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Friday, November 10, 2017

Everything about your Afghan Spaniel

Everything about your Afghan Spaniel
  The Afghan Spaniel is not a purebred dog. It is a cross between the Afghan Hound and the Cocker Spaniel. The best way to determine the temperament of a mixed breed is to look up all breeds in the cross and know you can get any combination of any of the characteristics found in either breed. Not all of these designer hybrid dogs being bred are 50% purebred to 50% purebred. It is very common for breeders to breed multi-generation crosses.

Overview


  The Afghan Spaniel is an interesting blend of two dogs who like to hunt as much as they like to play. The Afghan Hound has always been known for their elegance and speed and the Cocker Spaniel is known for being eager to please and fun. The Cocker Spaniel has two types, the English and American, which are similar in size, energy, appearance, and temperament. These two were considered to be the same breed until 1936 when the English Cocker Spaniel Club was formed in America. The Americans modified the Cocker Spaniel in ways the English Cocker Spaniel Club did not agree with, so they separated.

Breed standards
Breed Type: Mix
Family: Sighthound
Average lifespan: 12-15 Years
Average size: 20-300lbs
Coat appearance: Medium, Short-Haired, and Silky
Coloration: cream, white, golden, black, light brown, brown, and combinations of these

Hypoallergenic: No

History
  There is little known about the Afghan Spaniel because it is so new but the histories of the parent breeds can give insight into its characteristics. The Afghan Hound is a sighthound and one of the oldest breeds in history, dating back to Ancient Egypt where drawings of these beautiful dogs were found. It is thought that the Afghan Hound was used in hunting to flush and catch gazelle and rabbits. They were finally noticed in the early 1800s when they were brought down from the mountains of Afghanistan where they had lived isolated for centuries. 
  At first, the Afghan Hound was known as a Barukhzy Hound or Persian Greyhound but was later renamed for the area in which they originated. They were first noticed in the United States in 1926, when it was recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) and it became popular but mostly with the wealthy. 

  The Cocker Spaniel comes from a large family called the Spaniels that have seven varieties, which are the Welsh Springer Spaniel, Sussex Spaniel, Irish Water Spaniel, Field Spaniel, English Springer Spaniel, Cocker Spaniel, and Clumber Spaniel. They were divided depending on whether they were water or land Spaniels, with several types of each. This breed dates all the way back to the 1300s when a description was written by Gaston Phebus. 
  The Cocker Spaniel is one of the most popular dogs in the United States and has been a member of the American Kennel Club (AKC) since 1878. The name Cocker comes from their special ability to hunt woodcock.

Personality

  With a playful personality and a love for playing around, the Afghan Spaniel is friendly yet reserved in certain situations. The hound part of the breed is very independent and doesn't need to be lavished with attention, yet the cocker part of the breed is very loveable and wants to be hugged and praised. To get out all their extra energy, the Afghan Spaniel craves long walks and outings at the park.

Health

  Afghan Spaniel is a healthier breed like other hybrid breeds. However Afghan Spaniel has tendency to suffer from some congenital disorders.

Care

  Both the Afghan Hound and Cocker Spaniel have long, fine hair that needs a lot of attention. Therefore, you should be prepared to brush your Afghan Spaniel at least three times a week to keep the coat from getting matted and the skin healthy. Another alternative is to get your dog trimmed and groomed every few months. You can bathe your dog when needed with a gentle shampoo and conditioner specially made for dogs with fine hair.

Activity Requirements
  Due to the limited amount of information on this breed, the temperament of their parent breeds is the best way to determine how they will turn out. The Cocker Spaniel is a loyal and lovable family pet that likes cuddling as much as she likes hunting. They do well with children and pets and is really too friendly to be a guard dog. The Afghan Hound is an independent breed that can be wary of strangers so they make good guard dogs. They can become destructive if they do not get enough of your time to keep them from being bored so think twice about this breed if you are away from home often. However, they are happy if they are able to chase the neighborhood squirrels in a fenced yard all day.

Exercise
  Daily exercise for your Afghan Spaniel is important, dogs are living with human since thousands of years, wild dogs have challenges to survive so they work daily to find food, save food and themselves from other animals but companion dogs have nothing to do, they have ready food and couch to sit, which may affect their health, habits and activity. 

  Your Afghan Spaniel is recommended Fetching,Walking,Swimming regular according to its breed specific exercise requirements.

Training 
  Afghan Spaniel require training in early age like other hybrid dogs. Afghan Spaniel is easy to train.  It learns basic commands such as sit, stay, come easily. Behavior training is also very important for your Afghan Spaniel.  Behavior training prevents and or corrects bad habits of your puppy or dog. Behavior and basic commands training for your Afghan Spaniel should must on these lines. Do not get impatient. You will probably have to repeat the command many times. Never use negative reinforcement. Do not call your dog to come to you for punishment because this will teach your dog not to come on command. Be sure to keep any frustration out of the tone of your voice. If you feel yourself becoming frustrated, take a break. Your dog can sense this and will start to associate training with your unhappiness. You cannot hide your frustration from a dog. You cannot pretend. Dogs can feel human emotion, so stay relaxed, firm and confident.

Children and other pets
  Good with children of all ages and other pets after early socialization training.

Is the Afghan Spaniel the Right Breed for you?
Moderate Maintenance: Regular grooming is required to keep its fur in good shape. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Moderately Easy Training: The Afghan Spaniel is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
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Thursday, November 9, 2017

Everything about your Spinone Italiano

Everything about your Spinone Italiano
  Gentle and docile, this ancient all-purpose hunting breed can be good with kids and other dogs. The Spinone Italiano is affectionate, devoted and has a sense of humor. He can rock as a family dog or jogging companion. The downside: a wet beard in your lap after he drinks.
  We’re not talking an Italian dessert here. The Italian Spinone is a pointing breed with versatile hunting skills and a calm, easygoing temperament. He works slowly and methodically and is noted for his wiry, bramble-repelling “spino” coat, from which he takes his name. This is a large dog, weighing 60 to 85 pounds.

Overview

  Also known as the Spinone, Italian Spinone or Italian Griffon, the Spinone Italiano looks more like a tired old man than the rugged pointer that it is. Bred in Italy as a specialist hunting dog, the Spinone is as intelligent as it is strong and has almost human-like eyes which lend to its gentle and almost pensive appearance.
  Spinones are strong boned and solidly built with powerful muscles which allow it to navigate almost any terrain. Its body is covered in a thick, wiry coat which enables it to tolerate a wide range of environments. These characteristics make the Spinone Italiano an ideal hunting dog, a purpose which the breed is still used for today. The Spinone is also a highly versatile breed and can be used in showing, agility, obedience and therapy work.

  Spinones are a very gentle and devoted breed of dog and live to please their owners. They are highly affectionate and get along extremely well with children and other pets. Their temperament is also fairly easier going that other hunting breeds.

Other Quick Facts


  • The Spinone is a muscular dog with a squarish body, solid and powerful. He has a unique profile with a long head; yellowish-brown or darker eyes depending on his coat color; a bulbous and spongy looking nose with large, open nostrils; triangular ears that hang down; and a gentle, intelligent expression. His docked tail is carried horizontally or down, flicking from side to side  while he works.
  • The Spinone’s skin is protected by a dense, wiry, weather-resistant coat. The same coat protects his face, with stiff hair forming eyebrows, a mustache and beard to help prevent lacerations from briars and bushes. The coat comes in solid white, white and orange, orange roan, with or without orange markings, white with brown markings, and brown roan, with or without brown markings. The brown color should be a chestnut shade, described as “monk’s habit.”
  • This breed likes to jump and dig, so he needs a securely fenced yard with an area he can call his own.

Breed standards
AKC group: Sporting
UKC group: Gun Dog Breeds
Average lifespan:  10 to 12 years
Average size: 61 to 85 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense, Thick, and Wire
Coloration: Acceptable variants  are solid white, white with orange markings, orange roan with or without orange markings, white with brown markings, and brown roan with or without brown markings. 
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, houses with yards, hunters
Temperament: Gentle, docile, loyal, friendly

History
  The breed is believed to have been developed in the Piedmont region of Italy. As the Spinone is a very ancient breed , it is not known exactly what the origins of the breed are; there are many different theories. Some of these claim that the Spinone could have originated in Italy, France, Spain, Russia, Greece, or Celtic Ireland.
  Some people familiar with the history of the breed claim that the Spinone descended from the now-extinct Spanish Pointer, whilst others claim that it was the ancient Russian Setter that is responsible for the breed we know today. An even more popular theory is that Greek traders brought coarse-haired setters to Italy during the height of the Roman empire, where the dogs were then crossed with various others and the modern Spinone eventually emerged.
In his Camera degli Sposi (15th century),
Andrea Mantegna depicts a Spinone,
 Rubino, as a symbol of loyalty. 
  The French claim that the Spinone has descended from crosses of several French pointing breeds, whilst the Italians believe the Spinone is the ancestor of the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon, the German Wirehaired Pointer, and the Pudelpointer. Any one of these claims could be true; perhaps several of them are correct.
  During the Second World War, the Spinone became close to extinct. Both the war and the fact that Italian hunters had begun using other breeds  in the hunt, whereas before it was primarily the Spinone. Many breeders had to resort to crossing the Spinone with other wire-haired breeds, such as the Boulet, Wirehaired Pointing Griffon and German Wirehaired Pointer.
  The breed was not officially known as "Spinone" until the early 19th century. Before then, some areas knew the breed as the "Spinoso". The breed may have been named after an Italian thorn bush, the spino, which was a favorite hiding place for small game because for larger animals it was practically impenetrable. Only thick-skinned, coarse-haired animals could fight through the branches unharmed to locate the game. The Spinone was the breed most capable of doing so, and, perhaps, therefore the name was formed.
  Today the Bracco Italiano is the most popular hunting dog in Italy, although the Spinone is still common. The Bracco is a racier, higher energy dog, while the Spinone excels at hunting close or in dense cover, and in retrieving from water.
  The Duchess of Northumberland has a spinone, called Fuzzy.

Personality
  As puppies, Spinone Italianos are rowdy, rambunctious and full of energy. As adults, they mature into quiet, dignified companions who generally make themselves seen and not heard. They are reserved around strangers, but come to life in the outdoors. Spinones are sturdy hunting companions and make excellent hiking and jogging buddies. They get alone well with children, when raised alongside the little ones and don't mind other family dogs. For families who have experience with dogs and love the outdoors, Spinone Italianos make excellent pets.

Health
  The Spinone Italiano, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, is susceptible to major health concerns such as canine hip dysplasia (CHD), and minor issues like otitis externa, ectropion, cerebellar ataxia, and gastric torsion. Allergies and elbow dysplasia may also be seen on occasion in these dogs. Routine hip exams are recommended as the dogs grow older.

Care
  Brushing and combing the Italiano is important, and occasional hand-stripping helps to clear the feet and face of dirt. The breed is adaptable to both temperate and cold weather. Regular exercise in the form of running or long hours of walking is essential for the Italiano breed. It also loves to spend time with its human family.

Living Conditions
  Content within a fenced yard, this large dog is nevertheless capable of jumping very high. The occasional one is a tunneler. Talk to breeders about secure fencing.

Trainability
  For experienced trainers, Spinones are fairly easy to train. They are not dominant or overbearing, but can be quite stubborn. Novice trainers may grow frustrated or be inclined to resort to harsh treatment or discipline – which is the wrong approach to training this breed. Spinones need strong, consistent leadership but should never be punished or physically corrected, as this will cause them to shut down and become even more resistant to training and boundaries.
  Spinones are reserved dogs who need extensive socialization as puppies to help them come out of their shells. If not properly introduced to new people, new situations and other animals, a Spinone can be very difficult to live with. When properly socialized, he may still be cautious around strangers, but will always be polite and dignified.

Activity Requirements
  Spinone Italianos need a lot of vigorous exercise to remain healthy, happy and even-tempered. They are built for hunting and can withstand harsh terrain, hours in the sun and sopping wet conditions. Couch potatoes should not consider this breed, as they are much better suited for hunters and people who enjoy the outdoors. In the hunting field Spinones are versatile, tracking pointing and retrieving on land and water. When not hunting,   Spinones enjoy walking, jogging and long hikes.
 Spinones are far to large and need too much exercise to be cooped up in an apartment.   These are country dogs who need plenty of room to run, roam, romp and whenever possible, to swim.

Grooming
  The Spinone has a dense, wiry coat that resists weather and protects him from brush and debris. As he has no undercoat, he needs only occasional brushing and hand stripping to remove dead hair. For stripping your Spinone’s coat, you can use either a stripping knife  or your bare hands. Your breeder can show you proper technique, and how to tell how much hair needs to be stripped. Because of his harsh coat, he will only need a bath if he gets into something really gross.
  You may want to keep a hand towel close by when your Spinone gets a drink, because afterward his beard will drip water all over the place.
  Keep your Spinone’s ears clean and dry, and trim his nails and brush his teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste. Good dental hygiene promotes general health and will also give your Spinone good breath. Start grooming him at an early age so he becomes used to the process and accepts it willingly.

Is the Spinone Italiano the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. Occasional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Moderately Easy Training: The Spinone Italiano is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  The Spinone is a versatile Italian pointing breed with stamina and patience. He excels at hunting on any terrain, including being an excellent retriever, but given enough exercise can be perfectly happy as a companion dog.


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Everything about your German Pinscher

Everything about your German Pinscher
  The German Pinscher dog breed is muscular and agile, powerful yet graceful. A medium-sized dog with an elegant appearance, he’s admired as much for his beauty as for his intelligence. He’s a working breed and guard dog, and a devoted and loving family dog.
  In need of a strong leader, the assertive and determined German Pinscher is easy to train and intelligent. He's a strong watchdog, has lots of energy, and he's devoted to his family as long as small mammals aren't included. The German Pinscher remains playful well into adulthood and his smooth coat is easy to groom.

Overview
  The German Pinscher, also known at various times as the Deutscher Pinscher, the Reh Pinscher, the Medium Pinscher and the Standard Pinscher, is a medium-sized, energetic and watchful dog that makes an excellent guardian and family companion. The breed originated in Germany, where it was first recognized as a distinct breed in 1879. The first formal breed standard for the German Pinscher was written in 1884. Its name derives from the Germanic form of the French word “pincer,” which means “to seize” or “to nip”. The German Pinscher is an intense and proficient vermin-controller and rodent-killer. It was admitted into the American Kennel Club as a member of the Working Group in 2001.

Highlights
  • The German Pinscher is not recommended for homes with children under the age of nine.
  • A working breed, he needs daily exercise and cannot be left untrained or unexercised. Expect a healthy amount of exercise each day to curb negative behaviors.
  • The German Pinscher can fare all right in an apartment as long as he's walked at least twice a day. However, he's better suited to a home that has a fenced yard.
  • He has a strong prey drive and will chase anything that he deems worth chasing. He should be kept on lead while not in a secured area, and fences should be secure enough that he can't slip through them.
  • The German Pinscher is a strong-willed breed that needs a consistent and firm owner. He has been known to take over a home if rules are not set when he's young. With training and consistency, however, the German Pinscher will learn quickly and well.
  • Naturally suspicious of strangers, the German Pinschers makes an excellent guard dog. By the same token, he needs to be socialized from a young age to prevent the development of aggressive behavior.
  • The German Pinscher enjoys jumping up to greet loved ones, but proper training can correct this trait.
  • He will alert bark and he has a strong, loud voice, but he won't bark unnecessarily.
  • He thrives when he's part of a family and can participate in family activities. He isn't a breed who can live outside, and he's unhappy being forgotten while life is busy.
  • The German Pinscher can become destructive when he's bored. He's also known for his ability to gut toys at an alarming rate.

Other Quick Facts
  • When you look at a German Pinscher, you see a medium-size dog with a strong, square build; a powerful, elongated head that resembles a blunt wedge; medium-size dark oval eyes with a sharp and alert expression; and ears that are erect if cropped or V-shaped with a folding pleat if uncropped. The tail is docked.
  • The German Pinscher’s short, smooth coat lies close to the body and comes in several colors: Isabella (fawn); various shades of red, including stag, which is red intermingled with black hairs; and black or blue with red or tan markings.
Breed standards
AKC group: Working
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 12 to 14 years
Average size: 25 to 45 pounds
Coat appearance: Dense and Short
Coloration: They come in a variety of colors including red, stag red – red with black hairs intermingled in the coat – and Isabella, which is a bay or fawn color; black or blue with red or tan markings. 
Hypoallergenic: No
Best Suited For: experienced dog owners, active singles, active families, house with a yard

History
  Originally developed to eradicate vermin, the German Pinscher originated in Germany somewhere between the late 1700s and late 1800s. There is no clear evidence of when he was developed, but a painting that dates from about 1780 portrays a dog similar in appearance to the German Pinscher.
  He was a foundation dog for many breeds, including the Doberman Pinscher and the Miniature Pinscher. The breed was founded by the Rat Pinscher, also known as the Rat Catcher or the Great Ratter, a breed that became extinct in the early 1800s. The German Pinscher was recognized as a breed in 1895.
  During the World Wars, the German Pinscher came close to extinction. Two breed colors did in fact die out: the pure black and the salt-and-pepper. After World War II, a West German named Werner Jung began breeding German Pinschers and saved the breed. German Pinschers were first imported into the United States in the late 1970s.
  In 2004, the German Pinscher competed at its first Westminster Kennel Club. The Best of Breed winner was Ch. Windamir Hunter des Charmettes with the Best of Opposite Sex to Best of Breed won by Ch. Windamir's Chosen One.

Extinct varieties
  There are several now-extinct varieties of the German Pinscher:
  • Schweizer Pinscher (also called the Jonataler Pinscher, Pfisterlinge, Silberpinsch, Swiss Salt and Pepper Pinscher, Swiss Shorthair Pinscher)
  • Seidenpinscher (also called the German Silky Pinscher, Silky Pinscher)
  Some of these may have recently been re-formed from the German Pinscher and marketed as rare breeds for those seeking unique pets.

Personality
  Halfway in size between a Miniature Pinscher and a Doberman Pinscher, the German Pinscher is a medium-sized powerhouse – fearless, imposing, and completely devoted to the family he loves. German Pinschers have big personalities and tend to believe the world revolves around them. They are fiercely protective of their territory and family, and despite their medium size make excellent guard dogs and can be counted on to take down an intruder with shocking efficiency. 
 This breed is quite dependent upon human companionship and will want to be included in every aspect of home life, from work to play to sharing the bed. German Pinschers are an excellent choice for experienced dog owners and for people who lead an active lifestyle.

Health Problems
  Because the German Pinscher has a fairly small gene pool there are risks for a number of inherited conditions. Some of the health problems to which this breed is prone include hip and elbow dysplasia, cataracts, thyroid disorders, cardiac disease, and von Willebrand disease. Responsible breeding practices are the best way to prevent the passing of these conditions.

Care
  The grooming requirements for the German Pinscher is fairly simple: the occasional brushing and wash. German Pinschers love to be involved in family activities and hate to be left in the kennel or alone. They are very dedicated to their family, their devotion going to the extent of supervising housework, providing entertainment in the evenings, guiding gardening, and sharing their master’s bed.
  As the dog is full of energy it should be given good mental and physical exercises or it can get bored and frustrated.

Living Conditions
  The German Pinscher will do okay in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. It should have a tightly fenced-in yard. This breed will run off chasing anything that moves quickly.


Trainability
  Pinschers have an independent streak in them, but are generally easy to train. They possess a strong desire to please and pick up on new tasks quickly when rewarded with affection and treats. Consistency is important, as their independent side makes them prone to testing boundaries. Pinschers can be incredibly manipulative, their faces often look like they are smiling, and their eyes are quite expressive. The soft at heart can be easily walked all over by a Pinscher. But once leadership is established and basic obedience is mastered, however, German Pinschers can excel in advanced obedience, tracking and agility activities.
  German Pinschers, despite their imposing look, make excellent service and therapy dogs. Individual dogs with steady temperaments enjoy working with the elderly and infirm, especially if it involves having lots of attention and treats lavished upon them.

Exercise 
  The German Pinscher requires a lot of exercise. This breed needs to be taken on a daily, brisk, long walk or jog where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as instinct tells a dog the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the human. They will enjoy running alongside you when you bicycle, playing in the yard, or a walk around the block.

Grooming Needs
  The German Pinscher is low-maintenance when it comes to grooming. Weekly brushing with a mitt will remove dead hair, and they only need to be bathed when they start giving off a doggie odor. Active Pinscher will wear their toenails down naturally, but they do not, monthly trimmings will be in order. If the nails click on hard floors, it's time for a trim.
  Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of redness, irritation, or wax buildup. Cleanse with a veterinarian-approved solution and a cotton ball. Brush the dog's teeth at least once per week to help keep bad breath in check, and keep teeth and gums healthy.

Children And Other Pets

  The German Pinscher usually does well with children if he's brought up with them from puppyhood. But because of his assertive nature, he does best with older children, preferably those over the age of nine. An older Pinscher who's unfamiliar with children will probably do best in a home with kids who are mature enough to interact with him properly.
  Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he's eating or to try to take the dog's food away. No dog should be left unsupervised with a child.
  The same holds true for the German Pinscher's attitude toward some kinds of pets; he does best if he's been raised with them, or at least socialized to them when he's still young. But remember that he was developed to hunt and kill vermin. He's got a high prey drive that's hardwired, and no amount of training will keep him from going after a pet rat. He's not a good match with small mammals.

Is the German Pinscher the Right Breed for you?

Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. Little to no trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Easy Training: The German Pinscher is known to listen to commands and obey its owner. Expect fewer repetitions when training this breed.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?

  The German Pinscher played a role in the ancestry of the Doberman and other Pinscher breeds and is closely associated with the Standard Schnauzer. He is smaller than the Doberman but bigger than the Miniature Pinscher.


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Everything about your Toy Poodle

Everything about your Toy Poodle
  Size differentiates the Standard, Miniature, and Toy Poodles, who are otherwise similar. These elegant dogs have Einstein-like smarts and they make excellent family dogs. Most of them don’t have the runway styling of a show dog, but they do need professional grooming unless you are prepared to learn to use clippers.

Overview
  The Poodle, also known as the Caniche and the Pudle, is a breed of dog that comes in three sizes. The Standard and Miniature Poodles are in the Non Sporting Group, and the Toy Poodles are in the Toy Group. This is one of the most popular house pet breeds known, and poodles are famous for their companionable temperaments and extremely high degree of intelligence. The Poodle was recognized by the AKC in 1887 and AKC approved in 1984.
  When groomed to show dog standards the body is meant to give off a square appearance. It is approximately the same length as the height at the withers. The skull is moderately rounded with a slight but definite stop. It has a long, straight muzzle. The dark, oval-shaped eyes are set somewhat far apart and are black or brown. The ears hang close to the head and are long and flat. Both the front and back legs are in proportion with the size of the dog.   The topline is level. The tail is set and carried high. It is sometimes docked to half its length or less to make the dog look more balanced. Dewclaws may be removed. The oval-shaped feet are rather small and the toes are arched. The coat is either curly or corded. It comes in all solid colors including black, blue, silver, gray, cream, apricot, red, white, brown or café-au-lait. While it does not make the written show standard, some breeders are breeding parti-colored Poodles. 

Other Quick Facts
  • Poodles are canine scholars. Their intelligence combined with their desire to please makes it easy to train them.
  • The original purpose of the Standard Poodle was to retrieve waterfowl for hunters, and he is still capable of performing that task today.
  • Poodles need regular mental stimulation and physical exercise.
  • Poodles are not prissy and are just as likely as other dogs to enjoy wet or muddy fun.
  • A Poodle’s grooming needs are considerable. Clipping must be done regularly, typically about every 6 to 8 weeks, or that fine curly coat will mat into gnarly knots.
  • Poodles can be one of the best family dogs possible. For the tiny dog’s safety, though, most breeders won’t place Toy Poodles in homes with children younger than 10 years.
Breed standards
AKC group: Toy
UKC group: Companion Dogs
Average lifespan: 14 to 18 years
Average size: 5 to 10 pounds
Coat appearance: Corded, Dense, and Harsh and Rough
Coloration: It comes in all solid colors including black, blue, silver, gray, cream, apricot, red, white, brown or café-au-lait
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, houses with yards

Temperament: Intelligent, easy to train, obedient, playful

History 

  Poodles are thought to have originated in Germany, where they were called Pudel, meaning "splash in the water,”  a reference to their work as water retrievers. The exaggerated show cut seen today began as a practical way to keep the dog’s joints and torso warm in cold water.
  The Standard is the oldest of the three Poodle varieties. The Miniature and the Toy were created by selecting for smaller size. They, too, were working dogs. Miniatures are said to have sniffed out truffles, a type of edible mushroom that grows underground, and Toys and Miniatures were popular circus dogs because of their intelligence, love of performing and ability to learn tricks.

  The curly-coated dogs became popular in England and Spain, but in France they were adored. King Louis XVI was besotted with Toy Poodles and the breed became thought of as France’s national dog. It was in France that the breed achieved status as companions, and Poodles still enjoy that status today. They are beloved around the world and are consistently ranked among the most popular breeds. Today the Miniature is the most popular of the three sizes, and the three varieties together are ranked ninth in popularity among the breeds registered by the American Kennel Club.

Personality


  Poodles have a reputation for being “sissies.” They way their hair is cut for shows probably doesn't help that image, but Poodles are by no means fragile, shrinking violets.   They are outgoing, friendly dogs who love to run and romp, and interestingly, they were originally used to assist hunters of water fowl. They are true family dogs who can play hard with children all afternoon, then curl up in the living room for an evening of relaxation. Toy Poodles make excellent watchdogs, they are alert and curious and will sound the alarm that a person or animal is approaching. They make an excellent choice for families of all sizes and ages, and are great for first time dog owners.

Health

  This dog has a lifespan of 12 to 14 years and may suffer from minor diseases like trichiasis, entropion, cataract and lacrimal duct atresia, and major aliments like progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, patellar luxation, and epilepsy. Urolithiasis and intervertebral disk degeneration are sometimes noticed in the breed. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run hip, knee, and eye exams on the dog.

Care


  The Toy Poodle is not meant for outdoor living, but it enjoys moving to and from the yard. Its coat requires it to be brushed on alternate days. When hair sheds, it does not fall off easily, but gets tangled, thus causing matting. Clipping is recommended four times annually, while the feet and face require monthly clipping. Most Poodles need professional groomers, but owners of the dogs can also learn the grooming procedure. Poodles require plenty of physical and mental exercise - indoor games, short walks, etc. -as well as lots of interaction with humans.

Living Conditions

  Toy Poodles are good for city life as well as country living. Given enough exercise, they are not active indoors. They will lie right next to you and are more sedate when indoors, although they love to play outdoors and are a highly intelligent breed, so they do like lots of thoughtful activities to stimulate their mentality. They will do okay without a yard.

Trainability
  Poodles are highly trainable dogs. They catch on very quickly to patterns and don't require much motivation beyond praise and a couple of treats. Poodles should never be treated harshly as they will simply stop listening to you. They are natural learners, however, so they shouldn't test your patience too far during training sessions.

  Once basic obedience has been mastered, Poodles should graduate on to advanced obedience, trick training, or the agility course. They are thinking dogs and will appreciate the opportunity to learn new things.

Activity Requirements

  Toy Poodles can live as happily in and apartment as they can in a large home with a yard. Wherever they dwell, they do need daily walks and several chances to run every week. Poodles who aren't exercised enough can become high strung and bark excessively.

  They are a smart breed who need to use their minds as much as their bodies, so it is important to give your Poodle lots of interesting activities to do during the day.

Grooming
  Grooming is a significant consideration in Poodles. The fine, curly coat that works well in the water needs to be clipped regularly, typically about every six to eight weeks, depending on your preferences. It mats easily, and requires regular brushing at home, even with professional grooming care. Left untrimmed, the coat will naturally curl into cords. Some people want the coat to cord because they prefer the look.
  Dental care is an issue, particularly for the Toy and Miniature Poodle. Those small mouths full of teeth can cause problems. Keep on top of it by brushing the teeth regularly with a vet-approved pet toothpaste and having regular dental checks when you go to the veterinarian.

  Trim the nails as needed, usually every week or two. Don’t let them get so long that you can hear them clicking on the floor.

Is the Toy Poodle the Right Breed for you?

High Maintenance: Grooming should be performed often to keep the dog's coat in good shape. Professional trimming or stripping needed.
Minimal Shedding: Recommended for owners who do not want to deal with hair in their cars and homes.
Difficult Training: The Toy Poodle isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Slightly Active: Not much exercise is required to keep this dog in shape. Owners who are frequently away or busy might find this breed suitable for their lifestyle.

Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?

  Toy Poodles have been popular pets for centuries, including in the court of Louis XVI. Poodles didn’t originate in France, but they are often referred to as French Poodles because they were so popular in that country.



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Everything about your Zuchon

Everything about your Zuchon
  No, that’s not a teddy bear – it’s a Zuchon! A non-shedding, designer dog breed, the Zuchon is a mix of Shih Tzu and Bichon Frise. This breed is also known by the names of Shichon and Teddy Bear Zuchon . No matter what you call it, this dog will melt your heart and make a wonderful addition to your family.
  Because he gets along with everyone, there isn’t a lifestyle this dog won’t fit into. They rarely bark, are hypo-allergenic, love kids and other animals and can be active or laid back. Boasting a happy disposition and a passion for playtime, the Zuchon will be a loving companion for many years to come. Please read on to learn more about this hybrid breed.

Overview

  The Zuchon is also known as a Shichon, teddy bear dog, or fuzzy wuzzy puppy. They reach an average height of 9-12 inches from the shoulder, and a weight of 8-25 pounds fully grown. 'Dog Breed Info' says the Zuchon is a dog "known for his endearing face, large expressive eyes, and his soft teddy-bear coat." The Zuchon usually has a longer coat that does not shed very much, if at all. This longer coat may lead to more time for maintenance and grooming. As hypoallergenic dogs, Zuchons are generally more suitable for homes with allergy problems amongst the inhabitants, although allergic reactions may still occur.

  This toy dog is said to have a "great" personality, and it is playful, lively and well-mannered. They can be a bit stubborn, but when they are trained well, they are a good family pet. They are easily trained. The Zuchon is a well-mannered dog known to be social, happy, and gentle. They become devoted to their families but need much attention and do not do well when left alone for long periods of time. They are good therapy dogs.   Sometimes the Zuchon may be stubborn and in need of training. The Zuchon will remain active. They make fairly good watch dogs. When necessary, this dog will bark to alert its family that someone is nearby. This breed is typically good with other pets, especially when socialized at an early age. This dog gets along well with children, but it may be a good idea to socialize this breed at an early age as well as to supervise play time with children to make sure that the dog does not get hurt as a result of its small size.

Breed standards

Group: Not Applicable
Average lifespan: 15-18 years
Average size: 40-55 pounds
Coat appearance: Silky, Smooth, and Soft
Coloration: Apricot, Black, Cream, Gray,Red,Silver,White
Hypoallergenic: Yes
Best Suited For: Families with children, singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards

Temperament: Friendly, well mannered, affectionate, loving

History

  Americans began breeding designer dogs in the 1990s. The Zuchon is a cross between an oriental Shih Tzu and a Mediterranean Bichon Frisé. Although this breed of dog is relatively new, its popularity and fame is growing quickly. The Zuchon is still not thought of as an official breed of dog, only a cross-breed. This may change as the dog is becoming a popular toy dog being classified with all other toy dog purebreds. Organizations that recognise this breed include the American Canine Hybrid Club and the Designer Dogs Kennel Club.

Temperament


  Sporting an excellent temperament, you’ll find that your pup is eager to please you. With a lively and spunky personality, Zuchons are known to be well-mannered, making them great with children of all ages and all kinds of animals. Intelligent and affectionate, your pooch is sociable, so be sure to take your pooch to the dog park and around town so he can socialize. Playing and hogging attention is high on their list of priorities, so make sure your dog gets plenty of both. But this breed isn’t all about just fun and games – he will also serve as a watchdog, letting you know when someone is at the door. And this is generally the only time when he will bark. Even though the Zuchon is small, it’s not a yappy dog.

Health

  An important feature with the Zuchon hybrid breed is its longevity. The average life-expectancy of a Zuchon is around 12–15 years. The Zuchon, like many hybrid breeds, is usually healthy without showing the congenital defects that purebreds can have from inbreeding. However, this is only true if the Zuchon is a first generation dog. When a multi-generation Zuchon is born, the possibility of health issues increases. Some possible defects known to designer dogs include canine hip dysplasia, deafness, epilepsy, and liver disease.

Training


 High trainability, they are known for their high intelligence and train-ability and are always eager to please their loved ones. They are very responsive to facial expressions and body language, and love nothing more than to spend time close to the people they love. 

Exercise Requirements

  The Zuchon loves to play, so most of his exercise requirements can be met with a game of catch or tug of war. That means he is the ideal roommate for people who live in apartments and condos. But he’ll still need fresh air and visits to the bathroom, so make sure he gets his daily walk and makes a few trips outdoors. A trip to the dog park will also help tire him out.
   This is an intuitive breed, so the Zuchon will match your energy level. Whether you want to get outside for a walk or want to relax on the couch, the Zuchon will be by your side, content to do whatever it is you want to do.

Grooming

  Very little grooming is needed if their hair is kept in a low maintenance "teddy bear cut” or "puppy cut" every 3 months. It best represents the Teddy Bear Zuchons look.  Regular combing is recommended it is great for bonding and mat prevention. Regular nail trims and eye trims are all that’s required between trims. As with all dogs regular teeth cleaning and removal of tarter is important for overall health.

Children And Other Pets

  Being so patient, cuddly and gentle in temperament they are excellent with children. They pay attention to children of all ages and love to interact, make eye contact and play with them creating uniquely special bonds with them to remember for a lifetime. Teddy Bear Zuchons are calm, gentle, lovable and cuddly, and because of this, they were originally bred as companions for handicapped children who needed a cuddly and squeezable dog that would gladly handle hours of snuggling without becoming irritated or nippy.

  They are excellent with other pets of various types. 

Is the Zuchon the Right Breed for you?
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep.
Moderately Easy Training: The Zuchon is average when it comes to training. Results will come gradually.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.

Hypoallergenic
  Their fur is hypoallergenic, meaning most individuals will not be allergic to them as they may be to other breeds, making them great companions for allergy sufferers. Their hair is easy to groom, and they love baths, gladly jumping in when they are asked to.
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Everything about your Bull Terrier

Everything about your Bull Terrier
  Whenever you hear the word “Bull,” you probably imagine a frightening thing indeed. Who can blame you? Bulls can be scary – people run away from them as a sport in Pamplona, Spain. Bullfrogs are big, giant versions of frogs that we associate with big, loud noises. 
  Well, take one good look at the Bull Terrier and you’ll probably find out why it’s more terrier than bulldog. The rough name can be a little misleading, but as it turns out Bull Terriers can make loyal, energetic, and even fun pets that the entire family can enjoy – or can work as a great companion even if you’re the only member of your household. 

Overview
  There’s no mistaking the Bull Terrier for any other breed. With his football-shaped head, muscular body and unmatched swagger, this is a dog that commands attention anywhere he goes. He’s an icon, seen at the side of owners from General Patton to Princess Anne, and in advertising campaigns for beer - the famous Spuds McKenzie -- and department stores. He's a high-energy tough guy with a soft heart, crazy about kids and strongly attached to his family.
  The Bull Terrier is sometimes considered one of the breeds known as a " pit bull." Before getting one of these dogs, it is important to realize that there is much misinformation around the natures of pit bulls and there are campaigns to out-law the dogs. Check into local ordinances carefully to be sure that you can legally own one of these dogs in your town.  Also do your own research so you can help educate friends and neighbors about the merits of this breed.
  On the plus side, grooming is a breeze with a Bull Terrier; just brush him a couple of times a week to keep shedding to a minimum, and make sure his nails are trimmed and his ears are clean.
   The Bull Terrier is an indoor dog. Besides having a short coat unsuited to cold or wet weather, he’s the kind of dog who thrives on companionship and needs to be with his family when they are home.

Highlights
  • Bull Terriers thrive in the company of their people, and should live indoors with their human family. They don't do well when left alone for long periods and will wreak destruction when bored.
  • Bull Terriers aren't suited for cold, damp climates. Keep your Bull Terrier warm with a coat or sweater in winter.
  • These aren't high maintenance dogs, grooming-wise. A weekly brushing and occasional wipe-down with a damp cloth is usually all it takes to keeps them clean, although they must be brushed more frequently during twice-yearly shedding periods.
  • Ownership of Bull Terriers is restricted or banned in some cities, states, and provinces. Research your local dog laws before you get one; banned dogs may be seized and euthanized.
  • The Bull Terrier is strong-willed and can be difficult to train. He's not recommended for timid or first-time dog owners.
  • Without early socialization and training, Bull Terriers can be aggressive toward other dogs, animals, and people he doesn't know.
  • Bull Terriers are too rough and rambunctious for homes with young children, but they're tireless playmates for active older kids who've been taught how to interact with dogs.
Other Quick Facts
  • The Bull Terrier comes in two varieties: white and colored. They are exhibited in separate classes at dog shows but are otherwise the same breed. A colored Bull Terrier named Rufus won Best In Show at Westminster in 2006, the first of his variety to do so.
  • When you look at a Bull Terrier, you see a strong, muscular dog with a long oval head that resembles an egg . Small thin ears point upward, and small dark eyes with a piercing glint are sunken into the head. A short tail, thick at the root and tapering to a fine point, is carried horizontally
  • Bull Terriers have appeared in hundreds of films, ranging from "101 Dalmatians" and "Best in Show" to "The Mask" and "The Wizard of Oz."

Breed standards
AKC group: Terrier
UKC group: Terrier
Average lifespan: 11-14 years
Average size: 45-50 lbs
Coat appearance: Sleek, smooth, short
Coloration: White, brown and black
Hypoallergenic: No
Other identifiers: Triangular eyes; egg-shaped skull; round, muscular body.
Possible alterations: Coat coloring varies and can be seen in a variety of colors and combinations.
Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
Temperament: Independent, energetic, affectionate

History
  The family tree of the Bulldog is massive with many branches. One of those branches holds the bull-and-terrier breeds, the various results of 18 th-century crosses between bulldogs and terriers. Those crosses were made with the intent of producing a dog with the strength and tenacity of the bulldog and the intensity, alertness, agility and “game” nature of the terrier.
James Hinks Bullterrier
  The earliest Bull Terriers came in a variety of sizes. Some were as small as four to seven pounds and were considered toy breeds. Others were medium-size at 15 pounds and some ranged up to 45 to 60 pounds, close to the size of the modern Bull Terrier. They had an arched back, bent legs and an undershot jaw, all features that were reminiscent of the breed’s bulldog heritage.
  James Hinks of Birmingham, England, was a well-known breeder of Bull Terriers in the 1860s, and it was he who started them on the road to the more refined look they have today: the longer head and the more symmetrical body that was predominantly or completely white. To create them he used existing bull-and-terriers, his white Bulldog Madman, and white English Terriers, which are now extinct.
  Nicknamed White Cavaliers, they became fashionable accessories for gentlemen about town and could be soon sitting alongside them as they drove their carriages through the park. A rhyme of the time tells the story of the breed succinctly, saying that Hinks “Found a Bull Terrier a tattered old bum; Made him a dog for a gentleman’s chum.”
  The fad spread to the United States. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1885, and the Bull Terrier Club of America was founded in 1897. A new variety of Bull Terrier was invented in the early 20 th century when some breeders crossed them with Staffordshire Bull Terriers, adding color to the coat. The “Colored” variety of Bull Terrier was recognized in 1936. Today the Bull Terrier ranks 53 rd among the breeds registered by the AKC.

Personality
  Once upon a time Bull Terriers were bred to fight. Crossing a terrier and a bulldog produced a breed with fearlessness, tenacity and strength that made them natural gladiators. The fighting branches of the Bull Terrier's family tree have since withered away, and the modern breed is a loving, loyal, clown of a dog who makes an excellent family companion for those with active lifestyles. They love being with people and want to be included in all family activities whether it's a ride in the car, a neighborhood stroll or a romp in the park.

Health 
  Many dogs have certain propensities toward health problems, and Bull Terriers are no different, showing an inclination toward skin conditions and allergies. This can often be a good thing because it presents a problem that can be spotted, but it’s important to make sure that you take your Bull Terrier for regular checkups anyway.
  The Bull Terrier, which has an average lifespan of 11 to 14 years, may suffer from patellar luxation. It is also prone to minor health problems like heart complication, allergies and compulsive behavior, and more serious conditions such as kidney failure and deafness. To identify some of these issues, a veterinarian may run cardiac, thyroid, hearing and urine protein:urine creatinine ratio tests on the dog. 

Care
  A Bull Terrier needs half an hour to an hour of physical and mental exercise daily. He'll enjoy going for walks, chasing a ball, or testing his wits against an interactive toy. He's also capable of competing in agility and obedience trials. Be sure to always walk him on leash so he won't run after other animals or go off exploring on his own.
   Bull Terrier puppies are bouncy and into everything. High-impact exercise can damage growing bones, so until your puppy's full grown, at 12 to 18 months of age, beware of bone-jarring activities such as jumping on and off the furniture, playing Frisbee, or running on slick wood or tile floors. These can all stress or injure the still-developing joints and ligaments.
  Early and consistent training is essential. You must be able to provide leadership without resorting to physical force or harsh words. A Bull Terrier isn't the easiest breed to train, and you'll be most successful if you appeal to his love of play with positive reinforcement techniques while still remaining firm and consistent in what you expect.
  Bull Terriers can be difficult to housetrain. Follow the housetraining program closely; the crate method is best. A crate will also prevent your Bull Terrier from destroying your belongings or otherwise getting into trouble.

Living Conditions
  Bull Terriers will do okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They are fairly active indoors and a small yard will do. They prefer warm climates.

Trainability
  Bullies are intelligent and have a mind of their own. Training should be started early and always done in calm-assertive manner, as they won't respond to discipline or harsh tones. Training is best done in short sessions due to Bull Terriers' short attention span and they will quickly become uninterested, even if treats are used as a reward. Lots of patience is necessary when working with a Bull Terrier, as training can be a long process.
  Even after a Bull Terrier is fully trained, they may decide to test their boundaries as they get older and project dominance. These situations should be handled with calm assertion; like a teenager, they just want to see what they can get away with.

Exercise 
  Bullies need a lot of vigorous exercise. Though short and stocky, they are a hardy breed and are happiest when they are active. Long walks, short runs, or playing long games of ball in the back yard will meet their daily activity requirements. If a Bull Terrier is not getting enough exercise, they are sure to let you know. They are notoriously destructive, making easy work of flower beds or expensive furniture, and some develop the neurotic behavior of obsessively chasing their own tail.

Grooming
  Grooming the Bull Terrier is a cinch. Though the breed is naturally clean with little doggie odor, a bath every three months (or when he’s dirty) in a mild shampoo is a good idea. Brush his sleek coat with a natural bristle brush or rubber hound mitt once a week. Use coat conditioner/polish to brighten the sheen.
  His ears need to be checked every week and cleaned if needed, and toenails trimmed once a month. Regular tooth brushing with a soft toothbrush and doggie toothpaste keep the teeth and gums healthy and the breath fresh. Introduce grooming to the Bull Terrier when he is very young so he learns to accept the handling and fuss patiently.   

Children And Other Pets
  Bull Terriers and Miniature Bull Terriers are active dogs who can play rough, so they're not recommended for homes with young children. They're great playmates with boundless energy for active older children who understand how to interact with dogs.
  Bull Terriers can, however, be aggressive toward kids they don't know, especially if there's a lot of shouting or wrestling going on. They may feel it's their duty to protect "their" children from their friends. Always supervise play; as with any dog, never leave a dog alone with a child, and teach children how to approach and touch dogs.
  With the children in their own family, they're highly tolerant, but they don't like being teased. Don't permit your children to play tug-of-war with the dog.
  Bull Terriers, especially unneutered males, can be aggressive toward dogs of the same sex, but opposite genders usually get along well. Bull Terriers shouldn't be trusted with cats or other small furry animals.

Is this breed right for you?
  Bull Terriers can get along in most living enviroments, and they thrive in families with older children to play with. This breed can get along in smaller dwellings as long as a rigorous exercise regimen is part of their daily routine. Bull Terriers can be prone to various skin allergies and other more-serious health issues. All potential owners should take into consideration the financial responsibility with regard to a variety of health concerns.
Low Maintenance: Infrequent grooming is required to maintain upkeep. No trimming or stripping needed.
Moderate Shedding: Routine brushing will help. Be prepared to vacuum often!
Difficult Training: The Bull Terrier isn't deal for a first time dog owner. Patience and perseverance are required to adequately train it.
Fairly Active: It will need regular exercise to maintain its fitness. Trips to the dog park are a great idea.
Good for New Owners: This breed is well suited for those who have little experience with dog ownership.
Good with Kids: This is a suitable breed for kids and is known to be playful, energetic, and affectionate around them.

Did You Know?
  Because of his fun-loving, mischievous personality, the Bull Terrier is sometimes referred to as “the kid in a dog suit.”

In popular culture
  • General George S. Patton owned a Bull Terrier named Willie, and a portrayal of him is featured in the 1970 movie Patton.
    Bull Terrier about 1960
  • In Charles Dickens' Oliver Twist (1838), Bill Sikes' dog "Bullseye" is a Bull Terrier.
  • From 1987 to 1989, Budweiser's beer commercials featured a female Bull Terrier named "Spuds MacKenzie".
  • The book The Incredible Journey by author Sheila Burnford features a Bull Terrier named "Bodger", as well as in the 1963 film.
  • The 1993 Nickelodeon cartoon Rocko's Modern Life features a bull terrier named "Spunky", who is Rocko's pet dog.
  • The 1995 film Toy Story features a mean Bull Terrier named "Scud".
  • Target's mascot, named "Bullseye", is a Bull Terrier.
  • Ken Greenhill's 1977 novel Hell Hound recounts the story of a sociopathic Bull Terrier named Baxter, whose desire for a dominant master drives him to murder. The novel was adapted to the cult French horror film Baxter in 1989.
  • The album cover for Working Class Dog by singer Rick Springfield is of his own pet Bull Terrier named Ronnie.
  • Chris Van Allsburg, writer of books such as Jumanji and The Polar Express, includes a Bull Terrier named "Fritz" in each book he writes.
  • "Grimm" from the syndicated comic strip Mother Goose and Grimm is a yellow, cartoon Bull Terrier.
  • A formerly abandoned deaf Bull Terrier named "Patsy Ann", from 1929-1942, would greet new ships coming into the harbor in Juneau, Alaska. She was dubbed the "Official Greeter of Juneau, Alaska" in 1934. A statue in Juneau was erected in her honor in 1992.
A dream day in the life
  Games, training, running and more games. The Bull Terrier was originally bred for fighting purposes, so though it is a playful breed, training is required not only to diminish its protective tendencies, but also for mental and physical stimulation. Loyal 'til the end, Bull Terriers live for constant companionship, and a day spent with its beloved human makes this breed happy as a clown.



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