lies flat on the body. The normal colour of a French Spaniel's coat is white with brown markings rather in shade from a light cinnamon to dark liver.

  The French Spaniel has a friendly and outgoing personality and is well balanced and patient. It is not a naturally aggressive dog, is eager to please and thus can be trained easily. A dog of this breed will form a strong bond with its master, being typically a working dog. It has a high level of stamina and requires vigorous exercise.

Breed standards
AKC group: FSS. The AKC Foundation Stock Service (FSS) is an optional recording service for purebred dogs that are not yet eligible for AKC registration.
UKC group: Gun Dog
Average lifespan: 10-12 years
Average size:  45 to 60 lbs
Coat appearance: Fine, Long, Short, Silky, and Wavy
Coloration: Liver & White
Hypoallergenic: No

Temperament: Energetic, Intelligent, Loving

History
  Spaniels were first mentioned in France during the 14th century in Gaston III of Foix-Béarn's work Livre de chasse, later translated into English as The Master of Game.They were speculated to have originated during the Crusades of the 11th century.The French Spaniel was referred to as a specific type of Spaniel by 1660 and was noted as being distinctive from the King Charles Spaniel of the Holland type.
A drawing of a French Spaniel
being used to hunt Mallards from 1805.

  The breed was popular during the Middle Ages with it used for falconry and as a settling dog for net hunting. They became a favourite of French Royalty and Kings and Princes at the royal courts of Versailles favored them over other breeds of hunting dogs. In addition, Catherine I of Russia (1684–1727) was known to have owned a French Spaniel named Babe. During this period, the French Spaniel was known to have split into several regional types.
  The Sporting Magazine wrote of the French Spaniel and the hunting of mallards in 1805, "The rough French Spaniel has been found the best companion on these occasions: he watches the conduct of the sportsman, and, with a velocity unequalled, darts on the wounded prey, presents it with all possible speed at the feet of his master." In the 1850s, the Brittany (formerly known as Brittany Spaniel) was developed from crossing French Spaniels with English Setters.

  James de Connick established the first breed standard for the French Spaniel in 1891. At the turn of the 20th century, the numbers of French Spaniels dropped so low that they nearly became extinct due to competition from foreign sporting dogs, in particular as French hunters chose to hunt particularly with English breeds of hunting dogs. A French priest named Father Fournier undertook the task of gathering the remaining French Spaniels in his Saint Hillaire kennels in order to preserve the breed. There he built the lineages that are representatives of those we now have. The French Spaniel Club was founded in 1921, with Father Fournier as the president of the association.
  The modern French Spaniel is one of a group of recognised French Spaniels, including the Brittany, Picardy and Blue Picardy.

Temperament
  Calm, even-tempered and intelligent, French Spaniels very much enjoy the company of their owners. They are gentle with children, making great pets. Rustic looking, relatively tall and powerfully built, the French Spaniel trains well but is easily intimidated; training should be gentle, firm and consistent. They need human companionship and lots of exercise. Known and appreciated for its hunting skills, the French Spaniel works very well on rugged terrain and in the water as a flusher. French Spaniels are one of the best retrievers and point very precisely. Hunting at a gallop or extended trot, the French Spaniel has an excellent nose, but has less speed and a more limited search range than the Brittany Spaniel.
  They are enthusiastic hunting dogs, persistent, hardy and courageous. This breed gets along well with other dogs. It is important owners are even-tempered, but firm and consistent with the rules set upon the dog. It is also equally important, when the dog is not hunting, that he receives daily pack walks where he heels beside the handler during the walk. When a dog is lacking in either leadership and or proper mental/physical exercise it causes separation anxiety.

Health
  The breed is robustly healthy with few issues and adapts well to wet weather conditions. A dermatological condition known as acral mutilation and analgesia may affect French Spaniels. It is a newly recognised disorder, with symptoms becoming apparent between three and a half months and a year of age. 
  It was first reported in thirteen dogs in Canada and shares symptoms with the acral mutilation syndromes of the German Shorthaired Pointer, English Pointer and English Springer Spaniels. Dogs who are affected will lick, bite and mutilate their extremities resulting in ulcers with secondary bacterial infections. Self amputation of claws, digits and footpads can happen in extreme cases. The majority of the initial dogs identified were euthanised within days to months of being diagnosed.

Care and Grooming
  The French Spaniel is an easy to groom breed, it is best to brush the dog twice a week in order to maintain its good look. Regular brushing twice a week of the medium-length, flat coat is really all that is needed to keep it in good condition. Bathe or dry shampoo when necessary. It is generally a low-maintenance dog. Check the ears carefully, especially when the dog has been out in rough or brushy terrain. This breed is a light shedder.

Living Conditions
 The French Spaniel is not recommended for apartment life. They are very active indoors and will do best with acreage. This breed is resistant to cold and damp conditions.

Training
  Though, being intelligent it will rather easy to train, but sometimes can be intimidating, so it shall require very consistent and firm training. It may highly energetic, courageous, non aggressive and eager to please the owner, so it learns obediently. But training should be firm, moderate and consistent. It is very active and vigorous dog that will need an active and potent owner.

Exercise
  Not a breed for apartment livings, it is highly energetic and active indoor so it can do well in a large yards or rural settings with ample areas to run or to do a job. Being a working dog, it likes the daily exercise in order to maintain its best health and fitness. It has a great stamina; therefore, they need ample amount of exercises for their mental and physical satisfaction. Daily exercises include run, jog and long walks with owners.

French Spaniel with children and other pets
  Naturally, it is a non- aggressive breed, but it can intimidating, so it should well trained to resolve the intimidating. It can get along with other dogs. Mild, calm and friendly to the children, thus it forms a wonderful family dog.

Things You Should Know
  This people-oriented breed may suffer from separation anxiety, which can be resolved with patience and training. Keep in mind this dog’s gentle nature, and use positive reinforcement techniques with lots of praise. However, you must still establish yourself as the kind but firm alpha.

Is the French Spaniel Right For You?
  French Spaniels very much enjoy the company of their owners. They are gentle with children, making great pets. Rustic looking, relatively tall and powerfully built, the French Spaniel trains well but is easily intimidated; training should be gentle, firm and consistent
  French Spaniels tend to live indoors but are not suitable for small homes such as apartments. Indoors they tend to be very active but thrive with outdoor space and are resistant to cold and damp conditions. They need daily exercise and have great staminaand endurance, and so make great hiking companions.


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Wednesday, July 12, 2017

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in UK

10 Most Popular Dog Breeds in UK
  There are an estimated 9 million dog owners in the UK. This figure is rising year on year as new generations become dog parents and our canine companions become our surrogate children.
  Over the years, the list of most popular dog breeds has fluctuated, with new breeds emerging and taking pole position. However there are some breeds that have maintained their ranking and remain amongst the most popular breeds owned in the UK.
Here’s a list of the top 10 most popular dog breeds based on The Kennel Club registration in 2016.

10. Border Terrier
  In 10th place is the Border Terrier , part of the KC’s Terrier Group. Boasting a rustic, working appearance, the breed is easily identifiable and held in high esteem. First developed in the early 18th century in the Cheviot Hills, the Border Terrier was primarily bred for the purpose of flushing out and killing foxes that were attacking the farmer's livestock. Highly valued for its willingness and stamina, the Border Terrier rose to tremendous popularity in the century, also hunting otters, badgers and vermin.
  The Border’s wiry double coat is commonly coloured wheaten, blue, tan, grizzle, red and white, which may have aided the breed's camouflage in the outland terrains of the border.   The Border Terrier is an affectionate, loyal and mannered breed, displaying a relaxed temperament that makes for an ideal companion. Compatible with children and other house pets as well as being a practical size, it is unsurprising that this breed appears on the popularity list.

9. Miniature Schnauzer

In ninth place is the Miniature Schnauzer. The miniature schnauzer is a robust, sturdily built terrier of nearly square proportion. It was developed as a ratter and is quick and tough. Its gait displays good reach and drive. Its coat is double, with a close undercoat, and hard, wiry, outer coat which is longer on the legs, muzzle and eyebrows. Its facial furnishings add to its keen expression. 
  The miniature schnauzer deserves its place as one of the most popular terrier pets. It is playful, inquisitive, alert, spunky and companionable. It is a well-mannered house dog that also enjoys being in the middle of activities. It is less domineering than the larger schnauzers and less dog-aggressive than most terriers. It is also better with other animals than most terriers, although it will gladly give chase. It is clever and can be stubborn, but it is generally biddable. It enjoys children. Some may bark a lot. 

8. Golden Retriever 

  In eighth place is the Golden Retriever.Lower in the list than some might have assumed, the Golden Retriever is widely considered one of the most popular breeds, not only as a companionable house dog but in obedience, service and therapy. Believed to have been developed by Lord Tweedmouth in the late 1800s, the Golden Retriever has its roots in the Scottish Highlands where it was selectively bred for the purposes of hunting, tracking and retrieving upland game, as its name would suggest.

  Easily identifiable for its wavy golden coat, the Retriever is medium-sized with a straight muzzle, large brown eyes, feathering on ears, back of legs, underside of tail and front of neck. Highly trainable, the breed is the ideal choice for the modern family, being devoted to children and demonstrating love, loyalty and affection. Like the Labrador Retriever, the breed’s natural love of people is showcased at every opportunity.

7. German Shepherd Dog

   In seventh place is the German Shepherd Dog, a member of the Herding Group.
Despite falling fourth on the list, the German Shepherd – otherwise known as the Alsatian – is arguably the most popular breed worldwide. Founded in 1899, the Shepherd was primarily bred as a versatile working dog, developed to be fearless and agile for the purposes of military and police work. The German Shepherd retained its concrete reputation across Europe and the United States following its wide usage during World War I.

  Athletically built to change direction at full speed, the appearance of the German Shepherd reflects its versatile working capabilities. Contrary to popular belief, a socialised and consistently trained German Shepherd will not display undue aggression. Instead, a Shepherd will demonstrate a calm and gentle manner - having an enormous capacity for love, loyalty and affection. Inherently able-minded and intelligent, the Shepherd can be trained to a very good degree and is known for being incredibly devoted to children.

6. Bulldog

  In sixth place is the Bulldog, which is included in the Utility Group. Less of a lap dog, more of a fully-fledged canine side-kick, the Bulldog is just behind its smaller counterpart on the list of popular breeds. Commonly entitled the National Dog of Great Britain, the breed features in various patriotic pictorials – for this reason alone, the Bulldog simply had to appear on the list! Once the so-called sport of bull and badger baiting was finally dispensed with in 1850, the Bulldog grew in popularity as a fearless yet increasingly placid companion dog, hence its positioning on the list.

  Bearing in mind its early sporting heritage, the appearance of the Bulldog is somewhat intimidating, however such is not a fair reflection of its nature. The breed possesses an easy and affectionate temperament, is protective of children and its home, and is a great lover of people. The appearance of the Bulldog is distinctive and clearly desirable. Anyone wanting a dog with an outwardly fierce appearance but a mellow interior should seriously consider buying a Bulldog.

5. English Springer Spaniel 

  In fifth place is the English Springer Spaniel, part of the KC ’s Gundog Group.Larger than its cousin the Cocker Spaniel, the English Springer is a strong competitor in the popularity contest. Deriving its name from its early usage as a game flusher, 'springing' furred and feathered game from the bush in order for the hunter to shoot it, the breed is revered for its ability to work tirelessly in a variety of working fulfillments. Having retained its popularity as a companion dog since its early prevalence in the Renaissance, the English Springer Spaniel is often described as the ideal family dog.
  The coat of the English Springer Spaniel is typically wavy and feathered, common in colours of white and liver, usually with black, liver or tan markings. The breed possesses an amiable and relaxed temperament, displaying affection and loyalty towards its family and engaging well with children. Owners have described the Springer Spaniel as being ‘full of life and character,’ and making a great addition to active family life.

4. Pug

  In fourth place is the Pug, a member of the Toy Group. This entry might come as a surprise to some. Much conjecture surrounds the ancestry and origin of the Pug, although it was made popular during the Victorian period when it was commonly observed atop private carriages. As a breed, it has boasted many notable admirers throughout history, including Napoleon's wife – Josephine, Queen Victoria, and the Duke and Duchess of Windsor.
  The breed boasts several distinctive features, including a broad, flat and pronounced muzzle, prominent eyes, low-set, triangular ears and a short tail, arching over the back. The Pug is a suitable and delightful breed choice for families or a dedicated sole owner wanting a lap dog, due to its calm and amiable temperament and its compact proportions. Animated and spirited, a Pug is guaranteed to liven up any home setting – perhaps accounting for its popularity!

3. French Bulldog

  In third place is the French bulldog, which is included in the Utility Group. Another close contender, the French Bulldog is the eighth most popular breed choice in the UK – up four places from last year. Contrary to popular belief, the French Bulldog hails from Nottingham, England, where it was the breed choice of lace makers and craftsmen in the city. Popular amongst the artistic and eccentric of Parisian city dwellers also, the French Bulldog grew in favour, retaining its name on its return to England, as well as its concrete reputation.
  A compact dog of reduced proportions, the French Bulldog possesses a steady and easy temperament, despite its bullish appearance. A popular lap dog and ladies’ companion, the Bulldog is well suited to the home setting, being compatible with both children and other house pets. Time has proven the popularity of this breed, which is unlikely to ever go out of favour.

2.  Cocker Spaniel
  In second place is the Cocker Spaniel, a member of the Gun Dog Group. Taking second position is this versatile hunting gun-dog. The Cocker Spaniel was prominent during the Tudor reign of Henry VIII and proved a favourite in the royal courts of the 16th and 17th centuries. Until 1990, the breed was considered the most popular as registered by the American Kennel Club, however it now ranks 25th.
  Characterised by an arched head, low-set ears, ovular eyes and a soft, wavy coat in colour deviations of solid black, red or liver, the Cocker Spaniel is a highly attractive breed and is considered the original family companion, proceeding the Labrador and Golden Retriever as the dog most compatible with children, other pets and domestic living. The breed experienced a resurgence in popularity following the acquisition of a black Cocker Spaniel, named Lupo, by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge before Christmas of last year.

1.  Labrador Retriever

  In first place is the Labrador retriever, a friendly and active member of the Gundog Group. The KC (UK) recognized the breed in 1903. The Labrador retriever, the most popular dog breed in the United Kingdom, comes in three colors: yellow, black, and chocolate.   Labrador Retrievers are among the most popular dog breeds out there today. 
  The fact the Labrador Retriever takes pole position is probably not surprising. Described as 'the best all-round dog' by the Kennel Club, the Labrador Retriever has enjoyed great popularity throughout its existence, both as a domestic pet and service dog. This traditional working animal was originally utilised off the coast of Labrador and neighbouring Newfoundland in Canada, helping Portuguese fishermen to trawl, retrieve fish and retract the nets. The modern Labrador was developed in 19th century England and was officially recognised by the Kennel Club in 1903.

  Typically a proportioned and sprightly-looking breed, the Labrador Retriever boasts strong legs, a broad head, medium-sized pendant ears, and wide-set eyes. Today, the Labrador is observed in hunting, tracking, retrieving, military and police work, search and rescue, competitive obedience, agility and as a guide dog to the blind. Highly valued for being inherently gentle, affectionate and obedient, the Labrador is well suited to the home setting and is neither unduly shy nor aggressive. The Labrador is a great lover of people, perhaps why people are a great lover of it!
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What is the difference between a Parson Terrier and a Jack Russell Terrier?

What is the difference between a Parson Terrier and a Jack Russell Terrier?
  These are very similar looking dog breeds with a common ancestry. Therefore, understanding differences between Jack Russell and Parson Russell terriers would be very important. Range of body weights and body shapes of the two breeds are variable, but there are other notable differences between Jack Russell and Parson Russell terriers.

History
Trump, the terrier that started the Jack Russell breed

  The story of how the Jack Russell terrier came to being was relayed in the Memoir of the Rev. John Russell by E. W. L. Davies. In 1815, the Reverend, then 20 years old and obsessed with hunting, was on the point of taking his final exams at Oxford University. One day, while strolling near the river Cherwell, he encountered a milkman with a terrier — “such an animal as Russell had only seen in his dreams”. Determined to acquire the dog, he bargained with the owner until the animal, a bitch called Trump, came into his possession.

  White, with a patch of dark tan over each eye and ear and a dot of tan at the root of the tail, her coat was thick, close and slightly wiry. Her legs were straight, while her entire frame suggested hardiness and endurance. She was the height of a full-grown vixen.

Jack Russell Terrier


  This is a small terrier developed in England for foxhunting. They have a white coloured short and rough coat of fur with brown or black patches. They are not very tall and heavy, but the height at the withers is about 25 to 38 centimetres and the weight ranges around 5.9 – 7.7 kilograms. In fact, it is a compact and balanced body structure. Their head is balanced and proportionate to the body. The skull is flat and narrowed towards eyes and ends up with nostrils. Their ears are V-shaped and flapped forwards as in fox terriers. They are energetic dogs and require heavy exercises and stimulations for a better health. Jack Russell terriers can live a long life ranging around 13 – 16 years.

Parson Russell Terrier
  Parson Russell terrier is a small dog breed originated in the late 18th century for foxhunting. The most important feature of these dogs is the extremely close resemblance with Jack Russell terriers. Parson Russell terriers have been used in conformation shows for the standard breed characteristics. Parson Russel terrier, aka Parson or Parson Jack Russell terrier, does have the standards of a separate breed according to the prominent kennel clubs in the world.

  Parsons have long legs, and the lengths of which are almost equal to the length of the body. Their head is long, and the chest is large with the V-shaped dropped ears being pointed towards eyes. Usually, they are 33 – 36 centimetres tall at the withers, and the weights range from 5.9 through 7.7 kilograms. With their length and height being the same, the parsons possess a square shape body. Parson Russell terriers are agile dogs with proven record of accomplishment in excelling dog sport events such as fly ball and agility. Parsons prefer to be handled with care and love so that they can give it back to the owners.

Differences 
 The Jack Russell terrier and Parson Russell terrier breeds are similar, sharing a common origin, but have several marked differences — the most notable being the range of acceptable heights.
  The Russell terrier, which is also sometimes called the English Jack Russell terrier or the Short Jack Russell terrier is a generally smaller related breed. Both the breed standards of the American Russell Terrier Club and the English Jack Russell Terrier Club Alliance states that at the withers it should be an ideal height of 8–12 inches . Although sometimes called the English or Irish Jack Russell terrier,this is not the recognised height of Jack Russells in the United Kingdom. According to the Jack Russell Club of Great Britain's breed standard, it is the same size as the standard for Jack Russells in the United States, 10–15 inches.  Other differences in the Parson can include a longer head and larger chest as well as overall a larger body size.The height of a Parson Russell at the withers according to the breed standard is 12–14 inches which places it within the range of the Jack Russell Terrier Club of America's standard size for a Jack Russell of 10–15 inches. However, the Parson Russell is a conformation show standard whereas the Jack Russell standard is a more general working standard.
  Compared to the Parson, the Russell terrier should always be longer than tall at the withers, whereas the Parson's points should be of equal distance.

  The Fédération Cynologique Internationale standard for the Jack Russell terrier has this smaller size listed as a requirement. 

Jack Russell vs Parson Russell Terriers
Despite the weight range of the two breeds is exactly the same; Jack Russell has a broad range of height, whereas Parson Russell terriers have only range of three centimetres for the height.
The body of Parsons is square shaped with equal measurements for both height and length, whereas the Jack Russell terrier is not square-shaped.
The legs are taller in Parsons than in Jack Russell terriers.

Parson has a more conspicuous and larger head than the Jack Russell does.

Which Dog Breed is Right for you?
Maintenance: The Jack Russell Terrier will be easier to maintain. Its grooming needs are not as demanding and it fits well for owners who are not willing to spend time and money on upkeep.
Shedding: The Jack Russell Terrier sheds more. Shedding is a normal process to naturally lose old or damaged hair. Some owners might not find it desirable to find dog hair in their cars and homes.
Training: Training the Parson Russell Terrier will be easier, and will be great for first-time owners or owners who like dogs willing to obey and listen well quickly. Owners will need more patience and perseverance to train the Jack Russell Terrier and might need to seek out obedience schools.
Adaptability: The Parson Russell Terrier has better adaptability. It can better respond and alter itself to its environment.
Exercise Needs: Both the Parson Russell Terrier and Jack Russell Terrier will require daily, strenuous exercise. These dogs will need to be very active to maintain their fitness.

With Kids: Both the Parson Russell Terrier and Jack Russell Terrier are good with kids. They can grow up with them and become great family pets.


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Everything about your Parson Russell Terrier

Everything about your Parson Russell Terrier
  It may be similar to the Jack Russell Terrier, but the Parson Russell Terrier is a breed all its own. In fact, it was distinguished as its own breed in 2003. But while the name is different, the essential look, temperament, and genuine qualities inherent to this breed have not been shaken in the slightest. This is a smaller dog with the bright, energetic personality that many expect from smaller dogs, with a high propensity toward playfulness and confidence.

Overview

  The Parson Russell Terrier is a breed of small white terrier that was the original Fox Terrier of the 18th century. The breed is named after the person credited with the creation of this type of dog, the Reverend John "Jack" Russell. It is the recognised conformation show variety of the Jack Russell Terrier and was first recognised in 1990 in the United Kingdom as the Parson Russell Terrier. In America, it was first recognised as the Jack Russell Terrier in 1997. The name was changed to its current form in 1999 in the UK and by 2008 all international kennel clubs recognised it under the new name.
  A mostly white breed with either a smooth, rough or broken coat, it conforms to a narrower range of sizes than the Jack Russell. It is a feisty, energetic terrier, suited to sports and able to get along with children and other animals. It has a range of breed-related health issues, mainly relating to eye disorders.

Breed standards

AKC group: Large/medium-sized Terriers
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 13-15 years
Average size: 14 - 18 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense, Harsh and Rough, and Short
Coloration: white with black, tan or grizzle markings or a tricolor combination
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards

Temperament: Friendly, bold, intelligent, independent

History
  This breed shares a common history with the Jack Russell Terrier until the early 1980s.
This type of small white terrier dates back to the work of the Reverend John Russell, born in 1795.In 1819 he purchased a small white and tan terrier bitch named Trump from a milkman in the hamlet of Elmsford. She formed the basis for his breeding programme, and by the 1850s the dogs were recognised as a distinct type of Fox Terrier.
  In 1894, the Devon and Somerset Badger Club was founded by Arthur Blake Heinemann who created the first breed standard for this type of terrier. The club was formed with the aim of promoting badger digging, rather than fox hunting. By the turn of the 20th century, the name of John Russell had become associated with this type of terrier. The Devon and Somerset Badger Club would go on to be renamed the Parson Jack Russell Terrier Club and continued until just before World War II when the club folded.
  The Jack Russell Terrier Club of Great Britain was established in 1974 as the parent club for the Jack Russell Terrier in the UK. The club has actively opposed recognition of the Jack Russell Terrier by Kennel Club .In 1983, the Parson Jack Russell Terrier Club  was reformed with the aim of seeking Kennel Club recognition for the breed. The initial application was turned down, but after several further rejections, the Parson Jack Russell Terrier was recognised on 9 January 1990 as a variant of the Fox Terrier, with the United Kennel Club following suit in 1991.The American Kennel Club recognised the breed as the Jack Russell Terrier effective 1 November 1997.
  On 1 August 1999, the Parson Jack Russell Terrier Club successfully petitioned the Kennel Club  to change the name of the breed to the Parson Russell Terrier, with the name of the breed club following suit. The international kennel association, the Fédération Cynologique Internationale, recognised the Parson Russell Terrier on 4 June 2001. The American Kennel Club updated the name of the recognised breed from Jack Russell Terrier on 1 April 2003. The United Kennel Club adopted the new name on 23 April 2008.

  The Australian National Kennel Council , New Zealand Kennel Club and United Kennel Club  are the only three major kennel clubs to recognise both the Jack Russell Terrier and the Parson Russell Terrier separately. In 2009, there were 18 Parsons registered with the ANKC compared to 1073 Jack Russells.

Temperament

  A humorous and active person who seeks mischief and entertainment will find an ideal companion in this dog. As the dog loves adventure and action, it often tends to get into trouble. It is a real hunter, fond of exploring, chasing, wandering, and digging whenever given an opportunity.

  The intelligent and playful Parson Russell Terrier mixes well with both strangers and children. It is better than most terriers but may still get scrappy with unknown dogs. It may also chase cats or rodents, but gets along well with horses. Additionally, many Parson Russell Terriers have the tendency to dig and bark.

Health

  The average life span of the Parson Russell Terrier is 13 to 15 years. Breed health concerns may include cataracts, cerebellar ataxia, congenital deafness, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, lens luxation, myasthenia gravis, patellar luxation and von Willebrand disease.

Care
  The Parson Russell Terrier does best when it has access to the garden and the house; however, it does not make a good apartment dog. The Parson Russell requires a great deal of physical and mental activity daily. As it is not a dog that will sit idly indoors, the Parson Russell requires an energetic game or a long walk daily, in addition to a brief training session. Given the chance, it will definitely wander on its own; therefore, allow it to roam in safe areas. Be attentive, however, as it has a tendency to invite trouble by exploring down holes.

  For the smooth variety, coat care comprises just weekly brushing to get rid of dead hair, while the broken coat Parson Russells require the occasional hand stripping.

Living Conditions


  The Parson Russell Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. These dogs are very active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Training

  Parson Russells are highly trainable dogs and soak up new tasks like a sponge. They are terriers, however and like all terriers, Parsons can exhibit stubbornness if they don't like the attitude of the person training them. Positive reinforcement and mixing up the daily training routine will keep your Parson Russell engaged and interested. Discipline and harsh tones will cause this dog to become defensive which may lead to snapping or biting.
  Once basic obedience is mastered, Parson Russells should move on to advanced obedience, trick training and agility work. They thrive on new activity and will be at the top of their class in just about every activity they participate in.

Exercise Requirements

  This dog loves plenty of space and requires good, thorough daily exercise; a properly-exercised dog has had his change to point his energy somewhere and this means it will generally have a more pleasant and balanced personality. This dog will enjoy a good open area like a park or even a country home, and can be both a city and country dog but will definitely require regular exercise in either case.

Grooming

  All coat types are easy to groom. Comb and brush regularly with a firm bristle brush, and bathe only when necessary. To show, owners must strip the coat. Like the rough coat, the broken coated Parson needs to be stripped out also.

  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.   Check the ears weekly for dirt, redness or a bad odor that can indicate an infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with a gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner recommended by your veterinarian. 

Is the Parson Russell Terrier the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Parson Russell Terrier is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.

Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.
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Everything about your Jack Russell Terrier

Everything about your Jack Russell Terrier
  The Jack Russell Terrier is a small terrier that is commonly confused with the Parson Russell Terrier. The Parson Russell Terrier is shorter-bodied and longer-legged, while the Jack Russell Terrier is longer-bodied and shorter-legged. It is not yet an officially recognized breed by the AKC. The UKC recognized both the Jack and Parson under the breed Russell Terriers until 2009, and the NKC recognizes the Jack but not the Parson.

Overview
  He may be small, but what the Jack Russell Terrier lacks in size, he more than makes up for in energy. What was once an English hunting dog, the Jack Russell is now a treasured companion to many households around the world. But if you’re planning on bringing one of these feisty dogs home, you had better be active – this little fella never stops .
  Full of energy and exuberance, the Jack Russell Terrier is lively, busy, loves to hunt, and enjoys mental challenges. This is known to be an independent breed, so it is recommended that you should be an experienced dog owner. But once trained, you’ll find that the Jack Russell Terrier is a delight and is always up for amusement. Read on to learn more about this breed.

Highlights
  • The Jack Russell Terrier, like many terriers, enjoys digging and can make quite a large hole in a short time. It' easier to train a dog to dig in a specific area than it is to break him of a digging habit.
  • Jack Russell Terriers must have a securely fenced yard to give them room to play and burn off their abundant energy. Underground electronic fencing won't hold them. Jacks have been known to climb trees and even chain link fencing to escape their yards, so it's best if their time outdoors is supervised.
  • First-time or timid dog owners would do well to choose another kind of dog. The Jack can be a challenge even for an experienced dog owner. He's strong willed and requires firm and consistent training.
  • Jacks can be recreational barkers, so they're not suited to apartment life.
  • Aggression toward other dogs can be a serious problem with the Jack Russell Terrier if he's not taught to get along with other canines from an early age.
  • The Jack Russell thrives when he's with his family and should not live outdoors or in a kennel. When you leave the house, try turning on a radio to help prevent separation anxiety.
  • Jacks are bouncy and will jump up on people and things. They're capable of jumping higher than 5 feet.
  • Jack Russells have a strong prey drive and will take off after smaller animals. They should never be trusted off leash unless they're in a fenced area.
  • Jack Russell Terriers have a high energy level and are active indoors and out. They need several walks per day, or several good games in the yard. They make excellent jogging companions.
Breed standards
AKC group: Small Terriers
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 10 to 15 years
Average size: 13 to 17 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense, Harsh and Rough, Short-Haired, Thick, and Wire
Coloration: white, white with black or tan markings, or tricolor (white, black, and tan)
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, active singles, experienced owners, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Energetic, independent, intelligent, stubborn


History
A drawing of Trump, the dog purchased
by the Reverend John Russell.
  The Jack Russell Terrier was developed in southern England during the mid-1800s by Parson John Russell, from whom the breed took its name. Russell aimed to create a working terrier who would hunt with hounds, bolting foxes from their dens so the hounds could chase them.
  The Jack Russell became a favorite of many sportsmen, especially those who hunted on horseback. The breed was known in the U.S. by the 1930s, and several breed clubs sprang up with different opinions concerning the Jack's appearance, working ability, and whether he should compete in conformation shows or remain a working dog.
  The Jack Russell Terrier Club of America maintains an independent registry and considers the Jack purely a hunting dog, but the Jack Russell Terrier Association of America (JRTCA) sought recognition by the American Kennel Club, which was granted in 2000. To differentiate it from the dogs registered by the JRTCA, the American Kennel Club renamed the breed, calling it the Parson Russell Terrier.


Differences with related breeds
  The Jack Russell terrier and Parson Russell terrier breeds are similar, sharing a common origin, but have several marked differences — the most notable being the range of acceptable heights.
The Parson Russell terrier

  Other differences in the Parson can include a longer head and larger chest as well as overall a larger body size.The height of a Parson Russell at the withers according to the breed standard is 12–14 inches which places it within the range of the Jack Russell Terrier Club of America's standard size for a Jack Russell of 10–15 inches. However, the Parson Russell is a conformation show standard whereas the Jack Russell standard is a more general working standard.
  The Russell terrier, which is also sometimes called the English Jack Russell terrier or the Short Jack Russell terrier is a generally smaller related breed. Both the breed standards of the American Russell Terrier Club and the English Jack Russell Terrier Club Alliance states that at the withers it should be an ideal height of 8–12 inches . Although sometimes called the English or Irish Jack Russell terrier,this is not the recognised height of Jack Russells in the United Kingdom. According to the Jack Russell Club of Great Britain's breed standard, it is the same size as the standard for Jack Russells in the United States, 10–15 inches.
  Compared to the Parson, the Russell terrier should always be longer than tall at the withers, whereas the Parson's points should be of equal distance.
  The Fédération Cynologique Internationale standard for the Jack Russell terrier has this smaller size listed as a requirement. 

Personality

  The energetic and spirited Jack packs a lot of personality into his small body. Loving, devoted, and endlessly amusing, he enjoys life and all it has to offer. Given half a chance, he'll pursue his delights over fences and through the streets. He's incredibly intelligent, but his wilful nature can make him difficult to train. Friendly toward people, he can be aggressive toward other dogs and any animal that resembles prey, including cats. His fearless nature puts him at risk when he decides to take on a bigger dog.
  He thrives on structure and routine, but training sessions should be short and sweet to hold his interest. Repetition bores him. A proper Jack is friendly and affectionate, never shy.
  Like every dog, Jack Russells need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. Socialization helps ensure that your Jack Russell puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

Health
  Common health issues affecting the Jack Russell breed include inherited eye diseases and deafness. Legg Perthes is a disease of the hip joints that can occur most commonly in smaller breed dogs, the Jack Rusell included. They are also prone to dislocation of the knee caps.

  Jack Russells are well known for living long and healthy lives, as breeders have protected the gene pool, preventing direct in-line breeding. Given proper care, life expectancy averages about 15 years, possibly even longer. The common health issues associated with   Jack Russells are generally due to recessive genes of certain lines being bred.

Care

  The biggest care concern with Jack Russells is making sure they get enough exercise. Outside of that, caring for them is relatively simple. Jack Russells only need to be bathed when necessary due to their short coat. Regular combing and brushing is recommended with a firm bristle brush.

  To get a Jack Russell Terrier show-worthy, its coat must be stripped rather than clipped. This creates a shorter and smoother coat that is water and bramble resistant, unlike clipped coats.

Living Conditions

  The Jack Russell Terrier will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It is very active indoors and will do best with at least an average-sized yard.

Trainability
  Jack Russells are highly trainable dogs and soak up new tasks like a sponge. They are terriers and can exhibit stubbornness if they don't like the attitude of the person training them. Positive reinforcement and mixing up the daily training routine will keep your Jack Russell engaged and interested. Discipline and harsh tones will cause this dog to become defensive which may lead to snapping or biting.

  Once basic obedience is mastered, Jack Russells should move on to advanced obedience, trick training and agility work. They thrive on new activity and will be at the top of their class in just about every activity they participate in.

Exercise Requirements
  Jack Russell Terriers need lots of room to move around, so they aren’t the best choice for apartments. If stuck in a small living area, it may lead to destructive behavior such as chewing. A fenced-in yard is best for this breed, but he should always be supervised, as he will take off after small animals and dig up a storm.
  Take your Jack Russell out for a daily walk and let him run around in the yard. If you want to tire him out, a hearty game of catch will always set tails wagging. This breed loves balls and will gladly bring it back to you until your arm tires out.

  Just as important as physical activity is mental stimulation. The Jack Russell Terrier is an intelligent dog and will excel in agility activities including sprinting, flyball competitions, obstacle courses and retrieving. This covers your Jack Russell for both physical and mental stimulation requirements.

Grooming

  Need only weekly brushing to remove dead and loose hair. If you brush your Jack faithfully, he should rarely need a bath. 
  Trim nails once or twice a month. If you can hear them clicking on the floor, they're too long. Short, neatly trimmed nails keep the feet in good condition and protect your shins from getting scratched when your Jack enthusiastically jumps up to greet you.
  The only other grooming care he needs is dental hygiene. Brush his teeth at least two or three times a week to prevent tartar buildup and periodontal disease, daily for best results.

  Start brushing and examining your Jack when he's a puppy, to get him used to it. Handle his paws frequently — dogs are touchy about their feet — and look inside his mouth and ears.   Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you'll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he's an adult.

Children And Other Pets
  Jack Russell Terriers are loving and affectionate dogs who can do well in homes with older children who understand how to interact with dogs. They're not suitable for homes with young children. Besides being rambunctious, they can snap when roughly handled.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog's food away.

  Some Jacks are aggressive toward other dogs, especially dogs of the same sex. They have a strong prey drive and will chase  cats and other small animals.

Is the Jack Russell Terrier the Right Breed for you?

Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. Little to no trimming or stripping needed.
Constant Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Difficult Training: The Jack Russell Terrier isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Very Active: It will need daily exercise to maintain its shape. Committed and active owners will enjoy performing fitness activities with this breed.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.

Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

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