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Monday, September 25, 2017

Everything about your Bergamasco Shepherd

Everything about your Bergamasco Shepherd
  The Bergamasco Shepherd, also known as the Bergamasco Sheepdog and the Cane da Pastore Bergamasco, is a large herding dog with incredibly long eyelashes. Here is what you need to know about these shaggy pooches.

Overview
  Patient and quiet, this ancient Italian sheepherder is protective and makes an excellent watchdog. He is not aggressive, but is alert and watches strangers keenly. His work ethic is second to none.

  The Bergamasco is gentle with his family, and, in the absence of a flock, his primary job is to protect them. He is alert, always ready to bark an alarm or to step in and protect if he feels it’s necessary. These are great qualities, but it’s essential to teach him from puppyhood when it’s okay to exercise his protective nature and when to let you take charge. Early socialization and training are a necessary part of his upbringing to prevent him from becoming overly suspicious or fearful of anything new or different.
  If you want a dog that will always obey you without question, the Bergamasco is probably not the right choice. He will respond to kind, firm, consistent training, but he can be independent and self-sufficient.
  The Bergamasco will accept strangers once he has been introduced to them. If raised together, he gets along well with other pets.

  While you might think of him as an outdoor dog, nothing could be farther from the truth. Bergamascos are devoted to their people. They should have access to a securely fenced yard, but when the family is home, the Bergamasco should be with them.

Other Quick Facts


  • When you look at a Bergamasco, you will see a muscular dog with a large head whose slightly rectangular body is covered in a thickly matted coat made up of three types of hair. The hair on the head hangs over his large oval brown eyes, and he has a calm, attentive expression. His thick tail hangs down, curving slightly upward at the end.
  • The Bergamasco’s coat comes in shades of gray and, rarely, solid black.

Breed standards
AKC group: Herding Group
UKC group: Pastoral
Average lifespan: 13-15 years
Average size: 55 to 85 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense, Fine, Harsh and Rough, Long, and Water-Repellent
Coloration: This breed comes in all shades of silver, black and gray, including merle.
Hypoallergenic: Yes

History
  The Bergamasco is an ancient sheep herding dog breed with roots in the Middle East. Sheep and goats were first domesticated thousands of years ago near the Zagros Mountains, which straddle the present Iraq-Iran border. Herding dogs with long, thick coats worked alongside their masters to help move, guard and tend to those flocks. Eventually, some of these nomadic people moved west in search of greener pastures, settling in the foothills of the northern Italian Alps, near Milan, bringing their flocks and dogs with them. Probably the shaggiest breed in the world, the Bergamasco’s dense, disorderly coat protected it from the chilly alpine weather, and its natural herding and guarding instincts made it extremely valuable. 
  Bergamascos were – and are - courageous and fiercely protective of their flocks, working closely with their shepherds but requiring little direction from them. With just one person, a few dogs and hundreds of sheep, nomadic shepherds needed their dogs to be independent thinkers and the Bergamasco was perfect for the job. It undoubtedly contributed to several other shaggy European working breeds, such as the Bouvier, Briard and Polish Lowland Sheepdog.

Temperament
  Bergamascos are smart, strong but docile dogs that have a deep desire to please their people, but are not submissive animals. They are independent thinkers and usually act more as partners than subordinates within a family unit. Bergamascos share their time and attention equally with all family members, treating each of them as individuals rather than bonding tightly to only one. They are extremely loyal and protective of their owners, affectionate with family and friends and suspicious of strangers. Bergamascos have a reputation for being dominant around unfamiliar dogs. Owners who respect and return the Bergamasco’s intelligence, loyalty and affection will have a rare, steadfast companion.

Health
  As a relatively rare breed, the Bergamasco has not received the same genetic scrutiny as some others, making information about its health somewhat limited. Because this is a very old breed that hasn’t changed much over centuries, it is generally very healthy. Bergamascos reportedly are not prone to any specific disorders or diseases, major or minor.  
  Their typical life expectancy is 12 to 15 years. Because of its dramatic dense coat, this breed does not thrive in hot or humid climates. Cutting or shaving the Bergamasco’s shaggy locks can cause irritation and predispose it to skin infections.

Care
  Contrary to what many think, the Bergamasco's coat is not too difficult to maintain. For the first year, the dog will have a soft puppy coat. The coat will gradually become coarser and fuzzy "wool" will begin to appear. Around the age of one, the coat must be "ripped" into mats. This process can take a few hours, but once it is done, it is done for life. A weekly checkup to make sure the mats have not grown back together is all that is required for the next months. After that, the mats will become dense enough that few things will get caught in them.
  Bathing is not required more than 1-3 times a year. Though, as the coat gets longer it does take longer to dry. Fortunately, there is no brushing required.

Living Conditions
  The Bergamasco Sheepdog is best suited for seasonal to cold climates. Given its dense coat which provides protection from the elements of the climate, it is not uncommon to find the Bergamasco spending its nights sleeping outdoors. The Bergamasco Sheepdog would not do well in apartment living, rather a house with a yard to provide for daily exercise.

Trainability
  These are bright, obedient dogs that bond deeply with their owners and want to please. However, they won’t follow orders blindly. A Bergamasco wants to know why it is being asked to do something. Once it figures that out, it usually will happily comply, on its own terms. Bergamascos respond best to firm, consistent, patient training using positive reinforcement and rewards rather than harsh corrections. They are quickly learners and have a terrific work ethic.

Activity Level
  Bergamascos are fairly large dogs that require regular exercise in order to maintain health, happiness and an even temperament. They like having a job to do and love stretching their legs outside. Most enjoy playing fetch and participating in other outdoor activities, such as Frisbee. They perform well in athletic competitions, such as herding, agility and obedience. While these are not overly rambunctious dogs, long daily walks are always a good idea. Bergamascos are not suited for apartment living. They need plenty of room to romp and do best in rural settings with large, securely fenced yards.

Grooming
  The Bergamasco’s coat is unusual in having three different types of hair in it  that weld together and felt into mats. After five or six years, the coat reaches the ground. Some of the hair acts like the visor on a baseball cap to protect his eyes from the sun, but he can see past it. That coat helps protect the Bergamasco against everything from wolf bites to mosquitoes. Most people with dog allergies do not react to the Bergamasco's coat, but some who are allergic to wool or lanolin do react.
  Caring for the Bergamasco’s coat is not necessarily difficult, but it does call for some specific approaches. Ask the breeder to show you how to care for the coat. Trim the hair around the mouth and clean the dog’s face after meals to help reduce the odor.
  A common misconception is that the coat should not be brushed, but once the coat is formed, nothing will change it. Brushing is necessary to remove dirt.
  The Bergamasco can have as many baths as other dogs, but shampoo is not recommended because it dissolves natural oils in the coat.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Keep the ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial and yeast infections. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for overall health and fresh breath.

Is the Bergamasco right for you?
  If you love spending time outside, enjoy working with an intelligent dog, want a low-maintenance grooming routine and have experience with herding breeds, then the Bergamasco could be the perfect dog breed for you.
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Difficult Training: The Bergamasco isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Bergamasco’s matted coat is meant to protect him from bad weather and the predators he might have to drive off in defense of his flock.





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Everything about your Bracco Italiano

Everything about your Bracco Italiano
  Also known as the Italian Pointer, the Bracco Italiano is proud, athletic gun dog. With their strong muscles and long ears, it is easy to see why these dogs are the pride of Italy. Though this breed was originally developed for hunting, their gentle temperament makes them excellent family pets as well. Their droopy lips, soft eyes and loving nature makes them a great pet for any family.

Overview

  In his homeland of Italy, the Bracco (plural is Bracchi) is primarily a hunting dog, but people are starting to discover that this attractive dog with the noble appearance and pleasant  personality is also an excellent companion and show dog.
 The Bracco-or Italian Pointer- should be athletic and powerful in appearance, most resembling a cross between a German Shorthaired Pointer and a Bloodhound, although it is nothing like them in character. It has pendulous upper lips and long ears that create a serious expression. It should be "almost square", meaning that its height at the withers should be almost the same as the length of its body. It should not however be actually square as this would render its famous rear driving push off and front/rear extension to be compromised, thus losing much of its powerful grace. The tail can be docked, mostly due to the strong possibility of injury in rough/dense terrain when hunting, however there has been a sea-change in Italy, with some now working the breed with full tail.

Other Quick Facts

  • The Bracco’s short, shiny coat can be solid white; white with orange or dark amber; white with chestnut and may have roan (freckled) markings.
  • The Bracco often moves with an interesting extended trot.
  • In the field, the Bracco is often a versatile and efficient hunter with a strong ability to air scent; that is, he works with his nose in the air, following scents carried on air currents.

Breed standards
AKC group: Hound
UKC group: Gun dogs
Average lifespan: 10 to 12 years
Average size: 55 to 88 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense, Glossy, Hard, Short, Short-Haired, Silky, and Soft
Coloration: Bianco-Arancio - White-Orange and Roano-Marrone - Roano-Brown, chestnut, or amber coloured patches on the face, ears, base of tail, and body
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: houses with yards, singles, families with children, active singles, hunters
Temperament: Gentle, loving, obedient, intelligent

History 
  The Bracco Italiano can be found in paintings as early as the 4th and 5th centuries BC and frescoes of dogs resembling the modern Bracco date to 14th-century Renaissance Italy. The white-and-orange Bracco is believed to have originated in the Piedmont, while the roan-and-brown dogs may have come from Lombardy. The Piedmont dogs, hunting in mountainous terrain, were lighter and smaller than the Lombard dogs, which were bred for working in marshy lowland areas.
  Both types were popular hunting dogs and were bred by noble families such as the Medici and Gonzaga. Their original job was to drive game into nets or flush birds or other prey for falconers. Later, when hunters began using firearms, the dogs were used to point and retrieve game. Often given as gifts to noble and royal gentlemen in France and Spain, these dogs may have been the ancestors of European pointing breeds.
  By the early 20th century, though, the Bracco population had dwindled. Fortunately, an organization called Societa Amitori Bracco Italiano and an Italian breeder named Ferdinando Delor de Ferrabouc revived the breed, partially by uniting the two types to increase genetic diversity. The standard for the breed was released in 1949, and the Federation Cynologique Internationale accepted the breed in 1956. Today it’s not unusual to see the Bracco at Italian events for hunting and working dogs.
  The United Kennel Club recognized the breed in 2006. The Bracco Italiano Club of America was organized the next year and hopes to help the breed achieve full American Kennel Club recognition. The AKC added the breed to its Foundation Stock Service — a first step toward AKC recognition — in 2001, and the Bracco has been allowed to compete in AKC performance and companion events since 2010.

Temperament
  Braccos are very much a people-loving dog and thrive on human companionship, having a strong need to be close to their people. They are a particularly good family dog, and many have a strong love of children. They get along well with other dogs and pets, if trained to do so - it is, afterall, a hunting breed - and must be taught what to chase and what not to. They are very willing to please as long as they have decided that your idea is better than theirs. Obedience training is a must for a Bracco, and the more is asked of them, the better they do. Harsh reprimands do not work with this breed unless the reprimand is a fair one - and harshness must occasionally be used with some dogs to remind them who is actually in charge. Although not an aggressive breed, many Braccos will alert if there is a reason, and some will bark or growl if there's a good reason.
  The breed loves to hunt, and they excel at it - in fact, a non-hunting Bracco is not a happy Bracco, and will act out in various other ways. Hunting without a gun is an area in which the Bracco can excel and this can be a great opportunity for training the dog to connect with the owner. They are an active breed, but require more mental exercise than physical exercise to keep them happy. A Bracco owner can teach games like hide-and-seek which fits into the breed's original and current usage, and keeps them mentally active.

Health 
  The Bracco Italiano is generally a healthy breed but, like all dogs, they are prone to developing certain minor health conditions. Some of the most common health problems seen in this breed include hip dysplasia, entropion, umbilical hernias and ear mites. The Bracco Italiano is also sensitive to anesthesia, particularly to the drug Domitor.

Training
  The Bracco Italiano is a highly intelligent breed which is one of the many features that makes it a great hunting dog. Not only does this dog have great hunting instincts, but he is naturally eager to please. The best training methods for this dog are gentle but consistent – the gentle nature of this dog may make him stop trying if he is treated with harshness or cruelty. For the best results, use positive reinforcement training and start obedience training from a young age.
  Many fans of the breed will argue that a Bracco Italiano that is not trained to hunt will not be a happy dog. Not only is this the activity the breed was meant for, but the dogs truly enjoy the activity. Even if you choose not to train your dog for hunting, you should provide him with plenty of mental exercise in addition to physical exercise to keep him sharp.

Exercise Requirements
  As a hunting breed, the Bracco Italiano likes to be fairly active but they can do well in an apartment or house without a yard if given adequate exercise. A nice 30-minute walk once a day will be adequate for this breed, though he will gladly accept more exercise. The Bracco Italiano has a unique gait that you may see if you give him a chance to run – he starts out at a slow trot with long strides but is capable of a fast gallops. When hunting, the Bracco Italiano reduces his speed the closer he gets to his quarry, coming to a near crawl and ending in a non-moving “point”.

Grooming
  The Bracco’s coat is short, dense and shiny. The hair on the head, ears and front of the legs and feet usually has a finer texture.
  Spend a few minutes once or twice a week brushing the coat with a hound glove to keep it shiny and clean and remove dead hair.
  Bathe the dog as needed. He might not need a full bath very often, but you may want to clean the ends of his ears regularly. They often get wet when the dog drinks and may pick up dirt when he’s outdoors.
  These dogs can be droolers, although they don’t produce as much spit as a Mastiff or Saint Bernard. Keep a hand towel nearby to wipe your dog’s mouth after he eats or drinks.
  Check his ears weekly to make sure they don’t smell or look red or dirty, which could indicate an ear infection. Clean them only if they look dirty.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails every week or two or as needed. Brush the teeth often — with a vet-approved pet toothpaste — for good overall health and fresh breath.

Did You Know?
  In Italian, the plural of Bracco is Bracchi.

Is the Bracco Italiano the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Constant Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Moderately Easy Training: The Bracco Italiano is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.


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Friday, September 15, 2017

Everything about your Thai Ridgeback

Everything about your Thai Ridgeback
  Few people in the United States have heard of the Thai Ridgeback, let alone met one in person. This breed was naturally developed in Thailand and has been a favored companion of those needing a loyal companion and watchdog. This breed is strong-willed and not for the novice dog owner.
  With proper socialization and training, the Thai Ridgeback can make a wonderful family pet. Of course, he needs a lot of exercise but older kids can keep him exercised by playing ball or fetch. Running is essential to this breeds physical and mental health, so a fenced yard, dog park or owner who is an avid runner is necessary.

Overview

  Primitive dogs, sometimes known as pariah dogs, have distinctive physical traits, such as a moderate size, prick ears, wedge-shaped heads, wrinkled foreheads, squarish bodies with long legs, and smooth coats. The Thai Ridgeback is a classic example of one of these dogs. He comes in four colors — red, black, blue (gray), and yellow (fawn) — and he has pigmentation or spots on his tongue, similar to the Chow Chow and the Chinese Shar-Pei. Most (but not all) members of the breed have the signature ridge of hair running down their back with up to eight different ridge patterns.
  A Thai Ridgeback needs plenty of companionship and activity to be happy. Bear in mind that he will need at least a good hour of strenuous exercise daily. Overall health permitting, a couple of long walks or runs should satisfy him. He is also eligible to compete in lure coursing competitions.

  Better yet, keep him indoors, especially if the weather is rainy or cold. Because he's from Southeast Asia, he’s not one to appreciate that type of climate.

Other Quick Facts:

  • Some Thai Ridgebacks are born with a plush coat instead of a smooth coat. This is considered a flaw, and the dogs are spayed or neutered and sold as pets.
  • The Thai Ridgeback’s tail tapers to a point. He carries it up or curved like a sickle.

Breed standards
FCI group: Primitive Hunting Dogs 
AKC group: AKC Foundation Stock Service
UKC group: Sighthound & Pariah
Average lifespan: 10 to 12 years
Average size: 35 to 55 pounds
Coat appearance: short, hard, and straight
Coloration: solid colors of blue, black, red or fawn with a black mask being acceptable on reds
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with older children, active singles, experienced owners, houses with yards
Temperament: Strong-willed, loyal, energetic, brave

History
  The Thai Ridgeback was first noted more than 350 years ago in Thailand, but he is thought to be far older. One theory suggests that he is a descendant of the now-extinct Hottentot dog, which may have played a role in the development of the Rhodesian Ridgeback
 Ancient artifacts show that the Thai Ridgeback originated in the isolated islands of Eastern Thailand an estimated 4,000 years ago. Because this area was secluded from others, with poor transportation methods, this dog breed has remained very pure with little to no crossbreeding.
  The Thai Ridgeback was an all-purpose dog, kept to guard property and serve as an alarm dog,  escort or pull carts, hunt small and large game, and keep cobras at bay. He lived mainly in eastern Thailand, as well as on the island of Dao Phu Quoc, near the border of Cambodia and Vietnam. His relative isolation ensured that he maintained his distinctive look.
  Today the Thai Ridgeback is considered a very rare breed outside of Thailand, with only an estimated 300 in the United States. The breed has been in the United States since 1994. The United Kennel Club recognized the Thai Ridgeback in 1996, and it was recorded in the American Kennel Club’s Foundation Stock Service in 1997.

Temperament
  Thai Ridgebacks are an intelligent breed. The energy level is typically medium to high, with most of the day spent lounging and activity periods occurring in sporadic bursts. Well bred and properly socialized Thai Ridgebacks make loyal, loving family pets. They are naturally protective of their home and family and can be aggressive or shy when not properly socialized.
  They are best kept by consistent owners who have a thorough understanding of dog behavior. Because of prior geographic isolation and lack of human contact, the Thai Ridgeback remains independent minded and much of the original natural instinct and drives remain intact, particularly prey drive. Due to its nature, the Thai Ridgeback is not recommended for the novice dog handler. They have an excellent jumping ability and may seek to roam if not properly contained.

Health
  Thai ridgebacks are a hearty, overall healthy breed with few inherent health issues. The breed has reproduced in Thailand almost exclusively by natural selection until the very recent past. The domesticated population is small. Inbreeding depression has not been observed in the breed. Thai Ridgeback Dogs are prone to dermoid sinus. Modern lines of    Thai Ridgeback, resulting from interpopulation crosses, may also be prone to hip dysplasia and other genetic disorders.

Care
  Because this dog breed originated in a tropical climate, the Thai Ridgeback generally does not do well in colder climates and should be kept as an indoor dog. The coat of a Thai Ridgeback requires little maintenance, however daily exercise is suggested to keep a healthy lifestyle for this breed.

Living Conditions
 Thai Ridgebacks will do okay in an apartment if it sufficiently exercised. These dogs prefer warm climates and cannot withstand the cold.

Training
  An independent breed, the Thai Ridgeback requires an experienced owner who can assert himself to be the leader of the family. Manhandling and harsh discipline is counter-productive to training this breed. The Thai Ridgeback responds well to positive training methods and learns rather quickly when delectable treats are involved. Repetitive training sessions will prove to be worth the time.
  One of the things that the Thai Ridgeback was bred to do was to pull carts in Thailand. Nowadays, he is well-suited for draft trials, obedience and agility. Of course, the Thai Ridgeback can be an incredible watchdog.

Exercise Requirements
  Thai Ridgebacks were bred to work and they require a lot of exercise. Long walks or jogs are great but this breed also needs room to stretch out and run. He can tolerate living in condos or apartment buildings provided there is a dog park nearby that he can use.
  Without enough exercise, the Thai Ridgeback can become incredibly destructive and disruptive. Although not a barker, the dog will become frustrated and try to communicate his need for activity vocally. He will also tear up furniture and chew whatever he can get his teeth on if he is bored. Exercise is essential to living peacefully with a Thai Ridgeback.

Grooming
  The Thai Ridgeback has a short coat that is easily cared for with a weekly brushing. Use a rubber curry brush to keep it gleaming. He sheds year-round, but not heavily. Give him a bath when he is dirty, maybe once or twice a year.
  The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Keep the ears clean and dry, and check them weekly for redness or a bad odor that could indicate infection. If the ears look dirty, wipe them out with a cotton ball moistened with a mild pH-balanced cleanser recommended by your veterinarian. Brush the teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath. Introduce your puppy to grooming from an early age so that he learns to accept it with little fuss.

Is the Thai Ridgeback the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Difficult Training: The Thai Ridgeback isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Thai Ridgeback can have as many as eight different ridge patterns formed by hair growing in the opposite direction of the rest of the coat. Patterns include whorls, circles, and even the shape of a guitar.
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Best Fruit and Veggie Treats for Dogs

Best Fruit and Veggie Treats for Dogs
  If you’re on the lookout for new and fun ways to rev up your furry best friend’s diet, adding fruits & vegetables can be a really healthy way to do that. Of course, certain ones are better for your dog than others. 
  Just like we do, dogs love food treats. And just like us, dogs sometimes get too many calories from their treats.
  Dogs Like Veggies, Too!

A few things to keep in mind:
NEVER feed your pet the following foods, which are potentially toxic: Grapes, raisins, garlic, onion, avocado and chocolate.
The 10% Rule: Treats and snacks should only make up 10% of a dog’s daily calories. To get an idea of how many treats that is, ask your vet. They can make a recommendation based on the treats your dog likes, his weight, and how active he is.

But dogs love treats. And people love giving their dog treats. It's a way to bond with your pet, and that's a good thing.

Safe Vegetables
  Here is a list of vegetables that are safe for giving to your dog as treats. I also included a description of the benefits and any other information you may need about preparing the food for safe consumption. Always remember to wash off raw vegetables before giving to your dog because lots of raw vegetables may have dangerous pesticides on them.
  • Asparagus - Asparagus is high in fiber, has a lot of vitamins, and is an excellent source of potassium. Dogs can be at risk of choking on an asparagus stalk, so they should receive bite-sized pieces that have been softened through cooking to allow easier digestion before partaking in the nutritious benefits.  If cats express interest in eating asparagus, there’s no harm in also giving them a small piece.
  • Carrots- Carrots are a great treat for your dog. They contain beta carotene, are high in fiber, and rich in vitamins A, C, and K. That means they are great for the eyes and skin. They are also rich in antioxidants, which can help prevent cancer. They are great for your dogs teeth, and they are known for being delicious! Many dog foods actually have carrots listed right in the ingredients.
  • Sweet potato - Similar to the benefits of pumpkin, sweet potato offers dogs and cats fiber, water, and nutrients that aid with digestive problems. Sweet potato offers even more nutritional value, containing vitamins, thiamine, niacin, and even copper. Because of these nutrients, sweet potatoes are much more beneficial to pets than regular white potatoes.
  • Green Beans- Green beans are high in vitamins such as A, K, and C, and also contain manganese. This treat is great for a dog who is overweight because you can replace some of their food with green beans which will nourish them, but not load them up with calories.
  • Zucchini - Zucchini is a good source of vitamin C, magnesium and potassium. Shredding it on top of their regular food is a good way to incorporate it into their diet and may help protect them from infections, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases.
  • Pumpkin- This can be a great treat for you dog, especially if they happen to have diarrhea, constipation, or simply a sensitive stomach. Pumpkin contains lots of fiber that absorbs water and helps ease stomach upset. It also contains vitamin A and has lots of antioxidants.
  • Spinach - For pets or for people, spinach is widely regarded as a super food for containing almost every vitamin and mineral. It may help in all area of your pet’s health.  Avoid giving in large amounts or if they have kidney disease, as it can be harmful or exasperate problems with their kidneys.
  • Brussels Sprouts- Maybe if your kid sees your dog eating her Brussels sprouts, she’ll hop on board and eat them, too. And your dog should be eating Brussels sprouts for their vitamins K and G, manganese, folate, fiber, potassium and vitamins A, B1 and B6.
  • Peas - Peas offer vitamin B, thiamin, and potassium that can boost energy levels and improve bone health in pets. Frozen, thawed, steamed, or mashed, peas can make a nice snack or compliment to a cat or dog’s normal diet.
  • Lettuce - Lettuce helps add water and fiber to a pet’s diet which helps keep them hydrated and full. The leaf should be cut into very thin slices to make it easy to eat, and can be placed on top of their usual food.
  • Bell peppers (red, green, yellow) - All bell pepper varieties provide beta carotene, fiber, and antioxidants. Make sure to cut peppers up into manageable sized pieces and feed with the stem removed to help boost immune function.
  • Cucumber - Aside from vitamins K, C, and magnesium, cucumbers contain very little carbohydrates or fats, making them a good treat for overweight pets. Cucumber may also help lower cats and dogs blood pressure.  In addition, it may help freshen their breath.
  • Broccoli - Broccoli is high in fiber and vitamin C, but too much can cause stomach irritation in some dogs. Small pieces of broccoli without the large stems can make a good treat for dogs, and cats tempted to chew on broccoli florets are welcome to indulge in small bits.
  • Celery - Celery is low in calories and is packed full of nutrients and antioxidants. It also has high water content that has been shown to help freshen your pet's breath!
  • Cabbage - Eating cabbage can aid in digestion, fight cancer, and improve skin and fur health for cats and dogs. Shredding the cabbage over food is a good way to slowly introduce it into their diets, but give in moderation to avoid harmful effects to your dog’s thyroid gland.  It is best to cook the cabbage before feeding to allow for easier digestion.
  • Cauliflower - Cooked or raw, cauliflower is a treat you can share. The vitamins and antioxidants may help reduce inflammation and help older pets with arthritis. Its fiber can support digestive health, but too much may lead to an upset stomach. Serve plain and in small bites without the stem and leaves.
Steer clear of: Never feed your pet onions or garlic as they are toxic in all forms: cooked, raw, and even onion powder. These cause damage to the red blood cells, ultimately causing them to burst. Rhubarb and wild mushrooms also contain toxins. We suggest avoiding corn as it is a common allergen among pets.

Safe Fruits
 There are a number of safe fruits you can give to your dog for treats that are great for them and taste delicious!
  In general fruits are higher in sugar than vegetables, and thus should be limited in overweight pets. However, be sure to wash all fruits and remove rinds, inedible skins, seeds, and pits before feeding to pets.
  • Banana - Bananas are a great source of potassium which can support heart and kidney functions. Bananas are high in carbohydrates and the high sugar content in bananas mean that they should be given to dogs sparingly. When sliced into reasonable sizes this can make a good occasional treat.
  • Cantaloupe- Believe it or not, the same fruit salad staple that humans have come to know and love is just as good for dogs. They’re full of vitamins that will help with your canine’s eyesight, as well as lots of vitamin A and lots of beta carotene, which helps reduce the risk of cancer and prevents cell damage. It’s also a good source of vitamins B-6 and C, fiber, folate, niacin and potassium.
  • Blueberries- Blueberries, with their high levels of resveratrol and their anti-cancer and heart disease fighting qualities, make a great option for your dog’s diet. As an added bonus, the tannins found in blueberries also help prevent urinary tract infections.
  • Apples- Apples are a great source of vitamins A and C. They also are rich in antioxidants. Apples also contain pectin, which is a fiber that creates short­chain fatty acids which help get rid of toxins in the intestinal tract, strengthens intestinal muscles, and ward off dangerous bacteria.
  • Watermelon- If it’s lycopene that you’re looking to add to your dog’s diet, watermelon is your best source for that. The health benefits don’t stop there, though. Give your pooch a piece of this delicious summer treat and you’ll be loading him with up with tons of healthy vitamin A, B-6 and C, as well as thiamin.
  • Cranberries- Besides being high in antioxidants and minerals, and rich in vitamins A, C, B1, and B2, cranberries can also greatly improve your dog’s urinary tract health. They can also help prevent and control urinary tract infections by lowering the pH of your dog’s urine, therefore making it more acidic. They can be fed to them raw, frozen, or cooked. They are also great for you as well!
  • Apricot -The fleshy fruit of apricots can make a good treat for cats and dogs. They are full of potassium and beta-carotene which can help fight against cancer. Just be sure your pet doesn’t eat the poisonous pit, stem, or leaves.
  • Mango - Mangoes are a vitamin-packed treat for cats and dogs. As with all pitted fruits, be sure to remove the hard middle pit which contains poisonous amounts of cyanide. Giving small pieces of mango with the skin removed will allow for easier digestion and as a result lessen the chances that fiber from the fruit will upset your pets’ stomach and digestive tract.
  • Orange - Cats may not be interested in eating oranges, but dogs have been known to enjoy this sweet treat. The nutrients and Vitamin C can help their immune system and flush toxins out of the body. However, the seeds, peel, leaves, or stem of the orange contain oils that are poisonous, so make sure you only feed pets the fleshy part of the fruit.
  • Pear - Pears are full of vitamin C, vitamin A, and fiber, and make a great snack for cats and dogs when served in moderation. As with apples and oranges, pear seeds contain traces of cyanide and should be removed before feeding to your pet. You can give cats or dogs small slices of pear to help promote anti-cancer properties.
  • Strawberries - Fresh or frozen strawberries can help pets stay healthy whether they eat them raw or pureed over their normal pet food. The nutrients in strawberries help strengthen the immune system and slow issues related to aging.
  • Raspberries - Raspberries are low in sugar and contain lots of fiber and vitamin C. Their anti-inflammatory properties make them great for older pets. However, they should be given in moderation as they contain very small amounts of naturally occurring sweetener called xylitol.  In large amounts, such as is found in xylitol containing gum, this sweetener can be fatal to dogs and cats.
  • Pineapple - From folate to zinc, pineapple is bursting with vitamins and minerals that can help your cat or dog’s digestion and immune system. Like any other sugary fruit, it is best to feed pineapple to pets in small quantities. The spiky skin and hard core should be removed before giving to a pet to prevent choking hazards.
Steer clear of: Cherries are toxic to cats and dogs, and grapes and raisins can cause kidney damage. Citrus fruits like lemons, limes, and grapefruit as well as persimmons can cause an upset stomach.

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      Everything about your Scottish Terrier

      Everything about your Scottish Terrier
        When you think of a terrier, what kind of breed do you think of? Well, depending where you are, you might have a different answer. But perhaps no terrier is as unique or easy to recognize as the Scottish Terrier.
        So what makes a Scottish Terrier special? As you’re about to find out, there’s a great deal of information about the Scottish Terrier that inspires a cult following of this playful, easy-to-get-along-with breed. Like many breeds of dog, you’ll find that the relatively peaceful personality makes for a perfect pet. Just make sure your dog gets plenty of exercise, affection and discipline and you’ll rarely go wrong.

      Overview

        The Scottish Terrier, also known as the Aberdeen Terrier, the Diehard, and the Scottie, is a breed of dog in the Terrier Group. This breed is recognized by its short stature and characteristic beard in addition to its bold ‘sheriff’ type attitude. The Scottish Terrier was recognized by the AKC in 1885 and AKC approved in 1993. In 2010, a Scottish Terrier named "Sadie" won Best In Show at the world renowned Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

        The average Scottish Terrier stands 10 to 11 inches high at the shoulders and weighs between 18 and 22 pounds. Their coat needs to be brushed daily to prevent matting and control shedding. Professional cuts and grooming is recommended for the Scottie as well.

      Highlights


      • Originally bred for hunting and following prey to ground, the Scottish Terrier is designed to dig, and he still has that drive today. It's better to find a designated digging area in your backyard then fight an active and natural instinct.
      • Scottish Terriers tend to be aloof with strangers and can be aggressive to other dogs if they are not properly socialized when young.
      • Scotties are not low-energy small dogs. They were bred as working dogs and have lots of drive and intelligence that needs to be channelled. They need daily moderate exercise and stimulation. If you're looking for a dog that's happier sitting at your side then digging holes in your backyard, a Scottie might not be for you.
      • Behind German Shepherds and Rottweilers, Scotties have been ranked third in alarm barking. They will bark at strangers and are not the ideal pet in a dwelling or area that has noise rules.
      • The Scottie isn't suited for homes with young infants and toddlers. He's been known to defend himself against unwanted pulling and prodding.
      • In terms of his size and exercise needs, the Scottie is adaptable to various types of dwellings, including apartments.

      Other Quick Facts
      • The compact Scottie has an unmistakable look: a rectangular body set on short legs, a long head with a shaggy beard and eyebrows, small, bright, dark-brown to almost black eyes, prick ears covered in short, velvety hair, and a tail that tapers to a point and is carried up. Most often seen in Presbyterian black, his hard, wiry coat can also be wheaten or brindle.

      Breed standards
      AKC group: Terrier
      UKC group: Terriers
      Average lifespan: 11 to 13 years
      Average size: 18 to 22 pounds
      Coat appearance: Dense, Harsh and Rough, and Wire
      Coloration: Black is the color  typically, but they also come in gray, steel, brindle and wheaten
      Hypoallergenic: Yes
      Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
      Temperament: Fearless, friendly, active, loyal

      History
        There is a lot of confusion regarding the Scottish Terrier’s background, as all terriers in Scotland are referred as Scotch or Scottish Terriers. Adding to the confusion is the fact that the modern Scottish Terrier was originally placed under the group of the Skye Terriers, denoting a family of terriers belonging to Scottish Isle of Skye.
       
      A Scotch Terrier, published in 1859
      Irrespective of the origin, the earliest Scottish Terriers were first documented in the late 19th century, belonging to a group of hardy Highlanders whom they served as vermin hunters.    The first breed standard was drafted by J.B. Morrison and later published in Vero Shaw's Illustrated Book of the Dog in 1880. John Naylor is credited with introducing the breed to the United States in 1883.
        The Scottish Terrier's popularity gradually grew until World War II, after which its popularity surged. The Scottish Terrier is also the only breed of dog that has lived in the White House three times, beginning with Fala, a male Scottish Terrier gifted to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. President Roosevelt rarely went anywhere without his steady companion, even being buried by next to Fala. Most recently, President George W. Bush has owned two Scottish Terriers, Barney and Miss Beazley. Today, the Scottish Terrier is a popular pet and show dog.

      Personality
        The Scottish Terrier's character and personality are a bit like the lonely moors of his homeland. He's a serious guy, not particularly jolly, and he approves of dignity and reserve. He's opinionated, as well as independent and smart as a whip. He tends to be aloof . A Scottie doesn't respond much to people who oooh and ahh over him while he's out and about. He's slow to accept anyone outside the family, but his devotion to his own people is legendary. He needs to live inside the house, because companionship is his mainstay.   Sensitive to praise and anger, he's good at adapting to the changing moods of a household. When you're quiet, he'll be quiet ; when you're ready for a walk, he'll bound outdoors with you.
        Remember his background: he's a true terrier. If another dog provokes him, he'll fight to the end. If other dogs leave him alone, he leaves them alone.
        It's important, actually critical, to take your Scottie to socialization classes starting when he's a puppy. Inviting friends and family over or going to busy places with him while he's young will tamp down his general distrust of strangers. Left unchecked, that can translate into aggression when the dog is an adult — so start training your Scottie puppy from the moment you bring him home.

      Health Problems
        With a higher propensity to developing cancers than other dogs, it’s important to monitor your Scottish Terrier’s health with a close eye. Frequent trips to the veterinarian will be required particularly as your dog advances in age. Other issues like Scottie Cramp and von Willebrand’s disease might have interesting names but you don’t really want to see your terrier develop them. Be sure to keep your terrier plenty active – you might be surprised how durable they can be.

      Care
        The Scottie is active and can become destructive when bored and underexercised. He loves to go for walks, but running is not part of his plan for the day. He has to be leashed for walks because he is a hunter, after all, and he will see the squirrel but not the car.
        He likes water but can't swim, and that's a bad conflict. He'll sink like a stone because of his short legs and heavy body. Scotties and uncovered swimming pools are a disaster waiting to happen, which is why Scottie Rescue groups prefer not to place them in homes with pools.
        Crate training benefits every dog and is a kind way to ensure that your Scottie doesn't have accidents in the house or get into things he shouldn't. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will help your Scottie accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized. Never stick your Scottie in a crate all day long, however. Scotties are people dogs, and they aren't meant to spend their lives locked up in a crate or kennel.

      Living Conditions
        This dog is good for apartment living. It is moderately active indoors and will do okay without a yard. Prefers cool climates.

      Trainability
        Scottish Terriers are not for softies who are prone to bend the rules. Scotties have very high self esteem and assume themselves to be the leader of the house. Training should begin early and should be conducted with excited praise and lots of treats in order to keep him interested. Harsh discipline will cause a Scottie to simply disregard you and your rules.   Absolute consistency is a must in order to raise a well behaved Scottish Terrier, as they see rule-bending as an open invitation to take over.
        Scotties should be socialized from an early age to accept visitors into his home. While all Scotties are discriminating, if not properly socialized, they can become overly suspicious of strangers, which can be difficult to live with.

      Activity Requirements
        Scotties can adjust to any living arrangement, be it a small apartment or a sprawling estate. They need to be exercised daily, but a brisk walk around the neighborhood will cover their activity requirement. If you have a fenced yard, your Scottie will entertain himself by chasing squirrels, birds and butterflies. They do not have the athleticism or endurance to jog or take long hikes, however, so they are well suited for a more “indoorsy” family.

      Grooming
        The Scottie’s sculptured appearance requires some work in the form of regular brushing and clipping, so much so that the Scottish Terrier Club of America publishes an illustrated grooming guide. The heavy-duty manual has laminated pages in a three-ring binder and contains grooming instructions for puppies, pets, and show dogs.
        At a minimum, you will need to brush the coat one to three times a week. Don’t miss the belly or the areas where the legs meet the body or they will become tangled. Be sure you brush all the way down to the skin. If you just go over the top of the coat, you’ll miss a lot of tangles. After you brush the coat, go through it again with a comb to remove any remaining loose hairs. Comb out the beard and other facial hair, too, especially after meals or after your Scottie drinks. You should also learn how to strip the coat, the process of removing dead hair by hand, which is necessary twice a year. Learn to clip him yourself or take him to a professional groomer if you want him to have the distinctive Scottie silhouette.
        The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for good overall health and fresh breath.

      Children And Other Pets
        He's so good with children that he's been called a nanny — but, like any terrier, the Scottie will react poorly to his tail or hair being pulled, and he's not well suited to the noise and movements of toddlers and very young children. But with well-behaved children, he's a champion and he will appoint himself their guardian.
        A true terrier, he can be aggressive with other dogs, particularly those of the same sex. Although he's not a sparring dog, if he wants to start a fight or responds to another dog's challenge, it can be a real problem. He's fine with those dogs he's been raised with.
        Because he's a hunter, he is not well suited to smaller pets. He may or may not tolerate a cat, but he's definitely bad news around small mammals such as hamsters or rats. To him, they're fast-food snacks. It's hardwired in the Scottie to go after vermin — it's not a choice.    Set him up for success by not putting him in a situation where he has to fight his own nature, because he won't.

      Is the Scottish Terrier the Right Breed for you?
      Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
      Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
      Difficult Training: The Scottish Terrier isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
      Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
      Not Good for New Owners: This breed is best for those who have previous experience with dog ownership.
      Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

      Did You Know?
        Scottish Terriers have lived in the White House with three presidents: Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Dwight D. Eisenhower, and George W. Bush.

      Famous Scotties and popular culture
      Fala at the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial,
       the only Presidential dog so honoured.
      • The Scottie and the German Shepherd are the only breeds of dog that have lived in the White House more than three times. President Franklin D. Roosevelt was renowned for owning a Scottie named Fala, a gift from his distant cousin, Margaret Suckley. The President loved Fala so much that he rarely went anywhere without him. Roosevelt had several Scotties before Fala, including one named Duffy and another named Mr. Duffy. Eleanor Roosevelt had a Scottish Terrier named Meggie when the family entered the White House in 1933. More recently, President George W. Bush has owned two black Scottish Terriers, Barney and Miss Beazley. Barney starred in nine films produced by the White House.
      • Other famous people who are known to have owned Scotties include: Queen Victoria, Eva Braun, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Ed Whitfield, Rudyard Kipling and President of Poland, Lech Kaczynski. Actress Tatum O'Neal owned a Scottish Terrier. She was said to be so saddened by her dog's death to cancer and old age that she relapsed into drugs.
      • The Scottie is also renowned for being featured in the popular board game, Monopoly, as a player token. When the game was first created in the 1930s, Scotties were one of the most popular pets in the United States, and it is also one of the most popular Monopoly game tokens, according to Matt Collins, vice president of marketing for Hasbro. A Scottish Terrier named Dulcinea is a scene-stealer in the 1998 Latin American novel Yo-Yo Boing! by Giannina Braschi.
      • The Scottie was introduced
        as a token in the 1950s
      • In May 2007, Carnegie Mellon University named the Scottish Terrier its official mascot.The Scottie had been a long-running unofficial mascot of the university, whose founder's Scottish heritage is also honored by the official athletic nickname of "Tartans". Agnes Scott College in Decatur, Georgia also uses the Scottie as their mascot.The dog's image is a symbol for the Radley brand of bags. The amateur athletics organisation Jogscotland has an anthropomorphic Scottish Terrier as its mascot.

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      Top 10 Dog Breeds For Seniors

      Top 10 Dog Breeds For Seniors
        One of the best things a person can do at any age is to adopt a dog.  Dogs can provide a tremendous amount of love and joy, and are a great way to overcome loneliness or boredom, which sometimes can affect seniors in their retirement. There are so many different breeds that sometimes it can be difficult to decide which dog is best for you. Seniors need to think about how much exercise certain types of dogs need, and whether they can provide it. 
        Owning a pet has it's pros and cons, and you have to really think what type of pet, whether a cat or dog, and what type of breed is right for you.  For example, you have to factor in if you will have the time and energy for a larger dog, or whether a small lap dog is more your speed. There are an almost infinite amount of sizes and temperaments when it comes to dogs.  If you do choose to adopt a furry friend, they quickly become a loving and wonderful addition to any family.

      1. Pug
        The short-faced pug is both gentle and quiet. But don’t let their laid-back nature fool you. These compact dogs have a lot of personality! They don’t need tons of exercise, but they love being social and definitely need to be a part of the group.
        Pugs are known as adaptable, charming, and eager to please — affectionate and playful without requiring a lot of exercise to maintain their health. They are small, so they generally meet the size requirements of assisted living communities. They can be a bit mischievous, and they tend to shed quite a bit, especially in warmer climates.

      2. Bichon Frise

        Independent spirit, intelligent, affectionate, bold and lively. They are bright little dogs that are easy to train and love everyone. They need people to be happy and always love to tag along. They are competitive and obedient.

        The fluffy little Bichon Frise is a joyful and affectionate dog that makes an excellent companion. With an average weight of about 7-12 pounds, this small breed is extremely easy to handle for most people. Bichons are also relatively simple to train. The Bichon will need to be groomed periodically but is otherwise fairly low-maintenance. Many Bichon owners choose to take their dogs to a professional groomer every month or two. Moderate daily exercise is usually enough to keep the Bichon healthy and happy as long as he has your companionship.

      3. Miniature Schnauzer

        Schnauzers come in various sizes, including miniature, so they offer a lot of choice to a senior trying to meet a community’s pet size requirements. They are energetic, playful, trainable, and good with children, although they can have strong guarding instincts. They can be quite active; the AKC notes that they have a medium energy level, so playtime with your schnauzer can help keep you active as well.

        Miniature Schnauzers are the smallest of the Schnauzers and they are intelligent, fun-loving dogs that are a great choice for a more active lifestyle. They are the perfect choice for an older individual looking to maintain a relatively active lifestyle, as they enjoy exercise but not so much as a larger breed. 


      4. Beagle

        Beagles are moderately active dogs that can do well with a daily walk. They are social dogs that enjoy spending time with their people and make an excellent choice for someone older looking for a companion. 

        Beagles are cute (think Snoopy), funny, loyal, and friendly, enjoying the company of other dogs and humans. They love to play and are excellent family dogs. They can also be independent, which may make training a challenge, and they do need plenty of exercise – which is great for fitness-minded seniors. They shed a lot, but their coat is relatively easy to care for with regular brushing.

      5. Chihuahua
        If you live in a small assisted living apartment, why not consider one of the smallest dogs there is?Chihuahuas make a great choice for seniors because they are relatively low maintenance and small enough to be easily handled. They require minimal exercise and are perfectly happy being lapdogs. 
       Chihuahuas have a ton of personality for their size, and love being showered with affection; on the flip side, they are so loyal and protective that they might need a bit of training before dealing with children, and some Chihuahuas bark a lot. They can be active, but being small, they can often get sufficient exercise by playing indoors.

      6. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

        Another dog bred for companionship, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a great option if you want a dog that is as happy to snuggle in your lap as they are to be out exploring with you. They’re also great family dogs, and love nothing more than to be the center of attention.

        The Cavalier is a beloved puppy-like dog that is affectionate and adaptable. This is a small dog that is often happiest when snuggled up beside her owner. This breed typically weighs about 11 to 18 pounds and is easy to handle and train. The Cavalier has some grooming needs, such as regular hair brushing, ear cleaning, and possibly the occasional trip to a groomer. Overall, Cavaliers are favored among those who love small, snuggle companions.

      7. Pembroke Welsh Corgi

        If you want a small to medium dog that makes a great companion, the Corgi might be for you. Weight 24 to 30 pounds, this breed is still small enough for most people to handle. Corgis are smart and fairly easy to train. They are also quite adorable with those short little legs! A herding dog by nature, your Corgi will need routine exercise, but daily walks will often be enough. The Corgi has minimal grooming needs, which can be very convenient. 

        The spunky corgi is the perfect companion for an active senior. Compact in size, this herding breed has the energy of larger dogs, but in a more manageable package. They’re the favored companions of Queen Elizabeth and are a loving—albeit stubborn!—breed.

      8. Boston Terrier

        The Boston Terrier is a loving, gentle and clownish breed with an endearing personality. They make a great choice for seniors because of their outstanding temperaments and easy keeping. 
        Boston Terriers often make the list of top dogs for seniors because of their manageable size, friendliness, ease of grooming, and love of spending time with their owners. 

        Known as the American Gentleman, the Boston Terrier is lively, smart, and affectionate with a gentle, even temperament. They can, however, be stubborn, so persistence and consistency are definite musts when training.

      9. Poodle

        Poodles are great companions. They’re easy to train, devoted to their families, and a low-shedding breed (though they still need to be groomed). 

        Coming in different sizes from large to tiny, there’s a poodle out there for everyone, even if you live in a small apartment. Smart, proud, and active according to the AKC, it’s no surprise that poodles are the 7th most popular breed overall. They’re easily trained and enjoy a variety of activities, which makes them very adaptable to different-sized living situations. Their coats require regular grooming, but they are also hypo-allergenic.

      10. Greyhound

        The biggest dog on our list best dog breeds for seniors is also the laziest. Retired racing greyhounds are a great option for seniors because they are huge couch potatoes. If you adopt a greyhound from the track, you’re also getting a furry friend who has seen a lot and is well socialized.

        How can a racing dog be good for older adults? You may be surprised to learn that Greyhounds are not the high-energy dogs many think they are. Although Greyhounds will enjoy daily walks and the occasional chance to run, most tend to be "couch potatoes" that enjoy loafing around with their owners. They are usually very responsive to training and therefore easy to handle, even though most weight about 60 to 80 pounds. If you like larger dogs but worry about being able to handle one, the Greyhound is a breed to consider.
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